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Oral history interview with Douglas Crimp

Interviewee:
Crimp, Douglas  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
ACT UP (Organization)  Search this
Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Gay Activists Alliance  Search this
Rutgers University. Institute of Jazz Studies -- Faculty  Search this
Tulane University -- Students  Search this
University of Rochester -- Faculty  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Baker, Elizabeth C., 1934-  Search this
Belaygue, Christian  Search this
Bordowitz, Gregg  Search this
Cooke, Lynne  Search this
Copjec, Joan  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Elovich, Richard  Search this
Jonas, Joan, 1936-  Search this
Kohlmeyer, Ida, 1912-1997  Search this
Krauss, Rosalind E.  Search this
Lemann, Bernard, 1905-  Search this
Leonard, Zoe  Search this
Michelson, Annette  Search this
Olander, William  Search this
Owens, Craig  Search this
Robinson, Marilynne  Search this
Santos, René, 1954-1986  Search this
Torm, Fernando  Search this
Waldman, Diane  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-1987  Search this
Wodiczko, Krzysztof  Search this
Wolfe, Daniel, 1960-  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (6 hr., 2 min.), digital, wav)
69 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Germany -- description and travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 January 3-4
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Douglas Crimp, conducted 2017 January 3-4, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Crimp's home in New York, New York.
Crimp speaks of growing up in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; his athleticism in water skiing and ice skating; sibling rivalry as a child; seeing art for the first time at the Seattle World Fair; being closeted and conflicted as a young gay man in 1950s Idaho; attending Tulane University in New Orleans and the culture shock he experienced there; his first year in Tulane's rigorous architecture program and ultimately changing his major to art history; the pageantry of Mardi Gras parades and the gay society he explored; writing an undergraduate paper analyzing Marcel Duchamp's "The Large Glass"; deciding to go to New York City; finding his voice as an art critic while beginning his career at Art News and Art International; his extensive analysis of Joan Jonas; attending Firehouse dances sponsored by Gay Activist Alliance and coming into his sexuality; being a patient of esteemed doctor Dr. Dan William; first learning of the AIDS crisis and epidemic through a New York Times article in 1981 describing a gay cancer; receiving an NEA art critic grant and spending a year in Germany from 1985-86; returning to find friends and acquaintances sick with HIV/AIDS or having died from it; the Dia Conversations; his role as editor of October and bringing queerness and AIDS to the forefront; joining ACT UP; the genesis of October's AIDS double issue in 1987-1988 and its success; how the journal issue changed the course of his career and steered him to teach gay studies and further his work with AIDS activism; the inner workings of ACT UP meetings; the sense of community ACT UP provided and the empowerment everyone felt; noting a sense of personal and professional urgency during the crisis; the timeline of his AIDS writings; his reaction to seeing the AIDS quilt for the first time at the March on Washington; writing to a wide, non-academic audience; his 1988 course at Rutgers University on AIDS video; his complex relationships with Rosalind Krauss and Annette Michelson; the poor coverage of the AIDS epidemic in the media and how it informed his writing; the understanding of the need for safe sex practices and writing "How to Have Promiscuity in an Epidemic;" teaching courses on AIDS at the University of Rochester and how his teaching interest evolved into queer theory and studies; evaluating Warhol's work with a queer lens; writing about his experience with queer life in New York City in the 1970s to counter the condescending conservative narrative; his current writing projects and interests; experience in demonstrations held by ACT UP; and the tremendous communal support he felt during his seroconversion. Crimp also recalls Marilynne Summers (Robinson), Bernard Lemann, Marimar Benetiz, Ida Kohlmeyer, Lynn Emory, Diane Waldman, Betsy Baker, Lucinda Hawkins, Christian Belaygue, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Rosalind Krauss, Joan Copjec, Gregg Bordowitz, Terri Cafaro, Rene Santos, Craig Owens, Fernando Torm, Bill Olander, Richard Elovich, Daniel Wolfe, Hector Caicedo, Lynne Cooke, and Zoe Leonard.
Biographical / Historical:
Douglas Crimp (1944- 2019) was a professor and art critic in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer who is the Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Gay activists  Search this
Gay and lesbian studies  Search this
HIV and AIDS  Search this
Mardi Gras  Search this
NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt  Search this
Queer theory  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crimp17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crimp17

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Adkins, Minnie, 1934-  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L., 1936-  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi, 1989-2001  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (4 hr., 33 min.), digital, wav)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 17-30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carolyn Mazloomi conducted 2002 September 17 and 30, by Joanne Cubbs, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in West Chester, Ohio. Mazloomi speaks of growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a family of self-taught artists; the positive influence of her aunt and teacher Dr. Carter; the generation of African-American quilt-makers who followed a gap in quilt-making post-slavery; she describes her previous career as an aeronautical engineer and her transition to quilt-making; how she identifies herself as a craftsperson, not an artist; her experience with Baltimore album and Appalachian quilts; learning to quilt; the Women of Color Quilter's Network and its economic and social development programs; her book, "Spirits of the Cloth"; the positive and negative aspects of travel; the false generalizations of African-American quilts in academic circles; the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity in her work; her connection to "praise songs"; she discusses functional vs. nonfunctional quilts; the market for "hand-crafted" quilts; agents and galleries; she describes her working environment; adopting the use of a sewing machine in her work; the importance of community; her technique; her accomplishment of placing African-American quilts in the Renwick Gallery; the influence of magazines, including "Raw Vision;" her aversion to commissions; expanding her use of materials and technology; her exhibitions; her role as an advocate and dealer; finding inspiration in black and white linocuts and her use of color in quilts; and making a connection with her audience. Mazloomi also recalls Marie Wilson, Cuesta Benberry, Edjohnetta Miller, Roland Freeman, Robert Cargo, Martha Connell, Penny Sisto, Minnie Adkins, Nkosi Johnson, and Lauryn Hill.
Biographical / Historical:
Carolyn Mazloomi (1948- ) is a quilt maker from West Chester, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Self-taught artists  Search this
Topic:
African American quiltmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Album quilts -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Quilts -- Appalachian Region  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mazloo02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mazloo02

Sam Gilliam papers

Creator:
Gilliam, Sam  Search this
Names:
Carl Solway Gallery  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Studio Museum in Harlem  Search this
Andrews, Benny, 1930-2006  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Gilliam, Dorothy Butler, 1936-  Search this
Krebs, Rockne, 1938-2011  Search this
Mondale, Walter F., 1928-  Search this
Extent:
7.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Photographs
Prints
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Date:
1957-1989
Summary:
The papers of contemporary Color Field painter and educator Sam Gilliam measure 7.9 linear feet and date from 1957 to 1989. The papers include biographical material, correspondence, writings, business records, printed material, subject files, a scrapbook, artwork, and photographic material that document Gilliam's life from his time as a student through his teaching, professorial, and artistic career. The collection highlights Gilliam's close involvement with the art institutions, racial politics, and artistic innovation taking place in 1960s through 1980s America, specifically in Washington D.C.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of contemporary Color Field painter and educator Sam Gilliam measure 7.9 linear feet and date from 1957 to 1989. The papers include biographical material, correspondence, writings, business records, printed material, subject files, a scrapbook, artwork, and photographic material that document Gilliam's life beginning as a student, through to his teaching, professorial, and artistic career based in Washington D.C. The collection highlights Gilliam's close involvement with the art institutions, racial politics, and artistic innovation taking place in 1960s through 1980s America, specifically in Washington D.C., and showcases the planning and creation of the large scale three-dimensional paintings Gilliam is best known for as a member of the Washington Color School of painting.

Biographical material includes resumes, passports, exhibition lists, artists' statements and essays, interview transcripts and recordings. Also included are audio recordings of conversations between Sam Gilliam and artist Benny Andrews, between Gilliam and artist Rockne Krebs, as well as recordings of a 1968 interview conducted by Dorothy Gilliam.

Correspondence spans over 20 years and includes letters to and from museums and galleries such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Studio Museum in Harlem, Carl Solway Gallery, collectors, artists including David Driskell, friends, family, students, and fans.

Writings include notes, statements, and essays by and about Gilliam, writings by university students of Gilliam, and writings related to Gilliam's artwork and public commissions including measurements for artworks, material research, and information regarding prints created for the private home of Walter Mondale.

Business records primarily include the daily records of activities kept by Sam and Dorothy Gilliam's secretary, Debby, from 1973 to 1978. Also present are resumes for a studio assistant for Gilliam, certificates of originality, legal documents, receipts and invoices, a record of donated paintings, financial records, ledgers, contracts, records and paperwork for the Gilliam's company Enterprise 101, and miscellany.

Printed materials include photocopies, exhibition announcements, magazines, and clippings regarding exhibitions, specific artworks, and commissions, and Gilliam and/or his then-wife, Dorothy Gilliam.

The subject file series contains letters, photographic material, business records, sketches, and printed materials concerning specific galleries, public art commissions, arts organizations, workshops, teaching positions, Gilliam's studio, art suppliers, and other topics.

A disbound scrapbook contains photographs, notes, and printed material related to Gilliam and his studio practice.

The artwork series includes sketches, personal notes, and small preparatory drawings by Gilliam.

Photographic material includes negatives, slides, and transparencies of artworks, Gilliam in his studio, and Gilliam and staff preparing museum and gallery exhibition spaces. Also included are records of student artwork, and photos and slides of artwork sent to Gilliam by students and aspiring artists.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 9 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1958-1988, (Box 1; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1965-1989, (Boxes 1-2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1962-1988, (Box 2; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Business Records, 1957-1986, (Boxes 2-3; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1962-1987, (Boxes 3-4; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 6: Subject Files, 1963-1988, (Boxes 4-7; 2.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Scrapbook, 1958-1968, (Box 7; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Artwork, 1970-1980, undated, (Boxes 7-9; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographic Material, 1960-1985, (Boxes 8-9; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Sam Gilliam (1933- ) is an African-American artist based in Washington, D.C. He was born in Tupelo, Mississippi and raised in Louisville, Kentucky where he began painting as a child, eventually attending the University of Louisville where he received his B.A. in Fine Art and M.A. in Painting. He went on to teach art to high school students in the Washington D.C. public school system, and university-level students at the Corcoran School of Art, the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), the University of Maryland, and Carnegie Mellon University. His numerous grants and awards include the 1971 Solomon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and multiple Honorary Doctoral degrees.

As an artist, Gilliam is best known for his three-dimensional draped and suspended paintings, covered with large fields of poured paint, pigment, and colorful staining influenced by the movement and colors of Abstract Expressionist painters. Gilliam went on to become a part of the Washington Color School of painters, where his creation of free-form works flourished. He created many public works that incorporated new materials such as custom designed metal forms, quilted canvas, and textiles; his works often included subtle social commentaries through their titling. His suspended paintings cemented Gilliam as an innovative and influential presence in 20th century American art.
Provenance:
The Sam Gilliam papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Sam Gilliam in 1989.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce must be obtained from Sam Gilliam.
Occupation:
Educators -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Color-field painting -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Washington Color School (Group of artists)  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Prints
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Citation:
Sam Gilliam papers, 1957-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gillsam
See more items in:
Sam Gilliam papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gillsam

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Faculty  Search this
University of Wisconsin--Madison -- Students  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce Marquess Carey conducted 2002 June 16, by Glenn Adamson, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Carey's home, in Madison, Wisconsin.
Carey speaks of growing up in Redding, California; her widowed mother working to support Carey and herself; her "lonesome" childhood and her eagerness to leave Redding to attend the University of California at Berkeley; majoring in English; meeting her husband Harlan (Mark) Marquess in her senior year at Berkeley and marrying him; dropping out of college; regretting her marriage; her life as a housewife and mother in the late 1950s and 1960s; moving to Madison, Wisconsin, for her husband's job as a Russian teacher; taking weaving classes with Larry Edman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and meeting fiber artist Claire Zeisler on a field trip to Chicago. Carey discusses experimentation in her work and "stretching the limits of the technique" in Edman's class; receiving her undergraduate degree in textile arts in 1971; working with a computer-driven Dobby Loom; studying with Ruth Gao and Jim Peters at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for her MFA in the early 1970s; teaching weaving at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a focus on technical and design skills; writing articles on the technical aspects of fiber art for "Fiber Arts," "Weaver's Journal," "Shuttle, Spindle, & Dye Pot," and other periodicals; exhibiting with the Wisconsin Designer Craftsmen in the 1970s; participating in the Quilt National Show in 1979; receiving a five-year development grant from the University of Wisconsin and quitting her teaching job; using "systematic" weaving methods in quilting; her involvement with galleries such as the Connell/Great American Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia; working with art consultants; the difference between private and corporate commissions; her use of bright colors and various fabrics; her use of tools and technology including an industrial sewing machine and computer programs such as Photoshop; her second marriage to Phil Carey in 1980 after her divorce to Marquess in the mid-1970s; and the "ephemeral" qualities in art. She considers herself a "collager," assembling fabrics and "embellishments." She also discusses her involvement with the Studio Art Quilt Associates and in the Art Quilt Network; and her piece, "Blue Ribbon," in the collection of the American Craft Museum. Carey recalls Camille Cook, Lia Cook, Martha Connell, Hillary Fletcher, Ted Hallman, Pat Mansfield, Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Yvonne Porcella, [Laurence] Rathsack, Victor Vasarely, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce Marquess Carey (1936- ) is a quilt maker from Madison, Wisconsin. Glenn Adamson is an art historian.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 51 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Quilting -- Design  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Weaving -- Study and teaching  Search this
Weaving -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carey02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carey02

Oral history interview with Nancy Crow

Creator:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Interviewer:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Names:
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
Snyderman Gallery  Search this
Extent:
50 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2002 December 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Crow conducted 2002 December 18, by Jean Robertson, for the Archives of American Art, at her home and studio, in Baltimore, Ohio, as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Crow speaks of her early childhood and her father's high standards; her early interest in color; her studies at Ohio State University and her first ceramics professor Edgar Littlefield; joining the textile guild in Athens, Ohio; how her quilting evolved from traditional to contemporary and abstract forms; her practice of working on several quilts simultaneously; the influence of Anna Williams, a quiltmaker in Baton Rouge, Alabama; and she describes her studio. Crow also discusses her association with the Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia; a trip to China that resulted in the series Chinese Souls; and how beauty is her ultimate goal. She talks about her travels to Mexico and South Africa; her technical mastery of strip piecing; working at home while raising two sons; the dyeing process; her sketchbooks; her long-term working relationship with hand quilter, Marla Hattabaugh; teaching at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts; the beginnings of the Quilt National Show at the Dairy Barn; the Ohio Arts Council; the Art Quilt Network; periodicals including FiberArts, Surface Design, Hali, and Raw Vision; two seminal exhibitions in her career, "Nancy Crow: Work in Transition," at the American Craft Museum, 1993, and "Nancy Crow -- Improvisational Quilts," at the Renwick Gallery, 1995; and the changing market for quilts in America. She recalls Bruce Hoffman, Rick and Ruth Snyderman, Jan Myers-Newberry, Rosalie Gascoigne, Sandra Blaine, Vivian Harvey; Linda Fowler, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Crow (1943- ) is a fiber artist and quiltmaker in Baltimore, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 31 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Researchers note: A separate 1988 interview of Crow, also conducted by Robertson is also available.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Dyes and dyeing -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crow02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crow02

Oral history interview with Douglas Crimp, 2017 January 3-4

Interviewee:
Crimp, Douglas, 1944-  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Subject:
Bordowitz, Gregg  Search this
Baker, Elizabeth C.  Search this
Belaygue, Christian  Search this
Cooke, Lynne  Search this
Copjec, Joan  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Elovich, Richard  Search this
Jonas, Joan  Search this
Kohlmeyer, Ida  Search this
Krauss, Rosalind E.  Search this
Lemann, Bernard  Search this
Leonard, Zoe  Search this
Michelson, Annette  Search this
Olander, William  Search this
Owens, Craig  Search this
Robinson, Marilynne  Search this
Santos, René  Search this
Torm, Fernando  Search this
Waldman, Diane  Search this
Warhol, Andy  Search this
Wodiczko, Krzysztof  Search this
Wolfe, Daniel  Search this
ACT UP (Organization)  Search this
Gay Activists Alliance  Search this
Rutgers University  Search this
Tulane University  Search this
University of Rochester  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Century 21 Exposition  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Germany -- description and travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and travel
Topic:
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Gay activists  Search this
Gay and lesbian studies  Search this
HIV and AIDS  Search this
Mardi Gras  Search this
NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt  Search this
Queer theory  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17416
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)384973
AAA_collcode_crimp17
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_384973
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi, 2002 September 17-30

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Subject:
Adkins, Minnie  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L.  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
African American quiltmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Album quilts -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Quilts -- Appalachian Region  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11504
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)240143
AAA_collcode_mazloo02
Theme:
African American
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_240143
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Joyce Marquess Carey, 2002 June 16

Interviewee:
Carey, Joyce Marquess, 1936-  Search this
Interviewer:
Adamson, Glenn, 1972-  Search this
Subject:
University of Wisconsin--Madison  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Fiberwork  Search this
Quilting -- Design  Search this
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Weaving -- Study and teaching  Search this
Weaving -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Weaving -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12329
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237986
AAA_collcode_carey02
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237986
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Nancy Crow, 2002 December 18

Interviewee:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Interviewer:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Subject:
Ohio State University  Search this
Snyderman Gallery  Search this
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Dyes and dyeing -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13095
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)238493
AAA_collcode_crow02
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_238493
Online Media:

Quilt connections : literature-based thematic activities to use throughout the curriculum / [written by Rendy King, Maureen King ; illustrated by Gary Rittenour]

Author:
King, Rendy  Search this
King, Maureen  Search this
Illustrator:
Rittenour, Gary  Search this
Physical description:
64 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1995
C1995
Topic:
Quilts--Study and teaching (Elementary)  Search this
Quilting--Study and teaching (Elementary)  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1016330

The Civil War for kids : a history with 21 activities / Janis Herbert

Author:
Herbert, Janis 1956-  Search this
Physical description:
xi, 145 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 x 28 cm
Type:
Books
Juvenile literature
Instructional and educational works
Place:
United States
Date:
1999
©1999
Civil War, 1861-1865
Topic:
Handicraft  Search this
History  Search this
Study and teaching  Search this
Activity programs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1085843

Teacher's guide to crossroads quilters : stitching the community together / text by David Crosby ; based in part on material compiled by Jann Ferris and Geraldine Nash ; photographs by Patricia Crosby

Title:
Crossroads quilters
Author:
Crosby, David  Search this
Nash, Geraldine  Search this
Ferris, Jann  Search this
Crosby, Patricia  Search this
Southern Arts Federation (U.S.)  Search this
Mississippi Cultural Crossroads  Search this
Physical description:
27 p. : ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mississippi
Date:
1999
2002
[between 1999 and 2002]
Topic:
Quilting--Study and teaching  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
Call number:
TT835 .C93 1999
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_703553

To honor & comfort : native quilting traditions : educator information / author: Shawn Termin ; project director: Johanna Gorelick

Title:
To honor and comfort : native quilting traditions
Educator information
Author:
Termin, Shawn  Search this
Gorelick, Johanna  Search this
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
North America
Date:
1997
C1997
Topic:
Indian textile fabrics--History--Study and teaching  Search this
Quilting--History--Study and teaching  Search this
Call number:
E98.T35 T47 1997
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_796026

American artifacts : essays in material culture / edited by Jules David Prown and Kenneth Haltman

Author:
Prown, Jules David  Search this
Haltman, Kenneth 1957-  Search this
Physical description:
xiii, 255 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2000
C2000
Topic:
Material culture  Search this
Americana  Search this
Popular culture  Search this
National characteristics, American  Search this
Material culture--Study and teaching  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Civilization  Search this
Study and teaching  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_611799

Celebrating black heritage : 20 days of activities, reading, recipes, parties, plays, and more / by Carole Marsh

Title:
Black heritage : 20 days of activities, reading, recipes, parties, plays, and more
Author:
Marsh, Carole  Search this
Physical description:
24 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
2003
C2003
Topic:
African Americans--Study and teaching (Elementary)--Activity programs  Search this
African Americans--Study and teaching (Middle school)--Activity programs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1018285

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