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Interview with Tisha Thorne

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Tisha Thorne, founder and coordinator of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, talks about her techniques as a fabric media artist, when and how she started sewing, and teaching herself to sew when she was a teenager. She also talks about her involvement in the community, teaching and working with children and senior citizens, and her book projects. Thorne explains what creativity means to her, sources of inspiration, and her creative style and creative process. Thorne talks about the origin and goals of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, how the guild is involved in the community, and the diversity of the guild's membership. Footage of artwork - quilts, clothing, fashion accessories, and other mixed media fabric art - follows the interview.
Interview. Dated 20110425.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Tisha Thorne, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005234
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7205b8c2e-23f0-4e2f-a6dc-8c94ae329de8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref87

Writings and Notes

Collection Creator:
Kienbusch, William, 1914-1980  Search this
Extent:
(Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1940s-1970s
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains three of Kienbusch's notebooks from early 1940s, including one containing notes on casein wax technique. All notebooks include notes, drawings, and diagrams. Also found are various handwritten notes and lists on scraps of paper, notes and slide list for a lecture at the Portland Museum of Art, and notes and quilting diagrams from Kienbusch's interview of Doris Sanborn.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
William Kienbusch papers, 1915-2001, bulk 1936-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kienwill, Series 3
See more items in:
William Kienbusch papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96a6331ae-17ba-4ef5-981f-0bba9c47f8ba
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-kienwill-ref63

Using Zoom In and Voice and Choice | Easy PZ

Creator:
Smithsonian Education  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-29T17:39:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianEducation
Data Source:
Smithsonian Education
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianEducation
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1bXhvcJLzJk

Clarice Smith Distinguished Lecture: Bisa Butler

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-11-20T23:30:00.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_SsVT3v_AdTU

Smithsonian National Quilt Collection: Lydia Finnell's Star Quilt

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-06-27T21:06:51.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8wu4jOqJpNs

Using Looking: Ten Times Two (Session #2) | Easy PZ

Creator:
Smithsonian Education  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-16T05:35:22.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianEducation
Data Source:
Smithsonian Education
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianEducation
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_HVNJe6cDBps

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Cultural Conservation: Traditional Crafts in a Post-Industrial Age / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5a31b2a90-150b-4b60-8275-83b77cef13dc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1986-ref1308
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  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1

Dog Trot House Narrative; Food Preservation; Barre, Miller

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Folk Housing and Energy Efficiency Program 1980 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Barrs, Martha H., 1924-  Search this
Miller, Peggy, 1920-2000  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1980 October 10
Local Numbers:
FP-1980-7RR-0293
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, October 10, 1980.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1980, Item FP-1980-7RR-0293
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1980 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Community Activities and Food Preservation / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5385befaf-fea4-479c-bb7a-509bb0e721d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1980-ref312
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  • View Dog Trot House Narrative; Food Preservation; Barre, Miller digital asset number 1

Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Michigan / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59897f732-c285-41ec-8993-78083d5dac93
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref1454
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1

Michigan

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the State of Michigan, ninety of its residents came to the 1987 Festival to speak about and demonstrate some of the rich traditional culture from that region. To help create a festival setting in which performers of valued traditions could speak about their experiences and heritages with performed music, active demonstrations, and spoken words seemed a most appropriate way to celebrate the sesquicentennial of that geographically endowed, historically important and culturally rich state.

Throughout Michigan's history those who migrated to the state have been drawn by - or have themselves introduced - fishing, trapping, mining, lumbering, farming, and automobile manufacturing. The lore of such occupations, combined with the rich ethnic heritage of those who built Michigan, form the essence of the state's traditional culture. Michigan today is home to more than one hundred different nationalities, including the country's largest population of Finns, Belgians, Maltese, and Chaldeans; the second largest numbers of Dutch, Lebanese, and French Canadians; and perhaps the largest concentration of Muslim Arabs (in southeast Dearborn) outside the Middle East. Detroit alone is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the country. The heritage of these diverse groups - along with those of Native, Euro Americans, and Afro Americans who migrated to Michigan throughout the state's history - give Michigan folklife its distinctive characteristics.

Complementing a full performance schedule that highlighted Michigan's diverse musical heritage, ongoing demonstrations included lure making, fly tying, boat building, Native American quillwork, black ash basketry, finger weaving and beadwork, Dutch wooden shoe making, furniture carving, Afro American quilt making, Palestinian needlework, Ukrainian textiles and egg decorating, ski and sleigh making, decoy carving, rag rug weaving, cherry harvesting & pruning, evergreen nursery techniques, net making, and ice fishing.

Betty Belanus, Laurie Sommers, and Thomas Vennum, Jr. served as Curators for the Michigan program, with Laurie Sommers also serving as Program Coordinator and Barbara Lau, as Assistant Program Coordinator.

The Michigan Program was made possible by the Michigan Sesquicentennial Commission and the Michigan Department of State.
Fieldworkers and consultants:
Fieldworkers

Dennis Au, Michael Bell, Horace Boyer, John Alan Cicala, Timothy Cochrane, Gregory Cooper, C. Kurt Dewhurst, Stev'e Frangos, Roland Freeman, Janet Gilmore, Alicia María González, James Leary, Yvonne Lockwood, Marsha MacDowell, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Mario Montaño, Earl Nyholm, Marsha Penti, Roger Pilon, Peter Seitel, Eliot Singer, Laurie Sommers, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Thomas Vennum, Jr.

Consultants

George Cornell, LuAnne Kozma, Robert McCarl, Oscar Paskal, Barry Lee Pearson, Joseph Spielberg
Presenters:
Dennis Au, Horace Boyer, C. Kurt Dewhurst, Paul Gifford, Janet Gilmore, James Leary, William Lockwood, Yvonne Lockwood, Marsha MacDowell, Earl Nyholm, Mario Montaño, Roger Pilon, Joseph Spielberg, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Benjamin Wilson
Participants:
Crafts

Samiha Abusalah, Palestinian needle worker, Dearborn, Michigan

James Baker, wooden shoe maker, Holland, Michigan

Catherine Baldwin, 1935-2001, Ottawa quill worker, Suttons Bay, Michigan

Amnah Baraka, Palestinian needle worker, Dearborn, Michigan

Chou Chang, Hmong textile artist, Detroit, Michigan

Rita L. Corbiere, Ojibwa quill worker, storyteller, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Alice Fox, 1916-1995, Ojibwa quill worker, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Russell Johnson, 1918-, blacksmith, Strongs, Michigan

Arnold Klein, Jr., Ukrainian embroiderer, egg decorator, Hamtramck, Michigan

George McGeshick, Ojibwa birch bark canoe builder, Iron River, Michigan

Mary McGeshick, Ojibwa cradle board decorator, Iron River, Michigan

Yer Yang Mua, Hmong textile artist, Detroit, Michigan

Julia Nyholm, 1913-2005, Ojibwa finger weaver, bead worker, Crystal Falls, Michigan

Gust Pietilla, 1906-1999, ski, sleigh and tool maker, Bruce Crossing, Michigan

Agnes Rapp, 1920-2003, Ottawa-Potawatomi black ash basket maker, Berrien Springs, Michigan

Glen Van Antwerp, cedar fan carver, Lansing, Michigan

Lloyd Van Doornik, mas¬ter carver, furniture maker, Holland, Michigan

Julia Wesaw, 1908-1992, Potawatomi black ash basket maker, Hartford, Michigan

Rosie Wilkins, 1905-1994, quilt maker, Muskegon, Michigan

Foodways

Helen Mohammed Atwell, 1934-2003, Lebanese cook, Dearborn, Michigan

Marguerite L. Berry-Jackson, storyteller, cook, herbalist, Lansing, Michigan

Lucille Brown, 1917-1996, pasty maker, Wakefield, Michigan

Marie L. Cross, storyteller, cook, herbalist, Mecosta, Michigan

Eustacio Y. Flores, Jr., Mexican-American cook, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Anna E. Lassila, 1909-2001, pasty maker, rag rug weaver, Mohawk, Michigan

Elda Peltier, 1915-2005, muskrat cook, Monroe, Michigan

Hudson "Huddy" Peltier, 1912-2003, muskrat cook, Monroe, Michigan

Music

The Hammon Family, bluegrass, country, gospel music -- The Hammon Family, bluegrass, country, gospel musicGeorge "Dub" Hammon, bass player, vocalist¬, Davison, MichiganMarge Hammon, mandolin player, vocalist, Davison, MichiganMel Hammon, fiddle player, vocalist, Davison, MichiganRon Hammon, guitar player, vocalist, Davison, Michigan

Judy & Her Suchey Brothers, polka band -- Judy & Her Suchey Brothers, polka bandMike Kindt, bass player, Alpena, MichiganBill Suchey, Jr., trumpet player, Alpena, MichiganBob Suchey, saxophone player, Alpena, MichiganJim Suchey, accordion player, Alpena, MichiganJudy Suchey, drummer, Alpena, MichiganMike Suchey, trumpet player, Alpena, Michigan

Rev. Andre Woods & The Chosen, gospel music -- Rev. Andre Woods & The Chosen, gospel musicSederia Butler, soprano, Detroit, MichiganDawn Byers, alto, Detroit, MichiganStephanie Colfield, drummer, Westland, MichiganEarl Fisher, tenor, Detroit, MichiganCraig Harris, bass guitar player, Cleveland, Ohio, MichiganGrenee Hunter, alto, Detroit, MichiganWillie Lucas, tenor, Detroit, MichiganRenee Thomas, soprano, Detroit, MichiganDana Wilcox, soprano, Detroit, MichiganRev. Andre Woods, arranger, director, Detroit, Michigan

Sensational Gospel Tones -- Sensational Gospel TonesAlfred Charleston, Grand Rapids, MichiganDonald Charleston, lead guitar and bass player, Grand Rapids, MichiganJuanita Charleston, Grand Rapids, MichiganRev. Leon Charleston, Grand Rapids, MichiganHenrietta Fields, Grand Rapids, MichiganTanya Johnson, vocalist, drummer, Grand Rapids, MichiganNathaniel Smith, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Sugar Island Boys, Anglo-French string band -- Sugar Island Boys, Anglo-French string bandRené Coté, fiddle player, Ontario, CanadaHoney McCoy, 1904-1988, piano player, vocalist, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganJoe Menard, 1935-, guitar player, vocalist, Sault Ste. Marie, MichiganTom Stevens, Dobro player, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Bill Stimac & Sons, music from the Keweenaw Peninsula -- Bill Stimac & Sons, music from the Keweenaw PeninsulaBill Stimac, 1923-, accordion player, Houghton, MichiganMark Stimac, 1956-, banjo and guitar player, Houghton, MichiganRandy Stimac, 1958-, accordion player, Houghton, Michigan

Thimbleberry, Finnish music -- Thimbleberry, Finnish musicEd Lauluma, 1921-2005, fiddle player, Chassell, MichiganAl Reko, 1933-, accordion player, vocalist, St. Paul, Minnesota, MichiganOren Tikkanen, mandolin and guitar player, Calumet, Michigan

Tomicic Brothers Orchestra, tamburitza music -- Tomicic Brothers Orchestra, tamburitza musicMike Cani, cello player, Detroit, MichiganJoel Novosel, bass player, Detroit, MichiganGeorge Patrash, pugaria player, Detroit, MichiganMike Tomicić, first brac player, Windsor, Ontario, CanadaPeter Tomicić, second brac player, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Yemeni Folkloric Dance Group, Arab village music -- Yemeni Folkloric Dance Group, Arab village musicSaleh Alward, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganMohsin Elgabri, dramatist, dancer, Oud player, Dearborn, MichiganAlsanabani Faris, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganSaeed Masjahri, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganM. Aideroos Mohsen, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganAbdo Ali Saeed, dancer, Dearborn, MichiganOmar A. Wahashi, oud and tabla player, Dearborn, Michigan

Rose Mae Menard, 1901-1988, come¬dienne, storyteller, herbalist, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Art Moilanen, 1916-1995, vocalist, accordion player, Mass City, Michigan

Les Raber, fiddle player, Hastings, Michigan

Isaiah "Dr." Ross, 1925-1993, blues musician, Flint, Michigan

Occupations

Esperanza Alcala, ever¬green nursery worker, Grand Haven, Michigan

Steven B. Fouch, 1952-, cherry grower, extension agent, Grawn, Michigan

Elias Lopez, 1935-2004, evergreen nursery worker, Grand Haven, Michigan

Damien Lunning, trapper, Mio, Michigan

Judith Lunning, trapper, game cook, Mio, Michigan

Pedro Rodriguez, ever¬green nursery worker, Grand Haven, Michigan

Personal Experience Narrative, Flint Sit-Down Strike

Fred Ahearn, 1910-1991, Flint, Michigan

Burt Christenson, Flint, Michigan

Shirley Foster, Flint, Michigan

Berdene "Bud" Simons, Newport Richey, Florida

Nellie Simons, Newport Richey, Florida

Waterways

Josephine F. Sedlecky-Borsum, sports shop owner, fly tier, Baldwin, Michigan

Ray Davison, Great Lakes fisherman, Menominee, Michigan

Dick Grabowski, 1931-2006, Great Lakes fisherman, Menominee, Michigan

Charlie Nylund, 1933-, Great Lakes fisherman, Menominee, Michigan

Jay Stephan, river guide, boat builder, Grayling, Michigan

Elman G. "Bud" Stewart, 1913-1999, lure maker, Alpena, Michigan

Jim Wicks, ice fisherman, decoy carver, McMillan, Michigan

Ralph Wilcox, Great Lakes fisherman, fish smoker, Brimley, Michigan

David Wyss, river guide, boat builder, fly tier, Grayling, Michigan
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk558f67840-21f3-484a-b448-14772c6b5dcc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref34

Music and Crafts of the Southeastern United States

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Virtually every area of the South harbors a potter, weaver, toy maker, wood-carver, boatbuilder, calligrapher, ornamental blacksmith, sign painter, or seamstress who has maintained his or her craft in the face of nearly total indifference by the outside world. It is true, certainly, that many southern craftworkers have discarded quilt making, coverlet weaving, and pottery turning as unpleasant reminders of their humble origins. For others, the crafts remain a beloved preoccupation that, like family reunions and music festivals, have grown to symbolize an important component of regional and ethnic identity.

There are few generalizations that can be made about contemporary southern craftworkers as a group. Some are articulate about their work while others are inexpressive. Some practice crafts originally restricted to only one sex and passed from parent to child through an informal apprenticeship while others have not been so constrained. Many find monetary benefit in what they do; a few such as the solitary carver or painter work to some inner purpose largely devoid (until the coming of the folk art collector) of remunerative value. While some folk craftworkers employ modern labor and timesaving techniques, in every case they blend these with the preindustrial technologies of earlier generations. Such technologies, as well as the forms of the objects themselves, are the product of family and regional folk traditions.

The craft component at the 1981 Festival had three subdivisions:

1. a demonstration area where craftworkers were explaining their work; traditional Southeastern music - played, in part, on instruments made by the demonstrators - was also featured;

2. an exhibition of carefully-selected items commissioned specifically for the Festival and reminiscent of forms and styles made by the craftworkers' forebears; these objects were later sold at auction;

3. a general sales tent, planned with the Smithsonian Museum Shops, where an array of traditional crafts made for the Festival were on sale daily.

Secretary S. Dillon Ripley, in commenting on a previous Festival, noted: "The possibility of using a museum that is essentially a historical documentary museum as a theatre of live performance where people actually show that the objects in the cases were made by human hands, and are still being made, practiced on, worked with, is a very valuable asset for our role as a preserver and conservator of living cultural forms." Indeed, many of the objects crafted, exhibited, and sold at the 1981 Festival were very similar to items on view in the Museum. In fact, some of the objects in the permanent collections were purchased from Festival craftworkers in the late 1960s.
Participants:
Participants

David Allen, 1925-, walking stick carver, Homer, Louisiana

Linda Bowers, Seminole jacket maker, Clewiston, Florida

Charles Christian, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lucreaty Clark, 1904-1986, basket maker, Lamont, Florida

Burlon B. Craig, 1914-2002, potter, Vale, North Carolina

Mrs. B. Craig, potter, Vale, North Carolina

Edsel Martin, musical instrument maker, Old Fort, North Carolina

Irene Miller, 1907-, rag rug maker, Oakland, Maryland

Jack McCutcheon, 1923-2001, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lois McCutcheon, 1929-, chair maker, Mt. Judea, Arkansas

Lee Willie Nabors, 1916-, chair maker, Oklona, Mississippi

Judd Nelson, 1911-, blacksmith, Sugar Valley, Georgia

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, basket maker, Charenton, Iowa

Donny Tolson, wood carver, Campton, Kentucky

Celestine Turner, 1928-, basket maker, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Southeastern Crafts Exhibition, Exhibitors

Melvin Owens, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Robert Brown, pottery, Arden, North Carolina

Lanier Meaders, pottery, Cleveland, Georgia

Daniel Garner, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Charles Craven, 1944-1997, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Hobart Garner, 1922-1985, pottery, Robbins, North Carolina

Burlon B. Craig, pottery, Vale, North Carolina

Vernon Owens, 1941-, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Mary Livingston, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

David Farrell, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Wayman Cole, 1905-1987, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

Walter Cornelison, pottery, Waco, Kentucky

Dorothy Cole Auman, 1925-1991, pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

John Wiltshire, carvings, Coffee County, Indiana

Dicie Malone, corn shuck mat – Knox County, North Carolina

Mrs. Blaine Whitaker, corn shuck bonnet, Henderson County, North Carolina

Fairy Moody, 1907-1994, corn shuck crèche, Ashe County, North Carolina

Dieudonne Montoucet, Cajun triangle, Scott, Louisiana

Napolean Strickland, cane fife, Como, Mississippi

Clifford Glenn, 1935-, banjo & dulcimer, Sugar Grove, North Carolina

Dewey Shepherd, 1906-1996, gourd fiddle, David, Kentucky

Edsel Martin, dulcimer, Old Fort, North Carolina

Albert Hash, 1917-1983, fiddle, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Audrey Hash Miller, 1949-, dulcimer, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Mr. Mabry, wood carvings, Stone County, Arkansas

Willard Watson, wood carvings, Watauga County, North Carolina

Donny Tolson, wood carvings, Campton, Kentucky

David Allen, 1925-, wood carvings, Homer, Iowa

Dallas Bump, furniture, Royal, Arkansas

Charlie Christian, furniture, Mount Judea, Arkansas

Jack McCutcheon, 1923-2001, furniture, Mount Judea, Arkansas

Lee Willie Nabors, 1916-, furniture, Okolona, Mississippi

Bill McClure, furniture, Bloss, Kentucky

Amanda Palmer, baskets, Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Susan Peoples, 1898-1986, baskets, Aragon, Georgia

Mildred Youngblood, baskets, Woodbury, Indiana

Eva Wolfe, 1922-, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Carol Welch, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Agnes Welch, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Dolly Taylor, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Geneva Ledford, 1921-1998, baskets, Cherokee, North Carolina

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, baskets, Charenton, Louisiana

Lucreaty Clark, 1904-1986, baskets, Lamont, Florida

Edna Langley, baskets, Elton, Louisiana

Earnest Patton, wood carvings, Compton, Kentucky

Louise Jones, baskets, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina

Floyd Harmon, baskets, Ocean City, Maryland

Goodwin Family Weavers, Blowing Rock, North Carolina

Pecolia Warner, quilt, Yazoo City, Mississippi

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilts, Watauga County, North Carolina

Linda Bowers, Seminole jacket, Clewiston, Florida

Sally Tommie, Seminole jacket, Clewiston, Florida

Philip Simmons, 1912-, metal work, Charleston, South Carolina

Phipps Bourne, metal work, Elk Creek, Virginia

Erwin Thieberger, 1908-1997, metal work, Wheaton, Maryland

James Barnwell, metal work, Henderson County, North Carolina

Pete Howell, 1902-1981, metal work, Yancey County, North Carolina
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1981, Series 7
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1981 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk58bbc8392-fdbd-4561-9225-886732de78b9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1981-ref52

Regional America

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The first week of the 1975 Regional America program focused on the people of the Northern Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas), particularly on the occupational life-styles related to agriculture and livestock. This is the region that is called the "breadbasket" and the economy of the area is based on grain crops, feed crops, and livestock production. The Smithsonian represented the agriculture of the area by growing on the Festival site wheat (the principal grain crop), alfalfa (a principal feed crop), and some typical plains grasses as well as sorghum and sunflowers. Livestock grazed on the National Mall and were used in demonstrations of herding techniques. Visitors saw varieties of threshing from individual manual techniques to modern mechanical combines. A daily tractor pull contest demonstrated not only the skills of the farmers in operating equipment, but also the pride they take in the power of their own carefully maintained machinery.

Craft presentations included associated occupational and domestic crafts. For example, livestock-related crafts such as those involved with maintenance, auctioneering, leatherworking, blacksmithing, wagon making and repair, and metal working were highlighted, as well as key occupational skills related to livestock include horse handling, sheep shearing, and ropework. Functional but decorative domestic crafts were also demonstrated: piece quilts, braided and rag rugs, corn husk and rag dolls, toys carved from chips, noisemakers, whimmy diddles.

Festival visitors could see and participate in a variety of folk dancing by different ethnic groups who settled in the Plains: Germans, Scandinavians, Ukrainians and Czechs. Northern Plains music is characteristically performed on instruments practiced in isolation such as the fiddle.These are usually played solo, but at the Festival they were also performed in combination.

The character of the California Heartland region (second week of the Festival) is expressed by its flamboyant image, diverse landscape, and - of utmost importance - a 'Mediterranean' climate that makes outdoor living possible. It is also an area rich in ethnic communities, and many of these were featured at the 1975 Festival.

Mexican American muralists from East Los Angeles completed a mural depicting their contribution to the Festival. Paper flower making and piñata making were demonstrated and taught to visitors, as were masa grinding and tortilla and tamale making. Chinese Americans from the San Francisco area performed a shadow puppet play twice daily. Various crafts including kite-making and the construction of paper ribbon fish welcomed audience participation. Three traditional games (an early form of yoyo, shuttlecock and cat's cradle) were demonstrated and taught.

Portuguese American fisherfolk demonstrated boat building as well as net and lure making accompanied by traditional sea chanteys. A highlight of the Portuguese community is the "Festa da Espiritu Santu", a celebration involving a parade of decorated cows, ceremonial milking, a milk and bread feast and a traditional contest between solo singers who improvise verses, enacted on the Festival site from July 2 to 4.

Unique to San Francisco is the tradition of cable car bell ringing. Cable car gripmen announced each session at the main California stage and dance floor, and competed for the bell ringing championship. A Greek father and son demonstrated traditional woven straw beehive construction and discussed bee-keeping and the agricultural use of bees. California Armenians wove rugs and spun wool.

The joys of sociable dancing were shared by square dances, Portuguese chamaritas, Phillippine tinakling and an evening of waltzes. There were also examples of solo singing by Portuguese, Anglo, French, and black singers and group singing by Molokans, Anglos, Chicanos and blacks.

Administrator for the Regional America program was William K. McNeil, with Charles Camp as Research Coordinator; Rayna Green served as Consultant.
Fieldworkers:
Northern Plains Researchers

Metha Bercier, John Carter, Carey Cook, Larry Danielson, Sister Stephanie Dolyniuk, Karen Heinzman, Lynn Ireland, Constance Kane, Jens Lund, Janet McDonnell, Gina Newbold, Douglas Parks, Marjorie Sackett, Earl Sampson, Darrel Sawyer, Dorothy Shonsey, Scott Sorensen, Kenneth Stewart, Sherry Stoskopf, Robert Thompson, Robert Webb

California Research Staff

Coordinator: Bess Lomax Hawes; Assistant Coordinator: Barbara LaPan Rahm; Researchers: Justin Bishop, Joyce P. Bynum, Nicola Marguerite Deval, Nicholas Hawes, Michael Korn, Marilyn Salvador, Daniel Sheehy; Advisors: Stephen P. and Ethel Dunn (Molokan presentation), Elaine Miller (Mexican American presentation), Joanne B. Purcell (Portuguese presentation)
Participants:
Northern Plains

Margaret Anderson, 1900-2002, singer, cook, Scandia, Kansas

August Anheluk, 1917-2001, musician

Leslie Anheluk, dancer

James Baker, dancer

Emerson Baker, singer

Norman Baker, singer

Wade Baker, dancer

Donna Baranko, dancer

Ann Basaraba, singer

Roy Basaraba, singer

Lydia Bears Tail, bead worker, cook & dancer

Saunders Bears Tail, 1934-1998, dancer

Linnea B. Briggs, 1893-1990, bobbin lace maker, Windom, Kansas

Connie Burian, dancer

Laudie Burian, 1915-2001, musician

Lewis Calwell, 1895-1978, horse trainer, Belle Fourche, South Dakota

Alvin Campbell, 1921-, fiddler, Omaha, Nebraska

Marlys Ciscar, singer

George Crow Flies High, agricultural implement maker, dancer

Dan Dasovich, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

Danny Dasovich, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

George Dasovich, 1942-, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

Peter Drakulich, 1926-1998, musician

Frances Driver, Jr., dancer

Harold C. Edwards, 1927-1992, sheep shearer, Edgemont, South Dakota

Jeanette Evoniuk, 1923-2005, dancer

Johnnie Evoniuk, dancer

Laurence Evoniuk, singer

Matt Evoniuk, dancer

Matt Evoniuk, Jr., dancer

Pearl Evoniuk, dancer

Celia Fliginger, 1907-2003, cook, Freeman, South Dakota

Jarle Foss, 1894-1992, fiddler, Scotland, South Dakota

Dean Fox, dancer

George B. German, 1902-1991, singer

Hilda Goering, 1916-, quilter, Moundridge, Kansas

Aaron Goertzen, 1921-1987, mandolin player, Aurora, Nebraska

Dick Goertzen, mandolin player, Henderson, Nebraska

Jacob C. Goertzen, 1919-1992, mandolin player, Henderson, Nebraska

Delwayne Good Iron, 1943-2014, singer, war bonnet maker

Velda Graber, 1912-1984, soap, sauerkraut maker, Marion, South Dakota

Darrell Griffith, 1930-, horse handler, Faith, South Dakota

Rose Hand, cook, quilter

John Hanzek, 1919-1997, musician

Elmus Henderson, 1908-1979, saddle, harness maker, Kearney, Nebraska

Lyle Henderson, 1947-, saddle, harness maker, Kearney, Nebraska

Mabel Howling Wolf, 1907-1989, cook, quitter

Leslie Jeffery, cattle crew, Sturgis, South Dakota

Margie Jeffery, ranch cook, Sturgis, South Dakota

Mitchel Jeffery, 1951-, cattle crew, Sturgis, South Dakota

William Jeffery, Jr., cattle crew foreman, Sturgis, South Dakota

Betty Johnson, 1927-, rosemaler, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Edward Johnson, singer, musician

Esther Jorgensen, 1908-1998, cook, Viborg, South Dakota

ArvelIa Kenaston, 1934-, musician, Springview, Nebraska

Robert Kenaston, 1928-2013, musician, Springview, Nebraska

Roger Kenaston, 1954-, musician, Springview, Nebraska

Donna Kordon, dancer

Mary Ann Krush, singer

Kathleen Laible, 1929-1996, canner, Howard, South Dakota

Ann Larson, 1914-2003, cook, Aberdeen, South Dakota

Bill Larson, 1896-1990, fiddler, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Luella Loganbill, 1928-, quilter, Moundridge, Kansas

Glenn Lornev, tractor pull

Eugene Mack, dancer

George Mack, dancer

Joyce Mack, dancer

Verna Mack, dancer

Don Malnourie, 1939-2005, singer

Ben Makaruk, 1924-1999, singer

Marie Makaruk, singer

Bill Mastel, musician

Mack Medakovich, musician

Merle Messing, 1941-2007, tractor pull, Groton, South Dakota

Alex Morin, dancer, singer

Bill Nameniuk, musician

Debbie Painte, bead worker, shawl maker, dancer

Agnes Palaniuk, singer

Billy Palaniuk, dancer

Fred Penner, 1940-, musical saw player, Tyndall, South Dakota

D. Peter Plechas, musician, Omaha, Nebraska

Agnes Poitra, 1924-1999, dancer, Belcourt, North Dakota

Leon Poitra, 1922-2003, dancer, Belcourt, North Dakota

Harry Porter, 1902-1995, sheep shearer, Edgemont, South Dakota

Ken Putnam, 1955-, fiddler, Rapid City, South Dakota

Jean Roberts, 1932-, cornhusk doll maker, Axtell, Nebraska

Wayne Robinson, sausage maker

Alton Schlag, musician

James Schwab, musician

Larry Schwab, musician

Billy Marlene Short, cattle crew, Piedmont, South Dakota

Dennis Short, 1938-1984, cattle crew, Piedmont, South Dakota

Marlene Sitting Crow, cook, dancer

Murphy Sitting Crow, bustle maker, dancer

Johnny Smith, auctioneer

John E. Stratman, 1908-1989, agricultural spokesperson, Wilcox, Nebraska

Wilhelmine Thue, 1902-1989, cook, Howard, South Dakota

Joe Trottier, musician

Mary Wallette, dancer, cook

Earl Waltner, 1915-1979, blacksmith, Bridgewater, South Dakota

Douglas D. Weber, musician

Gene Weisbeck, musician

Donna Wilkie, dancer, cook

Edward Wilkie, dancer

Helen Wilkinson, quilter

Hugo Wuebben, 1910-1984, carver, Hartington, Nebraska

Alice Yellow Wolf, bead worker

Bert Yellow Wolf, 1939-1995, singer

Joe Zacharias, 1933-, accordion, Wagner, South Dakota

Marie Zaste, dancer, cook

California Heartland

Leslie Alamsha, dancer

Juan Alvarado, 1930-, -- pregonero -- , -- guitarrista -- , -- jaranero

Manuel Azevedo, caller, dancer, singer

Nora Bogdanoff, 1913-1981, Molokan singer

David Botello, muralist

Jane Botieff, Molokan singer

William J. Botieff, Molokan singer

Francisco Carrillo, -- guitarrista

Alfonso Chavez, charro

Kate Chernekoff, 1922-1999, Molokan singer

Peter Chernekoff, 1912-1988, Molokan singer

Jeoffrey Chiang, special Chinese consultant

Vivian Chiang, coordinator

Richard Ching, Chinese yo-yo, shuttlecock, cat's cradle

Dai T. Chung, musician, shadow player

Marilyn Cunningham Cleary, fiddler

Earl Collins, fiddler

Nemo Concepcion, yo-yo demonstrator

Danny Cruz, charro, Los Nietos, California

Jack Cunningham, fiddler

Van Cunningham, 1896-1984, fiddler, Bodfish, California

Antonio Garcia Da Rosa, mandolin player

Leonel Garcia Da Rosa, mandolin player

Al Figueroa, singer, guitarist, Blythe, California

Carmela Figueroa, singer

Alex A. Galkin, 1920-1976, Molokan singer

Juan Gandara, charro, vice president of La Alteña

Alicia Gonzalez, paper crafts, Los Angeles, California

Guadalupe D. Gonzalez, paper crafts, cook, Los Angeles, California

Jose Luis Gonzalez, muralist, Los Angeles, California

Rebecca Gonzalez, paper crafts, cook

Blanche Gonzalez, crafts, cook

Kenneth M. Hall, 1923-2013, mandolin player

Marta Louise Hall, musician assistant

Fermin Herrera, -- harpista

Jorge Herrera, -- jaranero

Maria Isabel Herrera, -- jaranera -- , -- requintera -- , dancer

Chi-mei Kao Hwang, Chinese craft assistant

Hubert Isaac, drummer

Rinold Isaac, dancer

Andrea Ja, shadow player

Robert Ernest Lee Jeffery, 1915-1976, blues pianist, San Diego, California

Kate Kalpakoff, Molokan singer

Craig Ernest Kodros, bee hive maker

George Harry Kodros, bee hive maker

Anna Koh, northern Chinese cook

David Koh, assistant northern Chinese cook

Jim A. Korneff, 1916-1994, singer

Julia Lazar, baker, spinner

Robert Lazar, dancer

Calvin E. Long, tinker, San Diego, California

Pauline Loo, Chinese craft assistant

Francisco Macias, charro

Eddie Martinez, muralist, Hacienda Heights, California

Heli Medeiros, 1921-2003, singer

Nellie Melosardoff, 1913-2007, Molokan singer

Anna Mendrin, Molokan singer

John Mendrin, 1923-1989, Molokan singer

Jonnie Kay Neavill, fiddler

David Page, uilleann bagpiper

Sara J. Patapoff, 1924-1993, Molokan singer

Jack Pavloff, 1919-2000, Molokan singers' director

Mary J. Pavloff, Molokan singer

Dolores Pequeño, singer

George M. Prohroff, 1937-2001, Molokan singer

Pamella Ramsing, shadow player

Rigoberto Rincon, charro, president of La Alteña

Victor Romero, -- guitarrista -- , -- vihuelo

Juanita Saludado, singer, Earlimart, California

Paul Saludado, singer, guitarist, Earlimart, California

Roy J. Samarin, 1920-1994, Molokan singer

Don Jesus Sanchez, 1910-1983, violinist, Los Angeles, California

Surma D'Mar Shimun, 1883-1975, dancer

Joel Silva, -- festa -- coordinator, dairyman

Jose V. Silva, tuna boat designer

Manuel Silva, -- guitarrista

Mary Silva, cook, flower maker

Julia Silveira, -- guitarrista

Rafael Furtado Simas, 1916-2006, violinist

Rosa Maria Simas, dancer, baker

João Soares, singer

Shirley Sun, presenter

Araks Talbert, baker, spinner

Anna Tarnoff, Molokan singer

Smith Tester, banjo player

Eugene Ung, assistant southern Chinese cook

Maizie Ung, kite making, paper folding, ribbon fish demonstration

Agostinho Valim, 1917-2000, singer

Laurindo Valim, dancer

Manuel Vasquez, 1935-, -- requintero

Moses A. Volkoff, 1892-1989, Molokan composer

Ossie White, guitarist, Lakewood, California

Roscoe White, 1923-2009, fiddler, Lakewood, California

Margaret L. Wong, southern Chinese cook

Judy Woo, assistant shadow player

Jesse Wright, singer

Jimmy Wright, singer, Fresno, California

Walter Wright, singer, Fresno, California

William Wright, 1914-1982, singer, Selma, California

Annie Zolnekoff, 1924-2010, Molokan singer

Paul Zolnekoff, 1919-2005, Molokan singer
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1975 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1975, Series 8
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1975 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5900565d0-2672-465d-92db-bc8e8f08e0c1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1975-ref1044

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Based on research in the rich and dynamic living culture of the border, the Borderlands Festival program of 1993 was designed to provide a glimpse of the border - its histories, its diverse communities, local and regional identities, and its music, arts, crafts, healing practices, foodways, and narrative. The program was about community-based culture. It presented cultural practices found on the border and cultural expressions about the border, and it explored cultural patterns that were created by the border. It also addressed the cultural heritage, adaptability, and creativity of Native Americans and of the Mexican, Hispanic American, Anglo, and other immigrant communities that have played a part in creating the life that surrounds the Mexico-U.S. border - those who maintain it, those who cross it, those who are left behind, and those who dwell in the border region. The program explored the processes through which such groups create, adapt, and preserve culture to meet the challenges of life on the border. It sought to present and understand community codes of behavior that evolved on the border including confrontation, evasion, violence, and romance, especially as these have been transformed into narrative and other forms of artistic expression.

Music performances at the Festival included emergent forms such as the conjunto, which grew out of the interaction between different cultural communities; older forms, such as the corrido, which has been used to preserve a historical vision in the defense of disputed territory; and adapted forms such as the string band music now incorporated into the traditional repertoire of the Tohono O'odham Native American communities. Also featured in the program were five muralists, whose work reflects the traditions of Mexican cholo and United States Chicano muralism. Murals continue to be touchstones of common historical experiences, archaeologies of sociocultural movements, and powerful statements of identity, ethical principles, and community aspirations. The unique fusion of border aesthetics and handcrafted technology was embodied for Festival visitors in lowriders - distinctively customized automobiles. These lowslung, hopping cars complemented the iconography of murals as statements of cultural identity.

Vaqueros of south Texas demonstrated their skills, crafts, and foodways associated with their cowboy tradition, which dates back to the Spanish colonial era. A fisherman from the port of Brownsville demonstrated shrimping techniques. A Laredo blacksmith forged stirrups, belt buckles, and other implements of vaquero life, along with a number of traditional and contemporary decorative objects. A ropemaker demonstrated the use of the local fiber called lechuguilla (a fibrous plant of the agave family). While fine craft traditions like guitar- and furniture-making are not specific to the border, craftspeople have incorporated motifs and instruments native to the region, like the bajo sexto guitar. Other occupational groups characteristic of the border environment included federal Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agents who regulate movement across the border; coyotes and polleros, who help migrants evade immigration regulations; and workers in maquiladora assembly line industried. Narrative sessions focused on the culture of craft and occupation in the context of the border.

Artisans also demonstrated crafts used in the home and for special celebrations, including quilt-making, flower- and piñata-making, candlemaking, and reverse-painted glass. Participants prepared regional specialties, traditional foods served for fiestas, and offered a sampling of typical vaquero outdoor cooking. Finally, the Festival presented members of the Mixteco Indian community in Tijuana, a recent migrant group, which preserves its cultural identity and contributes to the economy at the border by maintaining ties with other Mixteco communities in Oaxaca and California.

The United States-Mexico border has had a profound effect on the lives of millions of people. The then-pending NAFTA free trade agreement was only the latest in a long line of international socioeconomic arrangements with wide ranging local impacts. Critical attention in Mexico and the U.S. had increasingly focused on the historical consciousness created in this borderland and on its expression in traditional and other forms of art. Recognition of the vitality and value of borderland culture was growing in 1993 at the margins, among borderland populations, as well as in the centers of power and opinion in both countries. Scholars and political leaders increasingly realized that the cultural encounters, syntheses, and resistances characteristic of border life signaled similar cultural developments in the larger societies. This intensifying concern and scrutiny centered on the margin, but could it reduce the marginality in human rights, social dignity, and economic opportunity at the border? Festival organizers hoped that listening to community voices of the border from the Mexican and United States sides could better inform our thinking and decision-making.

Olivia Cadaval served as Program Curator, with Peter Seitel as Research Advisor; Héctor Antonío Corporán was Program Coordinator and Betty Belanus was Presentation Coordinator.

Collaborating institutions included Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universid Autónoma de Nuevo León; Consejo Nacional para las Culturas y las Artes – El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras; El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF); El Paso-Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Embajada de México en Washington, D.C.; John E. Conner Museum, Texas A & I University; Institute of Texan Cultures; Instituto Cultural de México; Instituto de Bellaas Artes del Estado de Baja California; Instituto Nacional Indigenista; Instituto Mexicano de Cultura, San Antonio; Laredo State University; Mexican Cultural Institute; Museo Regional de la Universidad Autónoma de Baja California en Mexicali; National Museum of the American Indian; New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Pimería Alta Historical Society, Arizona; Texas A & I University; Texas Folklife Resources; Tumacácori National Historical Park, Arizona; University of Arizona Library's Southwest Folklore Center; University of Arizona – Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; University of Texas – Brownsville; University of Texas, Center for Mexican-American Studies; University of Texas – Pan American; and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.

United States-Mexico Borderlands was made possible with the support and collaboration of the Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes - El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Texas Commission on the Arts, Cerveza Tecate - Imported Beer, Texas Folklife Resources, University of Arizona Library's Western Folklore Center, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Léon - Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Gubierno de Nuevo Léon, Mexican Cultural Institute, and the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
María Eugenia de la O, Enrique Madrid, Angel Norzagaray Norzagaray, Manuel Peña, Kathy Raglan, Michael James Ritchie, Suzie Reyes, Irene Vásquez Valle, Kathy Vargas, Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela
Presenters and fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Norma Cantú, Jessica Chapin, Andrew Connors, Maricela González Felix, Mary Lou Gortárez, Everardo Garduño, James S. Griffith, Celso Garza Guajardo, Ian F. Hancock, Pat Jasper, Enrique Lamadrid, Laura Larco, Francisco Javier Moreno, Daniel Sheehy, Emily Socolov, Michael C. Stone; José Manuel Valenzuela Arce, Meynardo Vásquez, Laura Velasco Ortíz, Thomas Vennum, Jr., Cynthia Vidaurri
Participants:
Tijuana, Baja California

Olga Lidia Cortés, Mixteca, hat and basket maker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Guadalupe Isabel Flores de Estrada, 1939-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Juvencio Extrada Maceda, 1936-, Mixteco, storyteller, oral historian, candlemaker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Gloria López López, Mixteca, vendor, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Elia Ilda Maceda Flores, 1971-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Ofelia Santos López, Mixteca, vendor, oral historian, hat and basket maker, altar maker, cook, weaver, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Francisco Paulino Sierra Cruz, 1955-, Mixteca, schoolteacher, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Cathedral City, California

Carmen Moreno, guitarist, singer, Cathedral City, California

Santa Catarina, Baja California

Benito Peralta González, Paipai, storyteller, oral historian, Santa Catarina, Baja California, Mexico

Tecate, Baja California

José Luis Lee Sandoval, furniture maker, Tecate, Baja California, Mexico

Mexicali, Baja California

Taller Universitario de Teatro -- Taller Universitario de TeatroAngel Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1961-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoHeriberto B. Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1959-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoLoreto Ramón Tamayo Rosas, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAlejandra Rioseco de la Pena, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAndrés García Moreno, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoPedro Gabriel González Castro, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

San Simon Village, Arizona

Tohono O'odham String Band -- Tohono O'odham String BandBlaine W. Juan, 1936-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaJoseph Alonzo García, 1924-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaFrank N. Pedro, 1928-, guitar, San Simon Village, ArizonaVictor Augustine García, 1922-, violin, San Simon Village, ArizonaNacho J. Feleys, 1909-1994, snare drum, San Simon Village, ArizonaMike L. Francisco, 1926-, bass drum, dancer, San Simon Village, Arizona

Lupe Lopez, 1927-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Marie Leon, 1930-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Nogales, Sonora

Maria Gloria Moroyoqui de Roques, 1930-, Yaqui cook, piñata and flower maker, herbalist, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

Imuris, Sonora

Anastasio Léon, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Francisco Silva, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Magdalena, Sonora

Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela, regional historian, Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico

Tumacácori, Arizona

María Rodríguez, 1912-2001, tortilla maker, flower maker, cook, Tumacácori, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

Reynaldo B. Hernandez, INS border patrol, storyteller, Tucson, Arizona

Arturo Carrillo Strong, 1930-, author, oral historian, Tucson, Arizona

Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño Band -- Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño BandJesús Juan Yucupicio, 1965-, electric bass, Tucson, ArizonaAlbert M. Yucupicio, 1954-, accordion, Tucson, ArizonaAngel M. Yucupicio, 1966-, drums, Tucson, ArizonaPeter S. Yucupicio, 1957-, bajo sexto, Tucson, Arizona

Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

Brigada por La Paz -- Brigada por La PazAlonso Encina Herrera, 1968-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoJesús Alberto "Pee Wee" Rodriguez Medina, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoGustavo "Sleepy" Grado Tiscareño, 1973-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoMiguel Angel "El Tandy" Sandoval Lira, 1971-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Oscar Ramírez, 1944-, guitar maker, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Los Alegres del Norte, norteño band -- Los Alegres del Norte, norteño bandJosé Flores Cordova, accordion, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoDiego Hidalgo Alvarez, 1944-, bajo sexto, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoEmilio Chaírez Muñoz, tololoche, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

El Paso, Texas

Agustín Castillo, 1950-, woodcarver, furniture maker, El Paso, Texas

Carlos Callejo, Chicano muralist, El Paso, Texas

Romulo Frías, lowrider, El Paso, Texas

El Divisidero, Chihuahua

Guadalupe Carrasco Leyva, 1923-, quilter, cook, El Divisidero, Chihuahua, Mexico

Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua

Baltazar Rodríguez Puentes, 1942-, ranching crafts, Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua, Mexico

Lajitas, Texas

Adolfo O. Rodríguez, 1971-, ranching crafts, Lajitas, Texas

Presidio, Texas

Richard Mark Bernholz, 1954-, INS border patrol, storyteller, Presidio, Texas

Nacimiento, Chihuahua

Gertrude Factor Vásquez, 1921-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Alice Fay Lozano, 1916-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Del Rio, Texas

Ethel I. Warrior, 1919-, oral historian, cook, Del Rio, Texas

William F. Warrior, 1927-, oral historian, storyteller, Del Rio, Texas

Laredo, Texas

Armando Flores, 1953-, blacksmith, Laredo, Texas

María Paredes de Solís, 1923-, quilter, Laredo, Texas

Monterrey, Mexico

El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño Band -- El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño BandMiguel "El Gorrión" Luna Franco, 1948-, drums, composer, vocals, Monterrey, MexicoMoisés García, guitar, Monterrey, Mexico

Hebbronville, Texas

Omar Galván, 1920-1999, vaquero, rope maker, cook, storyteller, Hebbronville, Texas

Kingsville, Texas

Joe O. Mendietta, 1961-, vaquero, horsehair braider, Kingsville, Texas

San Diego, Texas

Canuto Soliz, 1924-2006, vaquero, leatherworker, storyteller, guitarist, San Diego, Texas

Elsa, Texas

Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto Band -- Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto BandAntonio V. Layton, 1946-, guitar, vocals, Elsa, TexasRené Layton, drums, Elsa, TexasNorfilia Layton González, vocals, Elsa, TexasGilbert González, bass guitar, Elsa, TexasBenigno Layton, 1950-, accordion, vocals, Elsa, Texas

Brownsville, Texas

Julius Collins, 1928-, shrimper, net maker, cook, Brownsville, Texas
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53366ad74-9495-4412-9336-ea97e6c0f67a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref41

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Faculty  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Students  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce Marquess Carey conducted 2002 June 16, by Glenn Adamson, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Carey's home, in Madison, Wisconsin.
Carey speaks of growing up in Redding, California; her widowed mother working to support Carey and herself; her "lonesome" childhood and her eagerness to leave Redding to attend the University of California at Berkeley; majoring in English; meeting her husband Harlan (Mark) Marquess in her senior year at Berkeley and marrying him; dropping out of college; regretting her marriage; her life as a housewife and mother in the late 1950s and 1960s; moving to Madison, Wisconsin, for her husband's job as a Russian teacher; taking weaving classes with Larry Edman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and meeting fiber artist Claire Zeisler on a field trip to Chicago. Carey discusses experimentation in her work and "stretching the limits of the technique" in Edman's class; receiving her undergraduate degree in textile arts in 1971; working with a computer-driven Dobby Loom; studying with Ruth Gao and Jim Peters at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for her MFA in the early 1970s; teaching weaving at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a focus on technical and design skills; writing articles on the technical aspects of fiber art for "Fiber Arts," "Weaver's Journal," "Shuttle, Spindle, & Dye Pot," and other periodicals; exhibiting with the Wisconsin Designer Craftsmen in the 1970s; participating in the Quilt National Show in 1979; receiving a five-year development grant from the University of Wisconsin and quitting her teaching job; using "systematic" weaving methods in quilting; her involvement with galleries such as the Connell/Great American Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia; working with art consultants; the difference between private and corporate commissions; her use of bright colors and various fabrics; her use of tools and technology including an industrial sewing machine and computer programs such as Photoshop; her second marriage to Phil Carey in 1980 after her divorce to Marquess in the mid-1970s; and the "ephemeral" qualities in art. She considers herself a "collager," assembling fabrics and "embellishments." She also discusses her involvement with the Studio Art Quilt Associates and in the Art Quilt Network; and her piece, "Blue Ribbon," in the collection of the American Craft Museum. Carey recalls Camille Cook, Lia Cook, Martha Connell, Hillary Fletcher, Ted Hallman, Pat Mansfield, Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Yvonne Porcella, [Laurence] Rathsack, Victor Vasarely, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce Marquess Carey (1936- ) is a quilt maker from Madison, Wisconsin. Glenn Adamson is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Educators -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Fiberwork  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carey02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f3213bc2-a50f-4b55-a7f5-0c9301ff06f5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carey02
Online Media:

Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding the AIDS Memorial Quilt

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Presenters:
James Deutsch, Guy Hemrick, Brian Holman, Anthony Knight, Nadine Licostie, Marsha MacDowell, Katherine Ott, Julie Rhoad, Mike Smith, Jeff Stott, Nomvula Mashoai-Cook, David Gere, Annie Groeber, Jada Harris, Teresa Hollingsworth, Linda Rethman
Introduction:
The year 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and 30 years of life with AIDS. With the introduction of The Quilt in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation redefined the tradition of quilt making in response to contemporary circumstances. Through hands-on panel-making activities, individuals and communities have come together to remember loved ones, grieve, find support and strength, and engage in dialogues for change.

In 2012, The Quilt contained nearly 48,000 panels, and it had been viewed by more than 18 million people. It is much more than pieced-together fabric squares: it is a moving and monumental creative collaboration; it is a catalyst to remember, understand, educate, and act.

The 2012 Festival program featured the remarkable artistry, inspiration, and impact of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and provided the public with an unparalleled opportunity to experience this highly charged symbol of the AIDS crisis and the largest community art project in the world. It was the first Festival program to focus exclusively on community craft and performance directly developed in response to crisis and grief. With The AIDS Memorial Quilt as the anchor and through craft demonstrations, dance and musical performances, interactive discussions, and other activities, this program commemorated the innovative and resourceful ways through which communities have endeavored to educate people and to cope with one of the most complex pandemics in modern history.

The Festival brought together approximately 100 visual artists, designers, quilters, dancers, musicians, community activists, and others who shared the knowledge and creativity that shape their efforts to disseminate the message of the AIDS crisis. Quilt panel-making groups demonstrated and taught a variety of traditional quilting techniques. Volunteers and staff from The NAMES Project Foundation performed the rituals surrounding new panels and Quilt displays. The program also featured other artistic responses to the AIDS crisis from the United States and South Africa, and presented moderated conversations with project contributors, community leaders, and pioneers. Festival venues served as sites for sharing and documenting visitors' personal stories and creative expressions related to living in the age of HIV and AIDS.

Visitors of all ages had the opportunity to learn quilting techniques, make panels, and share stories from their own experiences. Sections of The Quilt were displayed throughout the Festival site, incorporated into the various demonstration and performance venues, and laid out on the National Mall - reinforcing The Quilt's size, visual impact, and the scale and diversity of people impacted by HIV and AIDS.

Arlene Reiniger was Curator and Anna Kaplan was Program Coordinator. The NAMES Project Foundation team included: Julie Rhoad, Jim Marks, Roddy Williams, Gert McMullin, Jada Harris, Chili Crane, Brian Holman, and Ritchie Crownfield.

Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding The AIDS Memorial Quilt program at the 2012 Festival was a partnership between the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and The NAMES Project Foundation, with the support and participation of many others.
Participants:
Hilary Anderson

David H. Bell, 1949-, writer and director, The NAMES Performers, Evanston, Illinois

Tom Berklund

Michael Berresse

Leigh Blake

Mary Bowman, 1988-, spoken word artist, Suitland, Maryland

J.T. Bullock, 1980-, spoken word artist, Silver Spring, Maryland

Reginald Cabico, 1970-, spoken word artist, Washington, D.C.

Jostina Nomvula Mashoai-Cook, 1952-, Observatory-Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

William R. Crownfield, Jr., 1959-, Atlanta, Georgia

Ryan Garson, 1991-, La Crosse, Wisconsin

Dan Green

Annie Groeber, New York, New York

Addison Heimann

Alex Hills

Teresa Hollingsworth, 1968-, Atlanta, Georgia

Terry Hooks

Stephen Keen, 1956-, DJ, Berkeley, California

Dwayne Lawson-Brown, spoken word artist, Community Outreach Coordinator for Metro Teen AIDS, Washington, D.C.

Cindi Love

Dale MacDonald, 1958-, Palo Alto, California

Kathleen Mead

Sherry Moore, 1956-, Desert Hot Springs, California

Richard Moultrie

Kelly Pochop

Vivian Pochop

Linda Rethman, 1958-, Berea, Durban, South Africa

Kelly Rivera Hart, San Francisco, California

Lili Romero De Simone

Molly Smith

Sonya Renee, 1976-, spoken word artist, Baltimore, Maryland

The NAMES Performers, Performance Group A – Green -- The NAMES Performers, Performance Group A – GreenGeoffrey Button, 1976-, Evanston, IllinoisRobert Deason, 1984-, Chicago, IllinoisJessica Paige Kahkoska, 1991-, Evanston, IllinoisNathaniel Lewellyn, 1988-, Milwaukee, WisconsinPatrick Martin, 1977-, Chicago, IllinoisBrad Raymond, 1977-, Newnan, GeorgiaBethany Thomas, 1982-, Chicago, Illinois

The NAMES Performers, Performance Group B - Blue -- The NAMES Performers, Performance Group B - BlueBrian J. Bohr, 1990-, Wheaton, IllinoisCarly Cantor, 1990-, Cincinnati, OhioEvelyn Jacoby, 1990-, Maplewood, New JerseyEmily Maltby, 1990-, New York, New YorkJevares Myrick, 1985-, Powder Springs, GeorgiaLatrice Ann Pace, 1978-, Atlanta, GeorgiaPatrick Sulken, 1990-, Evanston, Illinois

The NAMES Project Foundation -- The NAMES Project FoundationCleve Edward Jones, 1954-, AIDS Memorial Quilt founder, San Francisco, CaliforniaMike Smith, The NAMES Project Foundation co-founder, San Francisco, CaliforniaJulie Rhoad, 1960-, Atlanta, GeorgiaJada Harris, 1966-, Atlanta, GeorgiaJames Marks, Jr., 1957-, Atlanta, Georgia

Digital Component -- Digital ComponentRosemary Comella, 1961-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaTisha Dejmanee, 1985-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaBrittany Farr, 1988-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaBridgette Kidd, 1967-, Los Angeles, California

Quilt Display -- Quilt DisplayKevin Crane, 1974-, warehouse manager, Avondale Estates, GeorgiaBradford James Gammell, 1962-, chapter program coordinator, quilt display co-manager, Wilton Manors, FloridaDeneice Garland, 1961-, display assistant, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Bowie, MarylandSheila Hamilton, 1970-, display assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaKelly Hart, 1959-, display assistant, San Francisco, CaliforniaJoan Juster, 1953-, reader coordinator, San Francisco, CaliforniaWilfred Roczkos, panel maker, display assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaSherman R. Williams, 1972-, project manager, Atlanta, Georgia

2362 Market Street -- 2362 Market StreetPhillip Andrew Cockrell, Jr., 1960-, panel-making assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaKarl Burten Gustafson, 1958-, panel-making assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaRaymond Slater Kinlock, III, 1949-, panel maker, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Solebury, PennsylvaniaJon Lopez, 1957-, panel maker, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Palm Springs, CaliforniaRick McCormack, 1956-, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Springfield, MissouriCindy Ann McMullin, 1955-, quilt production manager, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaAudrey Muldoon, 1952-, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Peachtree City, GeorgiaLawrence Pellino, 1952-, panel maker, Avondale Estates, Georgia

Common Threads -- Common ThreadsNokuphiwa Caroline Gedze, 1981-, embroiderer, Peddie, South AfricaDavid Gere, 1957-, co-curator, The A.R.T. Show, Los Angeles, CaliforniaUnathi Bulelwa Mtshemla-Meslane, 1974-, Keiskamma Trust, Peddie, South AfricaBeauty Ndlovu, 1960-, beaded doll maker, Cato Ridge, South AfricaLobolile Bhekiswephi Ximba, 1953-, beaded doll maker, Muden, South Africa

Healing Arts -- Healing ArtsTeena Cahill-Dyer, 1946-, director of Wisdom and Beyond LLC, Princeton, New JerseyOsayi Endolyn, 1982-, storyteller, writer, Atlanta, GeorgiaNondumiso Hlwele, 1974-, artist, activist, Cape Town, South AfricaWilliam F. Howard, 1953-, photographer, Atlanta, GeorgiaValerie Knight, 1952-, expressive arts psychologist, New York, New YorkDouglas Lothes, 1958-, spoken word artist, Palm Springs, CaliforniaSydney March, 1954-, writing workshop facilitator, Washington, D.C.Jane Solomon, 1963-, body map facilitator, Cape Town, South Africa

Quilting Bee -- Quilting BeeJada Harris, project manager, Atlanta, GeorgiaMarquetta Bell-Johnson, 1955-, panel-making facilitator, Stone Mountain, Georgia Shannon Brogdon-Grantham, 1987-, material culture specialist, Bowie, MarylandRasheeda Parada Burston, 1953-, teaching artist, call my name facilitator, Atlanta, GeorgiaClarissa Christine Crabtree, panel maker, display and workshop coordinator, Glendale, New YorkDonita Lanette Daniels, 1955-, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaOnifa Funke Adesanya-Awoyade, 1964-, ritual performer, Seattle, WashingtonSonja Jackson, 1962-, panel maker, Clarkston, GeorgiaShelia Jones, 1957-, panel maker, Decatur, GeorgiaStephanie Laster, 1962-, panel maker, East Point, GeorgiaChristopher Locklear, 1969-, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaKaren Meredith, 1947-, panel maker, Manahawkin, New JerseyAma Saran, 1948-, ritual specialist, Washington, D.C.Juanita Williams, 1956-, panel maker, Orangeburg, South Carolina

Remember Their Names -- Remember Their NamesDarin Arrowood, Atlanta, GeorgiaAnne Balsamo, Los Angeles, California

In Process… -- In Process…Adwoa Agyeman, Washington, D.C.Vanessa Crosson, 1953-, Upper Marlboro, MarylandPamela Rogers, 1942-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Rock Creek Singers -- Rock Creek SingersGiuseppe DeBartolo, 1976-, Washington, D.C.Robert Dragoset, Germantown, MarylandAndrew Harmon, 1973-, Washington, D.C.Kyle Holland, 1980-, Hanover, MarylandGeorge Huffman, 1958-, Washington, D.C.David Jonas, 1966-, Washington, D.C.John Jowers, 1980-, Hyattsville, MarylandJack Reiffer, 1944-, Washington, D.C.Lyn Van Noy, 1954-, Arlington, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2012, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk569d36668-c562-4f86-9c51-a9eadcf3b63f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2012-ref32

ONE of FIFTEEN (2005-2006)

Collection Creator:
Parish Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2005-2006
2011
Scope and Contents:
This group show was the first in a series of six exhibitions held in 2006 commemorating Parish Gallery's 15th year. Included in this exhibition are works by Floyd Coleman, Victor Ekpuk, Ron Flemmings, Liani Foster, Naza McFarren, Roberto Morassi, Deanna Schwartzberg, Stephanie Parrish Taylor, and Yvette Watson.

Includes born-digital records, see ER07.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of electronic records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Parish Gallery records, 1940-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Parish Gallery records
Parish Gallery records / Series 1: Exhibition Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98f886f19-745f-47a5-b5ba-81e10cc2cdfd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parigall-ref177
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  • View ONE of FIFTEEN (2005-2006) digital asset number 1

Quilt

Culture/People:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Paula J. White; Mary Bighorse; Ina McNeil; Margaret Wood; Ana Cooke Hoffman; Gussie Bento; Judy Toppings; Sheree Bonaparte; Lula Red Cloud; Conrad House; Nancy Naranjo; Harriet Soong; Shirley M. Grady; Jimmie Carole Fife Stewart; Alice Olsen Williams; Rita L. Corbiere; Marlene Sekaquaptewa; Ollie Napesni; and Bernyce K. Courtney  Search this
Commissioner:
National Museum of the American Indian Exhibitions Department (NMAI Exhibits Department)  Search this
Contributor:
Paula J. White, Minnesota Chippewa [Leech Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Mary Bighorse (Mary Big Horse), Osage  Search this
Ina McNeil (Ina Brown), Hunkpapa Lakota [Standing Rock]  Search this
Margaret Wood, Diné (Navajo)/Seminole, b. 1950  Search this
Ana Cooke Hoffman (Cungass'aq), Yup'ik (Yupik Eskimo)  Search this
Gussie Bento (Augusta-Helen Bento), Native Hawaiian  Search this
Judy Toppings, Minnesota Chippewa [White Earth, Minnesota]  Search this
Sheree "Peachy" Bonaparte, Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York]  Search this
Lula Red Cloud, Oglala Lakota [Pine Ridge]  Search this
Conrad House, Diné (Navajo)/Oneida, 1956-2001  Search this
Nancy Naranjo (Nancy Cougar Crone Naranjo), Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Harriet Soong (Harriet Momilani Kimseu Soong), Native Hawaiian, 1927-2012  Search this
Shirley M. Grady (Lead Woman), Numakiki (Mandan)/Minitari (Hidatsa)/Sioux/Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Jimmie Carole Fife Stewart, Muscogee Nation (Creek), b. 1940  Search this
Alice Olsen Williams (Minaachimo-Kwe), Ontario Ojibwe  Search this
Rita L. Corbiere, Anishinaabe [Manitoulin Island, Ontario]  Search this
Marlene Sekaquaptewa, Hopi [Bacavi]  Search this
Ollie Napesni, Sicangu Lakota [Rosebud Sioux]  Search this
Bernyce K. Courtney (B.K. Courtney), Wasco/Tlingit  Search this
Object Name:
Quilt
Media/Materials:
Cotton cloth, silk cloth, yarn, glass bead/beads, thread
Techniques:
Sewn, pieced, embroidered, quilted
Dimensions:
216.0 x 173.0 cm
Object Type:
Works of Art (Other)
Place:
USA
Date created:
1997
Catalog Number:
26/9621
Barcode:
269621.000
See related items:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)
Works of Art (Other)
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws68bf879c8-06bd-4bd6-a4cc-c85abb7c2b1d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_412305
Online Media:

Sara Wendell Smith photographs

Photographer:
Smith, Sara Wendell  Search this
Artist:
Akeem, Ayanniyi  Search this
Davies, Nike  Search this
Fakeye, Lamidi  Search this
Florence  Search this
Gbelekale, Bayo  Search this
Onireke, Adeyemo Kasali  Search this
Saka, Waheed O.  Search this
Togbe, Gbenga Emmanuel  Search this
Togbe, Rotimi  Search this
Wenger, Suzanne  Search this
Yemisi, Lola  Search this
Extent:
117 Color copy slides (1 volume)
Container:
Volume 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color copy slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Oshogbo (Nigeria)
Date:
1991
Summary:
Photographs taken by Sara Wendell Smith in 1991 of textiles by Nigerian artists. The works include Adire fabric, which is made in a resist dyeing technique, quilts and appliqués. The artists include Nike Davies, Adeyemo Kasali Onireke, Ayanniyi Akeem, Florence, Lola Yemisi, Waheed O. Saka, Rotimi Togbe, Gbenga Emmanual Togbe, Bayo Gbelekale, Lamidi Fakeye and Suzanne Wenger. Also included among the slides are scenes from Oshogbo, Nigeria.
Arrangement note:
Images indexed by negative number.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
For study purposes only. Copyright held by Sara Wendell Smith. Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Adire -- 1991  Search this
Applique -- 1991  Search this
Quilts -- 1991  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.1993-003
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo70aa229f8-5f72-4111-aa3d-ed5dc34b3015
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1993-003

Clippings and Press

Collection Creator:
Zarina  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 18
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2000-2013
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Use of electronic records requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Zarina Hashmi papers, 1950-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Zarina Hashmi papers
Zarina Hashmi papers / Series 5: Printed Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw978b0cc5d-5e1f-4dae-9dda-d2d53a501bf7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-zarina-ref549
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  • View Clippings and Press digital asset number 1

Rauschenberg, Robert

Collection Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 84, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1984
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Leo Castelli Gallery records / Series 4: Artists Files / 4.1: Artists Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96d680829-80f7-4be2-be08-ddad381245f0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-leocast-ref11624
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Rauschenberg, Robert digital asset number 1
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