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Rose Slivka papers

Creator:
Slivka, Rose  Search this
Names:
American Craft Council  Search this
Craft Horizons  Search this
Craft International  Search this
World Crafts Council  Search this
De Kooning, Elaine  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Kunitz, Stanley, 1905-2006  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Slivka, David, 1913-  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Interviewee:
Cage, John, 1912-1992  Search this
Extent:
20.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Diaries
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1947-2006
Summary:
The papers of craft expert Rose Slivka, an editor, writer, critic, and educator, measure 20.8 linear feet and date from circa 1947-2006. The papers reflect Slivka's work with associations and universities to encourage the recognition of crafts as an international and broadly defined art form. The routine business of publishing Craft Horizons magazine and the founding and operation of Craft International magazine are documented by correspondence and subject files. Correspondence is mainly professional with some scattered personal letters. Subject files concern various organizations, individuals and events related to Slivka's work and interests. Among the writings are manuscripts, notes, and research materials for her book about Peter Voulkos; also included are shorter writings on a variety of topics, poems, 2 diaries, lectures and talks. There are many interviews with craftspeople and artists conducted by Slivka and others, some undertaken as research for articles. Photographs include views of Slivka, craftspeople she observed when traveling abroad, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of craft expert Rose Slivka, an editor, writer, critic, and educator, measure 20.8 linear feet and date from circa 1947-2006. The papers reflect Slivka's work with associations and universities to encourage the recognition of crafts as an international and broadly defined art form. The routine business of publishing Craft Horizons magazine and the founding and operation of Craft International magazine are documented by correspondence and subject files. Correspondence is mainly professional with some scattered personal letters. Subject files concern various organizations, individuals and events related to Slivka's work and interests. Among the writings are manuscripts, notes, and research materials for her book about Peter Voulkos; also included are shorter writings on a variety of topics, poems, 2 diaries, lectures and talks. There are many interviews with craftspeople and artists conducted by Slivka and others, some undertaken as research for articles. Photographs include artwork, views of Slivka, and craftspeople she observed when traveling abroad.

Interviews with craftsmen and other artists were conducted by Rose Slivka and others. Peter Voulkos is espcially well-documented. Among the artists interviewed are: Elaine de Kooning, Philip Guston, Jack Lenor Larsen, Louise Nevelson, and David Slivka. Also found are intereviews with John Cage, Stanley Kunitz, and Rose Slivka.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1947-2005 ( Box 1; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950-2004 (Boxes 1-4: 3.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1974-2001 (Boxes 5-6; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, Notes, and Related Research, 1954-2001 (Boxes 6-11, OV 23; 4.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Subject Files, 1958-2004 (Boxes 11-18, 22, OV 23; 7.4 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1952-2006 (Boxes 18-20, OV 23; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1947-1990s (Boxes 20-21; 1 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Crafts expert Rose Slivka (1919-2004) was an editor, educator, and critic in New York City and East Hampton, NY. Slivka edited Craft Horizons magazine from 1957-1979, and then founded Crafts International, which published its first issue in 1980.

Rose Slivka was very active in the American Crafts Council and World Crafts Council, and promoted crafts by participating in conferences around the world, acting as a juror of competitions, writing, and teaching. The author of books and articles about crafts, including the entry on "Handicrafts" in the 1961 edition of Encyclopedia Britannica, Slivka was tireless in her search for information pertaining to crafts of all nations. Her study of the subject was integrated into a strong, far-reaching campaign to include sculpture as a craft and promote crafts on a par with fine art. She was also interested in poetry and taught courses in art criticism at New York University and the New School for Social Research.

Many of Slivka's articles on craft, painting and sculpture have been published in periodicals such as Art in America, Architectural Digest, and The New York Times. Books and exhibition catalogs include The Crafts of the Modern World (1964); The Object as Poet (1976), Renwick Gallery, Washington, DC; Peter Voulkos: A Dialogue in Clay (1978); California Clay (1979), Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and The Book as Art and Artist (1979), Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY. Slivka's writings have been translated into at least 7 languages.

Slivka was awarded the National Endowment for the Arts Critics Fellowship in 1976 and between 1980 and 1982 conducted a research project on "Criticism and Scholarship in Modern Craft" also sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. She was awarded The Rhode Island School of Design President's Fellows Award in 1982, and its highest honor, the Athena Medal. In addition, she served on the boards of directors for several New York City organizations including Clayworks Studio Workshop, New York Experimental Glassworks, and Center for Book Arts.

Following her career as a magazine editor, international speaker on crafts, writer, and educator, Slivka moved to East Hampton, Long Island, where she continued to write poetry and was art critic for The East Hampton Star newspaper.

Rose Slivka's was married to sculptor David Slivka; the couple had 2 children and eventually divorced. She died of heart failure in Southampton, NY, on September 2, 2004.
Provenance:
The Rose Slivka papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Slivka's daughter, Charlotte Slivka, in 2008 and 2012.
Restrictions:
Use of original materials requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington D.C. research center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Editors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Interviews  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Diaries
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Rose Slivka papers, circa 1947-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.slivrose
See more items in:
Rose Slivka papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-slivrose

Oral history interview with Irena Brynner

Interviewee:
Brynner, Irena  Search this
Interviewer:
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Craft Students League -- Faculty  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Renwick Gallery  Search this
San Francisco Metal Arts Guild  Search this
Society of North American Goldsmiths  Search this
Bergman, Franz  Search this
Campbell, David Robert, 1907-1963  Search this
Daniels, Grete  Search this
De Patta, Margaret, 1903-1964  Search this
Faber, Aaron  Search this
Jensen, Georg Arthur, 1866-1935  Search this
Jeremias, Trudy  Search this
Renk, Merry, 1921-2012  Search this
Resnikoff, Florence Lisa Herman  Search this
Rosene, Caroline Gleick, 1907-  Search this
Stackpole, Ralph, 1885-1973  Search this
Winston, Robert, 1915-  Search this
Extent:
67 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2001 April 26-27
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Irena Brynner conducted 2001 April 26-27, by Arline M. Fisch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Brynner's home and studio, New York, New York.
Brynner speaks of her childhood in Vladivostok in Primorski Krai, Russia; her artistic family including her cousin Yul Brynner; fleeing from Russia to Darian (on the southern tip of the Liaotung peninsula, in the Kwantung Leased Territory of Manchuria); her art studies in Lausanne, Switzerland; her father's illness during World War II; moving with her mother to San Francisco in 1946; her studies with Ralph Stackpole and Franz Bergman in San Francisco; her relationship with architect Frank Merwin; teaching art in Catholic schools in San Francisco; her decision to make jewelry after seeing Claire Falkenstein's sculpture; working as an apprentice to Caroline Rosene and Franz Bergman; forming the Metal Arts Guild with Bob Winston, Merry Renk, Florence Resnikoff, Margaret De Patta, and others; and introducing forging and three-dimensional jewelry in the Metal Arts Guild. She also talks about her move to New York City in 1957; acting as her own agent; "open-air art shows" in San Francisco; her first show at Walker & Eberling; starting her own shop; teaching at the Craft Students League and at MoMA's Institute of Modern Art, at Victor D'Amico's invitation, circa 1962; her friendships with students and clients; her book, "Jewelry as an Art Form" (New York : Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1979) and its influence; learning to work with a Henes water welder; the treatment of women artists in America; her move to Geneva, Switzerland, in 1972, and the difficulties of starting a shop there; and her return to New York and reestablishing her career in the United States. Brynner also discusses her interest in singing, her voice lessons, her public performances of Russian classical music, and her health.
She comments on the intuitive development of her jewelry; the influence of Margaret De Patta; learning wax techniques from Bob Winston at Mills College; her progression from geometric to organic forms; her large-scale sculpture; her invention of "wrap-around earrings"; her use of niobium in the 1980s; drawing inspiration from Antonio Gaudi, Alberto Jaccometti, and others; involvement with the community of artists in the San Francisco Bay Area; the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG); craft periodicals; her exhibitions at the Little Gallery of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, the Musée de l'horlogerie et de l'émaillerie in Geneva, the Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., and others; her work in museum collections; serving as a juror; and writing her memoir. Brynner recalls Georg Jensen, Grete Daniels, Trudy Jeremias, Aaron Faber, David Campbell, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Irena Brynner (1917-2003) was a jeweler from New York, New York. Arline M. Fisch (1931- ) is a metalsmith from San Diego, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.brynne01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-brynne01

American metalsmithing and jewelrymaking in the 1940s and 1950s symposium records

Creator:
Renwick Gallery  Search this
Names:
American metalsmithing and jewelrymaking in the 1940s and 1950s (1982 : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Adler, Allan  Search this
Baldridge, Mark S., 1946-  Search this
Bates, Kenneth F. (Kenneth Francis), 1904-  Search this
Cardinale, Robert L.  Search this
Christensen, Hans, 1924-1983  Search this
Eikerman, Alma  Search this
Fisch, Arline M.  Search this
Husted-Andersen, Adda  Search this
Miller, Frederick A.  Search this
Miller, John Paul, 1918-  Search this
Pearson, Ronald H. (Ronald Hayes), 1924-1996  Search this
Penington, Ruth, b. 1905  Search this
Prip, John, 1922-2009  Search this
Pulos, Arthur J.  Search this
Smith, Carlyle H., 1912-2004  Search this
Thomas, Richard C., 1917-1988  Search this
Vierthaler, Arthur A., 1916-  Search this
Von Neumann, Robert  Search this
Winston, Robert, 1915-  Search this
Withers, Margret Craver, 1907-  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Date:
1979-1983
Scope and Contents:
Records of the symposium "American Metalsmithing and Jewelrymaking in the 1940s and 1950s" sponsored by the Renwick Gallery, Sept. 24-25, 1982
Biographical / Historical:
Symposium was organized by Mark Baldridge and Lloyd Herman.
Provenance:
Transferred 1982 and 1985 from the Renwick Gallery. An additional file of records was donated 1995 by organizer Mark Baldridge.
Restrictions:
Unmicrofilmed and untranscribed; use requires an appointment and is limited to Washington, D.C. office.
Occupation:
Jewelers  Search this
Enamelers  Search this
Goldsmiths  Search this
Metal-workers  Search this
Silversmiths  Search this
Topic:
Jewelry making  Search this
Art metal-work -- United States  Search this
Metal-workers  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.renwgall
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-renwgall

Gourd Colander

Collector:
Dr. Walter Hough  Search this
Donor Name:
Dr. Walter Hough  Search this
Object Type:
Colander
Place:
Guetuno San Francisco Near Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico, North America
Accession Date:
15 Feb 1900
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
036143
USNM Number:
E204688-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/35ea9f615-df7b-47e2-8a9d-a5f662ee0739
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8356763
Online Media:

Oral history interview with John Marshall

Interviewee:
Marshall, John, 1936-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Mellon Univ.) -- Students  Search this
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art -- Students  Search this
Cleveland Institute of Art -- Students  Search this
Grove City College -- Students  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Society of North American Goldsmiths  Search this
Syracuse University -- Faculty  Search this
Bacorn, Don  Search this
Bates, Kenneth F. (Kenneth Francis), 1904-  Search this
Clague, John, 1928-  Search this
DuSell, Lee  Search this
Griffin, Gary, 1945-  Search this
Hauberg, Anne Gould  Search this
Lannan, J. Patrick  Search this
Lutz, Winifred  Search this
Metcalf, Bruce, 1949-  Search this
Miller, Fred, (Decorative artist)  Search this
Miller, John Paul, 1918-  Search this
Nordness, Lee  Search this
Penington, Ruth, b. 1905  Search this
Scott, Michael, 1958-  Search this
Smith, Paul J., 1931-  Search this
Solberg, Ramona  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (Sound recording: 6 sound files (3 hrs., 2 min.), digital, wav)
45 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Europe -- description and travel
Germany -- description and travel
Date:
2001 April 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Marshall conducted 2001 April 5, by Lloyd Herman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Edmonds, Washington.
Marshall speaks of his childhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; participating in an educational program with the Carnegie Museum; his exposure to art while in grade school and throughout his education; joining the army after high school; spending time in Germany with the army and experiencing the metalwork of that area; learning to work hard from his father; his family background; attending Grove City College, then working in construction during the day and going to classes at Carnegie Tech during the night; finally attending Cleveland Institute of Art; some of his teachers at the Institute, Kenneth Bates, Toshiko Takaezu, and John Clague; his first experiences with metal, Fred Miller, and learning how to design metal pieces; getting a job as head of the metals department at Syracuse and completing his MFA there; meeting Paul Smith and Lee Nordness, and participating in Objects: USA; his travels throughout Europe; the many commissions he has done for churches, everything from baptismal bowls, chalices, and crosses; Patrick Lannan, and how instrumental he was in Marshall's career, his collection of work that Lannan bought and where it all is now located; the different types of communities in the different areas he lived; commissions and how they were important to his career; how he challenges himself with new ideas and creations; the Handy and Harman Workshop; the difference between a university trained artist and one who has learned his/her craft outside academia; his students and how much satisfaction he has received from teaching; the decline in metal working programs at the university level; the influence of other faculty members on his work, such as Lee DuSell; the critics of metalwork, Bruce Metcalf and Gary Griffin; his involvement in the Society of North American Goldsmiths; and his two sons. Marshall also recalls John Paul Miller, Winifred Lutz, Ramona Solberg, Ruth Penington, Michael Scott, Don Bacorn, Annie Hauberg, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
John Marshall (1936- ) is a jeweler and metalsmith from Edmonds, Washington. Lloyd Herman (1936- ) is the former director of the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick Gallery from Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 2 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Jewelers -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Metal-workers -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Religious articles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.marsha01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-marsha01

Raymond Loewy papers

Creator:
Loewy, Raymond, 1893-1986  Search this
Names:
American Society of Industrial Designers  Search this
Coca-Cola Company  Search this
Cooper-Hewitt Design Archive  Search this
Exxon Corporation  Search this
Gestetner Duplicating Machine Company  Search this
Hallicrafter  Search this
Hupp Motor Company  Search this
International Business Machines Corporation  Search this
Raymond Loewy Associates  Search this
Raymond Loewy/William Snaith, Inc.  Search this
Sears, Roebuck and Co.  Search this
Shell Oil Company  Search this
Studebaker Corporation  Search this
United Air Lines, Inc.  Search this
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Loewy, Raymond, 1893-1986  Search this
Snaith, William, 1908-1974  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes (2 letter sized boxes, 1 legal sized box.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Press releases
Speeches
Photographs
Date:
[mid-1940s-early 1960s]
Summary:
This collection spans the period from the mid-1940s to the early-1960s and consists ofnewspaper and magazine articles by and about Loewy, including the 1949 TIME magazine on which he appeared on the cover. Extensive clippings exist pertaining to his designs for automobiles. Also includes many articles and speeches written by and about William Snaith, a partner in the firm which was renamed Raymond Loewy/William Snaith, Inc. in 1961. A catalog from the exhibition, "Ten Automobiles," which took place at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 1953, is included. Other materials include brochures printed and designed by the firm, press releases, a listing of projects, honors, and membership. Some photographs of Loewy and his design team are included. The collection does not contain any original design materials or project files.
Arrangement note:
Unprocessed.
Biographical/Historical note:
Industrial Designer. Born Paris, France, November 8, 1893, Loewy initially studied electrical engineering, and by 1909, he has designed and sold a successful airplane model. He immigrated to the United States in 1919 and became a naturalized citizen in 1938. Loewy began working as a freelance window display designer for Macy's and Saks Fifth Avenue, and as an illustrator for Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, and others, from 1919.

He designed the trademark for Neiman-Marcus in 1923. Loewy is identified as one of the founding fathers of industrial design. In 1929, he started Raymond Loewy Associates in New York, and by 1947, he appeared on the cover of TIME magazine. Loewy's designs always stressed the importance of the clean, functional, dynamic design of products. His schooling in electrical engineering translated into his designs for automobiles, trains, airplanes, ships, and spacecraft for NASA. He also designed interiors for many hotels, offices, and supermarkets. He is best known for his designs for the 1947 Studebaker Starlight Coupe; the 1953 Starliner Coupe; the 1961 Avanti; the 1947 line of Hallicrafter radio recievers; the 1929 Gestetner duplicating machine; the 1934 Sears Coldspot refrigerator; and the S-I steam locomotive for the Pennsylvania Railroad.

He also designed logos for Exxon and Shell oil companies, and bottles and refrigerated vending machines for Coca Cola. He became President of the American Society of Industrial Designers in 1946. Loewy established Compagnie de l'Esthetique Industrielle in Paris in 1952. His work has been featured in many exhibitions, including: "An Exhibition for Modern Living", Detroit Institute of Arts, 1949; "The Designs of Raymond Loewy", Renwick Gallery of the National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 1975; and "The Machine Age in America", Brooklyn Museum, 1986, among others. He authored, "The Locomotive: Its Esthetics", 1937; "Never Leave Well Enough Alone", 1951; and "Industrial Design", 1979. In 1961, Loewy went into semi-retirement, became partners with William Snaith, and renamed the company Raymond Loewy/William Snaith, Inc. Loewy died in Monte Carlo, July 14, 1986.
Location of Other Archival Materials Note:
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. The Raymond Loewy Collection. Drawings, blueprints, sketches, phtographs, slides, and audio and video recordings, covering the period from 1929-1988.
Canadian Center for Architecture, Special Collections. Vertical file docmenting Loewy's work.
Provenance:
The materials in this collection were donated to Cooper-Hewitt by Betty Reese, Loewy's publicist.
Restrictions:
Unprocessed; access is limited. Permission of Library Director required for use.
Occupation:
Industrial designers  Search this
Interior designers  Search this
Packaging designers  Search this
Topic:
Radio -- Receivers and reception -- Design and construction  Search this
Packaging -- Design  Search this
Corporate image -- Design  Search this
Logos (Symbols) -- Design  Search this
Interior decoration -- United States  Search this
Automobiles -- Design and construction  Search this
Design, Industrial -- United States  Search this
Supermarkets -- Design  Search this
Coldspot refrigerator  Search this
Transportation -- Design  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Press releases
Speeches
Photographs
Identifier:
SIL-CH.XXXX-0001
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sil-ch-xxxx-0001

Oral history interview with Flora Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick

Interviewee:
Mace, Flora, 1949-  Search this
Kirkpatrick, Joey  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Foster/White Gallery  Search this
Habatat Galleries  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design -- Students  Search this
Walla Walla Foundry  Search this
Anderson, Dale, 1944-  Search this
Anderson, Doug, 1943-  Search this
Ben Tré, Howard, 1949-2020  Search this
Benglis, Lynda, 1941-  Search this
Borenstein, Joan  Search this
Chihuly, Dale, 1941-  Search this
Dehoff, Bill  Search this
Dehoff, Sarah  Search this
Littleton, Harvey K.  Search this
Moore, Ben  Search this
Morris, William, 1957-  Search this
Pfaff, Judy, 1946-  Search this
Pilloff, Bensen  Search this
Pilloff, Francine  Search this
Rooney, Alice, 1926-2019  Search this
Rosenfield, Betsy  Search this
Royal, Rich  Search this
Saxe, Dorothy  Search this
Saxe, George  Search this
Scanga, Italo, 1932-2001  Search this
Shirley, Jon, 1938-  Search this
Shirley, Mary  Search this
Statom, Therman, 1953-  Search this
Stroemple, George R.  Search this
Tagliapietra, Lino  Search this
Vallien, Bertil, 1938-  Search this
Welch, Ann  Search this
Wilmarth, Christopher  Search this
Wolff, Ann  Search this
Zynsky, Toots, 1951-  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Audio: 5 wav files (3 hrs., 17 min.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 August 17-18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Flora Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick conducted 2005 August 17-18, by Lloyd E. Herman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artists' home and studio, in Seattle, Washington.
They discuss their first meeting at Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, in 1979; the structure of classes and teaching philosophies at Pilchuck in the late '70s and early '80s; the change in equipment and the growth of the Pilchuck campus through the years; their first projects together, which were wire drawings made by Flora and based on Joey's sketches; leaving Pilchuck after the summer session and moving together to Waterville, New Hampshire, where they worked in a studio at the Rhode Island School of Design with Dale Chihuly; building up a body of work and then having to decide whose work it was, at a time when collaborating and co-signing was not standard practice; going back to Pilchuck every summer for 14 years after first meeting there in 1979; beginning to teach as a collaborative team at Pilchuck in 1981, the first women to teach glass blowing at that school; building their house together on the grounds of Pilchuck, a design which was then emulated for dormitories at the school; convincing Dale Chihuly to lower the class size at Pilchuck to 10, down from 20, to allow teachers to work more closely with the students; early shows of their work at Habatat Galleries in Royal Oak, Michigan, Ivor Kurland Gallery in Los Angeles, California, and Foster-White Galleries in Seattle, Washington; the support of their sisters and families throughout the years, mostly in providing them a place to stay as they traveled cross country; their relationships with collectors; what each artist brings to the partnership, including vision, inspiration, and technique; the influence of water on their work, as both artists are drawn to the sea and the tides; the purpose of their work, and what they feel it can bring to the viewer; the challenge given to the artists by Joan Borenstein to make 30 glass goblets, all with different fruits and vegetables; having their work cast at the Walla Walla Foundry; and the ideas behind various bodies of work, including the "Bird Pages" and the large latticino fruit. A more in-depth discussion of each artist's childhood, education, and artistic experiences prior to their meeting at Pilchuck can be found in the individual artist's interviews. They recall Italo Scanga, Bill Morris, Ben Moore, Rich Royal, Howard Ben Tre, Toots Zynsky, Therman Statom, Harvey Littleton, Lino Tagliapetra, Chris Wilmarth, Judy Pfaff, Lynda Benglis, Alice Rooney, Bertil Vallien, Ann Wolff, Betsy Rosenfield, George and Dorothy Saxe, Doug and Dale Anderson, Jon and Mary Shirley, Sarah and Bill Dehoff, Francine and Benson Pilloff, George Stroemple, Ann Welch, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joey Kirkpatrick (1952- ) and Flora Mace (1949- ) are glass artists from Seattle, Washington. Lloyd E. Herman (1936- ) is a curator and former director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery of Art and is currently from Seattle, Washington. Mace and Kirkpatrick have been working collaboratively on glass since the late 1970s.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 17 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Glass art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Glass art -- Technique  Search this
Glass art -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Glass artists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Glass blowing and working -- Technique  Search this
Glass blowing and working -- Study and teaching  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mace05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mace05

Oral history interview with Harvey K. Littleton

Interviewee:
Littleton, Harvey K.  Search this
Interviewer:
Byrd, Joan Falconer  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
American Craft Council  Search this
Ann Arbor Potters Guild  Search this
Black Mountain College (Black Mountain, N.C.)  Search this
Corning Glass Works  Search this
Cranbrook Academy of Art -- Students  Search this
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts  Search this
Midwest Designer-Craftsmen  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Penland School of Handicrafts  Search this
Pilchuck School  Search this
Renwick Gallery  Search this
University of Michigan -- Students  Search this
Braden, Norah, 1901-  Search this
Brown, William J. (William Joseph), 1923-1992  Search this
Dreisbach, Fritz  Search this
Eames, Charles  Search this
Eisch, Erwin, 1927-  Search this
Fredericks, Marshall M., 1908-1998  Search this
Hamada, Shōji, 1894-1978  Search this
Marioni, Dante, 1964-  Search this
Milles, Carl, 1875-1955  Search this
Turner, Robert Chapman, 1913-2005  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Extent:
36 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2001 March 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Harvey K. Littleton conducted 2001 March 15, by Joan Falconer Byrd, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Littleton's home, Spruce Pine, N.C.
Littleton speaks of his family background including the work of his father [Jesse Talbot Littleton] at Corning Glassworks, and his early experiences with glass at Corning. He discusses his studies at the University of Michigan in physics and his switch to sculpture; his studies at Cranbrook Academy, in 1941, and his teachers Marshall Fredericks and Carl Milles; his studies on industrial design; becoming a potter; and working at Corning Glassworks, in the summers, inspecting hand-blown coffee pots and top-of-the-stove ware. He discusses his service in the 849th Signal Intelligence Unit in North Africa and Italy during WWII; studying with Norah Braden, at the Brighton School of Art, in England; the importance of, "A Potter's Book," by Bernard Leach; teaching pottery at night, in Ann Arbor, Michigan; the beginnings of the Ann Arbor Potters Guild; making his own potters' wheels; serving on the board of Penland School of Crafts; the development of "American" art and the impact of the GI Bill on the creation and expansion of art departments; the "master-slave apprentice system"; "the genius of Shoji Hamada"; the properties of porcelain; artist communities at Penland and Cranbrook; the influence of Bill Brown, director of the Penland School of Crafts; art education and the impact of the MFA; Black Mountain College, Pilchuck Glass School, and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts; problems with the European educational system; the importance of Erwin Eisch's work on his development; his relationship with galleries and museums, particularly the Museum of Modern Art, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and American Craft Museum; and consignment laws. He also comments on the founding of the Midwest Designer Craftsmen; his involvement with the American Crafts Council (ACC) and the distinction between "the indigenous craftsman" and the "artist-craftsman"; American Crafts Council fairs; his printmaking; his techniques of sandblasting; teaching vitreography; and his plans for opening a print gallery. He recalls Charles Eames, Peter Voulkos, Shoji Hamada, Robert Turner, Dante Marioni, Fritz Dreisbach, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Harvey K. Littleton (1922- ) is a glass artist, potter, sculptor, and printmaker from Wisconsin and Spruce Pine, N.C. Joan Falconer Byrd (1939-) ia a professor in the art department of Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, N.C.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 10 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Glass artists -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Potters -- Interviews  Search this
Pottery -- Study and teaching -- United States.  Search this
Printmakers -- North Carolina -- Interviews  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.little01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-little01

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1978 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Memorandums
Plans (drawings)
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Audiocassettes
Business records
Correspondence
Notes
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Video recordings
Contracts
Date:
October 4-9, 1978
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1978 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 10 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Chesapeake Bay Traditions

Series 3: Children's Folklife

Series 4: Coal Miners & Oil Workers

Series 5: D.C. Folklore

Series 6: Folklife in the Museum: A Nation of Nations

Series 7: Folklife in the Museum: Renwick Gallery

Series 8: Mexican & Mexican American Traditions

Series 9: Other Programs

Series 10: San Juan Pueblo Culture
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1978 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Folklife Program of the Office of American and Folklife Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
With the 1978 Festival, the Smithsonian began a five-year cycle of variations on the theme of "community," exploring folklore as the artistic expression of community life, and the pleasure and dignity found in that process. When the Smithsonian Folklife Program staff decided to use "community" as the theme of the 1978 presentation, they were not grafting an idea onto the Festival, but featuring an aspect of the Festival that had been present throughout its history. Folklore consists of the traditional ways in which community people work and play together, and their customary forms of entertaining and instructing each other. Community is composed of people meeting regularly who have inherited or developed ways of celebrating their sense of coming together.

"Community" had been involved in the past eleven festivals in many ways. For communities - whether inherited or joined - serve as a vital buffer between individuals and a world of megastates and megacorporations. They are more manageable units in which all can participate - men and women, young and old - and give some living proof of Schumacher's notion that "small is beautiful." Festival organizers sought to reaffirm that humans are important, and that we are, like plants and other animals, dependent upon communities for survival.

As with the preceding year, the 1978 Festival (October 4-9) was held on a site on the National Mall later to be occupied by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, between 14th and 15th Streets and between Constitution Avenue and Madison Drive (see site plan). Indoor activities took place in the National Museum of History and Technology, the National Museum of Natural History, and the Renwick Gallery. The San Juan Pueblo programs took place outside of the National Museum of Natural History. As had been the case in 1977, Festival programming in the museums sought to connect objects on exhibit with people who could demonstrate, explain, or comment upon them; programming was again marked by collaboration between Folklife Program staff and museum curators. Festival programs included:

Chesapeake Bay Traditions

Children's Folklife

Coal Miners & Oil Workers

D.C. Folklore

Folklife in the Museum: A Nation of Nations (including presentations on Ellis Island, Dunham School, family folklore, sleeping car porters, and a wheelwright)

Folklife in the Museum: Renwick Gallery (featuring presentations on Mexican masks and on musical instruments)

Mexican & Mexican American Traditions

Other Programs (featuring organ-building in the Hall of Musical Instruments and sharecroppers in the Hall of Everyday Life in the American Past)

San Juan Pueblo Culture

The 1978 Program Book provided information on each of the programs, including a schedule and participant lists.

The 1978 Festival was again co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, McDonald's Washington Area Family Restaurants, and the Music Performance Trust Funds. It was organized by the Folklife Program within the Office of American and Folklife Studies.

Folklife Advisory Council

Wilcomb E. Washburn, Chairman, Roger Abrahams, Richard Ahlborn, Richard Dorson, William Fitzhugh, Lloyd Herman, Robert Laughlin, Scott Odell, Bernice Reagon, Ralph Rinzler, E. Richard Sorenson

Folklife Program, Office of American and Folklife Studies

Ralph Rinzler, Director; Jeffrey LaRiche, Program Coordinator; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Ethnomusicologist; Susan Kalcik, Folklorist; Steve Zeitlin, Folklorist; Jack Santino, Folklorist; Frank Proschan and Richard Derbyshire, Archivists

National Park Service

William J. Whelan, Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Fieldworkers and presenters:
Héctor Aguíñiga, Holly Baker, Karen Baldwin, Charles Camp, Susan G. Davis, Hazel Dickens, Jason Dotson, Ben Evans, Alicia González, Richard Haefer, Charlotte Heth, Marjorie Hunt, Amy Kotkin, Maria La Vigna, Phyllis May, Pat Mullen, Salvador Ortega, Keith Rollinson, Daniel Sheehy, Nick Spitzer, Peggy Yocom, Jean Alexander, Kate Rinzler, George McDaniels
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1978 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
World music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Memorandums
Plans (drawings)
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Audiocassettes
Business records
Correspondence
Notes
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Video recordings
Contracts
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1978 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1978
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1978 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1978

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Adkins, Minnie, 1934-  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L., 1936-  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi, 1989-2001  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (4 hr., 33 min.), digital, wav)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 17-30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carolyn Mazloomi conducted 2002 September 17 and 30, by Joanne Cubbs, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in West Chester, Ohio. Mazloomi speaks of growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a family of self-taught artists; the positive influence of her aunt and teacher Dr. Carter; the generation of African American quilt-makers who followed a gap in quilt-making post-slavery; she describes her previous career as an aeronautical engineer and her transition to quilt-making; how she identifies herself as a craftsperson, not an artist; her experience with Baltimore album and Appalachian quilts; learning to quilt; the Women of Color Quilter's Network and its economic and social development programs; her book, "Spirits of the Cloth"; the positive and negative aspects of travel; the false generalizations of African American quilts in academic circles; the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity in her work; her connection to "praise songs"; she discusses functional vs. nonfunctional quilts; the market for "hand-crafted" quilts; agents and galleries; she describes her working environment; adopting the use of a sewing machine in her work; the importance of community; her technique; her accomplishment of placing African-American quilts in the Renwick Gallery; the influence of magazines, including "Raw Vision;" her aversion to commissions; expanding her use of materials and technology; her exhibitions; her role as an advocate and dealer; finding inspiration in black and white linocuts and her use of color in quilts; and making a connection with her audience. Mazloomi also recalls Marie Wilson, Cuesta Benberry, Edjohnetta Miller, Roland Freeman, Robert Cargo, Martha Connell, Penny Sisto, Minnie Adkins, Nkosi Johnson, and Lauryn Hill.
Biographical / Historical:
Carolyn Mazloomi (1948- ) is a quilt maker from West Chester, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Baltimore album quilts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mazloo02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mazloo02

Oral history interview with Heikki Seppä, 2001 May 6

Interviewee:
Seppä, Heikki, 1927-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Cranbrook Academy of Art  Search this
Fabergé (Firm)  Search this
Society of North American Goldsmiths  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Jewelers -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Metal-work -- Technique  Search this
Metal-workers -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12958
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)227015
AAA_collcode_seppa01
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_227015
Online Media:

Oral history interview with John Marshall, 2001 April 5

Interviewee:
Marshall, John, 1936-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Bacorn, Don  Search this
Bates, Kenneth F. (Kenneth Francis)  Search this
Clague, John  Search this
DuSell, Lee  Search this
Griffin, Gary  Search this
Hauberg, Anne Gould  Search this
Lannan, J. Patrick  Search this
Lutz, Winifred  Search this
Metcalf, Bruce  Search this
Miller, Fred, (Decorative artist)  Search this
Miller, John Paul  Search this
Nordness, Lee  Search this
Penington, Ruth  Search this
Scott, Michael  Search this
Smith, Paul J.  Search this
Solberg, Ramona  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Mellon Univ.)  Search this
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art  Search this
Cleveland Institute of Art  Search this
Grove City College  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Society of North American Goldsmiths  Search this
Syracuse University  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Europe -- description and travel
Germany -- description and travel
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Jewelers -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Metal-workers -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Religious articles  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13311
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)226985
AAA_collcode_marsha01
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_226985
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Flora Mace, 2005 August 17-18

Interviewee:
Mace, Flora, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Calder, Alexander  Search this
Chihuly, Dale  Search this
Handler, Audrey  Search this
Kirkpatrick, Joey  Search this
Moore, Ben  Search this
Morris, William  Search this
Stankard, Paul  Search this
Wheaton, Frank  Search this
Wheaton, Mary  Search this
4-H Youth Development Program (U.S.)  Search this
Contemporary Glass Gallery  Search this
International Farm Youth Exchange  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
Plymouth State College  Search this
University of Illinois.  Search this
University of Utah  Search this
Wheaton Glass Village  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Norway -- description and travel
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Depression in women  Search this
Glass artists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13288
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)255870
AAA_collcode_mace05a
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_255870
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Flora Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick, 2005 August 17-18

Interviewee:
Mace, Flora, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kirkpatrick, Joey, 1952-  Search this
Subject:
Anderson, Dale  Search this
Anderson, Doug  Search this
Benglis, Lynda  Search this
Ben Tré, Howard  Search this
Borenstein, Joan  Search this
Chihuly, Dale  Search this
Dehoff, Bill  Search this
Dehoff, Sarah  Search this
Littleton, Harvey K.  Search this
Moore, Ben  Search this
Morris, William  Search this
Pfaff, Judy  Search this
Pilloff, Bensen  Search this
Pilloff, Francine  Search this
Rooney, Alice  Search this
Rosenfield, Betsy  Search this
Royal, Rich  Search this
Saxe, Dorothy  Search this
Saxe, George  Search this
Scanga, Italo  Search this
Shirley, Jon  Search this
Shirley, Mary  Search this
Statom, Therman  Search this
Stroemple, George R.  Search this
Tagliapietra, Lino  Search this
Vallien, Bertil  Search this
Welch, Ann  Search this
Wilmarth, Christopher  Search this
Wolff, Ann  Search this
Zynsky, Toots  Search this
Foster/White Gallery  Search this
Habatat Galleries  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck Glass Center (Stanwood, Wash.)  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Walla Walla Foundry  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Glass art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Glass art -- Technique  Search this
Glass art -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Glass artists -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Glass blowing and working -- Technique  Search this
Glass blowing and working -- Study and teaching  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11940
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)255912
AAA_collcode_mace05
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_255912
Online Media:

Oral history interview with William Harper, 2004 January 12-13

Interviewee:
Harper, William Claude, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Nelson, Harold B.  Search this
Subject:
Schwarcz, June  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Cloisonné  Search this
Jewelers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Enamel and enameling  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12112
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)247142
AAA_collcode_harper04
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_247142
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Joey Kirkpatrick, 2005 August 17-18

Interviewee:
Kirkpatrick, Joey, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Burford, Byron  Search this
Calder, Alexander  Search this
Chihuly, Dale  Search this
Cohen, Reba  Search this
Demetrion, James  Search this
Doty, Mark  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield  Search this
Edwards, Steven Dale  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto  Search this
Handler, Audrey  Search this
Hinds, Chuck  Search this
Mace, Flora  Search this
Moore, Ben  Search this
Morris, William  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia  Search this
Patrick, Peggy  Search this
Ragovin, Howard  Search this
Scanga, Italo  Search this
Schiele, Egon  Search this
Tagliapietra, Lino  Search this
Vigeletti, Sylvia  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Des Moines Art Center  Search this
Iowa State University  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Pilchuck School  Search this
University of Iowa  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Iowa -- Description and travel
Topic:
Ceramics -- Study and teaching  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Glass blowing and working  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12851
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)255873
AAA_collcode_kirkpa05
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_255873
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lloyd E. Herman, 2010 Sept. 21

Interviewee:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Interviewer:
Smith, Paul J., 1931-  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Arts administrators -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16029
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)306685
AAA_collcode_herman10
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_306685
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ron Ho, 2017 May 9

Interviewee:
Ho, Ron, 1936-2017  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Educators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelers -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17469
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)387965
AAA_collcode_ho17
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_387965

Oral history interview with Nancy Crow, 2002 December 18

Interviewee:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Interviewer:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Subject:
Ohio State University  Search this
Snyderman Gallery  Search this
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Dyes and dyeing -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13095
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)238493
AAA_collcode_crow02
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_238493
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Harold Balazs, 2012 August 13

Interviewee:
Balazs, Harold, 1928-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Sculptors -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16069
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)355453
AAA_collcode_balazs12
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_355453
Online Media:

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