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Music and Crafts of the Southeastern United States

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Virtually every area of the South harbors a potter, weaver, toy maker, wood-carver, boatbuilder, calligrapher, ornamental blacksmith, sign painter, or seamstress who has maintained his or her craft in the face of nearly total indifference by the outside world. It is true, certainly, that many southern craftworkers have discarded quilt making, coverlet weaving, and pottery turning as unpleasant reminders of their humble origins. For others, the crafts remain a beloved preoccupation that, like family reunions and music festivals, have grown to symbolize an important component of regional and ethnic identity.

There are few generalizations that can be made about contemporary southern craftworkers as a group. Some are articulate about their work while others are inexpressive. Some practice crafts originally restricted to only one sex and passed from parent to child through an informal apprenticeship while others have not been so constrained. Many find monetary benefit in what they do; a few such as the solitary carver or painter work to some inner purpose largely devoid (until the coming of the folk art collector) of remunerative value. While some folk craftworkers employ modern labor and timesaving techniques, in every case they blend these with the preindustrial technologies of earlier generations. Such technologies, as well as the forms of the objects themselves, are the product of family and regional folk traditions.

The craft component at the 1981 Festival had three subdivisions:

1. a demonstration area where craftworkers were explaining their work; traditional Southeastern music - played, in part, on instruments made by the demonstrators - was also featured;

2. an exhibition of carefully-selected items commissioned specifically for the Festival and reminiscent of forms and styles made by the craftworkers' forebears; these objects were later sold at auction;

3. a general sales tent, planned with the Smithsonian Museum Shops, where an array of traditional crafts made for the Festival were on sale daily.

Secretary S. Dillon Ripley, in commenting on a previous Festival, noted: "The possibility of using a museum that is essentially a historical documentary museum as a theatre of live performance where people actually show that the objects in the cases were made by human hands, and are still being made, practiced on, worked with, is a very valuable asset for our role as a preserver and conservator of living cultural forms." Indeed, many of the objects crafted, exhibited, and sold at the 1981 Festival were very similar to items on view in the Museum. In fact, some of the objects in the permanent collections were purchased from Festival craftworkers in the late 1960s.
Participants:
Participants

David Allen, 1925-, walking stick carver, Homer, Louisiana

Linda Bowers, Seminole jacket maker, Clewiston, Florida

Charles Christian, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lucreaty Clark, 1904-1986, basket maker, Lamont, Florida

Burlon B. Craig, 1914-2002, potter, Vale, North Carolina

Mrs. B. Craig, potter, Vale, North Carolina

Edsel Martin, musical instrument maker, Old Fort, North Carolina

Irene Miller, 1907-, rag rug maker, Oakland, Maryland

Jack McCutcheon, 1923-2001, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lois McCutcheon, 1929-, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lee Willie Nabors, 1916-, chair maker, Oklona, Mississippi

Judd Nelson, 1911-, blacksmith, Sugar Valley, Georgia

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, basket maker, Charenton, Iowa

Donny Tolson, wood carver, Campton, Kentucky

Celestine Turner, 1928-, basket maker, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Southeastern Crafts Exhibition, Exhibitors

Melvin Owens, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Robert Brown, pottery, Arden, North Carolina

Lanier Meaders, pottery, Cleveland, Georgia

Daniel Garner, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Charles Craven, 1944-1997, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Hobart Garner, 1922-1985, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Burlon B. Craig, pottery, Vale, North Carolina

Vernon Owens, 1941-, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Mary Livingston, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

David Farrell, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Wayman Cole, 1905-1987, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Walter Cornelison, pottery, Waco, Kentucky

Dorothy Cole Auman, 1925-1991, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

John Wiltshire, carvings, Coffee County, Indiana

Dicie Malone, corn shuck mat – Knox County, North Carolina

Mrs. Blaine Whitaker, corn shuck bonnet, Henderson County, North Carolina

Fairy Moody, 1907-1994, corn shuck crèche, Ashe County, North Carolina

Dieudonne Montoucet, Cajun triangle, Scott, Louisiana

Napolean Strickland, cane fife, Como, Mississippi

Clifford Glenn, 1935-, banjo & dulcimer, Sugar Grove, North Carolina

Dewey Shepherd, 1906-1996, gourd fiddle, David, Kentucky

Edsel Martin, dulcimer, Old Fort, North Carolina

Albert Hash, 1917-1983, fiddle, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Audrey Hash Miller, 1949-, dulcimer, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Mr. Mabry, wood carvings, Stone County, Arkansas

Willard Watson, wood carvings, Watauga County, North Carolina

Donny Tolson, wood carvings, Campton, Kentucky

David Allen, 1925-, wood carvings, Homer, Iowa

Dallas Bump, furniture, Royal, Arkansas

Charlie Christian, furniture, Mount Judea, Arkansas

Jack McCutcheon, 1923-2001, furniture, Mount Judea, Arkansas

Lee Willie Nabors, 1916-, furniture, Okolona, Mississippi

Bill McClure, furniture, Bloss, Kentucky

Amanda Palmer, baskets, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Susan Peoples, 1898-1986, baskets, Aragon, Georgia

Mildred Youngblood, baskets, Woodbury, Indiana

Eva Wolfe, 1922-, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Carol Welch, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Agnes Welch, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Dolly Taylor, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Geneva Ledford, 1921-1998, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, baskets, Charenton, Louisiana

Lucreaty Clark, 1904-1986, baskets, Lamont, Florida

Edna Langley, baskets, Elton, Louisiana

Earnest Patton, wood carvings, Compton, Kentucky

Louise Jones, baskets, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Floyd Harmon, baskets, Ocean City, Maryland

Goodwin Family Weavers, Blowing Rock, North Carolina

Pecolia Warner, quilt, Yazoo City, Mississippi

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilts, Watauga County, North Carolina

Linda Bowers, Seminole jacket, Clewiston, Florida

Sally Tommie, Seminole jacket, Clewiston, Florida

Philip Simmons, 1912-, metal work, Charleston, South Carolina

Phipps Bourne, metal work, Elk Creek, Virginia

Erwin Thieberger, 1908-1997, metal work, Wheaton, Maryland

James Barnwell, metal work, Henderson County, North Carolina

Pete Howell, 1902-1981, metal work, Yancey County, North Carolina
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1981, Series 7
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1981-ref52

Meeting Minutes

Collection Creator:
Donaldson, Jeff, 1932-2004  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1980
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate access copies requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Jeff Donaldson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Jeff Donaldson papers, 1918-2005, bulk 1960s-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jeff Donaldson papers
Jeff Donaldson papers / Series 7: Professional Files / 7.1: AfriCOBRA
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-donajeff-ref1027
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Meeting Minutes digital asset number 1

Dog Trot House Narrative; Food Preservation; Barre, Miller

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1980 October 10
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1980, Item FP-1980-7RR-0293
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Community Activities and Food Preservation / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1980-ref312
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Dog Trot House Narrative; Food Preservation; Barre, Miller digital asset number 1

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Adkins, Minnie, 1934-  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L., 1936-  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi, 1989-2001  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (4 hr., 33 min.), digital, wav)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 17-30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carolyn Mazloomi conducted 2002 September 17 and 30, by Joanne Cubbs, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in West Chester, Ohio. Mazloomi speaks of growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a family of self-taught artists; the positive influence of her aunt and teacher Dr. Carter; the generation of African-American quilt-makers who followed a gap in quilt-making post-slavery; she describes her previous career as an aeronautical engineer and her transition to quilt-making; how she identifies herself as a craftsperson, not an artist; her experience with Baltimore album and Appalachian quilts; learning to quilt; the Women of Color Quilter's Network and its economic and social development programs; her book, "Spirits of the Cloth"; the positive and negative aspects of travel; the false generalizations of African-American quilts in academic circles; the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity in her work; her connection to "praise songs"; she discusses functional vs. nonfunctional quilts; the market for "hand-crafted" quilts; agents and galleries; she describes her working environment; adopting the use of a sewing machine in her work; the importance of community; her technique; her accomplishment of placing African-American quilts in the Renwick Gallery; the influence of magazines, including "Raw Vision;" her aversion to commissions; expanding her use of materials and technology; her exhibitions; her role as an advocate and dealer; finding inspiration in black and white linocuts and her use of color in quilts; and making a connection with her audience. Mazloomi also recalls Marie Wilson, Cuesta Benberry, Edjohnetta Miller, Roland Freeman, Robert Cargo, Martha Connell, Penny Sisto, Minnie Adkins, Nkosi Johnson, and Lauryn Hill.
Biographical / Historical:
Carolyn Mazloomi (1948- ) is a quilt maker from West Chester, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Self-taught artists  Search this
Topic:
African American quiltmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Album quilts -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Quilts -- Appalachian Region  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mazloo02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mazloo02

Oral history interview with Joyce J. Scott

Interviewee:
Scott, Joyce, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Silberman, Robert B. (Robert Bruce), 1950-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
61 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 July 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce J. Scott conducted 2009 July 22, by Robert Silberman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Scott's home and studio, in Baltimore, Maryland.
Scott talks about her childhood in Baltimore; childhood visits to the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery; her parents' lives growing up in the segregated South; her artist mother, who was her first bead-teacher; craft traditions in her family, including pottery and quilting; quilting as storytelling, "diaries" for preliterate people; improvisational craft; Three Generation Quilt; Fifty .; undergraduate studies at Maryland Institute College of Art; travels after graduation in Mexico, Central , and South America; graduate studies in craft in Mexico; decision at age 23 to become a studio artist, and partnership with her mother; theater work with Robert Sherman and in New York and in Baltimore; theater work with Kay Lawal in Thunder Thigh Revue; studies at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, ME, where she learned traditional Navajo weaving, and learned the peyote stitch for beadwork, a seminal technique for her career; her book Fearless Beadwork: Improvisational Peyote Stitch: handwriting & drawings from hell. Rochester, NY: Visual Studies Workshop, 1994; working in different mediums; What You Mean Jungle Music? [1988]; working for recognition of beadwork as a sculptural medium; politics, social commentary, and humor in her work; series Day after Rape; her working processes; Rodney King's Head Was Squashed Like a Watermelon; working in monoprints; working in glass (flameworking, lampworking), including at Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA, Tacoma [WA] Museum of Glass, UrbanGlass, New York, NY, Haystack Mountain; retrospective exhibition, "Joyce Scott Kickin' It With the Old Masters" at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 2000; series Africa in Unexpected Places; installation work, including in "Images Concealed," San Francisco, 1995, and Believe I've Been Sanctified, Charleston, SC, 1991; small-scale work; influence of her upbringing in the Pentecostal church; Buddha Gives Basketball to the Ghetto [1991] and the importance of spirituality in her work; travels in South America, Africa, and Europe; the complementarity of performance/theater work and visual art; performance pieces: Generic Interference, Genetic Engineering, Virtual Reality, and Walk a Mile in My Drawers; Lips mosaic at Reagan National Airport, Washington, D.C.; teaching workshops at Haystack, Penland School of Crafts, Penland, NC, the Oregon School of Arts and Craft, Portland; artist-in-residency at Pilchuck; gallery affiliations, and usefulness of the gallery system, which allows her to work as a studio artist; the importance of galleries as a free venue open to ordinary people; luxuriating in beauty. She recalls Betty Woodman, Dr. Leslie King-Hammond, Lowery Sims, Fritz Dreisbach, Anthony Corradetti, Antony Gormley, Ann Hamilton, David Hammons, Mary Jane Jacob, Cesar Pelli, Susan Cummins, and Helen Drutt English.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce J. Scott (1948- ) is a visual and performance artist and educator who lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 memory cards. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Performance artists -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.scott09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-scott09

Oral history interview with Art Green

Interviewee:
Green, Art, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Silverman, Lanny  Search this
Names:
Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project  Search this
Chicago's Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (sound files (3 hrs., 36 min.), digital, wav)
102 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2015 September 17-18
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Art Green conducted 2015 September 17-18, by Lanny Silverman, for the Archives of American Art's Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project at Green's home in Stratford, Ontario, Canada.
Green speaks of growing up in Frankfurt, Indiana; his parents; quilt making and engineering; Necker cubes; early art pursuits; early art education; Fort Wayne Museum of Art; Chicago; Found Titles; Hairy Who; drawing and painting courses; Art Institute of Chicago; silk screening; art school and interests; Chicago imagists; Surrealism; Don Baum; Animal, Vegetable, Mineral; transfers and technique; response to art work; deciding to be an artist; New York; Art Forum; Pop Art; first shows; early influences; abstraction; looking at art; ideal viewer; Nova Scotia; teaching; Canada; signs and ice cream cones; inspiration; painting process; engineering; bridges; politics; Secretary McNamara; color; flames; inspiration; books and magazines; Ray Johnson; puzzles and discovery; Art Expo; the art world; use of technology; patterns; knots; making a living as an artist; self-portraits; and new work. Green also recalls Douglas Craft, Elizabeth Ruprecht, Whitney Halstead, Ray Yoshida, Carolyn Hoyle, George Cohen, Ted Halkin, June Leaf, Robert Frank, Bill Grams, Karl Wirsum, Jim Nutt, Murray Simon, Cynthia Carlson, Bill Schwedler, Marjorie Dell, Roger Brown, Vera Berdich, Thomas Kapsalis, Mogen David, Bill Conger, Evelyn Statsinger, Gary Kennedy, Paul Weighardt, Jim Falconer, Matthew Marks, Phyllis Kind, and Allen Frumkin Gallery.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Art Green (1941- ) is an painter and educator in Stratford, Ontario, Canada. Interviewer Lanny Silverman (1947- ) is a curator at the Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, Illinois.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire audio recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Educators -- Canada  Search this
Painters -- Canada  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.green15
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-green15

Writings and Notes

Collection Creator:
Kienbusch, William, 1914-1980  Search this
Extent:
(Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1940s-1970s
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains three of Kienbusch's notebooks from early 1940s, including one containing notes on casein wax technique. All notebooks include notes, drawings, and diagrams. Also found are various handwritten notes and lists on scraps of paper, notes and slide list for a lecture at the Portland Museum of Art, and notes and quilting diagrams from Kienbusch's interview of Doris Sanborn.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The William Kienbusch papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
William Kienbusch papers, 1915-2001, bulk 1936-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kienwill, Series 3
See more items in:
William Kienbusch papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kienwill-ref63

Eve Peri papers

Creator:
Peri, Eve, 1897-1966  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1996, bulk 1939-1966
Summary:
The papers of painter and embroidery artist Eve Peri measure 0.6 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1996 with the bulk of materials dating from 1939 to 1966. The papers are scattered and include biographical materials, travel documents, correspondence, financial records, printed material, designs for embroidered clothing, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and embroidery artist Eve Peri measure 0.6 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1996 with the bulk of materials dating from 1939 to 1966. The papers are scattered and include biographical materials, travel documents, correspondence, financial records, printed material, designs for embroidered clothing, and photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series.

Series 1: Eve Peri papers, circa 1900-1996 (0.6 linear feet; Box 1, OV2-3)
Biographical / Historical:
Eve Peri (1897-1966) was a collagist, embroiderer, and painter active in New York City, New York.

Eve Peri was born in Bangor, Maine in 1897. From her mother and aunts, Peri learned traditional quilting and embroidery techniques. A largely self-trained artist, she used her skills to design clothing, tapestry, and collages and also painted. She collaborated with her husband Alfonso Umana Mendez, a designer for Fred Leighton, designing women's embroidered clothing. After divorcing in 1939, she traveled around Europe and began to exhibit her works.

Peri moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania late in life and opened a gallery in New Hope to show her works. She died in 1966.
Provenance:
The Eve Peri papers were donated by Elizabeth Bullock and Judith Stein, executor and curator of the estate in 2001.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Women artists -- United States  Search this
Fiber artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Embroidery  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Eve Peri papers, circa 1900-1996, bulk 1939-1966. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.perieve
See more items in:
Eve Peri papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-perieve

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Faculty  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Students  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce Marquess Carey conducted 2002 June 16, by Glenn Adamson, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Carey's home, in Madison, Wisconsin.
Carey speaks of growing up in Redding, California; her widowed mother working to support Carey and herself; her "lonesome" childhood and her eagerness to leave Redding to attend the University of California at Berkeley; majoring in English; meeting her husband Harlan (Mark) Marquess in her senior year at Berkeley and marrying him; dropping out of college; regretting her marriage; her life as a housewife and mother in the late 1950s and 1960s; moving to Madison, Wisconsin, for her husband's job as a Russian teacher; taking weaving classes with Larry Edman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and meeting fiber artist Claire Zeisler on a field trip to Chicago. Carey discusses experimentation in her work and "stretching the limits of the technique" in Edman's class; receiving her undergraduate degree in textile arts in 1971; working with a computer-driven Dobby Loom; studying with Ruth Gao and Jim Peters at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for her MFA in the early 1970s; teaching weaving at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a focus on technical and design skills; writing articles on the technical aspects of fiber art for "Fiber Arts," "Weaver's Journal," "Shuttle, Spindle, & Dye Pot," and other periodicals; exhibiting with the Wisconsin Designer Craftsmen in the 1970s; participating in the Quilt National Show in 1979; receiving a five-year development grant from the University of Wisconsin and quitting her teaching job; using "systematic" weaving methods in quilting; her involvement with galleries such as the Connell/Great American Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia; working with art consultants; the difference between private and corporate commissions; her use of bright colors and various fabrics; her use of tools and technology including an industrial sewing machine and computer programs such as Photoshop; her second marriage to Phil Carey in 1980 after her divorce to Marquess in the mid-1970s; and the "ephemeral" qualities in art. She considers herself a "collager," assembling fabrics and "embellishments." She also discusses her involvement with the Studio Art Quilt Associates and in the Art Quilt Network; and her piece, "Blue Ribbon," in the collection of the American Craft Museum. Carey recalls Camille Cook, Lia Cook, Martha Connell, Hillary Fletcher, Ted Hallman, Pat Mansfield, Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Yvonne Porcella, [Laurence] Rathsack, Victor Vasarely, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce Marquess Carey (1936- ) is a quilt maker from Madison, Wisconsin. Glenn Adamson is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Quilting -- Design  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Weaving -- Study and teaching  Search this
Weaving -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carey02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carey02

Oral history interview with Nancy Crow

Creator:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Interviewer:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Names:
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
Snyderman Gallery  Search this
Extent:
50 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2002 December 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Crow conducted 2002 December 18, by Jean Robertson, for the Archives of American Art, at her home and studio, in Baltimore, Ohio, as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Crow speaks of her early childhood and her father's high standards; her early interest in color; her studies at Ohio State University and her first ceramics professor Edgar Littlefield; joining the textile guild in Athens, Ohio; how her quilting evolved from traditional to contemporary and abstract forms; her practice of working on several quilts simultaneously; the influence of Anna Williams, a quiltmaker in Baton Rouge, Alabama; and she describes her studio. Crow also discusses her association with the Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia; a trip to China that resulted in the series Chinese Souls; and how beauty is her ultimate goal. She talks about her travels to Mexico and South Africa; her technical mastery of strip piecing; working at home while raising two sons; the dyeing process; her sketchbooks; her long-term working relationship with hand quilter, Marla Hattabaugh; teaching at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts; the beginnings of the Quilt National Show at the Dairy Barn; the Ohio Arts Council; the Art Quilt Network; periodicals including FiberArts, Surface Design, Hali, and Raw Vision; two seminal exhibitions in her career, "Nancy Crow: Work in Transition," at the American Craft Museum, 1993, and "Nancy Crow -- Improvisational Quilts," at the Renwick Gallery, 1995; and the changing market for quilts in America. She recalls Bruce Hoffman, Rick and Ruth Snyderman, Jan Myers-Newberry, Rosalie Gascoigne, Sandra Blaine, Vivian Harvey; Linda Fowler, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Crow (1943- ) is a fiber artist and quiltmaker in Baltimore, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 31 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Researchers note: A separate 1988 interview of Crow, also conducted by Robertson is also available.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Dyes and dyeing -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crow02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crow02

Jean Robertson interview with Nancy Crow

Creator:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Interviewee:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
14 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1988 Aug. 17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Crow conducted by Jean Robertson, Aug.17, 1988, as a part of Robertson's research for the book, "Nancy Crow: Quilts and Influences" by Nancy Crow and Jean Robertson, Collector Books, Dec. 1989. Crow speaks about her childhood and early artistic aspirations; her dissatisfaction with her first quilts in the early 1970s; traditional quiltmaking; her work in tapestry weaving; meeting Francoise Barnes and Virginia Randles and learning to quilt; the difference between the weaving and quilting process; working in series; her interest in Mexican folk art and African American quilts; living on an isolated farm and drawing inspiration from nature; her use of titles, colors, patterns, scale, and fabrics; the importance of her training in ceramics; and she compares her work to quilts by Michael James.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Crow (1943-) is a quiltmaker from Baltimore, Ohio. Interviewer Jean Robertson is an art critic and curator from Indianapolis, Ind.
Provenance:
Donated 2003 by Jean Robertson as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America. Researchers note: A separate 2002 interview of Crow, also conducted by Robertson and a part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America is also available.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.robejean
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-robejean

Joyce Marquess Carey textile samples

Creator:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Extent:
2 Items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
2002
Scope and Contents:
2 samples of Carey's quilting technique from her "Glad Rag" series, 2002.
Biographical / Historical:
Quiltmaker; Madison, Wis.; b. 1936.
Provenance:
Donated 2002 by Joyce Marquess Carey.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.carejoyc
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carejoyc

Robbie Fanning Sewing Arts Collection

Creator:
Fanning, Robbie  Search this
Extent:
5 Cubic feet (13 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Publications
Trade catalogs
Correspondence
Pamphlets
Newsletters
Manuals
Photographs
Periodicals
Videocassettes
Date:
1903-2002
bulk 1993-2002
Summary:
The collection documents materials gathered by Robbie Fanning, publisher of sewing related books and newsletters and includes the history of major sewing machine brands, machine accessories, machine embroidery, machine needles, thread, binding, interfacing, and other sewing notions.
Scope and Contents:
Archival materials on the subject of sewing and sewing machines, including correspondence, Fanning's subject files, photographs, newsletters, product manuals, catalogs, trade literature, articles, reprints, sewing periodicals, and VHS videos.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Robbie Fanning (b. 1947-) of Menlo Park, California, a former journalism teacher, she started a publishing company called Open Chain Publishing, specializing in sewing books. She published a quarterly newsletter called The Creative Machine aimed at helping the sewing hobbyist learn new sewing techniques, review sewing equipment and products, and pose questions to the sewing industry. The newsletter ceased publication in 2002. The collection as a whole depicts the shift from sewing as a necessity to clothe a family or save money to sewing as a creative outlet for women and men with leisure time.
Related Materials:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries

Books related to sewing and books authored by Robbie Fanning.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center in 2008 by Robbie Fanning.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Machine quilting  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Sewing machines  Search this
Sewing  Search this
Quilting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Publications
Trade catalogs
Correspondence -- 2000-2010
Pamphlets
Newsletters
Manuals
Correspondence -- 20th century
Photographs -- 2000-2010
Photographs -- 1980-2000
Periodicals
Videocassettes
Citation:
Robbie Fanning Sewing Arts Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1139
See more items in:
Robbie Fanning Sewing Arts Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1139

Interview with Tisha Thorne

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Tisha Thorne, founder and coordinator of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, talks about her techniques as a fabric media artist, when and how she started sewing, and teaching herself to sew when she was a teenager. She also talks about her involvement in the community, teaching and working with children and senior citizens, and her book projects. Thorne explains what creativity means to her, sources of inspiration, and her creative style and creative process. Thorne talks about the origin and goals of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, how the guild is involved in the community, and the diversity of the guild's membership. Footage of artwork - quilts, clothing, fashion accessories, and other mixed media fabric art - follows the interview.
Interview. Dated 20110425.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Tisha Thorne, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005234
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref87

Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Textiles  Search this
Extent:
1.5 cu. ft. (1 record storage box) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1947-1982
Descriptive Entry:
For the most part, this record unit documents curatorial and staff activities of the Division of Textiles after the creation of the Museum of History and Technology in 1957; however, some records also date from the time the Division was a Section of the Division of Crafts and Industries in the United States National Museum.

These records consist of inquiries from private collectors, textile corporations, universities, and historical societies pertaining to collections of the Division; copies of curatorial responses to public inquiries; budgetary information; accession lists; correspondence referring to identification of textile specimens, their preservation needs, and tours of the Textile Hall; and curatorial reports.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution established a Section of Foods and Textiles as a part of the United States National Museum (USNM) in 1883. Romyn Hitchcock, an experienced microscopist and chemist, was selected as Curator of Textiles and also acted as Assistant Curator along with Honorary Curator W. O. Atwater in the analysis of food products. Many of the textile specimens assigned to Hitchcock were acquired at the close of the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. The Section was renamed the Section of Textiles shortly before its demise in 1890. In 1912, the Division of Textiles was re-established, reporting to the Assistant Secretary in charge of USNM. Frederick L. Lewton became Curator of the Division. From 1916, Lewton was also responsible for medical collections, and between 1931 and 1938 the collections were administered jointly by a single Division of Textiles and Medicine. In the latter year textiles became a Section within the newly established Division of Crafts and Industries, of which Lewton served as Curator through 1946. Textiles was reestablished as a division in 1957 and was moved among many different departments until its affiliation with the Department of Social and Cultural History in 1981. For an account of these administrative changes, see the introduction to the Department of the History of Science and Technology, whose antecedent departments oversaw the Division prior to 1980.

The principal function of the Division of Textiles is to document the historical, cultural, and economic development of American textile fabrics, implements, and machinery since the seventeenth century. In addition to American technical progress in the production of textiles, work of the Division focused on the earliest methods of textile making throughout the world. Research interests of the Division and its predecessors included tapestry, weaving, household and costume textiles, woolen goods, silks, sewing threads, hand spinning-wheels, sewing machines, patent models, textile techniques from fiber to fabric, fiber identification, dyes, quilts, and other needlework. The Division staff also has developed exhibitions, presented lectures on the history of textile manufacturing, published catalogs, and collected and conserved objects.

Staff of the Division included Rita J. Adrosko, Associate Curator, 1963-1970, and Curator, 1971- ; Grace Rogers Cooper, Assistant Curator, 1949-1956, Associate Curator, 1957, and Curator, 1958-1976; Gary B. Kulik, Assistant Curator, 1979-1981, and Associate Curator, 1982; William N. Watkins, Curator, 1947-1957; Milton Eisler, Conservator, 1960-1963; Maureen Collins McHugh, Conservator, 1963-1970; Katherine Dirks, museum technician, 1971-1980, and Conservator, 1981- ; Doris M. Bowman, needlework and lace specialist, 1960- ; Lois Vann, museum specialist, 1961- ; and Barbara Suit Janssen, museum specialist, 1975- .
Topic:
Museum curators  Search this
Textile machinery  Search this
Textile fabrics  Search this
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 472, National Museum of American History. Division of Textiles, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 472
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0472

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding the AIDS Memorial Quilt

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Presenters:
James Deutsch, Guy Hemrick, Brian Holman, Anthony Knight, Nadine Licostie, Marsha MacDowell, Katherine Ott, Julie Rhoad, Mike Smith, Jeff Stott, Nomvula Mashoai-Cook, David Gere, Annie Groeber, Jada Harris, Teresa Hollingsworth, Linda Rethman
Introduction:
The year 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and 30 years of life with AIDS. With the introduction of The Quilt in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation redefined the tradition of quilt making in response to contemporary circumstances. Through hands-on panel-making activities, individuals and communities have come together to remember loved ones, grieve, find support and strength, and engage in dialogues for change.

In 2012, The Quilt contained nearly 48,000 panels, and it had been viewed by more than 18 million people. It is much more than pieced-together fabric squares: it is a moving and monumental creative collaboration; it is a catalyst to remember, understand, educate, and act.

The 2012 Festival program featured the remarkable artistry, inspiration, and impact of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and provided the public with an unparalleled opportunity to experience this highly charged symbol of the AIDS crisis and the largest community art project in the world. It was the first Festival program to focus exclusively on community craft and performance directly developed in response to crisis and grief. With The AIDS Memorial Quilt as the anchor and through craft demonstrations, dance and musical performances, interactive discussions, and other activities, this program commemorated the innovative and resourceful ways through which communities have endeavored to educate people and to cope with one of the most complex pandemics in modern history.

The Festival brought together approximately 100 visual artists, designers, quilters, dancers, musicians, community activists, and others who shared the knowledge and creativity that shape their efforts to disseminate the message of the AIDS crisis. Quilt panel-making groups demonstrated and taught a variety of traditional quilting techniques. Volunteers and staff from The NAMES Project Foundation performed the rituals surrounding new panels and Quilt displays. The program also featured other artistic responses to the AIDS crisis from the United States and South Africa, and presented moderated conversations with project contributors, community leaders, and pioneers. Festival venues served as sites for sharing and documenting visitors' personal stories and creative expressions related to living in the age of HIV and AIDS.

Visitors of all ages had the opportunity to learn quilting techniques, make panels, and share stories from their own experiences. Sections of The Quilt were displayed throughout the Festival site, incorporated into the various demonstration and performance venues, and laid out on the National Mall - reinforcing The Quilt's size, visual impact, and the scale and diversity of people impacted by HIV and AIDS.

Arlene Reiniger was Curator and Anna Kaplan was Program Coordinator. The NAMES Project Foundation team included: Julie Rhoad, Jim Marks, Roddy Williams, Gert McMullin, Jada Harris, Chili Crane, Brian Holman, and Ritchie Crownfield.

Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding The AIDS Memorial Quilt program at the 2012 Festival was a partnership between the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and The NAMES Project Foundation, with the support and participation of many others.
Participants:
Hilary Anderson

David H. Bell, 1949-, writer and director, The NAMES Performers, Evanston, Illinois

Tom Berklund

Michael Berresse

Leigh Blake

Mary Bowman, 1988-, spoken word artist, Suitland, Maryland

J.T. Bullock, 1980-, spoken word artist, Silver Spring, Maryland

Reginald Cabico, 1970-, spoken word artist, Washington, D.C.

Jostina Nomvula Mashoai-Cook, 1952-, Observatory-Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

William R. Crownfield, Jr., 1959-, Atlanta, Georgia

Ryan Garson, 1991-, La Crosse, Wisconsin

Dan Green

Annie Groeber, New York, New York

Addison Heimann

Alex Hills

Teresa Hollingsworth, 1968-, Atlanta, Georgia

Terry Hooks

Stephen Keen, 1956-, DJ, Berkeley, California

Dwayne Lawson-Brown, spoken word artist, Community Outreach Coordinator for Metro Teen AIDS, Washington, D.C.

Cindi Love

Dale MacDonald, 1958-, Palo Alto, California

Kathleen Mead

Sherry Moore, 1956-, Desert Hot Springs, California

Richard Moultrie

Kelly Pochop

Vivian Pochop

Linda Rethman, 1958-, Berea, Durban, South Africa

Kelly Rivera Hart, San Francisco, California

Lili Romero De Simone

Molly Smith

Sonya Renee, 1976-, spoken word artist, Baltimore, Maryland

The NAMES Performers, Performance Group A – Green -- The NAMES Performers, Performance Group A – GreenGeoffrey Button, 1976-, Evanston, IllinoisRobert Deason, 1984-, Chicago, IllinoisJessica Paige Kahkoska, 1991-, Evanston, IllinoisNathaniel Lewellyn, 1988-, Milwaukee, WisconsinPatrick Martin, 1977-, Chicago, IllinoisBrad Raymond, 1977-, Newnan, GeorgiaBethany Thomas, 1982-, Chicago, Illinois

The NAMES Performers, Performance Group B - Blue -- The NAMES Performers, Performance Group B - BlueBrian J. Bohr, 1990-, Wheaton, IllinoisCarly Cantor, 1990-, Cincinnati, OhioEvelyn Jacoby, 1990-, Maplewood, New JerseyEmily Maltby, 1990-, New York, New YorkJevares Myrick, 1985-, Powder Springs, GeorgiaLatrice Ann Pace, 1978-, Atlanta, GeorgiaPatrick Sulken, 1990-, Evanston, Illinois

The NAMES Project Foundation -- The NAMES Project FoundationCleve Edward Jones, 1954-, AIDS Memorial Quilt founder, San Francisco, CaliforniaMike Smith, The NAMES Project Foundation co-founder, San Francisco, CaliforniaJulie Rhoad, 1960-, Atlanta, GeorgiaJada Harris, 1966-, Atlanta, GeorgiaJames Marks, Jr., 1957-, Atlanta, Georgia

Digital Component -- Digital ComponentRosemary Comella, 1961-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaTisha Dejmanee, 1985-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaBrittany Farr, 1988-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaBridgette Kidd, 1967-, Los Angeles, California

Quilt Display -- Quilt DisplayKevin Crane, 1974-, warehouse manager, Avondale Estates, GeorgiaBradford James Gammell, 1962-, chapter program coordinator, quilt display co-manager, Wilton Manors, FloridaDeneice Garland, 1961-, display assistant, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Bowie, MarylandSheila Hamilton, 1970-, display assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaKelly Hart, 1959-, display assistant, San Francisco, CaliforniaJoan Juster, 1953-, reader coordinator, San Francisco, CaliforniaWilfred Roczkos, panel maker, display assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaSherman R. Williams, 1972-, project manager, Atlanta, Georgia

2362 Market Street -- 2362 Market StreetPhillip Andrew Cockrell, Jr., 1960-, panel-making assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaKarl Burten Gustafson, 1958-, panel-making assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaRaymond Slater Kinlock, III, 1949-, panel maker, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Solebury, PennsylvaniaJon Lopez, 1957-, panel maker, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Palm Springs, CaliforniaRick McCormack, 1956-, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Springfield, MissouriCindy Ann McMullin, 1955-, quilt production manager, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaAudrey Muldoon, 1952-, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Peachtree City, GeorgiaLawrence Pellino, 1952-, panel maker, Avondale Estates, Georgia

Common Threads -- Common ThreadsNokuphiwa Caroline Gedze, 1981-, embroiderer, Peddie, South AfricaDavid Gere, 1957-, co-curator, The A.R.T. Show, Los Angeles, CaliforniaUnathi Bulelwa Mtshemla-Meslane, 1974-, Keiskamma Trust, Peddie, South AfricaBeauty Ndlovu, 1960-, beaded doll maker, Cato Ridge, South AfricaLobolile Bhekiswephi Ximba, 1953-, beaded doll maker, Muden, South Africa

Healing Arts -- Healing ArtsTeena Cahill-Dyer, 1946-, director of Wisdom and Beyond LLC, Princeton, New JerseyOsayi Endolyn, 1982-, storyteller, writer, Atlanta, GeorgiaNondumiso Hlwele, 1974-, artist, activist, Cape Town, South AfricaWilliam F. Howard, 1953-, photographer, Atlanta, GeorgiaValerie Knight, 1952-, expressive arts psychologist, New York, New YorkDouglas Lothes, 1958-, spoken word artist, Palm Springs, CaliforniaSydney March, 1954-, writing workshop facilitator, Washington, D.C.Jane Solomon, 1963-, body map facilitator, Cape Town, South Africa

Quilting Bee -- Quilting BeeJada Harris, project manager, Atlanta, GeorgiaMarquetta Bell-Johnson, 1955-, panel-making facilitator, Stone Mountain, Georgia Shannon Brogdon-Grantham, 1987-, material culture specialist, Bowie, MarylandRasheeda Parada Burston, 1953-, teaching artist, call my name facilitator, Atlanta, GeorgiaClarissa Christine Crabtree, panel maker, display and workshop coordinator, Glendale, New YorkDonita Lanette Daniels, 1955-, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaOnifa Funke Adesanya-Awoyade, 1964-, ritual performer, Seattle, WashingtonSonja Jackson, 1962-, panel maker, Clarkston, GeorgiaShelia Jones, 1957-, panel maker, Decatur, GeorgiaStephanie Laster, 1962-, panel maker, East Point, GeorgiaChristopher Locklear, 1969-, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaKaren Meredith, 1947-, panel maker, Manahawkin, New JerseyAma Saran, 1948-, ritual specialist, Washington, D.C.Juanita Williams, 1956-, panel maker, Orangeburg, South Carolina

Remember Their Names -- Remember Their NamesDarin Arrowood, Atlanta, GeorgiaAnne Balsamo, Los Angeles, California

In Process… -- In Process…Adwoa Agyeman, Washington, D.C.Vanessa Crosson, 1953-, Upper Marlboro, MarylandPamela Rogers, 1942-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Rock Creek Singers -- Rock Creek SingersGiuseppe DeBartolo, 1976-, Washington, D.C.Robert Dragoset, Germantown, MarylandAndrew Harmon, 1973-, Washington, D.C.Kyle Holland, 1980-, Hanover, MarylandGeorge Huffman, 1958-, Washington, D.C.David Jonas, 1966-, Washington, D.C.John Jowers, 1980-, Hyattsville, MarylandJack Reiffer, 1944-, Washington, D.C.Lyn Van Noy, 1954-, Arlington, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2012, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2012-ref32

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Based on research in the rich and dynamic living culture of the border, the Borderlands Festival program of 1993 was designed to provide a glimpse of the border - its histories, its diverse communities, local and regional identities, and its music, arts, crafts, healing practices, foodways, and narrative. The program was about community-based culture. It presented cultural practices found on the border and cultural expressions about the border, and it explored cultural patterns that were created by the border. It also addressed the cultural heritage, adaptability, and creativity of Native Americans and of the Mexican, Hispanic American, Anglo, and other immigrant communities that have played a part in creating the life that surrounds the Mexico-U.S. border - those who maintain it, those who cross it, those who are left behind, and those who dwell in the border region. The program explored the processes through which such groups create, adapt, and preserve culture to meet the challenges of life on the border. It sought to present and understand community codes of behavior that evolved on the border including confrontation, evasion, violence, and romance, especially as these have been transformed into narrative and other forms of artistic expression.

Music performances at the Festival included emergent forms such as the conjunto, which grew out of the interaction between different cultural communities; older forms, such as the corrido, which has been used to preserve a historical vision in the defense of disputed territory; and adapted forms such as the string band music now incorporated into the traditional repertoire of the Tohono O'odham Native American communities. Also featured in the program were five muralists, whose work reflects the traditions of Mexican cholo and United States Chicano muralism. Murals continue to be touchstones of common historical experiences, archaeologies of sociocultural movements, and powerful statements of identity, ethical principles, and community aspirations. The unique fusion of border aesthetics and handcrafted technology was embodied for Festival visitors in lowriders - distinctively customized automobiles. These lowslung, hopping cars complemented the iconography of murals as statements of cultural identity.

Vaqueros of south Texas demonstrated their skills, crafts, and foodways associated with their cowboy tradition, which dates back to the Spanish colonial era. A fisherman from the port of Brownsville demonstrated shrimping techniques. A Laredo blacksmith forged stirrups, belt buckles, and other implements of vaquero life, along with a number of traditional and contemporary decorative objects. A ropemaker demonstrated the use of the local fiber called lechuguilla (a fibrous plant of the agave family). While fine craft traditions like guitar- and furniture-making are not specific to the border, craftspeople have incorporated motifs and instruments native to the region, like the bajo sexto guitar. Other occupational groups characteristic of the border environment included federal Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agents who regulate movement across the border; coyotes and polleros, who help migrants evade immigration regulations; and workers in maquiladora assembly line industried. Narrative sessions focused on the culture of craft and occupation in the context of the border.

Artisans also demonstrated crafts used in the home and for special celebrations, including quilt-making, flower- and piñata-making, candlemaking, and reverse-painted glass. Participants prepared regional specialties, traditional foods served for fiestas, and offered a sampling of typical vaquero outdoor cooking. Finally, the Festival presented members of the Mixteco Indian community in Tijuana, a recent migrant group, which preserves its cultural identity and contributes to the economy at the border by maintaining ties with other Mixteco communities in Oaxaca and California.

The United States-Mexico border has had a profound effect on the lives of millions of people. The then-pending NAFTA free trade agreement was only the latest in a long line of international socioeconomic arrangements with wide ranging local impacts. Critical attention in Mexico and the U.S. had increasingly focused on the historical consciousness created in this borderland and on its expression in traditional and other forms of art. Recognition of the vitality and value of borderland culture was growing in 1993 at the margins, among borderland populations, as well as in the centers of power and opinion in both countries. Scholars and political leaders increasingly realized that the cultural encounters, syntheses, and resistances characteristic of border life signaled similar cultural developments in the larger societies. This intensifying concern and scrutiny centered on the margin, but could it reduce the marginality in human rights, social dignity, and economic opportunity at the border? Festival organizers hoped that listening to community voices of the border from the Mexican and United States sides could better inform our thinking and decision-making.

Olivia Cadaval served as Program Curator, with Peter Seitel as Research Advisor; Héctor Antonío Corporán was Program Coordinator and Betty Belanus was Presentation Coordinator.

Collaborating institutions included Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universid Autónoma de Nuevo León; Consejo Nacional para las Culturas y las Artes – El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras; El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF); El Paso-Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Embajada de México en Washington, D.C.; John E. Conner Museum, Texas A & I University; Institute of Texan Cultures; Instituto Cultural de México; Instituto de Bellaas Artes del Estado de Baja California; Instituto Nacional Indigenista; Instituto Mexicano de Cultura, San Antonio; Laredo State University; Mexican Cultural Institute; Museo Regional de la Universidad Autónoma de Baja California en Mexicali; National Museum of the American Indian; New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Pimería Alta Historical Society, Arizona; Texas A & I University; Texas Folklife Resources; Tumacácori National Historical Park, Arizona; University of Arizona Library's Southwest Folklore Center; University of Arizona – Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; University of Texas – Brownsville; University of Texas, Center for Mexican-American Studies; University of Texas – Pan American; and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.

United States-Mexico Borderlands was made possible with the support and collaboration of the Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes - El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Texas Commission on the Arts, Cerveza Tecate - Imported Beer, Texas Folklife Resources, University of Arizona Library's Western Folklore Center, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Léon - Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Gubierno de Nuevo Léon, Mexican Cultural Institute, and the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
María Eugenia de la O, Enrique Madrid, Angel Norzagaray Norzagaray, Manuel Peña, Kathy Raglan, Michael James Ritchie, Suzie Reyes, Irene Vásquez Valle, Kathy Vargas, Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela
Presenters and fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Norma Cantú, Jessica Chapin, Andrew Connors, Maricela González Felix, Mary Lou Gortárez, Everardo Garduño, James S. Griffith, Celso Garza Guajardo, Ian F. Hancock, Pat Jasper, Enrique Lamadrid, Laura Larco, Francisco Javier Moreno, Daniel Sheehy, Emily Socolov, Michael C. Stone; José Manuel Valenzuela Arce, Meynardo Vásquez, Laura Velasco Ortíz, Thomas Vennum, Jr., Cynthia Vidaurri
Participants:
Tijuana, Baja California

Olga Lidia Cortés, Mixteca, hat and basket maker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Guadalupe Isabel Flores de Estrada, 1939-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Juvencio Extrada Maceda, 1936-, Mixteco, storyteller, oral historian, candlemaker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Gloria López López, Mixteca, vendor, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Elia Ilda Maceda Flores, 1971-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Ofelia Santos López, Mixteca, vendor, oral historian, hat and basket maker, altar maker, cook, weaver, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Francisco Paulino Sierra Cruz, 1955-, Mixteca, schoolteacher, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Cathedral City, California

Carmen Moreno, guitarist, singer, Cathedral City, California

Santa Catarina, Baja California

Benito Peralta González, Paipai, storyteller, oral historian, Santa Catarina, Baja California, Mexico

Tecate, Baja California

José Luis Lee Sandoval, furniture maker, Tecate, Baja California, Mexico

Mexicali, Baja California

Taller Universitario de Teatro -- Taller Universitario de TeatroAngel Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1961-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoHeriberto B. Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1959-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoLoreto Ramón Tamayo Rosas, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAlejandra Rioseco de la Pena, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAndrés García Moreno, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoPedro Gabriel González Castro, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

San Simon Village, Arizona

Tohono O'odham String Band -- Tohono O'odham String BandBlaine W. Juan, 1936-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaJoseph Alonzo García, 1924-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaFrank N. Pedro, 1928-, guitar, San Simon Village, ArizonaVictor Augustine García, 1922-, violin, San Simon Village, ArizonaNacho J. Feleys, 1909-1994, snare drum, San Simon Village, ArizonaMike L. Francisco, 1926-, bass drum, dancer, San Simon Village, Arizona

Lupe Lopez, 1927-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Marie Leon, 1930-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Nogales, Sonora

Maria Gloria Moroyoqui de Roques, 1930-, Yaqui cook, piñata and flower maker, herbalist, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

Imuris, Sonora

Anastasio Léon, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Francisco Silva, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Magdalena, Sonora

Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela, regional historian, Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico

Tumacácori, Arizona

María Rodríguez, 1912-2001, tortilla maker, flower maker, cook, Tumacácori, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

Reynaldo B. Hernandez, INS border patrol, storyteller, Tucson, Arizona

Arturo Carrillo Strong, 1930-, author, oral historian, Tucson, Arizona

Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño Band -- Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño BandJesús Juan Yucupicio, 1965-, electric bass, Tucson, ArizonaAlbert M. Yucupicio, 1954-, accordion, Tucson, ArizonaAngel M. Yucupicio, 1966-, drums, Tucson, ArizonaPeter S. Yucupicio, 1957-, bajo sexto, Tucson, Arizona

Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

Brigada por La Paz -- Brigada por La PazAlonso Encina Herrera, 1968-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoJesús Alberto "Pee Wee" Rodriguez Medina, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoGustavo "Sleepy" Grado Tiscareño, 1973-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoMiguel Angel "El Tandy" Sandoval Lira, 1971-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Oscar Ramírez, 1944-, guitar maker, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Los Alegres del Norte, norteño band -- Los Alegres del Norte, norteño bandJosé Flores Cordova, accordion, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoDiego Hidalgo Alvarez, 1944-, bajo sexto, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoEmilio Chaírez Muñoz, tololoche, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

El Paso, Texas

Agustín Castillo, 1950-, woodcarver, furniture maker, El Paso, Texas

Carlos Callejo, Chicano muralist, El Paso, Texas

Romulo Frías, lowrider, El Paso, Texas

El Divisidero, Chihuahua

Guadalupe Carrasco Leyva, 1923-, quilter, cook, El Divisidero, Chihuahua, Mexico

Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua

Baltazar Rodríguez Puentes, 1942-, ranching crafts, Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua, Mexico

Lajitas, Texas

Adolfo O. Rodríguez, 1971-, ranching crafts, Lajitas, Texas

Presidio, Texas

Richard Mark Bernholz, 1954-, INS border patrol, storyteller, Presidio, Texas

Nacimiento, Chihuahua

Gertrude Factor Vásquez, 1921-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Alice Fay Lozano, 1916-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Del Rio, Texas

Ethel I. Warrior, 1919-, oral historian, cook, Del Rio, Texas

William F. Warrior, 1927-, oral historian, storyteller, Del Rio, Texas

Laredo, Texas

Armando Flores, 1953-, blacksmith, Laredo, Texas

María Paredes de Solís, 1923-, quilter, Laredo, Texas

Monterrey, Mexico

El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño Band -- El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño BandMiguel "El Gorrión" Luna Franco, 1948-, drums, composer, vocals, Monterrey, MexicoMoisés García, guitar, Monterrey, Mexico

Hebbronville, Texas

Omar Galván, 1920-1999, vaquero, rope maker, cook, storyteller, Hebbronville, Texas

Kingsville, Texas

Joe O. Mendietta, 1961-, vaquero, horsehair braider, Kingsville, Texas

San Diego, Texas

Canuto Soliz, 1924-2006, vaquero, leatherworker, storyteller, guitarist, San Diego, Texas

Elsa, Texas

Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto Band -- Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto BandAntonio V. Layton, 1946-, guitar, vocals, Elsa, TexasRené Layton, drums, Elsa, TexasNorfilia Layton González, vocals, Elsa, TexasGilbert González, bass guitar, Elsa, TexasBenigno Layton, 1950-, accordion, vocals, Elsa, Texas

Brownsville, Texas

Julius Collins, 1928-, shrimper, net maker, cook, Brownsville, Texas
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref41

News Coverage of the exhibition 'Always There.'

Creator:
WTTG (Television station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
During an interview for a news segment on FOX News 5, Anacostia Museum Director Steven Newsome talked about the exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' and African American quilt techniques; and a provided an explanation of story quilts. The news segment also included footage of the quilts which were on display throughout the exhibit.
News program. Related to exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.' Dated 1993.
Biographical / Historical:
'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' displayed 27 quilts with photographs and related objects, and surveyed 200 years of black quiltmaking. The quilts, images and artifacts in the exhibit were presented within a dual framework of black history and quilt history. Profiled quiltmakers included Mary Bell Berry, Jessie Telfair, Dorothy Nelle Sanders, parents of school children at P.S. 48 in New York City, Michael Cummings, Carolyn Mazloomi, Lillian Beattie, Jim Smoote, and Carole Harris. The exhibition was organized by the Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. in Louisville, Kentucky, and on display at the Anacostia Museum from July 15 to October 17, 1993.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of materials is restricted. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
News Coverage of the exhibition 'Always There,' Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-014, Item ACMA AV002223
See more items in:
Always there: the African American presence in American quilts exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-014-ref509

Sara Wendell Smith photographs

Artist:
Wenger, Suzanne  Search this
Yemisi, Lola  Search this
Saka, Waheed O.  Search this
Togbe, Gbenga Emmanuel  Search this
Togbe, Rotimi  Search this
Fakeye, Lamidi  Search this
Florence  Search this
Gbelekale, Bayo  Search this
Onireke, Adeyemo Kasali  Search this
Akeem, Ayanniyi  Search this
Davies, Nike  Search this
Photographer:
Smith, Sara Wendell  Search this
Extent:
117 slides (photographs) (dupe slides, 1 volume, color)
Container:
Volume 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Oshogbo (Nigeria)
Date:
1991
Summary:
Photographs taken by Sara Wendell Smith in 1991 of textiles by Nigerian artists. The works include Adire fabric, which is made in a resist dyeing technique, quilts and appliqués. The artists include Nike Davies, Adeyemo Kasali Onireke, Ayanniyi Akeem, Florence, Lola Yemisi, Waheed O. Saka, Rotimi Togbe, Gbenga Emmanual Togbe, Bayo Gbelekale, Lamidi Fakeye and Suzanne Wenger. Also included among the slides are scenes from Oshogbo, Nigeria.
Arrangement note:
Images indexed by negative number.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Adire -- 1991  Search this
Applique -- 1991  Search this
Quilts -- 1991  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.1993-003
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1993-003

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