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From Nadir Shah to the Islamic Republic / edited by Peter Avery, Gavin Hambly and Charles Melville

Author:
Avery, Peter 1923-2008 http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83150921  Search this
Hambly, Gavin 1934- http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no94031631  Search this
Melville, C. P (Charles Perer) 1951-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xxiii, 1072 pages, 34 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations, plans, maps
Type:
Electronic resources
History
Place:
Iran
Date:
1991
Qajar dynasty, 1794-1925
Pahlavi dynasty, 1925-1979
Topic:
Qajar Dynasty (Iran)  Search this
History  Search this
Call number:
DS272 .C34 v.7 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1143195

Album of Persian Photographs

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (album (120 photoprints))
Culture:
Qajar dynasty -- Iran -- 1794-1925  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Photographs
Place:
Asia
Iran
Bandar Anzalī (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Black leather bound album of 119 albumen prints and one silver gelatin print. Prints are likely produced by the studio of photographer Antoin Sevruguin in the 1870s and 80s in his early career in Iran. Includes handwritten captions in Persian. Many of the prints have an unusually purplish tone.
Arrangement:
images indexed by original order in the album
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2015.09
Provenance:
Purchase; 2015.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Hairstyles  Search this
headgear  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Military  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Street vendors  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Photographs
Citation:
Album of Persian Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2015.09
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a2015-09
Online Media:

Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh, Shah of Iran, 1831-1896  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (album (99 photoprints), b&w, 31.2 cm. x 41.6 cm. (sheet))
62 albumen prints (b&w, 25 cm. x 20 cm. or smaller)
Culture:
Qajar dynasty -- Iran -- 1794-1925  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Bandar Anzalī (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Qazvīn (Iran)
Qum (Iran)
Rasht (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
A large album of prints by photographer Antoin Sevruguin, likely dating from his early career in Iran in the 1870s and 1880s. The collection also includes a number of loose, unbacked prints, many duplicating the photographs in the album. Roughly half of the mounted prints have English handwritten captions.
Arrangement:
Images indexed by original photographic print number.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03
Provenance:
Purchase; 2011.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Criminal procedure  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Executions and executioners  Search this
Hairstyles  Search this
headgear  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Military  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Street vendors  Search this
Thrones  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a2011-03
Online Media:

Album of Iranian Photographic Portraits

Creator:
Unknown  Search this
Abdullah Mirza Qajar, 1850-1909  Search this
Names:
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh, Shah of Iran, 1831-1896  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Album (76 photoprints), b&w)
76 Items (Photographic prints, b&w)
Culture:
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Cartes-de-visite
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
A family compiled album bound in gold embossed green leather and sold by Au Bon Marche, Paris. Seventy-six informal and studio individual portraits or groups by a variety of photographers from the 1860s to the 1940s or later. Subjects are likely family members, although formal portraits of royalty are also included. Formats range from large cabinet prints to cartes de visites, and are inserted into pockets rather than glued onto pages. Many of the prints have been cut down to fit into the cartes de visite pockets of the album. Most of the photographs have Persian language annotations written in pen or pencil.
Arrangement:
Images indexed by original photographic print number.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2012.05
Provenance:
Purchase; 2014.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Hairstyles  Search this
headgear  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Military  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Cartes-de-visite
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Citation:
Album of Iranian Photographic Portraits. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2012.05
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a2012-05
Online Media:

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Talar-i Salam or Talar-i Takht (Throne Room) Including Takht-I Tavoos or the Peacock Throne, at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20.7 cm. x 14.4 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880 - 1890
Scope and Contents:
"The photograph depicts the famous Peacock throne of Gulistan palace in the throne room or Talar-i Salam. Takht-i Tavoos (Peacock Throne) is a later name of Takht-i Khurshid or the Sun Throne. Erroneously the name of the Throne as the peacock throne equated it with the famous Indian throne of Shah Jahan and Nadir's war booty from India, whereas Takht-i Khurshid - visible in this image - was ordered by Fath Ali Shah Qajar around 1800s and built by an Isfahani artist known as Haji Muhammad Hussayn Khan Sadr. The name of the throne changed to the Peacock Throne after Fath Ali Shah's marriage to Tavoos Khanum, his favorite wife. The marriage was celebrated on this particular throne. In the occasion of various royal celebration - such as Salam-i Nawruzi - the throne would be moved out of the palace and into the Iwan-i Dar al-Imara (later known as the hall of Takht-i Marmar or the marble throne) and would be the seating place of the Qajar kings of the time.Talar-I Takht or Throne room of Gulistan palace housed the famous Peacock throne and was the offical reception room of the palace. Located on the northwest side of the complex, the room was initially designed as a museum but was later known for its primary use as the official reception room of the palace. The construction of the new complex and the throne room staretd in 1874 and concluded two years later in 1876. It was then decorated with the extensive collection of foreign gifts and local/Iranian artefacts of the palace. The room is currently used as a museum as well." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page fourty-three of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.43a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Thrones  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.43a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref125

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Iwan-I Takht-I Marmar Including the Marble Throne, at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 21.3 cm. x 14.6 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880 - 1890
Scope and Contents:
"The marble throne, as depicted in this photo, was designed by Mirza Baba Shirazi Naqashbashi on the orders of Fath Ali Shah Qajar and in 1806. The throne was later built upon this design by an artisan called Muhammad Ibrahim, whose name is carved on the statues of the corners of the throne. The throne is placed on the statues of three angels, six demons and eleven twisted columns, some underneath the bed and some surrounding it. The marble eventually replaced the peacock throne in the open balcony of Gulistan palace, called Iwan-i Takht (The terrace of the throne)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- Faded handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page fourty-three of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.43b
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Thrones  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.43b
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref126

Arpee Album: Photograph of Talar-i Salam or Talar-i Takht (Throne Room), in the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 21.3 cm. x 15.5 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880 - 1890
Scope and Contents:
"The photograph depicts the throne room or Talar-i Salam with the view of the throne.Talar-I Takht or Throne room of Gulistan palace normally housed the famous Peacock throne and was the offical reception room of the palace. Located on the northwest side of the complex, the room was initially designed as a museum but was later known for its primary use as the official reception room of the palace. The construction of the new complex and the throne room staretd in 1874 and concluded two years later in 1876. It was then decorated with the extensive collection of foreign gifts and local/Iranian artefacts of the palace. The room is currently used as a museum as well." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- Faded handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page sixty of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.60a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.60a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref153

Photograph of the Imarat-i Badgir (Wind-catcher Building) at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20.8 cm. x 16 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
"The villa was built on the south side the Gulistan Palace complex on the orders of Fath Ali Shah Qajar. Later on and on the orders of Nasir al-Din Shah extensive renovations were carried out on the site and the renovations continued later in the early Pahlavi era as well. The building is currently undergoing fresh rounds of renovations. The photo depicts the structure from the far end of the front pool, carefully framing the structure in the centre of the image. The complete symmetry of the plans allows for such symmetry in the image." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
One of 62 albumen prints, un-numbered and without any apparent organization, housed in document box and stored on shelves. The 62 photographs were found sandwiched between the front and back covers of a leather-bound album of 19th. century photographs of Antoin Sevruguin. Many of these prints are duplicates of these in the album, and were certainly purchased at the same time.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 B.18
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 B.18
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref19

Photograph of a Room at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20.6 cm. x 15.6 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
- Partial handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
One of 62 albumen prints, un-numbered and without any apparent organization, housed in document box and stored on shelves. The 62 photographs were found sandwiched between the front and back covers of a leather-bound album of 19th. century photographs of Antoin Sevruguin. Many of these prints are duplicates of these in the album, and were certainly purchased at the same time.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 B.19
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 B.19
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref20

Photograph of Shams-Al Emarat Palace at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 15.7 cm. x 20.9 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
ca.1880
Scope and Contents:
- Faded handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
One of 62 albumen prints, un-numbered and without any apparent organization, housed in document box and stored on shelves. The 62 photographs were found sandwiched between the front and back covers of a leather-bound album of 19th. century photographs of Antoin Sevruguin. Many of these prints are duplicates of these in the album, and were certainly purchased at the same time.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 B.20
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 B.20
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref21

Photograph of Takkiya Dawlat and Imarat-i Badgir (Wind-catcher Building) at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20.6 cm. x 14.8 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
"The photo depicts the two adjacent structures of the southern side of Gulistan palace: Takia Dawlat and Imarat-i Badgir. Imarat-I Badgir was built on the south side the Gulistan Palace complex on the orders of Fath Ali Shah Qajar. Later on and on the orders of Nasir al-Din Shah extensive renovations were carried out on the site and the renovations continued later in the early Pahlavi era as well. Takia Dowlat, the Royal Theater in Tehran, was built in the 1870s by Nāṣer-al-Din Shah. The building was destroyed in 1930 to make room for the new building of National Bank (Bank-I Milli). The first American envoy to Persia, Samuel Benjamin (1837-1914, stayed in Persia in 1883-85), was invited by the royal court to attend the Moḥarram celebrations at the Takia Dowlat and recorded his impressions: "On looking over the vast arena a sight met my gaze which was indeed extraordinary. The interior of the building is nearly two hundred feet in diameter and some eighty feet high. A domed frame of timbers, firmly spliced and braced with iron, springs form the walls, giving support to the awning that protects the interior from the sunlight and rain. ... A more oriental form of illuminating the building was seen in the prodigious number of lustres and candlesticks, all of glass and protected from the air by glass shades open on the top and variously colored; they were concentrated against the wall in immense glittering clusters. Estimating from those attached on one box, I judged that there were upwards of five thousand candles in these lustres. ... In the center of the arena was a circular stage of masonry, raised three feet and approached by two stairways. On one side of the building a pulpit of white marble was attached to the wall. The entire arena with the exception of a narrow passage around the stage was absolutely packed with women, thousands on thousands. At a rough estimate it seemed to me that quite four thousand women were seated there cross-legged on the earthen floor, which was made slightly sloping in order to enable those in the rear to see over the heads of those before them." Quoted from Encyclopædia Iranica." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
One of 62 albumen prints, un-numbered and without any apparent organization, housed in document box and stored on shelves. The 62 photographs were found sandwiched between the front and back covers of a leather-bound album of 19th. century photographs of Antoin Sevruguin. Many of these prints are duplicates of these in the album, and were certainly purchased at the same time.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 B.22
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 B.22
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref23

Photograph of the Dari-Ahmasi at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20.1 cm. x 15.1 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Scope and Contents:
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
One of 62 albumen prints, un-numbered and without any apparent organization, housed in document box and stored on shelves. The 62 photographs were found sandwiched between the front and back covers of a leather-bound album of 19th. century photographs of Antoin Sevruguin. Many of these prints are duplicates of these in the album, and were certainly purchased at the same time.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 B.23
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 B.23
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref24

Photograph of Kamraniyya Palace Complex

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 22.8 cm. x 17 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Scope and Contents:
"The photograph depicts the palace complex of Kamraniyya, built around 1880s by Kamran Mirza, Nasir al-Din Shah's third and favorite son. The garden of the complex was known for its exotic and extensive kinds of trees and greenery." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Arrangement:
One of 62 albumen prints, un-numbered and without any apparent organization, housed in document box and stored on shelves. The 62 photographs were found sandwiched between the front and back covers of a leather-bound album of 19th. century photographs of Antoin Sevruguin. Many of these prints are duplicates of these in the album, and were certainly purchased at the same time.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 B.02
General:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 B.02
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref3

Arpee Album: Photograph of Nasir al-Din Shah and Attendants, at Maydan-I Mashq, Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh, Shah of Iran, 1831-1896  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 19.9 cm. x 13.8 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880 - 1900
Scope and Contents:
"The maydan (square) was built on the orders of Fath Ali Shah Qajar (b.1772-d.1834) and was expanded during Nasir al-Din Shah's time and in 1862 by Mirza Mohammad Khan Sipahsalar. The square was used primarily for military training, from eight to ten every morning, and military related events and apparently was the largest of its kind in Tehran." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Nasr ed-din Shah and court."
Arrangement:
Page three of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.03a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.03a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref59

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Imarat-i Badgir (Wind-catcher Building) at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 19.9 cm. x 13.8 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
ca.1900
Scope and Contents:
"." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Waiting Pavillion Shah's city palace."
- Partial handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page four of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.04a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.04a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref61

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Imarat-i Badgir (Wind-catcher Building) at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 21.9 cm. x 15.9 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Scope and Contents:
"The villa was built on the south side the Gulistan Palace complex on the orders of Fath Ali Shah Qajar. Later on and on the orders of Nasir al-Din Shah extensive renovations were carried out on the site and the renovations continued later in the early Pahlavi era as well. The building is currently undergoing fresh rounds of renovations. The photo depicts the structure from the far end of the front pool, carefully framing the structure in the centre of the image. The complete symmetry of the plans allows for such symmetry in the image." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "'Court yard in Shah's city palace."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page thirteen of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.13a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.13a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref78

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Front Courtyard at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20 cm. x 15.5 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
ca. 1880
Scope and Contents:
"The photograph depicts the front courtyard of the palace, commonly used for Salam ceremonies which during the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. The photograph depicts the space empty of people, however, instead showing the overall layout of the garden in relation to the balcony which housed the throne as the seating place of the king during official ceremonies." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Reception Room of Palace."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page sixteen of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.16a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.16a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref81

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Dari-Ahmasi at the Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 21.2 cm. x 15 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Scope and Contents:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Gateway to Palace."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page sixteen of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.16b
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.16b
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref82

Arpee Album: Photograph from the Garden at Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 20.2 cm. x 13.4 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
ca.1885
Scope and Contents:
"The structure seen in the image was an addition to the already existing Bagh-I Gulistan (Gulistan garden) the construction of which concluded in 1876. Since then the building was used both as the official reception room of the palace and as a museum of local and international artworks. Takht-i Tavoos was also located inside the main hallway of this building. The building, located on the northwest side of the garden, is currently a museum. The photograph depicts the front shallow pool and the entrance of the structure. The windows are shown covered with painted fabrics on both top and lower floors of the building. In order to achieve the specific framing of both the pool and the entrance gate, the photographer's tripod would have been located on a narrow bridge over the waterway in front of the gate, immediately beyond the lower edge of the image. Photos and paintings of the structure were frequently published in journals and books from 1885 onwards. a close comparison of the images from 1885 to 1890s with the ones published after 1904 shows the addition of the lamp-posts in the shape of standing human figures, not visible in this image." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Shah's Garden in City Palace."
Arrangement:
Page seventeen of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.17b
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.17b
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref84

Arpee Album: Photograph of the Talar-i Salam or Talar-i Takht (Throne Room) Including Takht-I Tavoos or the Peacock Throne, at Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Tehran (Iran)

Topic:
Early Photography of Iran
Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Names:
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)  Search this
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin, 1851-1933  Search this
Extent:
1 albumen print (b&w, 21.2 cm. x 15.1 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Scope and Contents:
"The photograph depicts the famous Peacock throne of Gulistan palace in the throne room. Peacock throne is a later name of Takht-i Khurshid or the Sun Throne. Erroneously the name of the Throne as the peacock throne equated it with the famous Indian throne of Shah Jahan and Nadir's war booty from India, whereas Takht-i Khurshid - visible in this image - was ordered by Fath Ali Shah Qajar around 1800s and built by an Isfahani artist known as Haji Muhammad Hussayn Khan Sadr. The name of the throne changed to the Peacock Throne after Fath Ali Shah's marriage to Tavoos Khanum, his favorite wife. The marriage was celebrated on this particular throne. In the occasion of various royal celebration - such as Salam-i Nawruzi - the throne would be moved out of the palace and into the Iwan-i Dar al-Imara (later known as the hall of Takht-i Marmar or the marble throne) and would be the seating place of the Qajar kings of the time.Talar-I Takht or Throne room of Gulistan palace housed the famous Peacock throne and was the offical reception room of the palace." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Throne Room and Peacock Throne."
- Handwritten Cyrillic signature in white (inked), probably by Antoin Sevruguin reads: "Cebpróôun."
Arrangement:
Page eighteen of an album of 99 mounted albumen prints with attractive leather covers and embossed green star-and-crescent design.
Biographical / Historical:
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2011.03 A.18a
General:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Palaces  Search this
Qajar dynasty, -- Iran, -- 1794-1925  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Thrones  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A2011.03, Item FSA A2011.03 A.18a
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2011-03-ref85

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