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Smithsonian National Quilt Collection: Lydia Finnell's Star Quilt

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-06-27T21:06:51.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8wu4jOqJpNs

Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture: Bisa Butler

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-11-20T23:30:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_SsVT3v_AdTU

upholstery, car hood

Maker:
Bajitos Lowrider Club  Search this
Physical Description:
fiber, synthetic (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
glass (overall material)
red, maroon (overall color)
black (overall color)
low-rider (overall style)
quilted velour (overall production method/technique)
Object Name:
Upholstery, Car Hood
Date made:
1991
ID Number:
1990.0567.01.b
Catalog number:
1990.0567.01.b
Accession number:
1990.0567
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a9-db29-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1143082

quilt

Physical Description:
applique (overall production method/technique)
Object Name:
Quilt
ID Number:
PL.T08755
Catalog number:
T08755
See more items in:
Political and Military History: Political History, Campaign Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-6d37-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_529146

Feedsack Dress

Maker:
Overall, Mrs. Dorothy  Search this
Physical Description:
cotton fabric and thread (overall material)
synthetic metallic thread (overall material)
plain weave; printed (overall production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall, unmounted: 42 1/2 in x 25 in; 107.95 cm x 63.5 cm
overall, mounted: 41 in x 17 in x 15 in; 104.14 cm x 43.18 cm x 38.1 cm
Object Name:
dress, women
woman's dress
Object Type:
Dress
Woman
Place Made:
United States: Kansas, Caldwell
Date made:
1959
Subject:
Costume  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mrs. Dorothy Overall
ID Number:
1992.0102.04
Catalog number:
1992.0102.04
Accession number:
1992.0102
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Textiles
Agriculture
Textiles
Exhibition:
Girlhood
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ab-62b5-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1105750
Online Media:

Delegate

Published by:
MelPat Associates, American, 1965 - 1986  Search this
Created by:
C. Melvin Patrick, American, died 1985  Search this
Subject of:
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
National Urban League, American, founded 1910  Search this
Sigma Phi Rho Fraternity, American, founded 1978  Search this
National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, American, founded 1969  Search this
Association of Black Women Attorneys, American, founded 1976  Search this
National Urban Affairs Council, American, founded 1971  Search this
Raymond A. Jordan Jr., American, born 1943  Search this
National Association of Market Developers, American, founded 1953  Search this
The Links, Incorporated, American, founded 1946  Search this
Northside Center for Child Development, Inc., founded 1946  Search this
National Newspaper Publishers Association, American, founded 1827  Search this
Prince Hall Freemasonry, founded 1784  Search this
Chi Delta Mu Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1913  Search this
Top Ladies of Distinction, Inc., American, founded 1964  Search this
Lambda Kappa Mu Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1937  Search this
Carats, Inc., American, founded 1959  Search this
Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1932  Search this
National United Church Ushers Association of America, Inc., American, founded 1919  Search this
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1929  Search this
National Medical Association, American, founded 1895  Search this
Dr. Leslie L. Alexander, Jamaican American, 1917 - 2002  Search this
Smithsonian Institution, American, founded 1846  Search this
National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., American, founded 1906  Search this
Morehouse College, American, founded 1867  Search this
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, American, founded 1913  Search this
Shriners International, American, founded 1870  Search this
Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays, American, 1894 - 1984  Search this
Count Basie, American, 1904 - 1984  Search this
National Coalition of 100 Black Women, American, founded 1981  Search this
National Bankers Association, American, founded 1927  Search this
369th Veterans Association, American  Search this
One Hundred Black Men, Inc., American, founded 1963  Search this
Association for the Study of African American Life and History, American, founded 1915  Search this
Signed by:
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1906  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 7/16 × 9/16 in. (27.5 × 21.4 × 1.5 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Harlem, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1985
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Business  Search this
Communities  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Fraternities  Search this
Government  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Labor  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Men  Search this
Political organizations  Search this
Politics (Practical)  Search this
Professional organizations  Search this
Religious groups  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Sororities  Search this
United States--History--1969-2001  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Women  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Anne B. Patrick and the family of Hilda E. Stokely
Object number:
2012.167.19
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5ee110782-b949-43b4-bbec-56a00d4f086e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.167.19
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  • View <I>Delegate</I> digital asset number 1

Music and Crafts of the Southeastern United States

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Virtually every area of the South harbors a potter, weaver, toy maker, wood-carver, boatbuilder, calligrapher, ornamental blacksmith, sign painter, or seamstress who has maintained his or her craft in the face of nearly total indifference by the outside world. It is true, certainly, that many southern craftworkers have discarded quilt making, coverlet weaving, and pottery turning as unpleasant reminders of their humble origins. For others, the crafts remain a beloved preoccupation that, like family reunions and music festivals, have grown to symbolize an important component of regional and ethnic identity.

There are few generalizations that can be made about contemporary southern craftworkers as a group. Some are articulate about their work while others are inexpressive. Some practice crafts originally restricted to only one sex and passed from parent to child through an informal apprenticeship while others have not been so constrained. Many find monetary benefit in what they do; a few such as the solitary carver or painter work to some inner purpose largely devoid (until the coming of the folk art collector) of remunerative value. While some folk craftworkers employ modern labor and timesaving techniques, in every case they blend these with the preindustrial technologies of earlier generations. Such technologies, as well as the forms of the objects themselves, are the product of family and regional folk traditions.

The craft component at the 1981 Festival had three subdivisions:

1. a demonstration area where craftworkers were explaining their work; traditional Southeastern music - played, in part, on instruments made by the demonstrators - was also featured;

2. an exhibition of carefully-selected items commissioned specifically for the Festival and reminiscent of forms and styles made by the craftworkers' forebears; these objects were later sold at auction;

3. a general sales tent, planned with the Smithsonian Museum Shops, where an array of traditional crafts made for the Festival were on sale daily.

Secretary S. Dillon Ripley, in commenting on a previous Festival, noted: "The possibility of using a museum that is essentially a historical documentary museum as a theatre of live performance where people actually show that the objects in the cases were made by human hands, and are still being made, practiced on, worked with, is a very valuable asset for our role as a preserver and conservator of living cultural forms." Indeed, many of the objects crafted, exhibited, and sold at the 1981 Festival were very similar to items on view in the Museum. In fact, some of the objects in the permanent collections were purchased from Festival craftworkers in the late 1960s.
Participants:
Participants

David Allen, 1925-, walking stick carver, Homer, Louisiana

Linda Bowers, Seminole jacket maker, Clewiston, Florida

Charles Christian, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lucreaty Clark, 1904-1986, basket maker, Lamont, Florida

Burlon B. Craig, 1914-2002, potter, Vale, North Carolina

Mrs. B. Craig, potter, Vale, North Carolina

Edsel Martin, musical instrument maker, Old Fort, North Carolina

Irene Miller, 1907-, rag rug maker, Oakland, Maryland

Jack McCutcheon, 1923-2001, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lois McCutcheon, 1929-, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lee Willie Nabors, 1916-, chair maker, Oklona, Mississippi

Judd Nelson, 1911-, blacksmith, Sugar Valley, Georgia

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, basket maker, Charenton, Iowa

Donny Tolson, wood carver, Campton, Kentucky

Celestine Turner, 1928-, basket maker, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Southeastern Crafts Exhibition, Exhibitors

Melvin Owens, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Robert Brown, pottery, Arden, North Carolina

Lanier Meaders, pottery, Cleveland, Georgia

Daniel Garner, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Charles Craven, 1944-1997, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Hobart Garner, 1922-1985, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Burlon B. Craig, pottery, Vale, North Carolina

Vernon Owens, 1941-, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Mary Livingston, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

David Farrell, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Wayman Cole, 1905-1987, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Walter Cornelison, pottery, Waco, Kentucky

Dorothy Cole Auman, 1925-1991, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

John Wiltshire, carvings, Coffee County, Indiana

Dicie Malone, corn shuck mat – Knox County, North Carolina

Mrs. Blaine Whitaker, corn shuck bonnet, Henderson County, North Carolina

Fairy Moody, 1907-1994, corn shuck crèche, Ashe County, North Carolina

Dieudonne Montoucet, Cajun triangle, Scott, Louisiana

Napolean Strickland, cane fife, Como, Mississippi

Clifford Glenn, 1935-, banjo & dulcimer, Sugar Grove, North Carolina

Dewey Shepherd, 1906-1996, gourd fiddle, David, Kentucky

Edsel Martin, dulcimer, Old Fort, North Carolina

Albert Hash, 1917-1983, fiddle, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Audrey Hash Miller, 1949-, dulcimer, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Mr. Mabry, wood carvings, Stone County, Arkansas

Willard Watson, wood carvings, Watauga County, North Carolina

Donny Tolson, wood carvings, Campton, Kentucky

David Allen, 1925-, wood carvings, Homer, Iowa

Dallas Bump, furniture, Royal, Arkansas

Charlie Christian, furniture, Mount Judea, Arkansas

Jack McCutcheon, 1923-2001, furniture, Mount Judea, Arkansas

Lee Willie Nabors, 1916-, furniture, Okolona, Mississippi

Bill McClure, furniture, Bloss, Kentucky

Amanda Palmer, baskets, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Susan Peoples, 1898-1986, baskets, Aragon, Georgia

Mildred Youngblood, baskets, Woodbury, Indiana

Eva Wolfe, 1922-, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Carol Welch, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Agnes Welch, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Dolly Taylor, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Geneva Ledford, 1921-1998, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, baskets, Charenton, Louisiana

Lucreaty Clark, 1904-1986, baskets, Lamont, Florida

Edna Langley, baskets, Elton, Louisiana

Earnest Patton, wood carvings, Compton, Kentucky

Louise Jones, baskets, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Floyd Harmon, baskets, Ocean City, Maryland

Goodwin Family Weavers, Blowing Rock, North Carolina

Pecolia Warner, quilt, Yazoo City, Mississippi

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilts, Watauga County, North Carolina

Linda Bowers, Seminole jacket, Clewiston, Florida

Sally Tommie, Seminole jacket, Clewiston, Florida

Philip Simmons, 1912-, metal work, Charleston, South Carolina

Phipps Bourne, metal work, Elk Creek, Virginia

Erwin Thieberger, 1908-1997, metal work, Wheaton, Maryland

James Barnwell, metal work, Henderson County, North Carolina

Pete Howell, 1902-1981, metal work, Yancey County, North Carolina
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1981, Series 7
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1981-ref52

Meeting Minutes

Collection Creator:
Donaldson, Jeff, 1932-2004  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1980
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate access copies requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Jeff Donaldson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Jeff Donaldson papers, 1918-2005, bulk 1960s-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Jeff Donaldson papers
Jeff Donaldson papers / Series 7: Professional Files / 7.1: AfriCOBRA
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-donajeff-ref1027
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  • View Meeting Minutes digital asset number 1

Regional America

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The first week of the 1975 Regional America program focused on the people of the Northern Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas), particularly on the occupational life-styles related to agriculture and livestock. This is the region that is called the "breadbasket" and the economy of the area is based on grain crops, feed crops, and livestock production. The Smithsonian represented the agriculture of the area by growing on the Festival site wheat (the principal grain crop), alfalfa (a principal feed crop), and some typical plains grasses as well as sorghum and sunflowers. Livestock grazed on the National Mall and were used in demonstrations of herding techniques. Visitors saw varieties of threshing from individual manual techniques to modern mechanical combines. A daily tractor pull contest demonstrated not only the skills of the farmers in operating equipment, but also the pride they take in the power of their own carefully maintained machinery.

Craft presentations included associated occupational and domestic crafts. For example, livestock-related crafts such as those involved with maintenance, auctioneering, leatherworking, blacksmithing, wagon making and repair, and metal working were highlighted, as well as key occupational skills related to livestock include horse handling, sheep shearing, and ropework. Functional but decorative domestic crafts were also demonstrated: piece quilts, braided and rag rugs, corn husk and rag dolls, toys carved from chips, noisemakers, whimmy diddles.

Festival visitors could see and participate in a variety of folk dancing by different ethnic groups who settled in the Plains: Germans, Scandinavians, Ukrainians and Czechs. Northern Plains music is characteristically performed on instruments practiced in isolation such as the fiddle.These are usually played solo, but at the Festival they were also performed in combination.

The character of the California Heartland region (second week of the Festival) is expressed by its flamboyant image, diverse landscape, and - of utmost importance - a 'Mediterranean' climate that makes outdoor living possible. It is also an area rich in ethnic communities, and many of these were featured at the 1975 Festival.

Mexican American muralists from East Los Angeles completed a mural depicting their contribution to the Festival. Paper flower making and piñata making were demonstrated and taught to visitors, as were masa grinding and tortilla and tamale making. Chinese Americans from the San Francisco area performed a shadow puppet play twice daily. Various crafts including kite-making and the construction of paper ribbon fish welcomed audience participation. Three traditional games (an early form of yoyo, shuttlecock and cat's cradle) were demonstrated and taught.

Portuguese American fisherfolk demonstrated boat building as well as net and lure making accompanied by traditional sea chanteys. A highlight of the Portuguese community is the "Festa da Espiritu Santu", a celebration involving a parade of decorated cows, ceremonial milking, a milk and bread feast and a traditional contest between solo singers who improvise verses, enacted on the Festival site from July 2 to 4.

Unique to San Francisco is the tradition of cable car bell ringing. Cable car gripmen announced each session at the main California stage and dance floor, and competed for the bell ringing championship. A Greek father and son demonstrated traditional woven straw beehive construction and discussed bee-keeping and the agricultural use of bees. California Armenians wove rugs and spun wool.

The joys of sociable dancing were shared by square dances, Portuguese chamaritas, Phillippine tinakling and an evening of waltzes. There were also examples of solo singing by Portuguese, Anglo, French, and black singers and group singing by Molokans, Anglos, Chicanos and blacks.

Administrator for the Regional America program was William K. McNeil, with Charles Camp as Research Coordinator; Rayna Green served as Consultant.
Fieldworkers:
Northern Plains Researchers

Metha Bercier, John Carter, Carey Cook, Larry Danielson, Sister Stephanie Dolyniuk, Karen Heinzman, Lynn Ireland, Constance Kane, Jens Lund, Janet McDonnell, Gina Newbold, Douglas Parks, Marjorie Sackett, Earl Sampson, Darrel Sawyer, Dorothy Shonsey, Scott Sorensen, Kenneth Stewart, Sherry Stoskopf, Robert Thompson, Robert Webb

California Research Staff

Coordinator: Bess Lomax Hawes; Assistant Coordinator: Barbara LaPan Rahm; Researchers: Justin Bishop, Joyce P. Bynum, Nicola Marguerite Deval, Nicholas Hawes, Michael Korn, Marilyn Salvador, Daniel Sheehy; Advisors: Stephen P. and Ethel Dunn (Molokan presentation), Elaine Miller (Mexican American presentation), Joanne B. Purcell (Portuguese presentation)
Participants:
Northern Plains

Margaret Anderson, 1900-2002, singer, cook, Scandia, Kansas

August Anheluk, 1917-2001, musician

Leslie Anheluk, dancer

James Baker, dancer

Emerson Baker, singer

Norman Baker, singer

Wade Baker, dancer

Donna Baranko, dancer

Ann Basaraba, singer

Roy Basaraba, singer

Lydia Bears Tail, bead worker, cook & dancer

Saunders Bears Tail, 1934-1998, dancer

Linnea B. Briggs, 1893-1990, bobbin lace maker, Windom, Kansas

Connie Burian, dancer

Laudie Burian, 1915-2001, musician

Lewis Calwell, 1895-1978, horse trainer, Belle Fourche, South Dakota

Alvin Campbell, 1921-, fiddler, Omaha, Nebraska

Marlys Ciscar, singer

George Crow Flies High, agricultural implement maker, dancer

Dan Dasovich, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

Danny Dasovich, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

George Dasovich, 1942-, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

Peter Drakulich, 1926-1998, musician

Frances Driver, Jr., dancer

Harold C. Edwards, 1927-1992, sheep shearer, Edgemont, South Dakota

Jeanette Evoniuk, 1923-2005, dancer

Johnnie Evoniuk, dancer

Laurence Evoniuk, singer

Matt Evoniuk, dancer

Matt Evoniuk, Jr., dancer

Pearl Evoniuk, dancer

Celia Fliginger, 1907-2003, cook, Freeman, South Dakota

Jarle Foss, 1894-1992, fiddler, Scotland, South Dakota

Dean Fox, dancer

George B. German, 1902-1991, singer

Hilda Goering, 1916-, quilter, Moundridge, Kansas

Aaron Goertzen, 1921-1987, mandolin player, Aurora, Nebraska

Dick Goertzen, mandolin player, Henderson, Nebraska

Jacob C. Goertzen, 1919-1992, mandolin player, Henderson, Nebraska

Delwayne Good Iron, 1943-2014, singer, war bonnet maker

Velda Graber, 1912-1984, soap, sauerkraut maker, Marion, South Dakota

Darrell Griffith, 1930-, horse handler, Faith, South Dakota

Rose Hand, cook, quilter

John Hanzek, 1919-1997, musician

Elmus Henderson, 1908-1979, saddle, harness maker, Kearney, Nebraska

Lyle Henderson, 1947-, saddle, harness maker, Kearney, Nebraska

Mabel Howling Wolf, 1907-1989, cook, quitter

Leslie Jeffery, cattle crew, Sturgis, South Dakota

Margie Jeffery, ranch cook, Sturgis, South Dakota

Mitchel Jeffery, 1951-, cattle crew, Sturgis, South Dakota

William Jeffery, Jr., cattle crew foreman, Sturgis, South Dakota

Betty Johnson, 1927-, rosemaler, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Edward Johnson, singer, musician

Esther Jorgensen, 1908-1998, cook, Viborg, South Dakota

ArvelIa Kenaston, 1934-, musician, Springview, Nebraska

Robert Kenaston, 1928-2013, musician, Springview, Nebraska

Roger Kenaston, 1954-, musician, Springview, Nebraska

Donna Kordon, dancer

Mary Ann Krush, singer

Kathleen Laible, 1929-1996, canner, Howard, South Dakota

Ann Larson, 1914-2003, cook, Aberdeen, South Dakota

Bill Larson, 1896-1990, fiddler, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Luella Loganbill, 1928-, quilter, Moundridge, Kansas

Glenn Lornev, tractor pull

Eugene Mack, dancer

George Mack, dancer

Joyce Mack, dancer

Verna Mack, dancer

Don Malnourie, 1939-2005, singer

Ben Makaruk, 1924-1999, singer

Marie Makaruk, singer

Bill Mastel, musician

Mack Medakovich, musician

Merle Messing, 1941-2007, tractor pull, Groton, South Dakota

Alex Morin, dancer, singer

Bill Nameniuk, musician

Debbie Painte, bead worker, shawl maker, dancer

Agnes Palaniuk, singer

Billy Palaniuk, dancer

Fred Penner, 1940-, musical saw player, Tyndall, South Dakota

D. Peter Plechas, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

Agnes Poitra, 1924-1999, dancer, Belcourt, North Dakota

Leon Poitra, 1922-2003, dancer, Belcourt, North Dakota

Harry Porter, 1902-1995, sheep shearer, Edgemont, South Dakota

Ken Putnam, 1955-, fiddler, Rapid City, South Dakota

Jean Roberts, 1932-, cornhusk doll maker, Axtell, Nebraska

Wayne Robinson, sausage maker

Alton Schlag, musician

James Schwab, musician

Larry Schwab, musician

Billy Marlene Short, cattle crew, Piedmont, South Dakota

Dennis Short, 1938-1984, cattle crew, Piedmont, South Dakota

Marlene Sitting Crow, cook, dancer

Murphy Sitting Crow, bustle maker, dancer

Johnny Smith, auctioneer

John E. Stratman, 1908-1989, agricultural spokesperson, Wilcox, Nebraska

Wilhelmine Thue, 1902-1989, cook, Howard, South Dakota

Joe Trottier, musician

Mary Wallette, dancer, cook

Earl Waltner, 1915-1979, blacksmith, Bridgewater, South Dakota

Douglas D. Weber, musician

Gene Weisbeck, musician

Donna Wilkie, dancer, cook

Edward Wilkie, dancer

Helen Wilkinson, quilter

Hugo Wuebben, 1910-1984, carver, Hartington, Nebraska

Alice Yellow Wolf, bead worker

Bert Yellow Wolf, 1939-1995, singer

Joe Zacharias, 1933-, accordion, Wagner, South Dakota

Marie Zaste, dancer, cook

California Heartland

Leslie Alamsha, dancer

Juan Alvarado, 1930-, -- pregonero -- , -- guitarrista -- , -- jaranero

Manuel Azevedo, caller, dancer, singer

Nora Bogdanoff, 1913-1981, Molokan singer

David Botello, muralist

Jane Botieff, Molokan singer

William J. Botieff, Molokan singer

Francisco Carrillo, -- guitarrista

Alfonso Chavez, charro

Kate Chernekoff, 1922-1999, Molokan singer

Peter Chernekoff, 1912-1988, Molokan singer

Jeoffrey Chiang, special Chinese consultant

Vivian Chiang, coordinator

Richard Ching, Chinese yo-yo, shuttlecock, cat's cradle

Dai T. Chung, musician, shadow player

Marilyn Cunningham Cleary, fiddler

Earl Collins, fiddler

Nemo Concepcion, yo-yo demonstrator

Danny Cruz, charro, Los Nietos, California

Jack Cunningham, fiddler

Van Cunningham, 1896-1984, fiddler, Bodfish, California

Antonio Garcia Da Rosa, mandolin player

Leonel Garcia Da Rosa, mandolin player

Al Figueroa, singer, guitarist, Blythe, California

Carmela Figueroa, singer

Alex A. Galkin, 1920-1976, Molokan singer

Juan Gandara, charro, vice president of La Alteña

Alicia Gonzalez, paper crafts, Los Angeles, California

Guadalupe D. Gonzalez, paper crafts, cook, Los Angeles, California

Jose Luis Gonzalez, muralist, Los Angeles, California

Rebecca Gonzalez, paper crafts, cook

Blanche Gonzalez, crafts, cook

Kenneth M. Hall, 1923-2013, mandolin player

Marta Louise Hall, musician assistant

Fermin Herrera, -- harpista

Jorge Herrera, -- jaranero

Maria Isabel Herrera, -- jaranera -- , -- requintera -- , dancer

Chi-mei Kao Hwang, Chinese craft assistant

Hubert Isaac, drummer

Rinold Isaac, dancer

Andrea Ja, shadow player

Robert Ernest Lee Jeffery, 1915-1976, blues pianist, San Diego, California

Kate Kalpakoff, Molokan singer

Craig Ernest Kodros, bee hive maker

George Harry Kodros, bee hive maker

Anna Koh, northern Chinese cook

David Koh, assistant northern Chinese cook

Jim A. Korneff, 1916-1994, singer

Julia Lazar, baker, spinner

Robert Lazar, dancer

Calvin E. Long, tinker, San Diego, California

Pauline Loo, Chinese craft assistant

Francisco Macias, charro

Eddie Martinez, muralist, Hacienda Heights, California

Heli Medeiros, 1921-2003, singer

Nellie Melosardoff, 1913-2007, Molokan singer

Anna Mendrin, Molokan singer

John Mendrin, 1923-1989, Molokan singer

Jonnie Kay Neavill, fiddler

David Page, uilleann bagpiper

Sara J. Patapoff, 1924-1993, Molokan singer

Jack Pavloff, 1919-2000, Molokan singers' director

Mary J. Pavloff, Molokan singer

Dolores Pequeño, singer

George M. Prohroff, 1937-2001, Molokan singer

Pamella Ramsing, shadow player

Rigoberto Rincon, charro, president of La Alteña

Victor Romero, -- guitarrista -- , -- vihuelo

Juanita Saludado, singer, Earlimart, California

Paul Saludado, singer, guitarist, Earlimart, California

Roy J. Samarin, 1920-1994, Molokan singer

Don Jesus Sanchez, 1910-1983, violinist, Los Angeles, California

Surma D'Mar Shimun, 1883-1975, dancer

Joel Silva, -- festa -- coordinator, dairyman

Jose V. Silva, tuna boat designer

Manuel Silva, -- guitarrista

Mary Silva, cook, flower maker

Julia Silveira, -- guitarrista

Rafael Furtado Simas, 1916-2006, violinist

Rosa Maria Simas, dancer, baker

João Soares, singer

Shirley Sun, presenter

Araks Talbert, baker, spinner

Anna Tarnoff, Molokan singer

Smith Tester, banjo player

Eugene Ung, assistant southern Chinese cook

Maizie Ung, kite making, paper folding, ribbon fish demonstration

Agostinho Valim, 1917-2000, singer

Laurindo Valim, dancer

Manuel Vasquez, 1935-, -- requintero

Moses A. Volkoff, 1892-1989, Molokan composer

Ossie White, guitarist, Lakewood, California

Roscoe White, 1923-2009, fiddler, Lakewood, California

Margaret L. Wong, southern Chinese cook

Judy Woo, assistant shadow player

Jesse Wright, singer

Jimmy Wright, singer, Fresno, California

Walter Wright, singer, Fresno, California

William Wright, 1914-1982, singer, Selma, California

Annie Zolnekoff, 1924-2010, Molokan singer

Paul Zolnekoff, 1919-2005, Molokan singer
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1975 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1975, Series 8
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1975 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1975-ref1044

Dog Trot House Narrative; Food Preservation; Barre, Miller

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1980 October 10
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1980, Item FP-1980-7RR-0293
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Community Activities and Food Preservation / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1980-ref312
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Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Adkins, Minnie, 1934-  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L., 1936-  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi, 1989-2001  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (4 hr., 33 min.), digital, wav)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 17-30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carolyn Mazloomi conducted 2002 September 17 and 30, by Joanne Cubbs, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in West Chester, Ohio. Mazloomi speaks of growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a family of self-taught artists; the positive influence of her aunt and teacher Dr. Carter; the generation of African-American quilt-makers who followed a gap in quilt-making post-slavery; she describes her previous career as an aeronautical engineer and her transition to quilt-making; how she identifies herself as a craftsperson, not an artist; her experience with Baltimore album and Appalachian quilts; learning to quilt; the Women of Color Quilter's Network and its economic and social development programs; her book, "Spirits of the Cloth"; the positive and negative aspects of travel; the false generalizations of African-American quilts in academic circles; the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity in her work; her connection to "praise songs"; she discusses functional vs. nonfunctional quilts; the market for "hand-crafted" quilts; agents and galleries; she describes her working environment; adopting the use of a sewing machine in her work; the importance of community; her technique; her accomplishment of placing African-American quilts in the Renwick Gallery; the influence of magazines, including "Raw Vision;" her aversion to commissions; expanding her use of materials and technology; her exhibitions; her role as an advocate and dealer; finding inspiration in black and white linocuts and her use of color in quilts; and making a connection with her audience. Mazloomi also recalls Marie Wilson, Cuesta Benberry, Edjohnetta Miller, Roland Freeman, Robert Cargo, Martha Connell, Penny Sisto, Minnie Adkins, Nkosi Johnson, and Lauryn Hill.
Biographical / Historical:
Carolyn Mazloomi (1948- ) is a quilt maker from West Chester, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Self-taught artists  Search this
Topic:
African American quiltmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Album quilts -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Quilts -- Appalachian Region  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mazloo02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mazloo02

Oral history interview with Joyce J. Scott

Interviewee:
Scott, Joyce, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Silberman, Robert B. (Robert Bruce), 1950-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
61 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 July 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce J. Scott conducted 2009 July 22, by Robert Silberman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Scott's home and studio, in Baltimore, Maryland.
Scott talks about her childhood in Baltimore; childhood visits to the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery; her parents' lives growing up in the segregated South; her artist mother, who was her first bead-teacher; craft traditions in her family, including pottery and quilting; quilting as storytelling, "diaries" for preliterate people; improvisational craft; Three Generation Quilt; Fifty .; undergraduate studies at Maryland Institute College of Art; travels after graduation in Mexico, Central , and South America; graduate studies in craft in Mexico; decision at age 23 to become a studio artist, and partnership with her mother; theater work with Robert Sherman and in New York and in Baltimore; theater work with Kay Lawal in Thunder Thigh Revue; studies at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, ME, where she learned traditional Navajo weaving, and learned the peyote stitch for beadwork, a seminal technique for her career; her book Fearless Beadwork: Improvisational Peyote Stitch: handwriting & drawings from hell. Rochester, NY: Visual Studies Workshop, 1994; working in different mediums; What You Mean Jungle Music? [1988]; working for recognition of beadwork as a sculptural medium; politics, social commentary, and humor in her work; series Day after Rape; her working processes; Rodney King's Head Was Squashed Like a Watermelon; working in monoprints; working in glass (flameworking, lampworking), including at Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA, Tacoma [WA] Museum of Glass, UrbanGlass, New York, NY, Haystack Mountain; retrospective exhibition, "Joyce Scott Kickin' It With the Old Masters" at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 2000; series Africa in Unexpected Places; installation work, including in "Images Concealed," San Francisco, 1995, and Believe I've Been Sanctified, Charleston, SC, 1991; small-scale work; influence of her upbringing in the Pentecostal church; Buddha Gives Basketball to the Ghetto [1991] and the importance of spirituality in her work; travels in South America, Africa, and Europe; the complementarity of performance/theater work and visual art; performance pieces: Generic Interference, Genetic Engineering, Virtual Reality, and Walk a Mile in My Drawers; Lips mosaic at Reagan National Airport, Washington, D.C.; teaching workshops at Haystack, Penland School of Crafts, Penland, NC, the Oregon School of Arts and Craft, Portland; artist-in-residency at Pilchuck; gallery affiliations, and usefulness of the gallery system, which allows her to work as a studio artist; the importance of galleries as a free venue open to ordinary people; luxuriating in beauty. She recalls Betty Woodman, Dr. Leslie King-Hammond, Lowery Sims, Fritz Dreisbach, Anthony Corradetti, Antony Gormley, Ann Hamilton, David Hammons, Mary Jane Jacob, Cesar Pelli, Susan Cummins, and Helen Drutt English.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce J. Scott (1948- ) is a visual and performance artist and educator who lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 memory cards. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Performance artists -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.scott09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-scott09

Oral history interview with Art Green

Interviewee:
Green, Art, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Silverman, Lanny  Search this
Names:
Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project  Search this
Chicago's Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (sound files (3 hrs., 36 min.), digital, wav)
102 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2015 September 17-18
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Art Green conducted 2015 September 17-18, by Lanny Silverman, for the Archives of American Art's Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project at Green's home in Stratford, Ontario, Canada.
Green speaks of growing up in Frankfurt, Indiana; his parents; quilt making and engineering; Necker cubes; early art pursuits; early art education; Fort Wayne Museum of Art; Chicago; Found Titles; Hairy Who; drawing and painting courses; Art Institute of Chicago; silk screening; art school and interests; Chicago imagists; Surrealism; Don Baum; Animal, Vegetable, Mineral; transfers and technique; response to art work; deciding to be an artist; New York; Art Forum; Pop Art; first shows; early influences; abstraction; looking at art; ideal viewer; Nova Scotia; teaching; Canada; signs and ice cream cones; inspiration; painting process; engineering; bridges; politics; Secretary McNamara; color; flames; inspiration; books and magazines; Ray Johnson; puzzles and discovery; Art Expo; the art world; use of technology; patterns; knots; making a living as an artist; self-portraits; and new work. Green also recalls Douglas Craft, Elizabeth Ruprecht, Whitney Halstead, Ray Yoshida, Carolyn Hoyle, George Cohen, Ted Halkin, June Leaf, Robert Frank, Bill Grams, Karl Wirsum, Jim Nutt, Murray Simon, Cynthia Carlson, Bill Schwedler, Marjorie Dell, Roger Brown, Vera Berdich, Thomas Kapsalis, Mogen David, Bill Conger, Evelyn Statsinger, Gary Kennedy, Paul Weighardt, Jim Falconer, Matthew Marks, Phyllis Kind, and Allen Frumkin Gallery.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Art Green (1941- ) is an painter and educator in Stratford, Ontario, Canada. Interviewer Lanny Silverman (1947- ) is a curator at the Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, Illinois.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire audio recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Educators -- Canada  Search this
Painters -- Canada  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.green15
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-green15

Writings and Notes

Collection Creator:
Kienbusch, William, 1914-1980  Search this
Extent:
(Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1940s-1970s
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains three of Kienbusch's notebooks from early 1940s, including one containing notes on casein wax technique. All notebooks include notes, drawings, and diagrams. Also found are various handwritten notes and lists on scraps of paper, notes and slide list for a lecture at the Portland Museum of Art, and notes and quilting diagrams from Kienbusch's interview of Doris Sanborn.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The William Kienbusch papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
William Kienbusch papers, 1915-2001, bulk 1936-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kienwill, Series 3
See more items in:
William Kienbusch papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kienwill-ref63

Eve Peri papers

Creator:
Peri, Eve, 1897-1966  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1996, bulk 1939-1966
Summary:
The papers of painter and embroidery artist Eve Peri measure 0.6 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1996 with the bulk of materials dating from 1939 to 1966. The papers are scattered and include biographical materials, travel documents, correspondence, financial records, printed material, designs for embroidered clothing, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and embroidery artist Eve Peri measure 0.6 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1996 with the bulk of materials dating from 1939 to 1966. The papers are scattered and include biographical materials, travel documents, correspondence, financial records, printed material, designs for embroidered clothing, and photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series.

Series 1: Eve Peri papers, circa 1900-1996 (0.6 linear feet; Box 1, OV2-3)
Biographical / Historical:
Eve Peri (1897-1966) was a collagist, embroiderer, and painter active in New York City, New York.

Eve Peri was born in Bangor, Maine in 1897. From her mother and aunts, Peri learned traditional quilting and embroidery techniques. A largely self-trained artist, she used her skills to design clothing, tapestry, and collages and also painted. She collaborated with her husband Alfonso Umana Mendez, a designer for Fred Leighton, designing women's embroidered clothing. After divorcing in 1939, she traveled around Europe and began to exhibit her works.

Peri moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania late in life and opened a gallery in New Hope to show her works. She died in 1966.
Provenance:
The Eve Peri papers were donated by Elizabeth Bullock and Judith Stein, executor and curator of the estate in 2001.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Women artists -- United States  Search this
Fiber artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Embroidery  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Eve Peri papers, circa 1900-1996, bulk 1939-1966. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.perieve
See more items in:
Eve Peri papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-perieve

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Faculty  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Students  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce Marquess Carey conducted 2002 June 16, by Glenn Adamson, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Carey's home, in Madison, Wisconsin.
Carey speaks of growing up in Redding, California; her widowed mother working to support Carey and herself; her "lonesome" childhood and her eagerness to leave Redding to attend the University of California at Berkeley; majoring in English; meeting her husband Harlan (Mark) Marquess in her senior year at Berkeley and marrying him; dropping out of college; regretting her marriage; her life as a housewife and mother in the late 1950s and 1960s; moving to Madison, Wisconsin, for her husband's job as a Russian teacher; taking weaving classes with Larry Edman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and meeting fiber artist Claire Zeisler on a field trip to Chicago. Carey discusses experimentation in her work and "stretching the limits of the technique" in Edman's class; receiving her undergraduate degree in textile arts in 1971; working with a computer-driven Dobby Loom; studying with Ruth Gao and Jim Peters at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for her MFA in the early 1970s; teaching weaving at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a focus on technical and design skills; writing articles on the technical aspects of fiber art for "Fiber Arts," "Weaver's Journal," "Shuttle, Spindle, & Dye Pot," and other periodicals; exhibiting with the Wisconsin Designer Craftsmen in the 1970s; participating in the Quilt National Show in 1979; receiving a five-year development grant from the University of Wisconsin and quitting her teaching job; using "systematic" weaving methods in quilting; her involvement with galleries such as the Connell/Great American Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia; working with art consultants; the difference between private and corporate commissions; her use of bright colors and various fabrics; her use of tools and technology including an industrial sewing machine and computer programs such as Photoshop; her second marriage to Phil Carey in 1980 after her divorce to Marquess in the mid-1970s; and the "ephemeral" qualities in art. She considers herself a "collager," assembling fabrics and "embellishments." She also discusses her involvement with the Studio Art Quilt Associates and in the Art Quilt Network; and her piece, "Blue Ribbon," in the collection of the American Craft Museum. Carey recalls Camille Cook, Lia Cook, Martha Connell, Hillary Fletcher, Ted Hallman, Pat Mansfield, Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Yvonne Porcella, [Laurence] Rathsack, Victor Vasarely, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce Marquess Carey (1936- ) is a quilt maker from Madison, Wisconsin. Glenn Adamson is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Quilting -- Design  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Weaving -- Study and teaching  Search this
Weaving -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carey02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carey02

Oral history interview with Nancy Crow

Creator:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Interviewer:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Names:
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
Snyderman Gallery  Search this
Extent:
50 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2002 December 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Crow conducted 2002 December 18, by Jean Robertson, for the Archives of American Art, at her home and studio, in Baltimore, Ohio, as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Crow speaks of her early childhood and her father's high standards; her early interest in color; her studies at Ohio State University and her first ceramics professor Edgar Littlefield; joining the textile guild in Athens, Ohio; how her quilting evolved from traditional to contemporary and abstract forms; her practice of working on several quilts simultaneously; the influence of Anna Williams, a quiltmaker in Baton Rouge, Alabama; and she describes her studio. Crow also discusses her association with the Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia; a trip to China that resulted in the series Chinese Souls; and how beauty is her ultimate goal. She talks about her travels to Mexico and South Africa; her technical mastery of strip piecing; working at home while raising two sons; the dyeing process; her sketchbooks; her long-term working relationship with hand quilter, Marla Hattabaugh; teaching at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts; the beginnings of the Quilt National Show at the Dairy Barn; the Ohio Arts Council; the Art Quilt Network; periodicals including FiberArts, Surface Design, Hali, and Raw Vision; two seminal exhibitions in her career, "Nancy Crow: Work in Transition," at the American Craft Museum, 1993, and "Nancy Crow -- Improvisational Quilts," at the Renwick Gallery, 1995; and the changing market for quilts in America. She recalls Bruce Hoffman, Rick and Ruth Snyderman, Jan Myers-Newberry, Rosalie Gascoigne, Sandra Blaine, Vivian Harvey; Linda Fowler, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Crow (1943- ) is a fiber artist and quiltmaker in Baltimore, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 31 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Researchers note: A separate 1988 interview of Crow, also conducted by Robertson is also available.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Dyes and dyeing -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crow02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crow02

Jean Robertson interview with Nancy Crow

Creator:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Interviewee:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
14 Pages
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1988 Aug. 17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Crow conducted by Jean Robertson, Aug.17, 1988, as a part of Robertson's research for the book, "Nancy Crow: Quilts and Influences" by Nancy Crow and Jean Robertson, Collector Books, Dec. 1989. Crow speaks about her childhood and early artistic aspirations; her dissatisfaction with her first quilts in the early 1970s; traditional quiltmaking; her work in tapestry weaving; meeting Francoise Barnes and Virginia Randles and learning to quilt; the difference between the weaving and quilting process; working in series; her interest in Mexican folk art and African American quilts; living on an isolated farm and drawing inspiration from nature; her use of titles, colors, patterns, scale, and fabrics; the importance of her training in ceramics; and she compares her work to quilts by Michael James.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Crow (1943-) is a quiltmaker from Baltimore, Ohio. Interviewer Jean Robertson is an art critic and curator from Indianapolis, Ind.
Provenance:
Donated 2003 by Jean Robertson as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America. Researchers note: A separate 2002 interview of Crow, also conducted by Robertson and a part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America is also available.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.robejean
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-robejean

Joyce Marquess Carey textile samples

Creator:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Extent:
2 Items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
2002
Scope and Contents:
2 samples of Carey's quilting technique from her "Glad Rag" series, 2002.
Biographical / Historical:
Quiltmaker; Madison, Wis.; b. 1936.
Provenance:
Donated 2002 by Joyce Marquess Carey.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.carejoyc
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carejoyc

Robbie Fanning Sewing Arts Collection

Creator:
Fanning, Robbie  Search this
Extent:
5 Cubic feet (13 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Publications
Trade catalogs
Correspondence
Pamphlets
Newsletters
Manuals
Photographs
Periodicals
Videocassettes
Date:
1903-2002
bulk 1993-2002
Summary:
The collection documents materials gathered by Robbie Fanning, publisher of sewing related books and newsletters and includes the history of major sewing machine brands, machine accessories, machine embroidery, machine needles, thread, binding, interfacing, and other sewing notions.
Scope and Contents:
Archival materials on the subject of sewing and sewing machines, including correspondence, Fanning's subject files, photographs, newsletters, product manuals, catalogs, trade literature, articles, reprints, sewing periodicals, and VHS videos.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Robbie Fanning (b. 1947-) of Menlo Park, California, a former journalism teacher, she started a publishing company called Open Chain Publishing, specializing in sewing books. She published a quarterly newsletter called The Creative Machine aimed at helping the sewing hobbyist learn new sewing techniques, review sewing equipment and products, and pose questions to the sewing industry. The newsletter ceased publication in 2002. The collection as a whole depicts the shift from sewing as a necessity to clothe a family or save money to sewing as a creative outlet for women and men with leisure time.
Related Materials:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries

Books related to sewing and books authored by Robbie Fanning.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center in 2008 by Robbie Fanning.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Machine quilting  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Sewing machines  Search this
Sewing  Search this
Quilting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Publications
Trade catalogs
Correspondence -- 2000-2010
Pamphlets
Newsletters
Manuals
Correspondence -- 20th century
Photographs -- 2000-2010
Photographs -- 1980-2000
Periodicals
Videocassettes
Citation:
Robbie Fanning Sewing Arts Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1139
See more items in:
Robbie Fanning Sewing Arts Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1139

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