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Whitney Museum of Art

Collection Creator:
Clark, Edward, 1926-2019  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1980
1996
2010
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Collection Citation:
Ed Clark papers, 1923-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Ed Clark papers
Ed Clark papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9002f665d-02d5-4e39-aa28-fcb837081535
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-clarked-ref99

Andreas Herzau Liberia essay von Binyavanga Wainaina

Title:
Liberia
Photographer:
Herzau, Andreas 1962-  Search this
Writer of supplementary textual content:
Wainaina, Binyavanga  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume (unpaged) illustrations (chiefly color), facsimile, portraits 26 cm
Type:
Books
Pictorial works
Ouvrages illustrés
Photography, Artistic
Photobooks
History
Livres de photographies
Place:
Liberia
Date:
2021
21st century
21e siècle
Topic:
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Photographie artistique  Search this
History  Search this
Histoire  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1155848

Lockwood-Greene Records

Creator:
Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated  Search this
Lockwood-Greene Company  Search this
Whitman, David  Search this
Greene, Stephen  Search this
Lockwood, Amos  Search this
Former owner:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of History of Technology  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering  Search this
Extent:
270 Cubic feet (233 boxes, 850 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Linen tracings
Paper flimsies
Business records
Design drawings
Blueprints
Patents
Specifications
Reports
Photograph albums
Photographs
Trade literature
Date:
1784-2004, undated
bulk 1915-1930
Summary:
The engineering firm that became Lockwood Greene was founded by David Whitman, a mill engineer, in 1832. Amos D. Lockwood, a consultant, succeeded Whitman and entered a partnership with Stephen Greene in 1882. The firm specialized in industrial engineering and construction; they designed and built a wide variety of structures and work environments worldwide over the next century. Lockwood Greene was acquired by CH2M HILL in December, 2003. Before its acquisition by CH2MHILL it was reportedly the oldest industrial engineering, construction, and professional services firm in the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The Lockwood Greene records are a comprehensive range of documents related to the appraisal, building, construction, design, evaluation, and engineering of facilities for a variety of clients. The material covers the entire period of industrialization of the United States, and, provides a thorough record of the textile industry, both in New England and the South. Some of the textile mills are documented with unusual completeness, showing water and steam power layouts, factory village plans, and landscaping schedules. A broad range of other building typologies is also covered, including projects with public or retail functions, such as early automobile showrooms, hospitals, apartments and private dwellings, churches, and schools.

In-depth study of the company's earliest history is hampered by a scarcity of records, many of which were lost in the great fire that destroyed Boston's city center in 1872. Nevertheless, graphic and textual evidence does exist within the collection that illuminates these early projects, in addition to the fabric of surviving buildings. The Lockwood Greene records document several commissions that the firm would return to again and again over the course of many decades as clients requested plant additions, upgrades to mechanical and operating systems, and other substantive changes. Researchers are encouraged to examine the blueprints, elevations, and plans for these later additions in order to find illustrations of the firm's earlier interventions at the site. In addition to drawings, other visual evidence for nineteenth-century projects can be found in the company's extensive photo files, which often document structures for which drawings do not exist.

The Lockwood Greene records contain an abundance of graphic and textual evidence for structures designed after 1910 until the 1930s. After this period, visual documentation becomes much more limited. This is partially due to the evolution of drafting tools and information management technologies within the architecture and engineering profession. Lockwood Greene was an early adopter of technological innovations in rendering and data capture, beginning with the introduction of aperture cards and microfilm and extending to the adoption of computer-aided design (CAD) programs. These more modern formats were not part of the acquisition, and, at the time of writing, still reside with the company.

The Lockwood-Greene collection will be of interest to historians of architecture and engineering, as well as those that study the history of business and labor relations. It provides extensive textual and documentary evidence on the evolution and growth of American engineering and the increasing professionalization of the discipline through specialization during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rich holdings of architectural drawings, photographs, and specifications provide unparalleled resources that trace the evolution of industrial buildings and their typologies; experimentation with building materials and systems, particularly with regards to fireproofing; and the history of textile manufacture in the United States. In addition, there is also rich visual and documentary evidence of the changing relationships between corporations and their employees through photographs, plans, and designs for company towns and mill villages, as well as through corporate records that illustrate the work culture of Lockwood Greene itself. The Lockwood-Greene collection will be of special interest to historic preservationists as the awareness of the significance of industrial and vernacular buildings continues to grow, and detailed design drawings and other visual material will be of especial value for restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive-reuse projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into six series.

Series 1, Project Drawings, Renderings, and Plans, 1784-1969, undated

Series 2, Photographs and Slides, 1881-2001, undated

Subseries 2.1: Photo Albums, 1906-1934

Subseries 2.2: Photographic Files, 1881-1956

Subseries 2.3: Spartanburg Office Photographic File, 1948-1974

Subseries 2.4: Spartanburg Office Photographic File, 1919-1999

Subseries 2.5: Project Negatives and Transparencies, 1956-1970

Subseries 2.6: Project Slides and Transparencies, 1985-2001

Subseries 2.7: Project Slides and Transparencies, Culls, 1974-2001

Subseries 2.8: Project Slides and Transparencies, Corporate Photography, 1976-1998

Subseries 2.9: Photograph Album Covers, 1920, undated

Series 3: Job Files, 1872-1957, undated

Subseries 3.1, Specifications, 1913-1942, undated

Subseries 3.2: List of Drawings, 1872-1951, undated

Subseries 3.3: Project Files, 1919-1969, undated

Subseries 3.4: Reports, 1913-1969

Subseries 3.5: Job Cost Records, 1913-1957, undated

Series 4, Corporate Records and History, 1881-2004, undated

Subseries 4.1: Meeting Minutes, 1913-1995

Subseries 4.2: Corporate Files, 1891-2004, undated

Subseries 4.3: Historical Research and Reference Files and Photographs, 1881-1983, undated

Subseries 4.4: Corporate Publications, 1917-2001, undated

Series 5, Non-Lockwood Greene Publications, 1910-1984, undated

Series 6, Audio-Visual, 1964
Biographical / Historical:
Lockwood Greene, one of the nation's oldest engineering firms, traces it roots to 1832, when Rhode Island native David Whitman began a machinery repair service. Riding the wave of the early industrial revolution in textile manufacturing, Whitman added mill design services to his repertoire, which formed the backbone of a flourishing consulting business for the rest of the century. Whitman was one of the first itinerant mill engineers or "doctors" that traveled throughout New England advising various industrialists on the placement, design, and construction of their factories and the layout of the complicated system of machinery and shafting that they contained. His largest commission was the design of the Bates Manufacturing Company complex in Lewiston, Maine, which was incorporated in 1850 and soon became one of the largest textile producers in New England.

Upon Whitman's death in 1858, his unfinished work was assumed by Amos D. Lockwood, a prominent mill agent and astute businessman who had built a name for himself in Connecticut and Rhode Island. The successful completion of the projects at Lewiston brought enough additional demand for Lockwood's services to prompt him to relocate to Boston, where he formally opened an independent consulting office with partner John W. Danielson in 1871. For the next ten years, A.D. Lockwood & Company was involved in a least eight major mill design projects, half of which were for new construction. One of these projects, the design and construction of the Piedmont Manufacturing Company in Greenville (now Piedmont), South Carolina was especially significant and is considered to be a prototype for the Southern textile industry.

In 1882, Lockwood established a new business, Lockwood, Greene and Company, with Stephen Greene, a professionally-trained civil engineer who had joined the firm in 1879. As the firm grew, it expanded its scope as consultants supplying all of the necessary architectural and engineering services a prospective owner needed to initiate, equip, and run a complete plant. Acting as the owners' representative, the company supervised construction and installation but did not directly act as builders or contractors. Lockwood

Greene's objective expertise was legendary and made it a leader in this emergent field. As Samuel B. Lincoln explains in his history of the company:

"The new firm's knowledge and experience in the textile industry enabled it to analyze samples of cloth and, from such samples, to provide everything necessary for a completed plant to make such goods in any desired quantity. It did not at any time act as selling agents for machinery or equipment, neither did it accept commissions or rebates from suppliers: by this policy it maintained a position as impartial and independent engineer." (pages 105-107)

Greene became president of the company upon Lockwood's death in 1884. Under his leadership, the company expanded into additional industries and designed an array of other industrial building types that would prefigure the diversity of later work. In 1893, the company revolutionized American industry by designing and constructing the first factory whose operating power was provided entirely over electric wires from a remote power plant, rather than relying upon a water source or a stockpiled fuel supply. The Columbia Mills project created a great deal of publicity for the firm and was a signal to other manufacturers that there were viable alternatives to the use of steam power.

As changing economic conditions led Lockwood Greene to move away from its traditional reliance upon the textile manufacturing industry, it was very successful at soliciting projects for a wide variety of structures, from newspaper plants and automotive factories to convention halls and schools. After 1900, Lockwood Greene expanded its operations and opened branch offices in other cities, including Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Detroit, Atlanta, and Charlotte. In 1915, Edwin F. Greene, president and son of Stephen Greene, reorganized the firm as Lockwood, Greene & Company, Incorporated This new entity served as the parent company and controlled three subsidiaries: one to own and operate cotton mills that Greene had acquired; one to manage other companies' textile mills; and one to provide engineering services.

Lockwood Greene expanded its operations tremendously as the textile industry boomed under wartime demand and in the years following. The severe textile depression from 1923 to 1928 caused the collapse of this structure, however, as Lockwood Greene continued to suffer deep losses in the textile mills that it owned. The parent company was dissolved in 1928 and the engineering subsidiary, which had remained profitable, was salvaged as Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated.

After a rocky start with the onset of the Depression, the company began to prosper during the Second World War and its growth continued steadily throughout the next several decades. In the late 1960s, as a result of declining business, the company's headquarters was transferred from Boston to Spartanburg, South Carolina. In 1981, Phillipp Holtzman USA, a subsidiary of Phillipp Holtzman AG of Frankfurt, Germany, acquired a majority interest in Lockwood Greene. In 2003, CH2M Hill, a global provider of engineering, construction, and operations services based in Denver, Colorado, acquired the company.

From its beginnings under David Whitman, Lockwood Greene has become one of the most diversified engineering firms in the United States. The firm is best known as a designer of industrial and institutional buildings, but the company has become a leader in many additional areas in recent years. Lockwood Greene dominates the market in the design and production of the germ- and dust-free "clean room" facilities required by the pharmaceutical industry and micro-electronics manufacturers. The company has also developed expertise in designing integrated security and networking systems for industrial plants, international port facilities, and military installations worldwide.

Banham, Raynor. A Concrete Atlantis: U.S. Industrial Building and European Modern Architecture, 1900-1925. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1986.

Biggs, Lindy. The Rational Factory: Architecture, Technology, and Work in America's Age of Mass Production. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Bradley, Betsy Hunter. The Works: The Industrial Architecture of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Greene, Benjamin Allen. Stephen Greene: Memories of His Life, with Addresses, Resolutions and Other Tributes of Affection. Chicago, R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 1903.

Heiser, William J. Lockwood Greene, 1958-1968, Another Period in the History of an Engineering Business. Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated, 1970.

Lincoln, Samuel B. Lockwood Greene: The History of an Engineering Business, 1832-1958. Brattleboro, Vermont: The Stephen Greene Press, 1960.

Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated The Lockwood Greene Story: One-Hundred-Fifty Years of Engineering Progress. Spartanburg, South Carolina: Lockwood Greene Engineers, Incorporated; undated.
Related Materials:
Materials at the Smithsonian Instituion Libraries

"[Trade catalogs from Lockwood, Greene & Co.]", Trade Literature at the American History Museum Books, Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Lockwood Greene, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 1997 (original drawings). An addendum to the collection was donated by CH2M HILL in 2007.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. One film is tored at an off-site facility and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Architects  Search this
Architecture, Commercial  Search this
Architecture, Domestic  Search this
Building materials  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Construction industry  Search this
Company towns  Search this
Textile mills  Search this
Mills  Search this
Manufacturing industries  Search this
Industrial engineering  Search this
Industrial buildings -- Design and construction  Search this
Industrial buildings  Search this
Engineering  Search this
Factories -- Power supply  Search this
Factories -- Design and construction  Search this
Factories  Search this
Cotton textile industry  Search this
Commercial buildings  Search this
Electric power production  Search this
Genre/Form:
Linen tracings
Paper flimsies
Business records
Design drawings
Blueprints
Patents
Specifications
Reports
Photograph albums
Photographs -- 21st century
Photographs -- 20th century
Trade literature
Photographs -- 1890-1900
Citation:
Lockwood Greene Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1113
See more items in:
Lockwood-Greene Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep85090342a-0c7e-4667-8b37-fa0e8309b5ac
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1113
Online Media:

Municipal Art Society of New York records, 1901-1960

Creator:
Municipal Art Society of New York  Search this
Citation:
Municipal Art Society of New York records, 1901-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Historic buildings -- Conservation and restoration -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Public art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8034
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210204
AAA_collcode_muniartn
Theme:
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210204
Online Media:

Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers

Creator:
Sullivan, Kathryn  Search this
Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
15.23 Cubic feet (34 boxes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Reports
Date:
1970s - 2010s
Summary:
This collection consists of approximately 15.23 cubic feet of papers, photographs, certificates, and video/film, created or collected by Kathryn Sullivan, spanning her lifetime of achievement.
Scope and Contents:
Scope and Content Note:

The Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers (acc. no. 2019-0007) reflect Dr. Sullivan's broad, restless curiosity regarding oceanography, geology, engineering, astronomy, space exploration and education advocacy. Sullivan's great contributions as a scientist, educator, astronaut and explorer are quite evident in this collection.

For the most part, this collection encompasses Dr. Sullivan's years spent as a NASA astronaut, with the U.S. Naval Reserve (USNR), as well as her post-NASA career as a federal government administrator, educator, scientist and explorer; roughly, from the 1970s through the 2010s. There is some material however, that dates back prior to this time span. This collection is a mixture of the following materials: correspondence, memoranda, notes, reports technical manuals, flight logs, photographs, speeches, news releases, papers, books, brochures, pamphlets, journals, magazines, articles and day planners. Additionally, there are some materials stored in oversized containers that include newspapers or sections of newspapers, Dr. Sullivan's Ph.D. dissertation from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, certificates and awards, a photograph album, as well as matted photographs pertaining to her Space Shuttle flights (STS-41G, STS-31 and STS-45) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).

Upon receiving the Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, the processing archivist did discern some order to this collection. Some materials, such as photographs, reports and speeches, tended to be grouped together. Other materials were threaded throughout in a more random fashion. Furthermore, most of the archival items had been already placed in some sort of files or folders. The processing archivist did rehouse these materials utilizing archival-friendly file folders and legal-size document cases.

This collection is arranged into three series. The first series is composed of personal materials that include correspondence, photographs, postcards, business cards and transcripts. Each type of archival material is organized chronologically and then alphabetically. The second series consists of professional materials and is by far and away the largest segment of the Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers. This series is arranged as follows: Dr. Sullivan's correspondence, memoranda, notes, reports, manuals (mainly Space Shuttle program-related), flight logs, photographs, speeches, news releases, policy directives and educational course materials, papers, Congressional hearings and testimony, books, brochures, catalogs and pamphlets, magazines and journals, certificates, articles, and miscellaneous materials (such as agendas, programs, day planners and photographic slides). All the above material is arranged chronologically and then alphabetically. The third series is composed of oversize materials. This material consists of newspapers or sections of newspapers (mainly focused on the Space Shuttle Challenger accident of 1986), Dr. Sullivan's Ph.D. dissertation, a photograph album, awards and certificates, as well as matted photographs, largely pertaining to her three Space Shuttle flights and the Hubble Space telescope (HST).

Please note: the initials "KDS" refer to Kathryn D. Sullivan.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into three series. The first series is composed of personal materials that include correspondence, photographs, postcards, business cards and transcripts. Each type of archival material is organized chronologically and then alphabetically. The second series consists of professional materials and is by far and away the largest segment of the Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers. This series is arranged as follows: Dr. Sullivan's correspondence, memoranda, notes, reports, manuals (mainly Space Shuttle program-related), flight logs, photographs, speeches, news releases, policy directives and educational course materials, papers, Congressional hearings and testimony, books, brochures, catalogs and pamphlets, magazines and journals, certificates, articles, and miscellaneous materials (such as agendas, programs, day planners and photographic slides). All the above material is arranged chronologically and then alphabetically. The third series is composed of oversize materials. This material consists of newspapers or sections of newspapers (mainly focused on the Space Shuttle Challenger accident of 1986), Dr. Sullivan's Ph.D. dissertation, a photograph album, awards and certificates, as well as matted photographs, largely pertaining to her three Space Shuttle flights and the Hubble Space telescope (HST).
Biographical / Historical:
Kathryn D. Sullivan was born on October 3, 1951, in Paterson, New Jersey. Several years later, the Sullivan family relocated to California where her father proceeded to work in the aerospace field. After graduating from high school in 1969, Sullivan received a Bachelor of Science degree in earth sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz. In 1978, she earned her Ph.D. in geology from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. During her time at Dalhousie, Sullivan participated in several oceanographic expeditions that studied the floors of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

In 1977, Sullivan applied for a position as astronaut candidate for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Her application was successful and she was accepted as part of the first group of six women astronauts hired by the space agency. Training and evaluation commenced in 1978 and was completed the following year. Dr. Sullivan was now an official astronaut, qualified for selection on space flight crews. She would make her first flight aboard NASA's new fleet of Space Shuttles five years later. This flight, designated STS-41G (Space Transportation System), lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Cape Canaveral, Florida, on October 5, 1984. While circling the Earth from the orbiter Challenger, Dr. Sullivan performed the first spacewalk or EVA (extra-vehicular activity) by an American woman. During her second shuttle flight, designated STS-31, she flew aboard the orbiter Discovery. Lifting off from KSC on April 24, 1990, she actively participated in deploying the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) into Earth orbit. Her third and final space flight occurred aboard Discovery once more, from March 24 to April 2, 1992. Dr. Sullivan served as Payload Commander on this mission, designated STS-45 - the first flight of Spacelab dedicated to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. In 1993, she retired from NASA but, not before logging a total of 532 hours in space.

Hand in hand with her NASA career, Dr. Sullivan also served her country with the U.S. Naval Reserve (USNR). In 1988, she became a direct commissioned officer with the rank of lieutenant commander. Two years later, Dr. Sullivan was given command of a specialized unit of oceanographers and meteorologists that was based at Naval Air Station Dallas. This facility provided support to the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Center on the island of Guam. By the time of her retirement from the USNR in 2006, she had attained the rank of captain.

Though retired from NASA, Dr. Sullivan has since maintained a very active life. Aside from her work as an USNR officer that continued into the first years of the 21st century, she also served as President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Ohio's Center of Science and Industry (COSI). Under her leadership, COSI enhanced its impact on science teaching in the classroom, as well as its national reputation as an innovator of hands-on, inquiry-based science learning resources. Additionally, from 2006-2011, she acted as Director for Ohio State University's Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy while continuing with COSI as a volunteer science advisor.

Two decades after leaving NASA, Dr. Sullivan reentered public service within the federal government. In 2011, the Obama administration nominated, and the U.S. Senate confirmed, her as Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction and Deputy Administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Moreover, starting in early 2013, she served as acting NOAA Administrator. The following year, she was confirmed by the Senate as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and simultaneously, as NOAA Administrator. She remained in these positions until early 2017.

Upon her retirement from government service, Dr. Sullivan was selected for the 2017 Charles A. Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History Fellowship, at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum (NASM). During her time with the museum as a Fellow, she focused her research energies on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Based on this research, Dr. Sullivan wrote her book, Handprints on Hubble: An Astronaut's Story of Invention, which was released in 2019.

Dr. Sullivan's life as an explorer, researcher, scientist and public servant continued into the early 2020s. In 2020, she ventured aboard a specially equipped submarine to the bottom of the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench of the Pacific Ocean, becoming the first woman to reach the deepest known point of all of Earth's oceans, as well as the first person to travel to both the Challenger Deep and aboard the shuttle Challenger (and later, Discovery) into outer space. Also, late that year, Dr. Sullivan was named a volunteer member of President-Elect Biden's presidential transition Agency Review team to help facilitate transition efforts connected to the Commerce Department. In 2021, President Biden appointed her to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

During her decades in public life, Dr. Sullivan has had many honors bestowed upon her and earned numerous awards – too numerous to list all of them here. The following is merely a sample: NASA Space Flight Medal (1984 and 1990), the National Air and Space Museum Trophy, Smithsonian Institution (1985), NASA Exceptional Service Medal (1988 and 1991), NASA Medal for Outstanding Leadership ((1992), Ohio Veteran's Hall of Fame (2001), Ohio Women's Hall of Fame (2002), inductee into the Astronaut Hall of Fame (2004) and the Aviation Week & Space Technology Aerospace Legend Award (2005). Additionally, she has received honorary degrees from multiple colleges, including ones from Brown University and Willamette University.
Provenance:
Kathryn D. Sullivan, Gift, 2018, NASM.2019.0007
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Manned space flight  Search this
Space Shuttle Program (U.S.)  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Hubble (Large) Space Telescope  Search this
Oceanography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Reports
Citation:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, NASM.2019.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2019.0007
See more items in:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2f15d66b1-23b3-47f0-97f1-e66162046440
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2019-0007
Online Media:

Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution, Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Minutes digital asset number 1

Agenda for Research on Women's Health for the 21st Century, A Report of the Task Force on the NIH Women's Health research

Container:
Box 90, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1997-11
Series Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
See more items in:
Disability Reference Collection
Disability Reference Collection / Series 10: Lindahl, Lisa
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86a834ff1-d0e8-4aef-b51a-327a1eae0109
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1319-ref1824

Visual representations of Native Americans transnational contexts and perspectives edited by Karsten Fitz

Author:
Fitz, Karsten  Search this
Subject:
Visuelle Medien (DE-603)085927171 (DE-588c)4188423-1  Search this
Indianer (DE-603)085066915 (DE-588c)4026718-0  Search this
Bildliche Darstellung (DE-603)085578959 (DE-588c)4145419-4  Search this
Physical description:
302 pages illustrations 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
2012
Topic:
Indians in art  Search this
Indians in motion pictures  Search this
Indians in popular culture  Search this
Indiens d'Amérique dans l'art  Search this
Indiens d'Amérique au cinéma  Search this
Indiens d'Amérique dans la culture populaire  Search this
Visuelle Medien  Search this
Indianer  Search this
Bildliche Darstellung  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1147629

Brown Egg Basket

Artist:
Ira Blount  Search this
Medium:
reed, wood splint, dye
Dimensions:
3 3/4 × 3 15/16 × 4 7/16 in. (9.5 × 10 × 11.3 cm)
Type:
basket
Date:
late 20th-early 21st Century
Cite As:
Gift of Ira Blount
Accession Number:
2011.0004.0043
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
Anacostia Community Museum Collection
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dl8d63f61cd-d747-4c0c-8435-d7a2189217b8
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:acm_2011.0004.0043

Flight accidents in the 21st century U.S. Air Force the facts of 40 non-combat events Henry Bond

Author:
Bond, Henry 1966-  Search this
Subject:
United States Air Force History  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 193 pages 23 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Date:
2019
21st century
21e siècle
Topic:
Airplanes, Military--Accidents--History  Search this
Avions militaires--Accidents--Histoire  Search this
Airplanes, Military--Accidents  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1118227

Municipal Art Society of New York records

Creator:
Municipal Art Society of New York  Search this
Extent:
3.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1901-1960
Summary:
The records of the Municipal Art Society of New York, based out of New York City and established in 1893, measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1901 to 1960. The records include minutes from the annual and directors meetings, which incorporate reports, directors' files, committee files, and printed material. Financial reports to the Municipal Art Society Board that detail the organization's Permanent Fund are also present.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Municipal Art Society of New York measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1901 to 1960. Minutes from annual and directors meetings, printed materials, and financial reports document the Municipal Art Society of New York's involvement in urban planning, city beautification, funding art for public spaces, and generally improving the quality of life in New York City.

Bound minute books from the annual and directors meetings incorporate annual reports, committee reports, membership lists, and by-laws, as well as some correspondence with business colleagues and fellow arts organizations. Printed materials are also integrated into the minute books and often relate to the content of the adjacent administrative files and include exhibition announcements and catalogs, event invitations, meeting announcements, bulletins, newsletters, magazine and newspaper clippings, and membership solicitation materials.

Financial reports to the Municipal Art Society Board detail the Permanent Fund and the organization's accounts.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 2 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Annual and Directors Meetings Minutes, 1901-1960 (3.2 linear feet; Box 1-8)

Series 2: Permanent Fund Financial Records, 1913-1949 (1 folder; Box 8)
Biographical / Historical:
The Municipal Art Society of New York is a private organization that was founded in 1893 to beautify New York City streets, parks, and public places in ways both practical and artistic through projects supported by member dues. The society regularly held competitions for artists to create murals and sculptures to decorate public buildings, and exhibited artists' public works. Members of the society spearheaded efforts to preserve, improve, and maintain public buildings, monuments, and parks; create and maintain street signage and fixtures; regulate zoning; plan thoroughfares; and advocate for public housing. Interests of the society also included establishing a housing authority, slum clearance, and post-World War II planning. The Municipal Art Society of New York continues to influence urban planning and historic preservation into the 21st century, and is known for their architectural tours of New York CIty.
Provenance:
Donated 1968 by Municipal Art Society of New York.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Historic buildings -- Conservation and restoration -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Public art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations -- New York (State)
Citation:
Municipal Art Society of New York records, 1901-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.muniartn
See more items in:
Municipal Art Society of New York records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95a2d9688-c4e1-4256-9148-8b59b430011b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-muniartn
Online Media:

Hemingway

Artist:
Ann Weisman  Search this
Sitter:
Ernest Miller Hemingway, 21 Jul 1899 - 2 Jul 1961  Search this
Medium:
Pencil on paper
Dimensions:
Image: 23 x 39cm (9 1/16 x 15 3/8")
Type:
Drawing
Date:
early 20th-early 21st century
Topic:
Nature & Environment\Animal\Insect  Search this
Nature & Environment\Animal\Wolf  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Male  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Journalism and Media\Journalist\Reporter\Newspaper  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Sports and Recreation\Outdoorsman  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Journalism and Media\Journalist\Correspondent  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Nobel Prize  Search this
Ernest Miller Hemingway: Pulitzer Prize  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Spencer Museum of Art
Object number:
1980.0696
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm422ef9753-62af-4e09-995d-2ed219443698
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_1980.0696

Spanish Language Broadcasting Collection

Creator:
WKAQ (Television station : San Juan, Puerto Rico)  Search this
WNJU (Television station : New York, NY)  Search this
Telemundo Group, Inc.  Search this
Univisión (Television network)  Search this
Mirós, Gilda  Search this
Aguilar, Héctor  Search this
Gazcón, Edgardo  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Cubic feet (27 boxes, 8 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Advertisements
Floor plans
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Statistics
Programs
Resumes
Scripts (documents)
Videocassettes
Writings
Immigration records
Letters (correspondence)
Diplomas
Commercials
Appointment books
Certificates
Clippings
Contracts
Dvds
Place:
Puerto Rico -- 20th century
Date:
1940-2017
Summary:
The collection documents Spanish language television stations in America, and the Telemundo network.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents Spanish language television stations in America, and the Telemundo network. The WNJU portion includes photographs of reporters and other station personnel; portrait shots of on-air personalities, both negatives and prints; photographs of the reporters at the anchor desk, including both negatives and pritns; a reel of motion picture film of a children's show.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into four series.

Series 1: Gilda Mirós

Subseries 1.1: Personal Papers

Subseries 1.2: Audiovisual Materials

Series 2: Hector Aguilar

Subseries 2.1: Personal Papers

Subseries 2.2: Audiovisual Materials

Series 3: Telemundo Group, Incorporated.

Subseries 3.1: WKAQ Television Station

Subseries 3.3.1: Maria Kapetanakis Files

Subseries 3.3.2: Ariel Lipiz Files

Subseries 3.3.3: Alicia Soriano Files

Subseries 3.3.4: Susan Solano Vila Files

Subseries 3.3.5: Maria Cristina Barros Files Subseries 3.3.6: Marilys Llanos Files Subseries 3.3.7: Manuel M. Martinez Files Subseries 3.3.8: Audiovisual Materials

Subseries 3.2: WNJU Television Station

Subseries 3.3: WSCV Television Station

Series 4: Univision

Subseries 4.1: Edgardo Gazón Files

Subseries 4.2: Mayda Delgado Files

Subseries 4.3: Ismael Moctezuma Files

Subseries 4.4: Eduardo Kachscovsky Files
Biographical / Historical:
WNJU was the second television station to broadcast in Spanish in the United States. It eventually was owned by Telemundo. WKAQ was the first television station to broadcast in Spanish in the United States. Telemundo stations provide diverse programming, including variety shows, telenovelas, sports, reality television, news programming, and films. Their target audience is the Hispanic and Latin American population in America.
Provenance:
Initial donation by by Jose Cancela, President of WNJU, 2016. The 2016 accrual was donated by station WKAQ. The television stations WKAQ, WNJU, and WSCV also donated materials in 2017.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Actresses  Search this
advertising  Search this
Broadcasting -- New York  Search this
Broadcasting -- United States  Search this
Ethnic television broadcasting  Search this
Minorities in broadcasting  Search this
Radio broadcasting  Search this
Television  Search this
Television broadcasting  Search this
Television journalists  Search this
Television advertising  Search this
Television stations  Search this
Theater  Search this
Notebooks  Search this
Awards  Search this
Genre/Form:
Advertisements -- 20th century
Advertisements -- 21st century
Floor plans
Motion pictures (visual works) -- 20th century
Motion pictures (visual works) -- 21st century
Photographs -- Color negatives -- Acetate film -- 1980-2000
Photographs -- Color photoprints -- 21st century
Photographs -- Color photoprints -- 1980-2000
Photographs -- Color negatives -- Acetate film -- 21st century
Statistics
Programs
Resumes
Scripts (documents)
Videocassettes
Writings
Immigration records
Letters (correspondence)
Diplomas
Commercials
Appointment books
Certificates
Clippings
Contracts
DVDs
Citation:
Spanish Language Broadcasting Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1404
See more items in:
Spanish Language Broadcasting Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8f72776c3-355d-48d4-aca0-49639fbecd73
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1404
Online Media:

Elaine Ostroff Universal Design Papers

Creator:
Ostroff, Elaine  Search this
Extent:
16 Cubic feet (37 boxes, 1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Grant proposals
Correspondence
Videocassettes
Reports
Audiocassettes
Theater programs
Date:
1965 - 2009
Summary:
Collection documents activist and educator Elaine Ostroff who advocated for improved access for people with disabilities in public places, co-founded the Adaptive Environments Center and who taught universal design in several institutions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers include correspondence, reports, photographs and slides, course-related materials, evaluations, printed publications, lectures and presentations, grant applications, conference materials, audiovisual materials and newspaper clippings documenting the career of Elaine Ostroff, an activist and educator of universal design.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into seven series. The arrangement follows Ms. Ostroff's original file order which for the most part has been retained.

Series 1: Personal/Biographical Materials, 1967-2008

Series 2: Subject Files, 1965-2008

Series 3: Universal Design Education Project (UDEP) Files, 1993-2008 (bulk 1993-1998)

Series 4: Adaptive Environments, 1978-2009

Series 5: Japan, 1996-1999

Series 6: Photographs and Slides, 1971-2002

Series 7: Audiovisual Materials, 1974-2004
Biographical Note:
Elaine Phillips Ostroff was born on February 27, 1933 and grew up in Fall River, Massachusetts. She graduated from Durfee High School (1951), received a B.S. from Brandeis University (1955), was awarded a Radcilffe Fellowship (1970) and an Ed.M from Harvard University (1972). In 1978, Ostroff co-founded with Cora Beth Abel the Adaptive Environments Center (now the Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD) to confront the barriers which prevent persons with disabilities and older people from fully participating in community life. In 1989, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, she developed the National Universal Design Education Project (UDEP) at Adaptive Environments. A national project, UDEP sought to incorporate universal design in professional curricula. Ostroff coined the term "user/expert" in 1995 to identify individuals whose personal experiences give them unique critical capacity to evaluate environments.

As an educator, Ostroff has been involved with the accessible environments effort on a national and international level since 1971. She was the former director of training for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health where she developed graduate programs and courses to sustain community based living for people with disabilities. In 1977, she was the United States representative to the United Nations meeting on the Rights of Children.

She convened the national seminar on Design for All People that provided the framework for the UDEP in 1982. In 1986, she developed the "Best of Accessible Boston," an awards program honoring the architects and owners of buildings that exemplified good as well as accessible design. Ostroff is internationally renowned for her role on the team that created the Principles of Universal Design. The Principles are taught to designers including architects, landscape architects, interior and product designers and their students and used in design, constructions and product development. In 2001, she was the senior editor of the "Universal Design Handbook" used as a textbook in educational settings. In 2004, she was the first American, and first woman, to receive the Misha Black Medal from the Royal College of Art. In 2006, the American Institute of Architects awarded her the Honorary AIA designation. Ostroff's experience emphasized creating educational programs for non-designers, facilitating their design advocacy as well as collaboration with design professionals. She has written and produced technical assistance materials on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) that were used in the National Network for ADA Technical Assistance. She married Earl Carlton Ostroff (1931-2006) in 1953. The couple had three children, Rebecca, Joshua, and Sam.
Historical Note:
The Universal Design Movement is an international effort advocating design for disabled persons to enjoy access, independence, and convenience. It also is known as design-for-all, accessible design, inclusive design, and human-centered design. It is applied to buildings, consumer products, packaging, appliances, tools, and devices. It can aid persons with mobility, visual, hearing, cognitive, developmental, neurological, and other disabilities.

The Universal Design movement has its roots in the disability rights movement, in the post-World War II era. Previously and especially before the First World War people with disabilities were members of a small minority and persons with severe handicaps tended to have short lifespans. The world wars caused a huge influx of disabled veterans into the population. Advances in medicine and drugs and better sanitation enabled increased lifespans resulting in a higher population of older and disabled people. Awareness of the problems and limitations experienced by people with disabilities has increased.

The "Barrier-Free" movement in the 1950s was born of the demands by veterans and their advocates to participate equally in educational and employment opportunities enjoyed by the non-disabled population. The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s influenced the rising Disability Rights Movement. Legislative changes in the 1960s and 1970s prohibited discrimination against persons with disabilities and mandated access to some, though not all, public spaces, public transit, and places of public accommodation.

The progression from the Barrier-Free movement to the Universal Design movement was aided by several pieces of national legislation and activism on the part of numerous organizations. The Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 required buildings designed, built, altered, or leased with federal funds to be made accessible. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was the first civil rights law for disabled people. It prohibited discrimination against people with handicapping conditions, but again, only applied to institutions or groups receiving federal funding. The Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 required educational institutions to provide a free education to handicapped children. The Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 expanded the requirements of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 to include disabled people. This applied to both public and private properties. The biggest change came in 1990 with the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This broad and sweeping legislation raised public consciousness about disability rights as a civil rights issue. It prohibited discrimination in employment, access to public accommodations, services, programs, public transit, and telecommunications. The law mandated the removal of physical barriers and the development of non-discriminatory policies.

The Universal Design Movement sought to integrate people with disabilities into the mainstream, and to promote inclusion by reducing the physical and social barriers that exist between people with disabilities. As planners, builders and architects struggled to meet the demands of the ADA, they realized that segregated accommodations were costly, unattractive, and unfair. They also realized that improvements in the built environment not only that benefitted people with disabilities, they benefitted all users. According to the Center for Universal Design, "Recognition that many such features could be commonly provided and thus less expensive, unlabeled, attractive, and highly marketable, laid the foundation for the universal design movement."

Against this background, Ostroff's own special interest was improving the environment for people with developmental disabilities. She initially worked with teachers in the Department of Mental Retardation (State of Massachusetts) to help them transform their classrooms into more engaging and supportive environments for young children with disabilities. She was inspired by Gunnar Dybwad (1909-2001), a prominent international international advocate who fought for community living and the de-institutionalization of people with developmental disabilities and Raymond Lifchez (1932-), professor of architecture and city and regional planning at the University of California, Berkeley. She also worked closely with, and learned from, Ron Mace (1941-1998), FAIA, the architect who powered the accessibility movement through his personal experience of disability along with his architectural training and experience.
Related Materials:
The Universal Design News is a quarterly publication that Ostroff edited from 2000-2012 and wrote column on international design education. A full run of the newsletter is available the wesbite for Universal Designers and Consultants, Inc.
Materials at the Archives Center:
Target Stores Collection of Fashion Advertising Using Disabled Models (AC0436)

Accessible Snowboard Collection (NMAH.AC.0747)

Disability Reference Collection (NMAH.AC.1319)

Safko International, Inc. Records (NMAH.AC.0911)

Harriet Green Kopp Papers (NMAH.AC.1130)
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center by Elaine Ostroff in 2015.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Reference copies for audio and moving images materials do not exist. Use of these materials requires special arrangement. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.

Social Security numbers and other personally identifiable information has been rendered unreadable and redacted. Researchers may use the photocopies in the collection. The remainder of the collection has no restrictions.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Disabilities  Search this
Architectural design  Search this
Playgrounds  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 21st century
Photographs -- 1960-2000
Grant Proposals
Correspondence -- 1960-2000
Videocassettes
Reports -- 21st century
Reports -- 1960-2000
Audiocassettes
Correspondence -- 21st century
Theater programs -- 1970-1980
Citation:
Elaine Ostroff Universal Design Papers, 1965-2009, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1356
See more items in:
Elaine Ostroff Universal Design Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep848e0200a-1cde-44c6-94d1-44ff2032306e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1356
Online Media:

Notes, reports and memoranda, conference, "National Conversation on Integrated Water Information for the 21st Century"

Collection Creator:
Sullivan, Kathryn  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2016
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, NASM.2019.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers / Professional Materials
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg22862f77d-1723-4ced-9164-d3c438ab0181
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2019-0007-ref54

Report, "COSI Development Plan for Ohio's 21st Century", Center of Science & Industry

Collection Creator:
Sullivan, Kathryn  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 13
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1994
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers, NASM.2019.0007, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers
Kathryn D. Sullivan Papers / Professional Materials
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg27cb4aec7-d459-4e04-be19-a30fbe447e5c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2019-0007-ref93

Anicka Yi in love with the world Hyundai Commission, with contributions by Mark Godfrey, Carly Whitefield, Elvia Wilk and Anicka Yi

Title:
In love with the world
Hyundai Commission : Anicki Yi : in love with the world
Contributor:
Yi, Anicka 1971-  Search this
Godfrey, Mark (Mark Benjamin)  Search this
Whitefield, Carly  Search this
Wilk, Elvia  Search this
Curator:
Borchardt-Hume, Achim  Search this
Editor:
Greenfield, Remina  Search this
Severne, Judith  Search this
Author:
Yi, Anicka 1971- Works Selections  Search this
Hyundai Commission (Exhibition) (Tate Modern (Gallery))  Search this
Subject:
Yi, Anicka 1971-  Search this
Physical description:
160 pages color illustrations 24 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Expositions
Date:
2021
21st century
21e siècle
Topic:
Conceptual art  Search this
Art conceptuel  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156649

Prolonged California aridity linked to climate warming and Pacific sea surface temperature

Author:
Bloom, Amy M.  Search this
Potito, Aaron P.  Search this
Holmquist, James R.  Search this
Porinchu, David F.  Search this
Hughes, Julia  Search this
MacDonald, Glen M.  Search this
Moser, Katrina A.  Search this
Kremenetski, Konstantine V.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2016
Citation:
MacDonald, Glen M., Moser, Katrina A., Bloom, Amy M., Potito, Aaron P., Porinchu, David F., Holmquist, James R., Hughes, Julia and Kremenetski, Konstantine V. 2016. Prolonged California aridity linked to climate warming and Pacific sea surface temperature. Scientific Reports, 6: 33325 doi:10.1038/srep33325
Topic:
Animal health  Search this
Environmental sciences  Search this
Coastal ecology  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_140871

Disequilibrium of fire-prone forests sets the stage for a rapid decline in conifer dominance during the 21st century

Author:
Serra-Diaz, Josep  Search this
Laflower, Danelle M.  Search this
Miller, Adam D.  Search this
Thompson, Jonathan R.  Search this
Maxwell, Charles  Search this
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina  Search this
Epstein, Howard E.  Search this
Scheller, Robert M.  Search this
Tepley, Alan J.  Search this
Lucash, Melissa S.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2018
Citation:
Serra-Diaz, Josep, Maxwell, Charles, Lucash, Melissa S., Scheller, Robert M., Laflower, Danelle M., Miller, Adam D., Tepley, Alan J., Epstein, Howard E., Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina and Thompson, Jonathan R. 2018. Disequilibrium of fire-prone forests sets the stage for a rapid decline in conifer dominance during the 21st century. Scientific Reports, 8(1): 6749 doi:10.1038/s41598-018-24642-2
Topic:
Invertebrates  Search this
Animals  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Natural History  Search this
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
See others in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_146306

Playbill for Having Our Say

Published by:
Playbill, American, founded 1884  Search this
Used by:
Booth Theatre, American, founded 1913  Search this
Subject of:
Mary Alice, American, born 1941  Search this
Gloria Foster, American, 1933 - 2001  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 8 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. (21.6 x 13.3 cm)
Type:
theater programs
Place used:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1995
Topic:
African American  Search this
Broadway Theatre  Search this
Drama (Theatre)  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Kayla Deigh Owens
Object number:
2011.45.41
Restrictions & Rights:
Playbill used by permission. All rights reserved, Playbill Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd517b935c0-9569-4aff-8d13-1a53ceb47445
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.45.41
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