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Jesse L. Nusbaum negatives and photographs

Creator:
Nusbaum, Jesse L. (Jesse Logan)  Search this
Extent:
205 acetate negatives
25 albumen prints
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
Kaibab Paiute  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Acetate negatives
Albumen prints
Negatives
Photographic prints
Photographs
Place:
New Mexico
Arizona
Santa Clara Pueblo (N.M.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Utah
Pecos National Historical Park (N.M.)
Hawikuh (N. M.)
Date:
1910-1928
Summary:
Includes images from the excavations at Hawikku near Zuni Pueblo and Basketmaker's Cave in Kane County, Utah, as well as objects found at Cave Lakes, also in Kane County, Utah. Also included are views of Zuni Pueblo, Santa Clara Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Puye cliff dwellings, Pecos Mission and other views of Arizona and New Mexico.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in individual sleeves; arranged by negative number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Biographical/Historical note:
Jesse L. Nusbaum, a long-time archaeologist and administrator for the National Park Service and recipient of the Distinguished Service ward from the Department of the Interior (1954), began his career as a teacher, attending Colorado Teachers College in Greeley, where he received his Bachelor of Pedagogy in 1907. He then moved to Las Vegas to teach science and manual arts at New Mexico State Normal School. Later that year, he made his first connection with Mesa Verde as a photographer and archeological assistant to A. V. Kidder; Nusbaum spent the next year working as an assistant to the archeologist. In June of 1909 he became the first employee of the School of American Archeology and Museum of New Mexico in Santa Fe under Dr. Edgar L. Hewett. Nusbaum traveled to Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Colorado, and New Mexico where he undertook archeological surveys, investigations, excavations, and ruins stabilization.

Nusbaum's work at the museum brought him back to Mesa Verde for the excavation, repair, and stabilization of the Balcony House, a project which extended into the winter of 1910. In 1913, he supervised the completion of the New Mexico Palace of Governors in Santa Fe and worked in the Mayan ruins of the Yucatan with Dr. S. G. Morley. He then supervised the construction of the state art museum from 1916 to 1918. Nusbaum enlisted during World War I in the hopes of becoming an aviator, but instead he became an engineer and served in France until his discharge in 1919. After the war, Nusbaum moved to New York City and worked at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. While Nusbaum was working in New York he took part in several expeditions to the Southwest, including those at Hawikku (Hawikuh) Pueblo and Basketmaker Cave.

In 1921, while still in New York, he was selected by Stephen Mather and Arno Cammerer to become superintendent at Mesa Verde National Park. Director Mather had become disgusted with the conditions that had developed there under a political superintendent. Nusbaum was a very effective superintendent, advancing the development of the park and preserving the archeological resources. He discontinued grazing, built a museum and developed good interpretive programs, especially ones designed to explain the Antiquities Act. His involvement with the Act led to his designation in 1927 as the lead archeologist and prime enforcer of the Act for the Southwest (while remaining Mesa Verde superintendent).

Nusbaum continued this dual capacity until 1930, when he took a leave of absence to organize and direct the Laboratory of Anthropology at Santa Fe, New Mexico. He continued as director of the laboratory until 1935, having earlier returned to the Park Service and resumed his dual duties as Mesa Verde superintendent and Department of the Interior archeologist enforcing the Antiquities Act. Nusbaum continued this dual position for many years. In 1946 he left Mesa Verde and his dual role for Santa Fe. At the National Park Service office there, he took up increased duties as the senior archeologist of the National Park Service. In this capacity, Nusbaum began one of the first salvage archeology projects when he persuaded El Paso Natural Gas Company to allow archeological excavation along their pipelines. After a year's extension Nusbaum was forced to retire from the NPS at the age of 71 in 1957. However, he continued to do consulting work for many years. He died in Santa Fe in December 1975, at the age of 88.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Photographs
Citation:
Jesse L. Nusbaum negatives and photographs, 1910-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.012
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-012

George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
1292 negatives (photographic)
23 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Pojoaque Pueblo  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Hano]  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Pueblo (Anasazi) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photograph

Creator:
Halseth, Odd S.  Search this
Extent:
158 negatives (photographic) (black and white)
4 Photographic prints (black and white)
Culture:
Puye Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui]  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1920-1925
Summary:
The collection consists of negatives and photographs made by Halseth from 1920 to 1925 in Arizona and New Mexico.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of negatives and photographs made by Halseth from 1920 to 1925 in Arizona and New Mexico. The materials are primarily informal, outdoor group and individual portraits of Akimel O'odham (Pima), Diné (Navajo), Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui], Piipaash (Maricopa), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Zia Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Cochiti Pueblo, Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), and Tesuque Pueblo men, women, and children. In addition among the Akimel O'odham photographs are depictions of dwellings, potters, ladle makers, baskets, the construction of an oven, food preparation, dwellings, and mattress factory wokers; among the K'apovi ceremonials and village views; among the Zia pottery and portraits of and paintings by Velino Shije Herrera; among the Jemez ceremonials and village views; among Kewa ovens; and among San Ildefonso village views and paintings by Awa Tsireh. The collection also includes photogrpahs depicting the pictographs at Puye.
Arrangement note:
Negatives Arranged by negative number (N32893-N33051)

Prints Arranged by print number (P19345-P19346, P19630-P19631)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in 1893 in Moss, Norway, Halseth was an anthropologist, museum director, educator, author, art critic, and lecturer. As a young man he studied electrical engineering and anthropology in Germany and served both Norway and the United States during World War I. While in San Diego for military training, he met archaeologist Edgar L. Hewett and after the war accepted a position with Hewett as the curator of art at the San Diego Museum. In 1923, he moved to Santa Fe, where he was on both the staff of the School of American Research and the Museum of New Mexico. After four years, Halseth was appointed director of the newly established Arizona Museum in Phoenix and in 1929 initiated the excavation of the Pueblo Grande Indian ruins and founded the Pueblo Grande Museum. Halseth was also Phoenix's head archaeologist and superintendent of the city's Division of Archaeology. Active in his field, Halseth was a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, a member of the Society of American Archaeology, and the author of numerous publications on Arizona archaeology and indigenous arts and crafts. He retired in 1960.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic materials separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Restricted: Cultural Sensitivity
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photographs, 1920-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.038
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-038

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