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An Anthology of North American Indian and Eskimo Music

Producer:
Asch, Michael  Search this
Performer:
La Farge, Peter, 1931-1965  Search this
Low Horn, Jack  Search this
Low Horn, Jim  Search this
Wings, Emil, Mrs.  Search this
Peaychew, William, 1900-1960  Search this
Anquoe, Jack V., 1933-2006  Search this
Anquoe, Kenneth, 1920-1989  Search this
Webster, Nick  Search this
Evarts, Mark  Search this
Burn Stick, William  Search this
Nicotine, George  Search this
Roanhorse, Ambrose, 1904-1982  Search this
Pichette, Baptiste, 1903-1986  Search this
Conko, Eneas  Search this
John, Burton, 1905-1996  Search this
James, Roy  Search this
Poolaw, Irene Chalepah, 1920-2000  Search this
Assu, Billy  Search this
Martin, Mungo, 1879-1962  Search this
McKenzie, Sebastian  Search this
Ahkivigak, Otis  Search this
Lewis, Thomas  Search this
Miller, Huron  Search this
Yellow Thunder, Albert, 1878-1951  Search this
Snake, Blow  Search this
White Eagle, Winslow, b. 1896  Search this
Kenosha, David, Oshawenimiki, 1893-1963  Search this
Lacasse, Fred  Search this
Shalifoe, Thomas, 1903-1986  Search this
Stewart, Billy, Gatcayehola  Search this
Stewart, Billie  Search this
Tiger, Susie, 1871-1970  Search this
Fort Wingate (N.M.) Indian School  Search this
Kemukserar  Search this
Pangatkar  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 12 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Canadians  Search this
Teton Indians  Search this
Dakota Indians  Search this
Assiniboine Indians  Search this
Kainah Indians  Search this
Cree Indians  Search this
Kiowa Indians  Search this
Arapaho Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Salish Indians  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Tohono O'Odham Indians  Search this
Washo Indians  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo (N.M.)  Search this
Hopi  Search this
Zuni  Search this
Kiowa Apache Indians  Search this
Nootka Indians  Search this
Denetha  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Naskapi Indians  Search this
Inuit  Search this
Onondaga Indians  Search this
Tuscarora Indians  Search this
Winnebago Indians  Search this
Ottawa Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Seminole Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Place:
New York
United States
New York (N.Y.)
Saskatchewan
Canada
Fort Qu'appelle (Sask.)
New Mexico
Fort Wingate (N.M.)
Montana
Québec (Province)
Schefferville (Qub̌ec)
Alaska
Barrow, Point (Alaska)
Chesterfield (Alaska)
Onondaga Indian Reservation (N.Y.)
Wisconsin
Michigan
Florida
Oklahoma
Nebraska
Alberta
Edmonton (Alb.)
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
San Ildefonso (N.M.)
Arizona
Hopi (Ariz.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Cape Mudge (B.C.)
British Columbia
Fort Rupert (B.C.)
Ontario
Six Nations Indian Reserve No. 40 (Ont.)
Cross Village (Mich.)
Lac du Flambeau (Wis.)
Baraga (Mich.)
Cow Creek (Fla.)
Date:
1973
Contents:
Sun dance (1:32) -- Love song (0:57) -- Crazy Dog song (1:41) -- Buffalo dance song (1:03) -- Man's love song (0:54) -- Hand game song (1:42) -- Prisoner's song (2:20) -- World War II song (1:36) -- Warrior death song for Sitting Bull (2:00) -- Canvas dance song (1:40) -- Funeral song (1:37) -- Suguaro song (1:58) -- Peyote song : first song cycle (1:26) -- Moonlight song (2:09) -- Eagle dance (2:59) -- Butterfly dance (1:41) -- Lullaby (0:58) -- Rain dance (1:47) -- Night chant (1:43) -- Song of happiness (1:09) -- Silversmith's song (1:09) -- Corn grinding song (0:59) -- Children's songs (1:47) -- Church song (1:03) -- Devil dance, crown dance (2:57). Wolf song (2:05) -- Potlatch song (1:38) -- Hamatsa song (1:12) -- War song for marriage (1:50) -- Rabbit dance song (2:03) -- Cree dance song (2:24) -- Fiddle dance song (1:00) -- Bear hunting song (1:44) -- Inviting-in dance song (0:47) -- His first hunt (2:06) -- Hunting for musk ox (3:33) -- Corn dance (2:08) -- Stomp dance (1:57) -- Song of welcome (1:19) -- Buffalo feast song (1:06) -- Morning song (1:12) -- Song of the unfaithful woman (0:59) -- Hoot owl song (1:09) -- Oh Mary (1:01) -- Catholic hymn (0:42) -- Calusa corn dance song (1:32) -- Song of removal (1:41) -- Fortynine dance (2:00) -- Unidentified track (1:03) -- As long as the grass shall grow (6:03).
Track Information:
101 Sun Dance / Drum,Whistle.

102 Love Song.

103 Crazy Dog Song / Jack Low Horn, Jim Low Horn, Emil, Mrs. Wings. Drum,Rattle (Musical instrument).

106 Hand Game Song / William Peaychew. Sticks (Musical instrument).

104 Buffalo Dance Song / Jack V. Anquoe, Kenneth Anquoe, Nick Webster. Drum.

105 Man's Love Song / Mark Evarts.

107 Prisoner's Song / William Burn Stick. Drum.

108 World War II Song / George Nicotine. Drum. English language.

109 Warrior Death Song for Sitting Bull / Bass drum,Bells.

207 Song of Happiness / Fort Wingate (N.M.) Indian School. Drum,Harmonica. Navajo language.

208 Silversmith's Song / Ambrose Roanhorse. Anvils. Navajo language.

209 Corn Grinding Song / Basket drum. Navajo language.

110 Canvas Dance Song / Baptiste Pichette, Eneas Conko. Drum.

111 Funeral Song.

112 Suguaro Song.

113 Peyote Song: First Song Cycle / Burton John, Roy James. Drum,Rattle (Musical instrument).

201 Moonlight Song.

202 Eagle Dance / Drum.

203 Butterfly Dance / Drum.

204 Lullaby.

205 Rain Dance.

206 Night Chant / Rattle (Musical instrument). Navajo language.

210 Children's Song: Wolf Song / Irene Chalepah Poolaw. Kiowa Apache.

210 Children's Song: Turtle Song / Irene Chalepah Poolaw. Kiowa Apache.

210 Children's Song: Turkey Song / Irene Chalepah Poolaw. Kiowa Apache.

210 Children's Song: Puppy Song / Irene Chalepah Poolaw. Kiowa Apache.

211 Church Song / Kiowa Apache.

212 Devil Dance, Crown Dance.

301 Wolf Song / Billy Assu.

302 Potlatch Song / Billy Assu.

303 Hamatsa Song / Billy Assu.

303 Hamatsa Song, Cedar Bark Dance / Mungo Martin.

304 War Song for Marriage / Billy Assu.

305 Rabbit Dance Song.

306 Cree Dance Song.

307 Fiddle Dance Song / Fiddle.

308 Bear Hunting Song / Sebastian McKenzie.

309 Inviting in Dance Song / Otis Ahkivigak.

310 His First Hunt / Kemukserar, Pangatkar.

311 Hunting for Musk Ox / Kemukserar, Pangatkar. Drum.

401 Corn Dance / Thomas Lewis.

402 Stomp Dance / Huron Miller.

403 Song of Welcome / Albert Yellow Thunder, Blow Snake, Winslow White Eagle.

404 Buffalo Feast Song / Albert Yellow Thunder, Blow Snake, Winslow White Eagle.

405 Morning Song / Albert Yellow Thunder, Blow Snake, Winslow White Eagle. Rattle (Musical instrument).

406 Song of the Unfaithful Woman / Albert Yellow Thunder, Blow Snake, Winslow White Eagle. Flute.

407 Hoot Owl Song / David, Oshawenimiki Kenosha.

408 Oh Mary / Fred Lacasse.

409 Catholic Hymn / Thomas Shalifoe.

410 Calusa Corn Dance Song / Billy, Gatcayehola Stewart.

411 Song of Removal / Billie Stewart, Susie Tiger.

412 Fortynine Dance / Fred Lacasse. English language.

413 The Seneca: As Long As the Grass Shall Grow / Peter La Farge.
Local Numbers:
FW-COMM-LP-04541

Folkways.4541
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
New York Folkways 1973
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Florida, Michigan, Wisconsin, Onondaga Indian Reservation (N.Y.), Chesterfield (Alaska), Barrow, Point (Alaska), Alaska, Schefferville (Québec), Québec (Province), Montana, Fort Wingate (N.M.), New Mexico, Fort Qu'appelle (Sask.), Canada, Saskatchewan, New York (N.Y.), United States, New York.
General:
Commercial

Songs and dance music from many tribes including Sioux, Cree, Hopi, Zuni, Navajo, Apache, Kwakiutl-Nootka, Slavey, Iroquoian, Winnebago, Ojibwa, Seminole, and others. Compiled and edited by Michael I. Asch. Originally compiled principally from material previously released on several Folkways and Asch recordings. Program notes in English by Michael I. Asch and others, and Native American vocal texts with English translations and English vocal texts (10 p.)
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Jigs  Search this
Drum  Search this
Whistle  Search this
Rattle (Musical instrument)  Search this
Sticks (Musical instrument)  Search this
Bass drum  Search this
Bells  Search this
Harmonica  Search this
Anvils  Search this
Basket drum  Search this
Violin  Search this
Flute  Search this
Religion  Search this
Native American Church of North America  Search this
Children  Search this
puberty  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-COMM-LP-04541
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / LP
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f3ff2b57-5a6a-4a21-8ca1-3b570b93e60b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref16044

Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 262A, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1928 - 1968
Restrictions:
Image number 011 "Holiday Handcraft" has been removed from the slideshow due to culutral sensitivity.
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a322f6cb-5196-43ba-a2f9-d7bc7ada72a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14859
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Festival Recordings: Learning Center/Camp Fire: Cuentos; Stories: Drums, Mountain Spirit Dancers: Rural Life & Environment

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. New Mexico Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Davis, Mariel Smith (recorder)  Search this
Recorder:
Barge, Michelle (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Atencio, Paulette, 1947-  Search this
Chee, Abraham, 1959-  Search this
Geronimo, Joseph, 1949-  Search this
Martinez, Consuelo, 1948-  Search this
Varela, Maria  Search this
Henio, Samuel, 1952-  Search this
Jones, Rodney  Search this
Dorn, Vodra, 1957-  Search this
Dorn, William, 1952-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New Mexico
Chama (N.M.)
Mescalero (N.M.)
Mora (N.M.)
Pine Hill (N.M.)
Dell City (N.M.)
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Date:
1992 June 27
Track Information:
101 Cuentos: Stories from the Rio Grande Valley / Paulette Atencio.

102 Drums of the Mountain Spirit Dancers / Abraham Chee, Joseph Geronimo.

103 Rural Life and Environment / Consuelo Martinez, Maria Varela, Samuel Henio.

104 Gospel Traditions / Rodney Jones, Vodra Dorn, William Dorn.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0137
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Storytelling  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
Religion  Search this
Musical instruments -- Construction  Search this
Dance  Search this
Ranches  Search this
Water rights  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0137
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: New Mexico / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59e7504d3-e993-45c0-ac0c-3ec8ffdfa94e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref685

Festival Recordings: Learning Center/Camp Fire: Pan-Festival Workshop; Expressions of Faith: Micaceous Pottery

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. New Mexico Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Marriock, Barbara (recorder)  Search this
McCauley, John (recorder)  Search this
Performer:
Trujillo, Floyd, 1934-  Search this
Dreadfulwater, J.B., 1932-2002  Search this
Dorn, William, 1952-  Search this
Paz, Carolina  Search this
Ortega, Felipe V.  Search this
Vigil, Priscilla, 1919-2001  Search this
Cellcion, Fernando  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Zuni  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New Mexico
Taos (N.M.)
Oklahoma
Jamaica
Albuquerque (N.M.)
La Madera (N.M.)
Tesuque (N.M.)
Tortugas (N.M.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Date:
1992 June 28
Track Information:
101 Pan Festival Workshop: Expressions of Faith / Floyd Trujillo, J.B. Dreadfulwater, William Dorn.

102 Micaceous Pottery / Carolina Paz, Felipe V. Ortega, Priscilla Vigil.

103 Fernando Cellicion- Zuni Flute / Fernando Cellcion. Flute.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0142
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 28, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
American Indian  Search this
Flute  Search this
Christianity  Search this
Religion  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0142
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: New Mexico / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5a6fe05ad-16eb-427e-81cf-63aa58dd69fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref690

Festival Recordings: Narrative Stage: Iroquoian Traditions; Cherokee Singing; Pan Festival Workshop- Drum Making

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Indian Program 1992 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Van Buren, Tom (recorder)  Search this
Kamalidiin, Sais (recorder)  Search this
Henhawk, Dugan  Search this
Performer:
Dreadfulwater, J.B., 1932-2002  Search this
Goodrich, John, 1931-  Search this
McLemore, Joanne, 1925-  Search this
McLemore, Sanders  Search this
Bonaparte, Brad  Search this
Geronimo, Joseph, 1949-  Search this
Topo, Louis  Search this
Akwesasne Singers  Search this
White Boy & the Wagon Burners (Musical group)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Akwesasne Mohawk  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
New York
Oklahoma
Tahlequah (Okla.)
Canada
Québec (Province)
French Guiana
New Mexico
Akwesasne Indian Reserve (Québec and Ont.)
Date:
1992 June 27
Track Information:
101 Iroquoian Traditions / Akwesasne Singers, White Boy & the Wagon Burners (Musical group).

102 Cherokee Singing / J.B. Dreadfulwater, John Goodrich, Joanne McLemore, Sanders McLemore.

103 Pan Festival Workshop: Drum Making / Brad Bonaparte, Joseph Geronimo, Louis Topo. Drum.
Local Numbers:
FP-1992-CT-0058
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 27, 1992.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Rockabilly music  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
Drum  Search this
Baptists  Search this
Religion  Search this
Maroons  Search this
Musical instruments -- Construction  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
French Guiana -- Songs and music  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Item FP-1992-CT-0058
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: The Changing Soundscape in Indian Country / 2.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk55e943ab1-1f78-4fa0-8bd8-e93ad3ab07b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref848

James Mooney photographs

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
11.75 Linear feet (Photographic prints: albumen, gelatin silver Negatives: glass, cellulose nitrate )
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Nansemond  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Mexico
Date:
circa 1872-1920
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made during James Mooney's fieldwork with Apache, Arapaho, Caddo, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Comanche, Dakota/Lakota, Hopi, Kiowa, Navaho, Powhatan, and Wichita communities, as well as in Mexico. Photographs document individuals and families, gatherings, ceremonies and dances, daily activities, games, crafts, landscapes, and burials.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Biographical / Historical:
James Mooney (1861-1921) was an American ethnographer whose research focused on Native North Americans. The son of Irish Catholic immigrants, Mooney was born in Richmond, Indiana. His formal education was limited to the public schools of the city; most of his knowledge of anthropology and ethnography was self-taught, largely through his field experience working with various Native communities.

In 1885, Mooney began working for the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) under John Wesley Powell. There, he carried out ethnographic research for more than 30 years. He was a very early adopter of photography and made thouands of photographs in the course of his fieldwork.

Mooney married Ione Lee Gaut in 1897, and had six children. He died in 1921 in Washington, D.C. from heart disease.

For fuller biographies of Mooney see George Ellison's introduction to the 1992 edition of Mooney's History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees, as well as The Indian Man: A Biography of James Mooney by L.G. Moses (2002).

Chronology

February 10, 1861 -- Born

1878 -- Graduated high school, then taught public school for 1 year

1879 -- Joined the staff of The Richmond Palladium

April 1885 -- Joined the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE)

May-June 1885 -- Worked with Cherokee Chief N. J. Smith on Eastern Cherokee grammar

Summer 1886 -- Worked with Chief Smith (in D.C.)

Summer 1887 -- First trip to the Eastern Cherokee of the Great Smokey Mountains to study language, collect material culture, and document activities including the Green Corn Dance and Cherokee ball games (3.5 months)

Winter/Spring 1888 -- Studied Iroquoian and Algonquian synonymies and published articles on the Irish and the Cherokee, collected and studied Cherokee sacred formulae

1889 -- Visit to Cherokee (worked with Swimmer, worked on his maps of place names/mound sites, witnessed ball play and the Green Corn Dance, gathered plants and collected objects for the Smithsonian

December 1890 -- Visited Oklahoma Territory to complete research with Western Cherokee, witnessed the Ghost Dance at the Cheyenne/Arapaho Reservation for the first time

1891 -- "The Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee" published Visit to Cherokee in Oklahoma Territory

April 1891 -- Delegated to collect material for Chicago Exposition. Collected for the next 2 years while studying the Ghost Dance

May 1891 -- Photographed Kiowa Mescal (Peyote) Ceremony Headed west for a four month collecting trip for the Chicago exposition, commissioned model tipis and summer houses from the Kiowa

1891-1893 -- Observed/participated in three ghost dances during three seasons of fieldwork among Arapaho, Sioux, Kiowa, and Cheyenne communities

1892 -- Photographed Kiowa Mescal (Peyote) Ceremony and Oglala Sioux Ghost Dance

Winter 1892 -- Began intensive field study of Kiowa winter counts and Kiowa heraldry Among the Navajo and Hopi, making collections for Chicago Exposition

Fall 1893 -- Returned to Oklahoma Territory to observe and record Arapaho Sun Dance. Also studied the Hopi Kachina Dance, the Wichita Corn Dance, and possibly also the Arapaho Ghost Dance

May 1895 -- "Siouan Tribes of the East" published

1895 -- Trip to the Southwest, visited Hopi and Navajo communities

1896 -- "The Ghost Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890" published

January 1897 -- At Anadarko

September 28, 1897 -- Married Ione Lee Gaut

Fall 1898 -- Trip to Southwest, visited Hopi and Navajo communities

1898 -- Attended Omaha Fair, helped plan 'Congress of Indians', supervised Frank Rinehart, who photographed many of the Indian delegates to the fair Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians published

Fall 1899 -- For three weeks in the fall traveled with DeLancey Gill to William Co, VA to study and photograph Mattapony and Pamunkey communities; Gill took pictures while Mooney did census work before traveling to the Chickahominy River

1900 -- Myths of the Cherokee published

Spring 1900 -- Studied communities of the Powhatan Confederacy in VA; traveled to VA again with Gill to visit the Pamunkey and Mattapony communities for more pictures and to complete census, then traveled to area south of Portsmouth to find the rural settlement of the Nansemond.

Fall 1901 -- Cooperative agreement with Field Museum and J. Owen Dorsey; Studied Kiowa for BAE, studied Cheyenne for Field Museum (focused on heraldry). This project, with Dorsey working on Arapaho, continued until 1906

1902 -- Fieldwork on heraldry with Kiowa and Apache communities all year except for two brief visits to Washington, D.C. in September and November

July 1903 -- Mooney and Dorsey study Sun Dance on Cheyenne reservation in Oklahoma Territory, brought staff photographer Charles Carpenter. Spent a week attending the Sun Dance and made the first photographs of the skull-dragging ceremony

October 1903 -- Photographed Arapaho Tomahawk Dance

Winter 1903 -- At the Cheyenne-Arapaho agency in Darlington; winter spent with Cheyenne, and finishing Kiowa tipi models for the Bureau's exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition

March 1904 -- At Mount Scott with Kiowa

June 1904 -- St. Louis Exposition opens

April 1906 -- Last visit to Cheyenne

Summers, 1911-1916 -- Visits to Cherokee

1918 -- Assisted with charting the Native American Church of Oklahoma (the Secretary of the Interior issued a ban on his research)

June 28, 1918 -- Requested by Fewkes to study peyote cult and Kiowa Heraldry (see Mooney Papers, Box 1, Letters, statement dated 1921)

December 22, 1921 -- Died
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 74, James Mooney photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.74
See more items in:
James Mooney photographs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35162d7ce-2ae2-4302-963d-b416aa1eca3b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-74
Online Media:

MS 1302-a Jicarilla Apache vocabulary and notes

Creator:
Russell, Frank, 1868-1903  Search this
Informant:
Gun-si Vi-gil  Search this
Quintana, Juan  Search this
Quintana, Reuben  Search this
Extent:
143 Pages
1 Volume
Culture:
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Volumes
Vocabulary
Date:
1898
Scope and Contents:
Vocabulary listed according to categories in Powellʼs printed outline with added information on culture, customs and religion.
Biographical / Historical:
Informants: Gunʹ -si Vigil, interpreter, educated at Santa Fe and Fort Lewis Indian schools; Juan Quintana, "authority for many names of plants and narrator of most of the animal tales and information regarding the sun;" and Reuben [Quintana], interpreter for Juan.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1302-a
Local Note:
Identified as Jicarilla Apache by comparison with manuscript numbers 115 and 116.
Place:
New Mexico
Topic:
Religion -- Mexico -- Apache  Search this
Culture -- Apache  Search this
Medicine feast -- Apache  Search this
Religion -- Mexico. -- Apache  Search this
Education -- Apache  Search this
Marriage -- Apache  Search this
Basketry -- Apache  Search this
Initiation ceremony -- Apache  Search this
Folklore -- Apache  Search this
Myths -- origin of animals -- Apache  Search this
Bows and arrows -- Apache  Search this
Folklore -- origin of fire -- Apache  Search this
Folklore -- fox and porcupine -- Apache  Search this
Folklore -- horse -- Apache  Search this
Weaving -- Apache  Search this
Beverages -- Apache  Search this
Hide preparation -- Apache  Search this
Gambling -- Apache  Search this
Widows -- Apache  Search this
Child life -- child birth -- Apache  Search this
Social organization -- Apache  Search this
Medicine Lodge -- Drawing -- Apache  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 1302-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1302A
See more items in:
MS 1302-a Jicarilla Apache vocabulary and notes
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f9a7f9a7-f1e3-4749-ac33-68d6995c70dd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1302a

Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs

Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
86 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1895-2001
bulk 1898-1951
Scope and Contents:
The Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs, circa 1895-2001 (bulk 1898-1951) primarily relate to Curtis's work on his opus, the North American Indian (NAI), although other subjects are documented as well. The papers relate closely to the Edward S. Curtis papers at the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections (UW), as that collection was donated by Curtis's daughter Florence Graybill and appears to be part of the same body of materials that was maintained by Curtis, and after his death, by Florence. Occasionally a correspondence exchange or manuscript draft is divided between the National Anthropological Archives and UW. Also found in both collections are notes, mostly dated 1951, in Curtis's handwriting on slips of paper or the document itself that gives an explanation of the document.

The collection includes correspondence, research notes, NAI files and promotional material, writings and memoirs, a small amount of material relating to a complaint regarding his reporting in NAI of certain Pueblo ceremonies, and correspondence and other documents relating to his gold mining interests. Also included are papers of Florence Graybill, who published on Curtis after his death and maintained contacts with various individuals and entities involved in Curtis exhibits, publications, and sales.

The correspondence exchanges are almost exclusively NAI related and document the relationships Curtis had with various influential people, including Gifford Pinchot, Joseph Blethen, Jacob Riis, William Farabee, Smithsonian scholars Frederick Webb Hodge and Matilda Coxe Stevenson, and the immediate and extended family of Theodore Roosevelt. Included are letters of introduction for Curtis as he sought to promote his work.

The research notes consist of a small mixture of writings on field experiences as well as maps used during his fieldwork (the bulk of Curtis's fieldnotes and NAI manuscripts are at the Seaver Center in the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History). The NAI files chiefly contain material promoting the work, such as published reviews, articles, and ephemera, but there are a few North American Indian Inc. business records (the bulk of the business records are maintained at the Pierpont Morgan Library). Of note is a lengthy annual report for the North American Indian, Inc., in which Curtis explains difficulties encountered in the fieldwork and volume publication. Related to his NAI work are letters and other materials documenting a 1934 complaint from Harold Ickes, Secretary of the Interior on Curtis's reporting of certain Pueblo ceremonies, as well as Curtis's response.

The writings comprise manuscript drafts on various topics. Most are short, stand-alone stories relating to his NAI work, often relaying a story about his own experiences. Similar stories can be found in Florence Graybill's papers, as she published some of them after his death. Also part of the writings are drafts for several chapters of Curtis's unpublished memoir, "As it Was."

Curtis's interest in gold mining is represented in correspondence and other material dating from 1938-1950. Most of the letters are between Curtis and his son Harold. Curtis's invention of a concentrator for separating fine gold from placer tailings is also documented in photographs and drawings.

Florence Graybill's papers pertain to writings, talks, and projects relating to Curtis after his death. Included are publication files for Graybill's biography of Curtis written with Victor Boesen, Visions of a Vanishing Race, as well as other of her articles and book reviews. Graybill's correspondence reveals her commitment to assist scholars and others interested in researching and exhibiting Curtis material, as well as her communication with individuals having a commercial interest in Curtis. Also present are Graybill's lecture notes for talks given, and articles and newspaper features on Curtis written by others.

The photographs in this collection primarily relate to Curtis's NAI work (1898-1927) and are a mix of original and working copy negatives, prints, and transparencies. The original negatives are remarkable in that they reveal some of Curtis's working methods in crafting his images through pencil and other enhancements, as well as showing removal of unwanted items from the image. Also of note are two original logbooks used for recording negatives from approximately 1895-1916. The majority of the prints appear to be silver gelatin prints made for reference; however, there are a fair number of platinum prints as well as several blue-toned silver prints in the collection. There are only a few cyanotypes.

Among the photographs is a deerskin-bound photograph album containing Harriman Alaska Expedition and NAI photographs, representing some of Curtis's earliest Native American subjects. These include images of people from the Puget Sound area as well as from his 1900 trip to the Blackfoot reservation. There are no annotations in the album; however, tucked among the pages are a few small notes of identification in Curtis's handwriting.

Photographs documenting other subjects are also present to a lesser degree. Among these are photographs of Curtis's Seattle photography studio, a 1915 Grand Canyon trip, hop field workers in the Puget Sound area, and Curtis's illustrations for Marah Ryan's book Flute of the Gods. Additionally, the collection contains a number of photographs of Curtis, his children, and portraits of various individuals including Theodore Roosevelt and actor Anna May Wong.
Arrangement:
The Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs are arranged into the following 10 series:

Series 1: Biographical information, 1919-1952

Series 2: Correspondence, 1904-1951

Series 3: Research notes, 1900-1930, undated

Series 4: North American Indian, circa 1906-1920

Series 5: Writings, 1906, 1948, undated

Series 6: Complaint regarding Curtis's reporting of Pueblo ceremonies, 1924-1935

Series 7: Gold mining, 1938-1950

Series 8. Florence Curtis Graybill papers, 1948-2001

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1896-1927

Series 10: Duplicate material, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sherriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer famous for his photographs of the indigenous peoples of North America. His work was highly influential in shaping a sympathetic yet romantic view of cultures that he and many others believed to be "vanishing." Over the course of 30 years, Curtis visited more than 80 Native American communities and published his photographs and ethnographies in the twenty-volume North American Indian (NAI) (1907-1930).

Curtis was born in Whitewater, Wisconsin, to Ellen and Johnson Curtis in 1868. In about 1874, his family moved to a farm in Cordova, Minnesota. At a young age, Curtis built a camera, and it is possible that he may have worked in a Minneapolis photography studio for a time. In 1887, Curtis and his father moved West and settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, with the rest of the family joining them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, 20-year-old Curtis became the head of the family.

In 1891, Curtis moved to Seattle and bought into a photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he and Thomas Guptill formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers." The endeavor became a premier portrait studio for Seattle society and found success in photoengraving for many local publications. In 1892, Curtis married Clara Phillips (1874-1932) and in 1893 their son Harold was born (1893-1988), followed by Elizabeth (Beth) (1896-1973), Florence (1899-1987) and Katherine (Billy) (1909-?). Around 1895, Curtis made his first photographs of local Native people, including the daughter of Duwamish chief Seattle: Kickisomlo or "Princess Angeline." Curtis submitted a series of his Native American photographs to the National Photographic Convention, and received an award in the category of "genre studies" for Homeward (later published in volume 9 of the NAI). In 1896, the entire Curtis family moved to Seattle, which included Curtis's mother, his siblings Eva and Asahel, Clara's sisters Susie and Nellie Phillips, and their cousin William Phillips. Most of the household worked in Curtis's studio along with other employees. Curtis became sole proprietor of the studio in 1897, which remained a popular portrait studio but also sold his scenic landscapes and views of the Seattle Area. Curtis also sent his brother Asahel to Alaska and the Yukon to photograph the Klondike Gold Rush, and sold those views as well. Asahel went on to become a well-known photographer in his own right, primarily working in the American Northwest.

Curtis was an avid outdoorsman and joined the Mazamas Club after his first of many climbs of Mount Rainier. On a climb in 1898, Curtis met a group of scientists, including C. Hart Merriam, George Bird Grinnell, and Gifford Pinchot, who had lost their way on the mountain, and led them to safety. This encounter led to an invitation from Merriam for Curtis to accompany a group of over 30 well-known scientists, naturalists, and artists as the official photographer on a maritime expedition to the Alaskan coast. Funded by railroad magnate Edward Harriman, the Harriman Alaska Expedition left Seattle in May of 1899, and returned at the end of July. Curtis made around 5000 photographs during the trip, including photographs of the indigenous peoples they met as well as views of mountains, glaciers, and other natural features. Many of the photographs appeared in the expedition's 14 published volumes of their findings.

In 1900, Curtis accompanied Grinnell to Montana for a Blackfoot Sundance. Here, Curtis made numerous photographs and became interested in the idea of a larger project to document the Native peoples of North America. Almost immediately upon returning from the Sundance, Curtis set off for the Southwest to photograph Puebloan communities. By 1904, Curtis had already held at least one exhibit of his "Indian pictures" and his project to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, the NAI) had taken shape and already received some press coverage. With his fieldwork now increasing his absences from home, Curtis hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank Rinehart, to help manage the Seattle studio.

In 1904, Curtis was a winner in the Ladies Home Journal "Prettiest Children In America" portrait contest. His photograph of Marie Fischer was selected as one of 112 that would be published and Fischer was one of 12 children selected from the photographs who would have their portrait painted by Walter Russell. Russell and Curtis made an acquaintance while Russell was in Seattle to paint Fischer's portrait, and not long afterwards, Russell contacted Curtis to make photographic studies of Theodore Roosevelt's children for portraits he would paint. Curtis subsequently photographed the entire Roosevelt family, and developed a social connection with the President. Several important outcomes came of this new friendship, including Roosevelt eventually writing the foreword to the NAI, as well as making introductions to influential people.

Key among these introductions was one to wealthy financier John Pierpont Morgan, in 1906. After a brief meeting with Curtis during which he viewed several of Curtis's photographs of Native Americans, Morgan agreed to finance the fieldwork for the NAI project for five years, at $15,000.00 per year. It was up to Curtis to cover publishing and promotion costs, with the publication being sold as a subscription. In return, Morgan would receive 25 sets of the 20-volume publication. The ambitious publication plan outlined 20 volumes of ethnological text, each to be illustrated with 75 photogravure prints made from acid-etched copper plates. Each volume would be accompanied by a companion portfolio of 35 large photogravures. With high-quality papers and fine binding, a set would cost $3000.00. 500 sets were planned. Under Morgan, the North American Indian, Inc. formed as body to administer the monies. Also around this time, Frederick Webb Hodge, Director of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology, agreed to edit the publications.

Curtis then began more systematic fieldwork, accompanied by a team of research assistants and Native interpreters. In 1906, Curtis hired William E. Myers, a former journalist, as a field assistant and stenographer. Over the years, Myers became the lead researcher on the project, making enormous contributions in collecting data and possibly doing the bulk of the writing for the first 18 volumes. Upon meeting a new community, Curtis and his team would work on gathering data dealing with all aspects of the community's life, including language, social and political organization, religion, food ways, measures and values, and many other topics. (See box 2 folder 1 in this collection for Curtis's list of topics.) Curtis and his assistants, especially Myers, brought books and papers to the field relating to the tribes they were currently concerned with, and often wrote from the field to anthropologists at the Bureau of American Ethnology and other institutions for information or publications. In addition to fieldnotes and photographs, the team also employed sound recording equipment, making thousands of recordings on wax cylinders. Curtis also often brought a motion picture camera, although few of his films have survived.

The first volume of the NAI was published towards the end of 1907. Already, Curtis was encountering difficulty in finding subscribers to the publication despite great praise in the press and among those who could afford the volumes. Curtis spent progressively more of his time outside the field season promoting the project through lectures and in 1911, presenting his "Picture Musicale"—a lecture illustrated with lantern slides and accompanied by an original musical score—in major cities. After the initial five funded years, only eight of the twenty volumes had been completed. However, Morgan agreed to continue support for the fieldwork and publication continued.

Starting in 1910, Curtis and his team worked among the Kwakwaka'wakw First Nation on Vancouver Island, and in 1913 began to develop a documentary film project featuring the community in Alert Bay. In 1914, Curtis produced the feature-length film, In the Land of the Headhunters. The film showcased an all-indigenous cast and included an original musical score. Screened in New York and Seattle, it received high praise. However after this initial success, it did not receive the attention Curtis had hoped for, and resulted in financial loss.

Meanwhile, Curtis's prolonged absences from home had taken a toll on his marriage and in 1919 Clara and Edward divorced. The Seattle studio was awarded to Clara, and Curtis moved to Los Angeles, opening a photography studio with his daughter Beth and her husband Manford "Mag" Magnuson. Daughters Florence and Katherine came to Los Angeles sometime later. Curtis continued with fieldwork and promotion of the project, and in 1922 volume 12 of the NAI was published. Also in 1922, Curtis was accompanied during the field season in California by his daughter Florence Curtis Graybill, the first time a family member had gone to the field with him since the Curtis children were very small.

Curtis continued to push the project and publications along, yet never without financial struggle and he picked up work in Hollywood as both a still and motion picture photographer. John Pierpont Morgan, Jr., continued to provide funding for the fieldwork in memory of his father, but with the various financial upsets of the 1910s and 1920s, Curtis had a difficult time getting subscribers on board. In 1926, Myers, feeling the strain, regretfully resigned after the completion of volume 18. Anthropologist Frank Speck recommended Stewart Eastwood, a recent graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, to replace Myers as ethnologist for the final two volumes.

In 1927, Curtis and his team, along with his daughter Beth Curtis Magnuson, headed north from Seattle to Alaska and Canada on a final field season. Harsh weather and a hip injury made the trip difficult for Curtis, but he was very satisfied with the season's work. The party returned to Seattle, and upon arrival Curtis was arrested for unpaid alimony. He returned exhausted to Los Angeles, and in 1930 the final two volumes of NAI were published without fanfare. Curtis spent the next two years recovering from physical and mental exhaustion. Beth and Mag continued to run the Curtis studio in LA, but for the most part, Curtis had set down his camera for good. With the NAI behind him and his health recovered, Curtis pursued various interests and employment; he continued to do some work in Hollywood, including working on The Plainsman, starring Gary Cooper.

In 1933 Curtis was publicly criticized by John Collier, the Commissioner for Indian Affairs for some of the statements he had made on certain Pueblo ceremonies in the NAI volume 16, published in 1924. In September of 1934 Curtis received a letter from Harold Ickes, Secretary of the Interior regarding the claims published in volume 16, demanding a printed apology to be distributed among the text of the book as well as removal of the offending text from any undistributed copies of the publication. Curtis spent months writing and compiling supporting documentation in his defense, which he submitted to Ickes in January 1935. Also in 1935, the Morgan estate liquidated the North American Indian, Inc. and sold the remaining sets of the NAI volumes and unbound pages, photogravures, and copper printing plates along with the rights to the material to Boston bookseller Charles Lauriat for $1000.00.

Curtis's interest in gold prospecting took a front seat in the mid-1930s. While he scouted for potentially profitable mines in Northern California, his friend Ted Shell and possibly his son Harold sought investors. However, nothing ever fully panned out, though Curtis did design and build a concentrator for separating fine gold from placer tailings. He later sold the patent for ten dollars. Eventually, Curtis settled down on a farm outside Los Angeles, moving later to live with Beth and Mag, where he stayed until his death. In the mid to late 1940s Curtis began to write his memoirs. His daughter Florence visited him regularly and typed as Curtis dictated his recollections, and at some point he completed a draft of a memoir titled "As it Was." He also went through his papers and annotated or tucked notes among the correspondence and other material giving a brief explanation of the item or its context. Curtis died at home in 1952.

Prior to his death, Curtis had been out of the public eye for some years, and the NAI had slipped into relative obscurity. The Curtis studio in Los Angeles continued to sell Curtis's Native American photographs, and Florence gave occasional talks on her father, but it wasn't until the early 1970s that Curtis's work saw a renewed interest. This renaissance took place largely in the art photography market, but Curtis's biography and the NAI were also getting treatment in publications. Florence Curtis Graybill partnered with Victor Boesen to produce two narrative histories of Curtis and his work, and these were followed by many others. Florence continued to publish short works on her father for many years, and stayed in touch with numerous people involved in projects both scholarly and commercial that related to Curtis's work.

Sources Cited

Davis, Barbara. Edward S. Curtis: the life and times of a shadowcatcher. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1984.

Gidley, Mick. The North American Indian, Incorporated. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Chronology

1868 -- Curtis is born in Whitewater, Wisconsin

circa 1874 -- Curtis family moves to Cordova, Minnesota

1887 -- Moves with his father to Washington territory to be joined by his mother and siblings in 1888

1891 -- With Rasmus Rothi forms Rothi & Curtis photography studio in Seattle

1892 -- Marries Clara Phillips With Thomas Guptill forms Curtis & Guptill Photographers and Photoengravers in Seattle

circa 1895 -- Becomes interested in photographing the indigenous people of the area

1897 -- Guptill leaves, Curtis establishes himself as Edward S. Curtis, Photographer and Photoengraver

1898 -- Meets C. Hart Merriam, George Bird Grinnell, and Gifford Pinchot during climb on Mount Rainier Receives first place award from the National Photographic Convention in the "Genre Studies" for his photographs of Native Americans

1899 -- Joins Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer at request of C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell

1900 -- Accompanies George Bird Grinnell to Blackfoot reservation in Montana for Sundance Becomes interested in a major project to document Native American tribes Travels to Arizona to photograph Hopi communities

circa 1902 -- Travels again to the southwest to photograph Native communities

1903 -- Holds first formal exhibit of Native American photographs in his studio

1904 -- Publicly announces intention to produce major publication on Native Americans Portrait entered in the Ladies Home Journal "Prettiest Children in America" contest is selected for publication and as a result, Curtis is asked to photograph President Theodore Roosevelt's family

circa 1904-1906 -- Conducts fieldwork among Native communities of the southwest

1906 -- Meets with J. P. Morgan, who agrees to finance the fieldwork for Curtis's project Hires William E. Myers as researcher and writer for the project

1907 -- Volume 1 of NAI is published

1908 -- Volumes 2 and 3 of NAI are published

1909 -- Volumes 4 and 5 of NAI are published

1911 -- Volumes 6, 7, and 8 of NAI are published Presents and tours the "Picture Musicale"

1913 -- J. P. Morgan dies, but his son agrees to continue to provide support for NAI Volume 9 of NAI is published

1914 -- Releases film In the Land of the Headhunters

1915 -- Volume 10 of NAI is published

1916 -- Volume 11 of NAI is published

1919 -- Edward and Clara Curtis divorce and the Seattle studio is awarded to Clara Moves to Los Angeles and opens new studio with daughter Beth and her husband, Manford Magnuson

1922 -- Volume 12 of NAI is published Conducts fieldwork in California with daughter Florence Curtis Graybill

1924 -- Volumes 13 and 14 of NAI are published

1926 -- Volumes 15, 16, and 17 of NAI are published William E. Myers resigns as chief writer and ethnologist of NAI

1927 -- Conducts fieldwork in Alaska and Canada for final NAI volume with daughter Beth Curtis Magnuson

1928 -- Volume 18 of NAI is published

1930 -- Volumes 19 and 20 of NAI are published

circa 1930-1950 -- Applies himself to various interests, especially gold mining

1952 -- Dies in Los Angeles at the home of Beth and Manford Magnuson
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds additional Curtis papers and photographs in MS 2000-18, the Edward Curtis investigation of the battle of Little Bighorn and Photo Lot 59, the Library of Congress copyright prints collection.

The Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University holds Curtis's wax cylinder audio recordings from 1907-1913.

The Braun Research Library at the Autry Museum of the American West holds the Frederick Webb Hodge papers (1888-1931), which contain substantial correspondence from Curtis. The Braun also holds a small amount of Curtis papers and photographs, including some of Curtis's cyanotypes.

The Getty Research Institute holds the Edward S. Curtis papers (1900-1978), which include the original manuscript scores for the Curtis Picture Musicale and film In the Land of the Headhunters.

The Palace of the Governors at the New Mexico History Museum holds original Curtis negatives pertaining to the southwest.

The Pierpont Morgan Library holds the Edward S. Curtis papers (1906-1947), which contain the records of the North American Indian, Inc., as well as Curtis's correspondence to librarian, and later library director, Belle Da Costa Greene. The library also holds a large collection of Curtis's lantern slides, used in his Picture Musicale.

The Seattle Public Library holds correspondence of Curtis to Librarian Harriet Leitch (1948-1951), pertaining to his career.

The Seaver Center for Western History Research at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History holds collection GC 1143, which contains Curtis's field notes as well as manuscript drafts for the North American Indian.

The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian holds NMAI.AC.080, the Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs, as well as NMAI.AC.053, the Mary Harriman Rumsey collection of Harriman Alaska Expedition photographs.

The University of Washington Libraries Special Collections holds the Edward S. Curtis papers (1893-1983). Additionally, the Burke Museum holds papers and photographs of Edmund Schwinke, which relate to Curtis's work with the Kwakwaka'wakw community.
Separated Materials:
Artifacts collected by Curtis that were a part of this donation comprise Accession No. 2058745 in the collections of the Department of Anthropology in the National Museum of Natural History.
Provenance:
The papers and photographs were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Jim Graybill, grandson of Edward S. Curtis, in 2010 and 2011.
Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d9637048-0e34-47a7-8fd4-210055d47c69
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2010-28
Online Media:

Nación Ǵenízara ethnogenesis, place, and identity in New Mexico edited by Moises Gonzales and Enrique R. Lamadrid

Editor:
Gonzales, Moises  Search this
Lamadrid, Enrique R  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xxviii, 359 pages ) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
History
Electronic books
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
2019
Topic:
Ethnohistory  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Racism--History  Search this
Indians, Treatment of  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Ethnic identity  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Indians of North America--Social conditions  Search this
Indians of North America--Ethnic identity  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Call number:
E78.N65 N33 2019 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145044

Living life's circle : Mescalero Apache cosmovision / Claire R. Farrer

Author:
Farrer, Claire R.  Search this
Physical description:
xiii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1991
Topic:
Mescalero astronomy  Search this
Religion  Search this
Mescalero philosophy  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_417661

The Jicarilla Apache of Dulce / Veronica E. Velarde Tiller and Mary M. Velarde

Author:
Tiller, Veronica E. Velarde  Search this
Velarde, Mary M  Search this
Physical description:
127 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
History
Place:
New Mexico
Jicarilla Indian Reservation (N.M.)
Dulce (N.M.)
Date:
2012
©2012
Topic:
Jicarilla Indians--History  Search this
History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1091255

The Norton anthology of Latino literature / Ilan Stavans, general editor ; [editors], Edna Acosta-Belén [and others]

Author:
Stavans, Ilan  Search this
Acosta-Belén, Edna  Search this
Physical description:
lxxi, 2489, A177 pages : illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm
Type:
Literary collections
Date:
2011
©2011
Topic:
American literature--Hispanic American authors  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1088257

Readings in American Indian law : recalling the rhythm of survival / edited by Jo Carrillo

Author:
Carrillo, Jo 1959-  Search this
Physical description:
xiii, 353 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1998
Topic:
Legal status, laws, etc  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_897465

The Apaches / Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve ; illustrated by Ronald Himler

Author:
Sneve, Virginia Driving Hawk  Search this
Himler, Ronald  Search this
Physical description:
32 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 24 x 26 cm
Type:
Juvenile literature
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
1997
C1997
Topic:
History  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_724316

On the bloody road to Jesus : Christianity and the Chiricahua Apaches / H. Henrietta Stockel

Author:
Stockel, H. Henrietta 1938-  Search this
Subject:
Jesuits Missions History  Search this
Franciscans Missions History  Search this
Physical description:
xxi, 314 p. : ill. map ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico, North
United States
Oklahoma
Date:
2004
C2004
Topic:
Missions  Search this
Religion  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Indians, Treatment of--History  Search this
Protestant churches--Missions--History  Search this
Christianity and culture--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_738355

Ethnographic data recovery and treatment recommendations for the proposed improvement of Navajo Route 7 (5 & 7) in the area of Fluted Rock (Dził Dah Siʼáni) (AZ-P-7-55), Apache County, Arizona / prepared by David Zimmerman, Robert Johnson

Author:
Zimmerman, David  Search this
Johnson, Robert  Search this
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs Navajo Area Office Branch of Roads  Search this
Navajo Nation Historic Preservation Department  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 31 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm. + 1 letter of transmittal ([1] p. ; 28 cm.)
Type:
Books
Place:
Navajo Indian Reservation
Arizona
Fluted Rock
Date:
2005
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Religion  Search this
Navajo mythology  Search this
Roads--Design and construction--Environmental aspects  Search this
Cultural property--Protection  Search this
Call number:
E99.N3 Z56 2005
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_776369

Apache medicine-men / John G. Bourke

Author:
Bourke, John Gregory 1846-1896  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 158 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
1993
1892
Topic:
Medicine  Search this
Shamans  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Religion  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_514216

Native American dance : ceremonies and social traditions / Charlotte Heth, general editor

Author:
Heth, Charlotte  Search this
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.)  Search this
Subject:
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 196 p. : col. ill. ; 34 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Date:
1992
C1992
Topic:
Indians--Dance  Search this
Indians--Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Indians--Religion  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_475435

Voices of the American Indian experience / James E. Seelye Jr. and Steven A. Littleton, editors

Author:
Seelye, James E  Search this
Littleton, Steven A  Search this
Physical description:
2 volumes (xxii, 796 pages) ; 26 cm
Type:
Sources
History
Place:
North America
United States
Date:
2013
©2013
Topic:
History  Search this
Indians in literature  Search this
Indian mythology  Search this
Creation--Mythology  Search this
Politics and government  Search this
Social policy  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1031080

The light gray people : an ethno-history of the Lipan Apaches of Texas and northern Mexico / Nancy McGown Minor

Author:
Minor, Nancy McGown  Search this
Physical description:
xi, 188 p. : maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Texas
Mexico, North
Date:
2009
C2009
Topic:
Lipan Indians--History  Search this
Lipan Indians--Ethnic identity  Search this
Lipan Indians--Social life and customs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_948931

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