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The Real McCoy: Lewis Temple, Jan E. Matzeliger, and Norbert Rillieux

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
James, Portia P.  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Matzeliger, Jan Ernst, 1852-1889  Search this
Rillieux, Norbert, 1806-1894  Search this
Temple, Lewis  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Video recordings (open reel, 1 inch)
3 Video recordings (VHS)
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1990
Scope and Contents:
The exhibition, The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, included three short documentary films: Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale, Jan E. Matzeliger, and Norbert Rillieux. Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale provides an overview of early 19th century whaling industry and tools, including the toggle head harpoon invented by blacksmith Lewis Temple. The short documentary about Jan Matzeliger provides an overview of the shoe industry and shoe making, including the refining of Matzeliger's idea and success of his shoe-lasting machine. The short documentary about Norbert Rillieux covers the history of sugar production and manufacturing from early sugar processing through the development of Rillieux's sugar refining process and the installation of Rillieux's device at Theodore Packwood's Myrtle Grove Plantation. All three documentaries provide historical background of three inventors' families and life, respectively.
Short documentary films. Part of The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930 Audiovisual Materials. AV000926 includes all three short films, dated 19910606. AV003326 includes Norbert Rillieux only (film image direction is sideways), dated 19890505. AV003324: Jan E. Matzeliger, undated. AV003433: outtakes, edited voiceover narration by Portia James for Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale, dated 19890517. AV000226: loop tape of Norbert Rillieux with captions, undated. AV000227: loop tape of Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale with captions, dated 19920526. AV000228: loop tape of Lewis Temple and Hunting the Whale with captions, undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003326

ACMA AV003324

ACMA AV003433

ACMA AV000226

ACMA AV000227

ACMA AV000228
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Whaling  Search this
Shoe industry  Search this
Shoe machinery industry  Search this
Shoemaking  Search this
Sugar  Search this
Sugar -- Manufacture and refining  Search this
Sugar machinery  Search this
Patents  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Narration
Citation:
The Real McCoy: Lewis Temple, Jan E. Matzeliger, and Norbert Rillieux, Exhibition Records AV03-026, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV000926
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref506

Climbing Jacob's Ladder

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Smith, Edward D.  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Nelson, Stanley, 1955-  Search this
Caesar, Shirley, 1938-  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
First African Baptist Church (Savannah, Ga.)  Search this
First Bryan Baptist Church (Savannah, Ga.)  Search this
Johns Island Presbyterian Church (Johns Island, S.C.)  Search this
Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Sharp Street Memorial United Methodist Church (Baltimore, Md.)  Search this
Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church (Richmond, Va.)  Search this
St. George's United Methodist Church (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
St. Thomas' Church (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Allen, Richard, 1760-1831  Search this
Boyd, Ruby Chappelle  Search this
Collier-Thomas, Bettye  Search this
Dougherty, Dorothy  Search this
Ellis, Edward L., Reverend  Search this
Epps, Annie  Search this
Freeman, Evelynne  Search this
Freeman, Felder  Search this
James, Harry, Deacon  Search this
Jasper, John, 1812-1901  Search this
Jones, Absalom, 1746-1818  Search this
Ross, Benjamin  Search this
Turner, Wesley  Search this
Washington, Alonzo, Reverend  Search this
West, Donald  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1 inch)
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
1 Item (film , color interpositive, 16mm)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Documentary films
Place:
United States
Date:
circa 1992
Scope and Contents:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder argues for the importance of documenting and preserving the history of the African American church as explained by church historians, archivists, and curators. The African American church tells the story of African Americans, provides direction and goals for the young, and is the center of African American life. Its history is illustrated through photographs and moving images, which are endangered of being lost and forgotten if preservation measures are not taken. The short documentary also provides an overview of the history of the black church and African American worship from slavery through present day, the role and style of black preachers, black church music and choirs, and clothing worn to religious services.
Short documentary. Part of Climbing Jacob's Ladder Audiovisual Records. AV001152: dated 19920324. AV005160: transferred from VHS, captions burnt into image, dated 1991. AV005350: 16mm Preservation Color Interpositive, no sound, dated 20150317.
Biographical / Historical:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder was based on the Climbing Jacob's Ladder: The Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American Cities, 1740 - 1877 exhibition which explored the growth and central role of African American churches during the 18th- and 19th-centuries in the eastern United States: Boston, Savannah, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and Richmond. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Museum and held there from October 1987 to October 1988.;The African American church provides the spiritual, educational, social, political, and economic center for the African American community. Because the history of the African American church tells the story of African Americans, the church is the largest repository of African American history.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005160

ACMA AV005350
General:
Title transcribed from open credits of video recording.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American history  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Churches  Search this
Church history  Search this
Historic preservation  Search this
Religion  Search this
Preachers  Search this
Church music  Search this
Music  Search this
African American choirs  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Civil rights movements  Search this
Jacob's ladder (Biblical dream)  Search this
African American youth  Search this
Youth  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Documentary films
Citation:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder, Exhibition Records AV03-036, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-036, Item ACMA AV001152
See more items in:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 Exhibition Records
Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 Exhibition Records / Series 3: Audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-036-ref886

Lou Stovall

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Artist Lou Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. He also discusses his ability and passion for drawing.
Short documentary. Audio only [most likely there is related 16mm film which has not been digitized yet]. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dated 19940329.
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Citation:
Lou Stovall, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV000957
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref508

Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Interview with Lou Stovall for documentary in which Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. During the interview, Stovall discusses his ability and passion for drawing, hiding the human figure in landscape compositions, working with stencils and proofing strips, details of the reductive printing process, integration of color in his work, silk screen printing as a technical medium, art intelligence, aesthetics in his work and other artists, where he gets his inspiration, and Sam Gilliam's work and abstract art.
Interview for short documentary titled Lou Stovall. Audio only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003305: audio skips and minimal distortions. Dated 19830627.
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003305-2

ACMA AV003281
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Citation:
Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003305-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref509

Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
10 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Outtakes
Ambient sounds
Sound effects recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Sound rolls for short documentary titled Lou Stovall in which Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. Interviews, narration, ambient sounds, foley sound effects, and demonstration of screen printing process contained on sound rolls. During the interview segments, Stovall discusses his ability and passion for drawing, working with stencils and proofing strips, details of the reductive printing process, mixing and integrating of color in his work, and silk screen printing as a technical medium. Some of the footage, particularly AV003285, AV003287 and AV003288, consists of almost exclusively demonstration [sounds of the screen printing process].
Sound rolls and narration for short documentary titled Lou Stovall. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Audio only. Most likely there is film which syncs with sound rolls, except AV003276 [no camera/image according to statement at beginning of sound roll]. AV003506: Sound Roll 1. AV003288: Sound Roll 2. AV003285: Sound Roll 3. AV003276: Sound Roll 4. AV003313: Sound Roll 5. AV003498: Sound Roll 6. AV003287: Sound Roll 7. AV003303: Sound Roll 8. AV003289: Sound Roll 9. AV003447: Lou Stovall Narration [distortion at beginning of recording]. Dated 19830803 [AV003506], 19830804 [AV003276, AV003285, AV003288, AV003498], 19830805 [AV003287, AV003303], 19830824 [AV003289]. Undated [AV003313, AV003447].
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003285

ACMA AV003287

ACMA AV003288

ACMA AV003289

ACMA AV003303

ACMA AV003313

ACMA AV003447

ACMA AV003498

ACMA AV003506
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Outtakes
Ambient sounds
Sound effects recordings
Citation:
Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003276
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref510

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