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Chauve-Souris (program)

Artist:
Ralph Barton, 14 Aug 1891 - 19 May 1931  Search this
Sitter:
Nikita Balieff, 1877 - 3 Sep 1936  Search this
Al Jolson, 26 May 1886 - 23 Oct 1950  Search this
John Emerson, 1874 - 1956  Search this
Anita Loos, 26 Apr 1888 - 18 Aug 1981  Search this
Irving Berlin, 11 May 1888 - 22 Sep 1989  Search this
David Belasco, 25 Jul 1853 - 14 May 1931  Search this
Lenore Ulric, 21 Jul 1892 - 30 Dec 1970  Search this
John Barrymore, 15 Feb 1882 - 29 May 1942  Search this
Michael Strange, 1890 - 1950  Search this
Anna Pavlova, 1881 - 1931  Search this
Josef Hofmann, 20 Jan 1876 - 16 Feb 1957  Search this
Reina Belasco Gest, ? - 1948  Search this
John Drew, 13 Nov 1853 - 9 Jul 1927  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., 13 Sep 1887 - 12 Jul 1944  Search this
Maria Jeritza, 6 Oct 1887 - 10 Jul 1982  Search this
Giulio Gatti-Casazza, 3 Feb 1869 - 2 Sep 1940  Search this
Geraldine Farrar, 28 Feb 1882 - 11 Mar 1967  Search this
Mary Garden, 20 Feb 1874 - 3 Jan 1967  Search this
Elsie de Wolfe, 20 Dec 1865 - 12 Jul 1950  Search this
Arthur Brisbane, 12 Dec 1864 - 25 Dec 1936  Search this
Millicent Willson Hearst, 1882 - 1974  Search this
Henry Blackman Sell, 1889 - 1974  Search this
Condé Montrose Nast, 26 Mar 1873 - 19 Sep 1942  Search this
Irene Foote Castle, 7 Apr 1893 - 26 Jan 1969  Search this
Francis Welch Crowninshield, 24 Jun 1872 - 28 Dec 1947  Search this
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 9 Jan 1875 - 18 Apr 1942  Search this
Kenneth MacGowan, 1888 - 1963  Search this
Alan Dale, 1861 - 1928  Search this
Ray Long, 1878 - 1935  Search this
Sam Bernard, 1863 - 1927  Search this
Marilyn Miller, 1 Sep 1898 - 7 Apr 1936  Search this
Ed Wynn, 9 Nov 1886 - 19 Jun 1966  Search this
Florence Jaffray Hurst Harriman, 1870 - 1967  Search this
Charles Dana Gibson, 14 Sep 1867 - 29 Dec 1944  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott, 19 Jan 1887 - 23 Jan 1943  Search this
Mrs. Lydig Hoyt, 1890? - 1930?  Search this
Franklin Pierce Adams, 15 Nov 1881 - 23 Mar 1960  Search this
Neysa McMein, c. 1880 - 1949  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun, 7 Dec 1888 - 18 Dec 1939  Search this
Doris Keane, c. 1885 - 1945  Search this
Percy Hunter Hammond, 1873 - 1936  Search this
Moranzoni, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Ann Haven Morgan, 1882 - 1966  Search this
Robert Burns Mantle, 1873 - 1948  Search this
Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt, ? - 1940  Search this
Willard Huntington Wright, 1888 - 11 Apr 1939  Search this
S. Jay Kaufman, 1886 - 1957  Search this
Herbert Bayard Swope, 5 Jan 1882 - 20 Jun 1958  Search this
Walter Catlett, 1889 - 1960  Search this
Sophie Braslau, 1882 - 1935  Search this
Dorothy Gish, 1898 - 1968  Search this
David Lewelyn Wark Griffith, 22 Jan 1875 - 23 Jul 1948  Search this
Lillian Gish, 14 Oct 1893 - 27 Feb 1993  Search this
Elizabeth Marbury, 1856 - 1933  Search this
Leon Errol, 1881 - 1951  Search this
Zoe Akins, 1886 - 1958  Search this
Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin, 13 Feb 1873 - 12 Apr 1938  Search this
Lucrezia Bori, 1887 - 1960  Search this
Frances Alda, 1883 - 1952  Search this
Maude Adams, 11 Nov 1872 - 17 Jul 1953  Search this
John Francis McCormack, 14 Jun 1884 - 16 Sep 1945  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin, 16 Apr 1889 - 25 Dec 1977  Search this
Marechal Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre, 1852 - 1931  Search this
Laurette Taylor, 1884 - 1946  Search this
Frances Starr, 1881 - 1973  Search this
Clare Consuelo Frewen Sheridan, 1885 - 1970  Search this
John Hartley Manners, 1870 - 1928  Search this
Albert Davis Lasker, 1880 - 1952  Search this
Samuel Lionel Rothafel, 9 Jul 1881 - 13 Jan 1936  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler, 2 Apr 1862 - 7 Dec 1947  Search this
Ralph Barton, 14 Aug 1891 - 19 May 1931  Search this
Jesse Louis Lasky, 1880 - 1958  Search this
Edward Ziegler, 1870 - 1966  Search this
William J. Guard, ? - 1932  Search this
Louis Untermeyer, 1885 - 1977  Search this
Jacob J. Shubert, 1880 - 1963  Search this
Levi Lee Shubert, c. 1872 - 1953  Search this
F. Ray Comstock, 1880 - 1949  Search this
Morris Gest, 1881 - 1942  Search this
Oliver Martin Sayler, 1887 - 1958  Search this
Boris Israelevich Anisfeld, 1879 - 1973  Search this
Robert Edmond Jones, 12 Dec 1887 - 26 Nov 1954  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner, 6 Mar 1885 - 25 Sep 1933  Search this
Stephen Rathbun, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Armand Veszy, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Andrés de Segurola, c. 1873 - 1953  Search this
Gennare Papi, 1886 - 1941  Search this
Raymond Hitchcock, 1865 - 1929  Search this
Adolph Zukor, 7 Jan 1873 - 10 Jun 1976  Search this
Robert Gilbert Welsh, 1869 - 1924  Search this
Fay Okell Bainter, 1893 - 1968  Search this
Lawrence Reamer, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Gertrude Hoffman, 1898 - 1955  Search this
Walter Johannes Damrosch, 30 Jan 1862 - 22 Dec 1950  Search this
Mary Nash, 1885 - 1976  Search this
Josef Willem Mengelberg, 1871 - 1951  Search this
Charles Darnton, 1870 - 1950  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn, 21 Feb 1867 - 20 Mar 1934  Search this
Frank Andrew Munsey, 1854 - 1925  Search this
Florenz Ziegfeld, 21 Mar 1867 - 22 Jul 1932  Search this
Artur Bodanzky, 1877 - 1939  Search this
Adolph Simon Ochs, 1858 - 1935  Search this
John Rumsey, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Ludwig Lewisohn, 30 May 1883 - 31 Dec 1955  Search this
George Simon Kaufman, 16 Nov 1889 - 2 Jun 1961  Search this
Lynn Fontanne, 6 Dec 1887 - 30 Jul 1983  Search this
Marcus Cook Connelly, 1890 - 1980  Search this
George Michael Cohan, 3 Jul 1878 - 5 Nov 1942  Search this
John MacMahon, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Henry Edward Krehbiel, 1854 - 1923  Search this
Dorothy Benjamin Caruso, ? - 1955  Search this
Jacob Ben-Ami, 1890 - 1977  Search this
Dorothy Dalton, 1893 - 1972  Search this
David Warfield, 28 Nov 1866 - 27 Jun 1951  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley, 15 Sep 1889 - 21 Nov 1945  Search this
Karl Kitchen, 1885 - 1935  Search this
Antonio Scotti, 1866 - 1936  Search this
Fannie Hurst, 19 Oct 1885 - 23 Feb 1968  Search this
Hugo Reisenfeld, c. 1883 - 1939?  Search this
Vera Fokina, 1886 - 1958  Search this
Michel Fokine, 23 Apr 1880 - 22 Aug 1942  Search this
Avery Hopwood, 28 May 1882 - 1 Jul 1928  Search this
Constance Talmadge, c. 1899 - 1973  Search this
Anna Fitziu, c. 1886 - 1967  Search this
Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, 1880 - 1925  Search this
Frank Crane, 1861 - 1928  Search this
Jascha Heifetz, 2 Feb 1901 - 12 Dec 1987  Search this
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill, 16 Oct 1888 - 27 Nov 1953  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich, 10 Oct 1874 - 12 Dec 1947  Search this
Joseph Urban, 1872 - 1933  Search this
Arthur Hornblow, 1865 - 1942  Search this
Paul Meyer, 1880? - 1940?  Search this
Elsie Janis, 1889 - 1956  Search this
Paul Block, 1877 - 1941  Search this
John Chipman Farrar, 1896 - 1974  Search this
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninoff, 2 Apr 1873 - 28 Mar 1943  Search this
Herbert Clark Hoover, 10 Aug 1874 - 20 Oct 1964  Search this
John Golden, 1874 - 1955  Search this
Winchell Smith, 1871 - 1933  Search this
George Jay Gould, 1864 - 1923  Search this
Medium:
Color halftone on paper
Dimensions:
Image (Centerfold): 28.5cm x 44cm (11 1/4" x 17 5/16")
Sheet (Centerfold): 30.8cm x 46cm (12 1/8" x 18 1/8")
Cover: 30.8cm x 23.1cm (12 1/8" x 9 1/8")
Type:
Print
Date:
c. 1922
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry\Necklace  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Earring  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses\Pince-nez  Search this
Caricature  Search this
Interior\Performing Arts\Theatrical  Search this
Architecture\Door  Search this
Architecture\Balcony  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn: Male  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Financier  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Banker  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn: Education\Administrator\University\Trustee  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn: Performing Arts\Patron\Opera  Search this
Otto Hermann Kahn: Visual Arts\Art Collector  Search this
Franklin Pierce Adams: Male  Search this
Franklin Pierce Adams: Communications\Journalist\Columnist  Search this
Franklin Pierce Adams: Literature\Writer\Humorist  Search this
Herbert Clark Hoover: Male  Search this
Herbert Clark Hoover: Politics and Government\President of US  Search this
Herbert Clark Hoover: Science and Technology\Engineer  Search this
Herbert Clark Hoover: Politics and Government\Cabinet Member\Secretary of Commerce  Search this
Mary Nash: Female  Search this
Mary Nash: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Herbert Bayard Swope: Male  Search this
Herbert Bayard Swope: Literature\Writer  Search this
Herbert Bayard Swope: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Newspaper  Search this
Herbert Bayard Swope: Communications\Journalist\Reporter\Newspaper  Search this
Herbert Bayard Swope: Pulitzer Prize  Search this
Lillian Gish: Female  Search this
Lillian Gish: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Lillian Gish: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Lillian Gish: Oscar  Search this
Levi Lee Shubert: Male  Search this
Levi Lee Shubert: Business and Finance\Businessperson  Search this
Levi Lee Shubert: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Jacob J. Shubert: Male  Search this
Jacob J. Shubert: Business and Finance\Businessperson  Search this
Jacob J. Shubert: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Avery Hopwood: Male  Search this
Avery Hopwood: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Michel Fokine: Male  Search this
Michel Fokine: Performing Arts\Director  Search this
Michel Fokine: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer  Search this
Michel Fokine: Performing Arts\Choreographer  Search this
Michel Fokine: Performing Arts\Dance Instructor  Search this
David Lewelyn Wark Griffith: Male  Search this
David Lewelyn Wark Griffith: Performing Arts\Director\Motion Pictures  Search this
David Lewelyn Wark Griffith: Performing Arts\Producer\Motion Pictures  Search this
David Lewelyn Wark Griffith: Oscar  Search this
Florenz Ziegfeld: Male  Search this
Florenz Ziegfeld: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Florenz Ziegfeld: Performing Arts\Producer\Impresario  Search this
Willard Huntington Wright: Male  Search this
Willard Huntington Wright: Visual Arts\Art critic  Search this
Willard Huntington Wright: Literature\Literary critic  Search this
Willard Huntington Wright: Literature\Writer\Detective  Search this
Oliver Martin Sayler: Male  Search this
Oliver Martin Sayler: Literature\Writer  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Male  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Literature\Writer  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Communications\Journalist  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Performing Arts\Performer\Entertainer\Radio  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Literature\Writer\Essayist  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Alexander Humphreys Woollcott: Humanities and Social Sciences\Cultural critic  Search this
Raymond Hitchcock: Male  Search this
Raymond Hitchcock: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Raymond Hitchcock: Performing Arts\Performer\Comedian  Search this
Arthur Brisbane: Male  Search this
Arthur Brisbane: Business and Finance\Businessperson  Search this
Arthur Brisbane: Communications\Publisher\Newspaper  Search this
Arthur Brisbane: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Newspaper  Search this
Marcus Cook Connelly: Male  Search this
Marcus Cook Connelly: Education\Educator\Professor\College  Search this
Marcus Cook Connelly: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Marcus Cook Connelly: Pulitzer Prize  Search this
John Drew: Male  Search this
John Drew: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
John Drew: Performing Arts\Theater Manager  Search this
John Emerson: Male  Search this
John Emerson: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
John Emerson: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin: Male  Search this
Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Fannie Hurst: Female  Search this
Fannie Hurst: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Fannie Hurst: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Fannie Hurst: Literature\Writer\Screenwriter  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Male  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Literature\Writer  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Communications\Journalist\Editor  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Communications\Journalist\Reporter\Newspaper  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Sports and Recreation  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Literature\Writer\Magazine article  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Communications\Journalist\Columnist  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Literature\Writer\Humorist  Search this
Ringgold Wilmer Lardner: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Frances Starr: Female  Search this
Frances Starr: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Frank Crane: Male  Search this
Frank Crane: Communications\Journalist  Search this
Frank Crane: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun: Male  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun: Communications\Journalist\Reporter\Newspaper  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun: Communications\Journalist\Columnist  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun: Literature\Writer\Essayist  Search this
Matthew Heywood Campbell Broun: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Dorothy Gish: Female  Search this
Dorothy Gish: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Male  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Performing Arts\Director\Motion Pictures  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Performing Arts\Performer\Comedian  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Performing Arts\Performer\Vaudeville  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Literature\Writer\Screenwriter  Search this
Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin: Oscar  Search this
John Francis McCormack: Male  Search this
John Francis McCormack: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Giulio Gatti-Casazza: Male  Search this
Giulio Gatti-Casazza: Performing Arts\Director\Opera  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Male  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Business and Finance\Businessperson  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Literature\Writer  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Politics and Government\Public Official  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Military\Army\Officer\General  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Magazine  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Politics and Government\Son of US President  Search this
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.: Politics and Government\Governor\Puerto Rico  Search this
Irene Foote Castle: Female  Search this
Irene Foote Castle: Performing Arts\Costume Designer  Search this
Irene Foote Castle: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer  Search this
John Barrymore: Male  Search this
John Barrymore: Visual Arts\Artist\Sculptor  Search this
John Barrymore: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
John Barrymore: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
John Barrymore: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
David Belasco: Male  Search this
David Belasco: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
David Belasco: Performing Arts\Producer\Motion Pictures  Search this
David Belasco: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
David Belasco: Performing Arts\Theater Manager  Search this
David Belasco: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Josef Hofmann: Male  Search this
Josef Hofmann: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Josef Hofmann: Politics and Government\Diplomat\Ambassador  Search this
Josef Hofmann: Education\Educator\Professor\University  Search this
Josef Hofmann: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Pianist  Search this
Josef Hofmann: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Conductor  Search this
Ralph Barton: Visual Arts\Artist  Search this
Ralph Barton: Male  Search this
Ralph Barton: Visual Arts\Artist\Caricaturist  Search this
John Chipman Farrar: Male  Search this
John Chipman Farrar: Literature\Writer  Search this
John Chipman Farrar: Education\Educator\Lecturer  Search this
John Chipman Farrar: Literature\Writer\Poet  Search this
John Chipman Farrar: Literature\Editor\Book  Search this
Leon Errol: Male  Search this
Leon Errol: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Robert Edmond Jones: Visual Arts\Artist  Search this
Robert Edmond Jones: Male  Search this
Robert Edmond Jones: Visual Arts\Designer  Search this
Robert Edmond Jones: Performing Arts\Scenographer  Search this
S. Jay Kaufman: Male  Search this
S. Jay Kaufman: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Boris Israelevich Anisfeld: Male  Search this
Boris Israelevich Anisfeld: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter  Search this
Boris Israelevich Anisfeld: Performing Arts\Scenographer  Search this
Jascha Heifetz: Male  Search this
Jascha Heifetz: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Violinist  Search this
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney: Female  Search this
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney: Visual Arts\Artist\Sculptor  Search this
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney: Visual Arts\Founder\Art Museum  Search this
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney: Society and Social Change\Philanthropist  Search this
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney: Visual Arts\Art Patron  Search this
Morris Gest: Male  Search this
Morris Gest: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley: Male  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley: Literature\Writer  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley: Communications\Journalist\Humorist  Search this
Robert Charles Benchley: Communications\Broadcast Journalist\Radio  Search this
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill: Male  Search this
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill: Nobel Prize  Search this
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill: Pulitzer Prize  Search this
Anna Pavlova: Female  Search this
Anna Pavlova: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer\Ballet  Search this
Charles Darnton: Male  Search this
Charles Darnton: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Male  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Military\Army\Officer  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Education\Educator\Lecturer  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Education\Educator\Professor\University  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Education\Founder\School  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Visual Arts\Founder\Art Museum  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Humanities and Social Sciences\Archaeologist  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Military\Officer  Search this
Nicholas Konstantin Roerich: Visual Arts\Administrator\Art Museum\President  Search this
Maude Adams: Female  Search this
Maude Adams: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Maude Adams: Education\Educator\Professor\College  Search this
Adolph Simon Ochs: Male  Search this
Adolph Simon Ochs: Communications\Publisher\Newspaper  Search this
Adolph Simon Ochs: Society and Social Change\Philanthropist  Search this
Ed Wynn: Male  Search this
Ed Wynn: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Ed Wynn: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Ed Wynn: Performing Arts\Performer\Comedian  Search this
Ed Wynn: Performing Arts\Performer\Television Personality  Search this
Ed Wynn: Performing Arts\Performer\Entertainer\Radio  Search this
Lynn Fontanne: Female  Search this
Lynn Fontanne: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Lynn Fontanne: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Lynn Fontanne: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Television  Search this
Lynn Fontanne: Presidential Medal of Freedom  Search this
Charles Dana Gibson: Male  Search this
Charles Dana Gibson: Literature\Writer  Search this
Charles Dana Gibson: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter  Search this
Charles Dana Gibson: Visual Arts\Artist\Illustrator  Search this
Mary Garden: Female  Search this
Mary Garden: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Maria Jeritza: Female  Search this
Maria Jeritza: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Adolph Zukor: Male  Search this
Adolph Zukor: Performing Arts\Producer  Search this
Adolph Zukor: Performing Arts\Producer\Motion Pictures  Search this
Adolph Zukor: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
George Simon Kaufman: Male  Search this
George Simon Kaufman: Communications\Journalist\Columnist  Search this
George Simon Kaufman: Performing Arts\Director\Theater  Search this
George Simon Kaufman: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
George Simon Kaufman: Pulitzer Prize  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Male  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Literature\Writer  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Education\Educator\Professor\University  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Education\Administrator  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Education\Administrator\University\President  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Politics and Government\Government Official\Presidential Advisor  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Humanities and Social Sciences\Philosopher  Search this
Nicholas Murray Butler: Nobel Prize  Search this
Jacob Ben-Ami: Male  Search this
Jacob Ben-Ami: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
David Warfield: Male  Search this
David Warfield: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
George Michael Cohan: Male  Search this
George Michael Cohan: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
George Michael Cohan: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
George Michael Cohan: Performing Arts\Performer\Vaudeville  Search this
George Michael Cohan: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
George Michael Cohan: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Nikita Balieff: Male  Search this
Nikita Balieff: Performing Arts\Director  Search this
Nikita Balieff: Visual Arts\Designer  Search this
Nikita Balieff: Performing Arts\Performer  Search this
Nikita Balieff: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Jesse Louis Lasky: Male  Search this
Jesse Louis Lasky: Performing Arts\Producer\Motion Pictures  Search this
Marilyn Miller: Female  Search this
Marilyn Miller: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Marilyn Miller: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer  Search this
Marilyn Miller: Performing Arts\Performer\Comedian  Search this
Marilyn Miller: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer  Search this
Samuel Lionel Rothafel: Male  Search this
Samuel Lionel Rothafel: Performing Arts\Performer\Entertainer\Radio  Search this
Samuel Lionel Rothafel: Performing Arts\Theater Manager  Search this
Samuel Lionel Rothafel: Performing Arts\Producer\Impresario  Search this
Sam Bernard: Male  Search this
Sam Bernard: Performing Arts\Performer\Vaudeville  Search this
Gertrude Hoffman: Female  Search this
Gertrude Hoffman: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer  Search this
George Jay Gould: Male  Search this
George Jay Gould: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Financier  Search this
George Jay Gould: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Executive\Railroad  Search this
Walter Johannes Damrosch: Male  Search this
Walter Johannes Damrosch: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Walter Johannes Damrosch: Performing Arts\Director\Opera  Search this
Walter Johannes Damrosch: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Conductor  Search this
Geraldine Farrar: Female  Search this
Geraldine Farrar: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Anita Loos: Female  Search this
Anita Loos: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Anita Loos: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Anita Loos: Literature\Writer\Screenwriter  Search this
Lenore Ulric: Female  Search this
Lenore Ulric: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Michael Strange: Female  Search this
Michael Strange: Literature\Writer  Search this
Michael Strange: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Reina Belasco Gest: Female  Search this
Reina Belasco Gest: Society and Social Change\Wife  Search this
Elsie de Wolfe: Female  Search this
Elsie de Wolfe: Society and Social Change\Hostess  Search this
Elsie de Wolfe: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Elsie de Wolfe: Visual Arts\Designer\Interior Designer  Search this
Millicent Willson Hearst: Female  Search this
Millicent Willson Hearst: Society and Social Change\Wife  Search this
Millicent Willson Hearst: Society and Social Change\Socialite  Search this
Henry Blackman Sell: Male  Search this
Henry Blackman Sell: Communications\Journalist\Editor  Search this
Condé Montrose Nast: Male  Search this
Condé Montrose Nast: Communications\Publisher\Magazine  Search this
Kenneth MacGowan: Male  Search this
Kenneth MacGowan: Performing Arts\Producer\Motion Pictures  Search this
Kenneth MacGowan: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Kenneth MacGowan: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Alan Dale: Male  Search this
Alan Dale: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Ray Long: Male  Search this
Ray Long: Communications\Journalist\Editor  Search this
Florence Jaffray Hurst Harriman: Female  Search this
Florence Jaffray Hurst Harriman: Literature\Writer  Search this
Florence Jaffray Hurst Harriman: Politics and Government\Diplomat\Minister  Search this
Florence Jaffray Hurst Harriman: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Suffragist  Search this
Mrs. Lydig Hoyt: Female  Search this
Neysa McMein: Visual Arts\Artist  Search this
Neysa McMein: Female  Search this
Doris Keane: Female  Search this
Doris Keane: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Percy Hunter Hammond: Male  Search this
Percy Hunter Hammond: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Moranzoni: Male  Search this
Ann Haven Morgan: Female  Search this
Ann Haven Morgan: Education\Educator  Search this
Robert Burns Mantle: Male  Search this
Robert Burns Mantle: Literature\Writer  Search this
Robert Burns Mantle: Literature\Editor\Book  Search this
Robert Burns Mantle: Performing Arts\Theater critic  Search this
Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt: Female  Search this
Anne Harriman Sands Rutherfurd Vanderbilt: Society and Social Change\Wife  Search this
Walter Catlett: Male  Search this
Walter Catlett: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Sophie Braslau: Female  Search this
Sophie Braslau: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Elizabeth Marbury: Female  Search this
Elizabeth Marbury: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Elizabeth Marbury: Performing Arts\Agent\Theatrical  Search this
Zoe Akins: Female  Search this
Zoe Akins: Literature\Writer\Poet  Search this
Zoe Akins: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Zoe Akins: Literature\Writer\Screenwriter  Search this
Zoe Akins: Pulitzer Prize  Search this
Lucrezia Bori: Female  Search this
Lucrezia Bori: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Lucrezia Bori: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Soprano  Search this
Frances Alda: Female  Search this
Frances Alda: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Marechal Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre: Male  Search this
Marechal Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre: Military\Army\Officer  Search this
Marechal Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre: Politics and Government\Statesman\French  Search this
Laurette Taylor: Female  Search this
Laurette Taylor: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Clare Consuelo Frewen Sheridan: Female  Search this
Clare Consuelo Frewen Sheridan: Visual Arts\Artist\Sculptor  Search this
Clare Consuelo Frewen Sheridan: Literature\Writer  Search this
John Hartley Manners: Male  Search this
John Hartley Manners: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
John Hartley Manners: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Albert Davis Lasker: Male  Search this
Albert Davis Lasker: Society and Social Change\Philanthropist  Search this
Albert Davis Lasker: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Executive\Advertising  Search this
Edward Ziegler: Male  Search this
Edward Ziegler: Performing Arts\Music critic  Search this
William J. Guard: Male  Search this
William J. Guard: Communications\Journalist  Search this
Louis Untermeyer: Male  Search this
Louis Untermeyer: Literature\Writer  Search this
Louis Untermeyer: Literature\Writer\Poet  Search this
Louis Untermeyer: Literature\Editor\Book  Search this
F. Ray Comstock: Male  Search this
F. Ray Comstock: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Stephen Rathbun: Male  Search this
Armand Veszy: Male  Search this
Andrés de Segurola: Male  Search this
Andrés de Segurola: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician  Search this
Gennare Papi: Male  Search this
Gennare Papi: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Conductor  Search this
Robert Gilbert Welsh: Male  Search this
Robert Gilbert Welsh: Literature\Writer\Poet  Search this
Fay Okell Bainter: Female  Search this
Fay Okell Bainter: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Fay Okell Bainter: Oscar  Search this
Lawrence Reamer: Male  Search this
Josef Willem Mengelberg: Male  Search this
Josef Willem Mengelberg: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Conductor  Search this
Frank Andrew Munsey: Male  Search this
Frank Andrew Munsey: Communications\Publisher\Magazine  Search this
Frank Andrew Munsey: Communications\Publisher\Newspaper  Search this
Artur Bodanzky: Male  Search this
Artur Bodanzky: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Artur Bodanzky: Performing Arts\Director\Opera  Search this
Artur Bodanzky: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Conductor  Search this
John Rumsey: Male  Search this
Ludwig Lewisohn: Male  Search this
Ludwig Lewisohn: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Magazine  Search this
Ludwig Lewisohn: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Ludwig Lewisohn: Communications\Translator  Search this
Ludwig Lewisohn: Literature\Literary critic  Search this
John MacMahon: Male  Search this
Henry Edward Krehbiel: Male  Search this
Henry Edward Krehbiel: Literature\Writer  Search this
Henry Edward Krehbiel: Performing Arts\Music critic  Search this
Dorothy Benjamin Caruso: Female  Search this
Dorothy Benjamin Caruso: Society and Social Change\Wife  Search this
Dorothy Dalton: Female  Search this
Dorothy Dalton: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Karl Kitchen: Male  Search this
Karl Kitchen: Literature\Writer  Search this
Antonio Scotti: Male  Search this
Antonio Scotti: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt: Male  Search this
Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt: Business and Finance\Businessperson  Search this
Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt: Sports and Recreation\Athlete\Equestrian  Search this
Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt: Sports and Recreation\Promoter  Search this
Hugo Reisenfeld: Male  Search this
Hugo Reisenfeld: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Hugo Reisenfeld: Performing Arts\Theater Manager  Search this
Vera Fokina: Female  Search this
Vera Fokina: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer  Search this
Vera Fokina: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer\Ballet  Search this
Constance Talmadge: Female  Search this
Constance Talmadge: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Anna Fitziu: Female  Search this
Anna Fitziu: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Opera  Search this
Anna Fitziu: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Soprano  Search this
Joseph Urban: Male  Search this
Joseph Urban: Visual Arts\Architect  Search this
Joseph Urban: Performing Arts\Director\Opera  Search this
Joseph Urban: Performing Arts\Scenographer  Search this
Arthur Hornblow: Male  Search this
Arthur Hornblow: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Newspaper  Search this
Arthur Hornblow: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Paul Meyer: Male  Search this
Elsie Janis: Female  Search this
Elsie Janis: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Elsie Janis: Performing Arts\Performer\Vaudeville  Search this
Paul Block: Male  Search this
Paul Block: Communications\Publisher\Newspaper  Search this
Paul Block: Business and Finance\Businessperson\Executive  Search this
John Golden: Male  Search this
John Golden: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Songwriter  Search this
John Golden: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
John Golden: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Winchell Smith: Male  Search this
Winchell Smith: Literature\Writer\Playwright  Search this
Winchell Smith: Performing Arts\Producer\Theater  Search this
Irving Berlin: Male  Search this
Irving Berlin: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Songwriter  Search this
Irving Berlin: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Pianist  Search this
Irving Berlin: Military\Army  Search this
Irving Berlin: Oscar  Search this
Irving Berlin: Presidential Medal of Freedom  Search this
Irving Berlin: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Francis Welch Crowninshield: Male  Search this
Francis Welch Crowninshield: Communications\Publisher\Magazine  Search this
Francis Welch Crowninshield: Communications\Journalist\Editor\Magazine  Search this
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninoff: Male  Search this
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninoff: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninoff: Education\Educator\Professor\College  Search this
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninoff: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Pianist  Search this
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninoff: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Conductor  Search this
Al Jolson: Male  Search this
Al Jolson: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Al Jolson: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer  Search this
Al Jolson: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Bruce Kellner
Object number:
S/NPG.92.12
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm498c2a346-0606-402f-a46d-1cf031328530
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_S_NPG.92.12
Online Media:

'La Vendedora de Amor' movie costume

Physical Description:
silver (overall color)
fabric (overall material)
Measurements:
brasierre: 5 1/2 in x 14 in; 13.97 cm x 35.56 cm
underwear: 10 in x 15 in; 25.4 cm x 38.1 cm
sleeves: 17 1/2 in x 5 1/4 in; 44.45 cm x 13.335 cm
Object Name:
costume
bikini
Associated Place:
United States: New York, Bronx
Date made:
1964
Subject:
Latino  Search this
Hispanic  Search this
Spanish  Search this
Entertainment  Search this
Dancing  Search this
Women's History  Search this
Puerto Rico  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Gilda Miros
ID Number:
2016.0233.04
Catalog number:
2016.0233.04
Accession number:
2016.0233
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Work
Work
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b3-5337-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1847926

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Afro-Caribbean cults  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
Plena
Place:
Caribbean Area
Haiti
Jamaica
Puerto Rico
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
June 16-September 6, 1976
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1976 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora

Series 3: Children's Program

Series 4: Family Folklore

Series 5: Festival Stage

Series 6: Native Americans

Series 7: Old Ways in the New World

Series 8: Regional America

Series 9: Working Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1976 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Festival of American Folklife's first decade culminated with the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife that took place for twelve weeks in the summer of 1976, from June 16 to September 6 (programs typically ran from Wednesday through Sunday each week). More than 5000 participants took part over the course of the summer. The 1976 Festival involved the participation of every region of the United States, 38 foreign governments, scores of American Indian tribes, and many labor organizations. Some 4.5 million people attended the Festival.

The Bicentennial Festival resulted from the collaboration of the Smithsonian with thousands of national and international scholars, community spokespeople, and cultural exemplars involved in the documentation, presentation, transmission, and conservation of cultural traditions. Preceding the Festival were several years of establishing cultural networks, training students, and providing opportunities for diverse peoples to interpret and present their traditions. The Bicentennial also saw the flowering of a touring program, begun in 1973, in which foreign groups at the Festival subsequently toured the United States. Scores of groups from the African Diaspora and Old Ways in the New World programs gave some 200 performances in 50 cities and towns across the U.S.

The 1976 Festival again took place in the western part of the National Mall to the south of the Reflecting Pool, between 17th and 23rd Streets (see site plan). It was co-organized by the Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts (James R. Morris, Director; Richard Lusher, Deputy Director) and the National Park Service (Gary Everhardt, Director). Ralph Rinzler was Director of the Festival, and Bess Lomax Hawes and Robert Byington were Deputy Directors of the Festival. Tom Vennum served as Ethnomusicologist, and Frank Proschan as Archivist. The Bicentennial Festival was sponsored by American Airlines and General Foods.

The 1976 Festival again featured seven thematic programs, complemented by a Festival Stage. African Diaspora featured different countries every two weeks. The Festival Stage brought together participants from other areas and - for the last four weeks - its own dedicated performers. Native Americans changed focus by region every week; similarly, Old Ways in the New World changed focus by country every week. Regional America (June 16-August 8) changed focus by region every week, and Working Americans changed focus by theme every two weeks, with an expanded program on Transportation the last four weeks (August 11-September 6).

The 1975 Program Book provided information on each of the programs. Biweekly, a Program Supplement provided schedules and participant information.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Vodou -- Haiti -- Rituals.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
plena
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5858643e8-749f-494f-b205-eca860d96375
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1976
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
bomba (music)  Search this
Bomba (Dance)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Videotapes
Digital images
Notes
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Business records
Negatives
Video recordings
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Contracts
Plena
Place:
Caribbean Area
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1983
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1983 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Aviation Program

Series 3: Festival Sampler

Series 4: French/French-American Program

Series 5: National Heritage Fellowships Program

Series 6: New Jersey
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1983 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
Like its predecessor, the 1983 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). A program on the folklife of flight celebrated the 200th anniversary of human flight, with other major programs focusing on French and French American music and dance, the folklife of New Jersey, and the second awarding of National Heritage Fellowships by the National Endowment for the Arts.

The idea that shaped this year's program - and any year's program, for that matter - was the Smithsonian Institution's abiding commitment to cultural conservation. The selected traditions were brought to the National Mall not only for visitors' enjoyment and intellectual edification, but also as a statement to the people who keep the traditions, to their communities, and to the great American public that these cultural traditions were more than the artistic flowering of a healthy community. They were often the very roots of a group's cultural identity, community feeling, and shared sense of style and, as such, were crucial to its well-being and productivity. Visitors were encouraged to find entertainment in the beautiful and significant traditions presented at this year's Festival and to understand their importance in the lives of the performers and their communities. Festival organizers also expressed their hope that visitors would join in making our nation an environment in which myriad cultural traditions can flourish.

The 1983 Program Book provides information on each of the programs.

The 1983 Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service, with support from Festival New Jersey '83!, the Government of France, Continental Telecom, Inc., Music Performance Trust Funds, and John & Clara Higgins Foundation, and with cooperation of the National Endowment for the Arts. It was organized by the Office of Folklife Programs, in conjunction (for the Aviation Program) with the National Air and Space Museum.

Folklife Advisory Council

Wilcomb E. Washburn, Chairman, Roger Abrahams, Richard Ahlborn, William Fitzhugh, Lloyd Herman, Robert Laughlin, Scott Odell, Ralph Rinzler, Peter Seitel, Thomas Vennum

Office of Folklife Programs

Ralph Rinzler, Festival Director; Peter Seitel, Acting Director; Jeffrey LaRiche, Acting Assistant Director; Diana Parker, Associate Festival Director; Thomas Vennum, Senior Ethnomusicologist; Marjorie Hunt, Folklorist; Kazadi wa Mukuna, Ethnomusicologist; Jack Santino, Folklorist; Richard Derbyshire, Archivist

National Park Service

Russell E. Dickenson, Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Fieldworkers and presenters:
Barry Ancelet, Tina Bucuvalas, Lynda Burack-Novick, Tom Carroll, David Cohen, Angus Gillespie, John Herbst, Pandora Hopkins, Mary Hufford, Michael Licht, Amanda McQuiddy, Rita Moonsammy, Kazadi wa Mukuna, Kathleen Mundell, Catherine Perrier, Charlie Sayles, Daniel Sheehy, Nick Spitzer, Bob Teske, Norma Threadgill, Tom Vennum, John Vlach, Hank Willett, John Wright, Peggy Yocum
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Afro-Caribbeans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Videotapes
Digital images
Notes
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Business records
Negatives
Video recordings
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Contracts
plena
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1983
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk56c2d8417-9e8c-4110-9a58-c35dae394057
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1983
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Memorandums
Negatives
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Business records
Digital images
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Contracts
Place:
Caribbean Area
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 26-July 7, 1985
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1985 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Cultural Conservation

Series 3: Louisiana

Series 4: Mela! An Indian Fair

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1985 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
From the first Festival of American Folklife in 1967 through the 1984 Festival, more than 10,000 participants traveled to Washington to share their wisdom and talent with visitors, Festival Director Diana Parker recalled in the 1985 Program Book. In explaining and demonstrating their skills as singers, dancers, musicians, cooks, artisans, storytellers, and workers, they represented legions more in their home communities. Because of the time and knowledge they shared, lives had been enriched, while the cultural understanding of the aesthetic variety in this and other nations had broadened. Meanwhile, the Smithsonian's archive of folklife research and programming experience had grown incrementally each year. There remained much still to be learned, and each participant's story added to our understanding of the mosaic of folk culture.

Festival participants often spoke of their struggle to maintain traditions in the face of overwhelming odds. Each year brought another person to inform visitors, "I am the last who knows how to do this the old way." For this reason the Folklife Programs viewed conservation of culture as an issue equal in urgency to the conservation of natural resources, for the pluralism reflected at each year's Festival would be terrible to lose. The Smithsonian was not, of course, the only organization concerned with cultural conservation. The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress consistently contributed on a national scale to research and preservation of traditional culture. Numerous state and local programs were also hard at work in similar efforts and have made notable contributions. As the National Endowment for the Arts celebrated its 20th anniversary in 1985, the Smithsonian was especially aware of the immense contributions of its Folk Arts Program.

The 1985 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 26-30 and July 3-7) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

For the 1985 Festival, more than two hundred participants came to Washington to share in a great celebration of cultural diversity. Three thematic programs were presented, complemented by a number of special events. The 1985 Program Book provides information on each of the programs.

The 1985 Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs. In addition to specific support (acknowledged below) for the Louisiana and Mela! programs, the recording industry provided support in part for the instrumental music in performances at the Festival through the Music Performance Trust Funds (Martin A. Paulson, Trustee).

Office of Folklife Programs

Peter Seitel, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Marjorie Hunt, Folklorist; Alicia María González, Folklorist and Program Developer; Kazadi wa Mukuna, Ethnomusicologist; Richard Derbyshire, Archivist; Laurie Kalb, Foodways Coordinator

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Memorandums
Negatives
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Business records
Digital images
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Contracts
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1985
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5bf226fa1-a213-4111-9413-e1a0a7c57ee8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1985
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
459 Sound tape reels (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Plans (drawings)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Business records
Notes
Videotapes
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Contracts
Correspondence
Cha-chas (music)
Lindy (dance)
Jitterbug (dance)
Place:
Caribbean Area
Trinidad and Tobago
Puerto Rico
Cuba
Date:
July 3-14, 1974
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1974 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora

Series 3: Children's Program

Series 4: Family Folklore

Series 5: Festival Stage

Series 6: Native Americans

Series 7: Old Ways in the New World

Series 8: Regional America

Series 9: Working Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1974 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
With the 1974 Festival of American Folklife (July 3-7 and July 10-14, 1974), the seven programs that would constitute the Bicentennial Festival were all in place. As in 1973, the Festival took place in the western part of the National Mall alongside the Reflecting Pool, between 17th and 23rd Streets, and between Constitution Avenue N.W. and Independence Avenue S.W. (see site plan). It was co-organized by the Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts (James R. Morris, Director; Richard Lusher) and the National Park Service (Ronald H. Walker, Director). Ralph Rinzler was Director of the Folklife Program and the Festival.

The 1974 Festival included seven programs, with a Festival Stage bringing together performers from other programs and, in the second week, its own participants. The 1974 Program Book was supplemented by daily folios with additional information on that day's programs.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Afro-Caribbeans  Search this
Steel bands (Music)  Search this
Calypso (Music)  Search this
Mambos (Music)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Business records
Notes
Videotapes
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Contracts
Correspondence
Cha-chas (Music)
Lindy (Dance)
Jitterbug (Dance)
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c04ee5c0-e362-495e-8db1-3073cf7c17af
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1974
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Areyto  Search this
Moko Jumbie Dance  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Memorandums
Correspondence
Business records
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Place:
Caribbean Area
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands
Date:
July 1-5, 1971
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1971 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Northwest Coast Indians

Series 3: Ohio

Series 4: Performances

Series 5: Union Workers
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1971 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Festival of American Folklife, since its initiation in 1967, sought to present varied folk traditions representing a broad spectrum of our nation's cultural groups. It was the Smithsonian's hope and belief that the 1971 Festival would deepen and advance public appreciation of the richness and viability of American grass-roots creativity.

The 1971 Festival featured the State of Ohio, Pacific Northwest Coast Indians and Alaskan Eskimos, and the American worker as a part of organized labor. It took place for five days on the National Mall, between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of History and Technology and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

Evening programs took place in two locations: Indian Pow Wows were held in the Indian Area at 13th Street opposite the National Museum of History and Technology nightly except July 4th when a powwow was held on the Washington Monument Grounds. Evening concerts took place on the Main Stage located in front of the National Museum of Natural History. The Main Stage also hosted its own performers and others drawn from one of the Festival's three other programs; the resulting recordings constitute a separate subseries below.

The 1971 Festival was once again produced by the Division of Performing Arts, where James R. Morris was Director and Richard Lusher was Deputy Director. Ralph Rinzler continued as Festival Director, with Gerald L. Davis as Assistant Director and Kenneth S. Goldstein as Special Assistant to the Secretary on Folklore and Folklife.

The 1971 Program Book included information on all of the programs, a participant list, and schedule.
Festival speakers and consultants:
Roger Abrahams, Daniel Barnes, Mike Cooney, Hazel Dickens, Josh Dunson, Kenneth S. Goldstein, Archie Green, Richard Hulan, Martin Koenig, George Mitchell, Patrick Mullen, Hoyle Osborne, Ethel Raim, Alice Foster Seeger, Bob Siggins, Frances Utley, Arthur Walker
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Taino Indians  Search this
limbo (dance)  Search this
Steel bands (Music)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Memorandums
Correspondence
Business records
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1971
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1971 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5105a001a-14fb-47ca-9eb7-c698642ab4d1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1971

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1989 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Correspondence
Business records
Memorandums
Plans (drawings)
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Negatives
Slides (photographs)
Video recordings
Contracts
Digital images
Notes
Sound recordings
Place:
Caribbean Area
Cuba
Haiti
Jamaica
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1989
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1989 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: American Indian Program

Series 3: The Caribbean: Cultural Encounters in the New World

Series 4: Les Fêtes Chez Nous: France and North America

Series 5: Hawai'i
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1989 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In commemoration of our common French and American covenants of human rights and in recognition of our common French heritage, the 1989 Festival celebrated the Bicentennial of the French Revolution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (on display during the Festival in the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building). One of the Festival's four programs thus featured Francophone musicians and craftspeople from France, Quebec, New England, Louisiana, Missouri, and North Dakota.

The Hawai'i program included the descendants of immigrants, mainly from the Pacific rim (but also from the Atlantic), who came to the islands to work on plantations, enduring servitude and hardship in hope of a better life. Hawai'i is unique in that its indigenous culture suffuses its society as a whole, giving nuance to the forms of immigrant cultures that came there. This thirtieth anniversary of Hawaii's statehood invited the Smithsonian to reflect upon human cultural freedom - equity for and conservation of traditional cultures, as the Festival celebrated the vitality and open spirit of an indigenous Hawaiian culture that endured political, ideological and commercial attempts to restrict its practice and growth.

The continuity of culture depends upon access to various natural, social, and cultural resources. We bridle at unfair restrictions of such access that limit our freedom to realize our visions of who we are. The American Indian program in 1989 examined such restrictions and their impact upon contemporary tribal life. What happens when tribal rituals depend on endangered species, or traditional means of subsistence are threatened by land and water pollution? The program also illustrated attempts by various tribes to gain freedom over their cultural future through the innovative management of traditional resources.

The Caribbean program illustrated the historical flow of cultural and aesthetic ideas between diverse Native, European, and African populations in several island societies. Caribbean populations are characterized by the creative creolization of music, food, language, and art. Indeed, this encounter of diverse peoples defined the New World that developed in the wake of the Columbian voyages, whose 500th anniversary would be commemorated a few years later, in 1992. The Festival hosted contingents of musicians from Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico so that Americans could hear their musics and the complex historical tale they tell about the making of the New World.

The 1989 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). The 1989 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book featured four substantial essays, each laying out in depth the rationale for one of the four Festival programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Richard Kurin, Acting Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator, Folkways Records; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Olivia Cadaval, Marjorie Hunt, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Heliana Portes de Roux, Frank Proschan, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Folklorists; Betty Belanus, Education Specialist; Richard Kennedy, Winifred Lambrecht, Curators; Jeffrey Place, Archivist

Folklife Advisory Council

Richard Bauman (Chair), Roger Abrahams, Henry Glassie, Rayna Green, John Gwaltney, Charlotte Heth, Adrienne Kaeppler, Ivan Karp, Bernice Reagon, John Kuo Wei Tchen, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

James M. Ridenour, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1989 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Correspondence
Business records
Memorandums
Plans (drawings)
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Negatives
Slides (photographs)
Video recordings
Contracts
Digital images
Notes
Sound recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1989 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1989
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1989 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52232caa4-6acc-4267-87da-be2ecad7d0f1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1989
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1990 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Notes
Business records
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Place:
Caribbean Area
Virgin Islands
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 27-July 8, 1990
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1990 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 4 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Musics of Struggle

Series 3: Senegal

Series 4: U.S. Virgin Islands
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1990 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In the 1990 Program Book, Secretary Robert McC. Adams noted that the Festival of American Folklife, the annual extension of the Smithsonian onto the National Mall of the United States, was a long-lived national and international model for the research and presentation of living culture. Emphasizing the Smithsonian's commitment to cultural pluralism, Adams pointed to the Festival ais an example of cultural pluralism in research, exhibition development, and public education. In 1990, programs on the folklife of the U.S. Virgin Islands, the cultures of Senegal, and the Musics of Struggle presented people with much to say about the cultures they represented, but whose voices were not frequently heard in national or international cultural forums. Field research to develop those programs was conducted largely by academic and lay scholars from the U.S. Virgin Islands, Senegal, and the featured communities, and usually in close collaboration with local cultural institutions. Program interpretation was multivocal, as tradition bearers, local scholars, and Smithsonian curators spoke for themselves, with each other, and to the public. Together they created a rich, pluralistic, and knowledgeable perspective in the Festival presentations.

The 1990 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 27-July 1 and July 4-8) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1990 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book featured substantial essays laying out in depth the rationale for the Festival as a whole and for each of the three Festival programs, complemented by shorter pieces focusing on particular topics (not all of which were presented on the National Mall).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Richard Kurin, Acting Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Anthony Seeger, Curator, Folkways Records; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Director, Quincentenary Projects; Richard Kennedy, Program Analyst; Betty Belanus, Education Specialist; Diana N'Diaye, Jacquelin Peters, Curators; Marjorie Hunt, Ed O'Reilly, Frank Proschan, Nicholas Spitzer, Research Associates; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Jeffrey Place, Archivist

Folklife Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Richard Bauman, Henry Glassie, Rayna Green, John Gwaltney, Charlotte Heth, Adrienne Kaeppler, Ivan Karp, Bernice Reagon, John Tchen, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

James M. Ridenour, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1990 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Notes
Business records
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1990 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1990
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1990 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5b1e648e1-40ae-4356-9d5e-8d68f245ba34
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1990
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Correspondence
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Negatives
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Digital images
Notes
Photographic prints
Place:
Caribbean Area
Trinidad and Tobago
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1988
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1988 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial

Series 3: Festival Music Stage

Series 4: Ingenuity and Tradition: The Common Wealth of Massachusetts

Series 5: Migration to Metropolitan Washington: Making a New Place Home

Series 6: Music from the Peoples of the Soviet Union
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1988 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1988 Festival celebrated the centennial of the American Folklore Society, founded one hundred years earlier because of the need to document and study cultures that were seen as disappearing. Much of the Society's attention today, however, is engaged in the documentation and interpretation of emerging traditions and cultural expressions. Folklorists work in inner cities, conduct research on occupational groups, analyze processes of traditionalization and cooperate with other professionals in devising natural conservation and historical preservation strategies, which also promote cultural continuity, equity and integrity. Visitors to the 1988 Festival could learn about what it is that folklorists do and what impacts they have on the communities with which they work.

The other living exhibitions that made up this year's Festival also provided ample illustrations of this same view of the traditional. The Massachusetts program told a paradigmatic American story. Gay Head Wampanoag, Yankee settlers, Afro American migrants, and immigrants from Italy, Greece, Poland, the Cape Verde Islands, Puerto Rico, and Southeast Asia have not only preserved their traditions; through ingenious acts of individual and community creativity they have adapted them and endowed them with new meanings, as circumstances have changed. The Metropolitan Washington program pointed to the heightened consciousness of cultural issues associated with the migration experience. The program asked how immigrants from El Salvador, Ethiopia, China, Trinidad and Tobago, as well as domestic Anglo and Afro American groups historically migrating from nearby states, discard, reinvent, and reconstitute their traditions as they actively make a new place home. A varied contingent of musicians and performers from several republics of the Soviet Union demonstrated how truly ancient traditions nurtured in various pastoral, tribal, and religious environments have not merely survived but actually flourished in contemporary Soviet life. Also at the Festival were American musicians who, as part of a groundbreaking cultural exchange with the Soviet Union, would later travel to Moscow to participate in the International Folklore Festival in August 1988 and be reunited with the Soviet musicians participating in the Smithsonian's Festival.

The 1988 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1988 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book essays provided a larger context for the Festival presentations, extending beyond the traditions actually presented at the 1988 Festival.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Richard Kurin, Acting Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator, Folkways Records; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Marjorie Hunt, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Heliana Portes de Roux, Frank Proschan, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Folklorists; Jeffrey Place, Assistant Archivist

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Correspondence
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Negatives
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Digital images
Notes
Photographic prints
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk59e9f3773-cd55-493f-94e0-c53650d914c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1988
Online Media:

Robinson and Via Family Papers

Collector:
Robinson, Franklin A., Jr., 1959- (actor)  Search this
Names:
Capital Transit Company (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Serenity Farm, Inc.  Search this
Howes, Grace Bourne, ?-1976  Search this
Robinson, Adina Theresa, 1963-  Search this
Robinson, Amanda Baden, 1849-1940  Search this
Robinson, Elizabeth Bourne, 1892-1976  Search this
Robinson, Frank A., 1883-1970  Search this
Robinson, Franklin A., 1841-1905  Search this
Robinson, Franklin A., Sr., 1932-  Search this
Robinson, Martha Walls, 1807-1897  Search this
Robinson, Robert David, 1962-  Search this
Robinson, Robert Henry, 1851-1937  Search this
Robinson, Thomas Wells, 1803-1869  Search this
Townshend, Martha Robinson, 1880-1961  Search this
Via, Adina Mae, 1937-1966  Search this
Via, Ida Virginia Woods, 1914-2010  Search this
Via, Robert Delano, 1933-  Search this
Via, Robert Milton, 1906-1983  Search this
Creator:
Conner, Mary Robinson, 1930-2009  Search this
Extent:
23.1 Cubic feet (71 boxes, 3 map-size folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Correspondence
Photographs
Postcards
Baby books
Phonograph records
Postcard albums
Ephemera
School yearbooks
Diaries
Albums
Housebooks
Snapshots
Home movies
Family papers
Scrapbooks
Funeral registers
Architectural drawings
Place:
Maryland -- Family farms
Washington (D.C.)
Prince George's County (Md.)
Arizona -- Motion pictures
Benedict (Md.)
Charles County (Md.) -- Family farms
Calvert County (Md.) -- Family farms
California -- Motion pictures
Bahamas -- Motion pictures
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Puerto Rico -- Motion pictures
Washington -- motion pictures
Oregon -- Motion pictures
Disneyland (California)
Brandywine (Md.)
St. Thomas, V.I. -- Motion pictures
Florida -- Motion pictures
United States of America -- Maryland -- Carroll County -- Westminster
United States of America -- Maryland -- Carroll County -- Marston
United States of America -- Maryland -- Carroll County -- New Windsor
Date:
1838-2017, undated
bulk 1872-1985
Summary:
Papers documenting the farming and family life of the Robinson family of Prince George's County and after 1975, Charles County, Maryland. Papers documenting the farming and family of the Via family of Greene County, Virginia, Washington, D.C., Prince George's and Calvert Counties, Maryland, by 1949.
Scope and Contents:
An extensive and comprehensive collection of papers relating to family, farming, and the Southern Maryland tobacco culture, the Robinson and Via Family Papers cover many aspects of family and farm life. The papers are particularly important in regard to the tobacco culture that defined Southern Maryland for generations. The papers concern two distinct family groups, the Robinson and Via families who are connected through the marriage of Franklin A. Robinson and Adina Mae Via. The papers consist of material generated by the Robinson and Via families in their personal and working lives and as farm owners and operators.

The papers are especially strong in 20th century material. They consist of various types of farm records: account books, bills, receipts, tenant farming agreements, ephemera, land rental and purchase agreements, insurance policies, photographs and 8mm and 16mm films of farming practices and procedures, equipment and landscapes, related to the farming of tobacco, small grains, and livestock. The personal records include diaries, letters both personal and business, greeting cards, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, high school yearbooks, baby books, house plans, recipe books, photographs and 8mm films of birthdays, holidays, weddings, baptisms, family occasions, and family travel, oral histories, and funeral ephemera including photographs, and transcription discs. Of particular interest are the "Serenity Farm Tobacco Production Photographs" documenting the crop year 1999-2000 and the films detailing agricultural practices. There is a memorandum book for Black Walnut Thicket, 1885-1901, the Baden farm in Baden, Prince George's County.

This collection includes a comprehensive range of 8mm and 16mm films and photographs documenting farming practices and landscapes as well as family gatherings, birthdays, holidays, and vacations. The researcher is alerted to the fact that in some cases with the memorandum and account books, books printed for a given year were often saved and used for subsequent years, some were dated, some were not.

The collection is divided into seven series arranged by subject and most often chronologically at folder level within each series.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into seven series:

Series 1: Ferndale Farm (Potomac Landing), Prince George's County, Maryland, 1861-1973, undated

Subseries 1.1: Farm papers, bill, and receipts, and publications, 1861-1973, undated

Subseries 1.2: Farm papers, bill, and receipts, 1945-1960, undated

Subseries 1.3: Farm papers, bills, and receipts, 1960-1965, undated

Series 2: Robinson Family, 1845-2017, undated

Subseries 2.1: Family Papers and Publications, 1845-1993, undated

Subseries 2.2: Townshend, Martha Robinson, 1896-1961, undated

Subseries 2.3: Robinson, Frank A., 1899-1970, undated

Subseries 2.4: Robinson, Elizabeth Bourne, 1841-1976, undated

Subseries 2.5: Conner, Mary Robinson, 1938-1985, undated

Subseries 2.6: Robinson, Franklin A., 1932-1997, undated

Subseries 2.6.1: Farming, 1948-1976, undated

Subseries 2.6.2: Financial, 1948-1988, undated

Subseries 2.6.3: 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA), 1945-1954, undated

Subseries 2.6.4: Travel, 1959-1970, undated

Subseries 2.7: Robinson, Jr., Franklin A., 1959-2001, undated

Series 3: Serenity Farm, Charles County, Maryland, 1962-2000, undated

Series 4: Via Farm, Calvert County, Maryland, 1954-1987, undated

Series 5: Via Family, 1932-2010, undated

Subseries 5.1: Family papers, 1941-1983, undated

Subseries 5.2: Via, Robert M., 1933-1987, undated

Subseries 5.3: Via, Ida Virginia, 1928-2010, undated

Subseries 5.4: Via, Robert D., 1933-1988, undated

Subseries 5.5: Robinson, Adina Via, 1937-1966, undated

Series 6: Photographs, Photographic Slides, and Photographic Negatives, 1860-2000, undated

Subseries 6.1: Photographs, 1872-2000, undated

Subseries 6.2: Photographic negatives, 1927--2000, undated

Subseries 6.3: Photographic Slides, 1955-1979, undated

Series 7: AudioVisual, 1943-1988
Biographical / Historical:
Robinson Family

The Robinson family is thought to be of Scottish origin and appear in the records of Prince George's County, Maryland by the early 18th century. The line has been definitively traced to James Robinson (?-1849). James' father was probably Benjamin Robinson (?-1810), of Prince George's County, Maryland. (Will Book TT1, pg. 15, Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, Maryland State Archives (MSA))

James Robinson and Sarah Wynn were issued a marriage license on February 28, 1802 in Prince George's County, Maryland. (Marriage Records of Prince George's County, Maryland) Eleven children lived to maturity (not listed in birth order); Thomas Wells (1803-1869), Ann, Priscilla, James Monroe, Benjamin (1813-1882), John C. (1819-1895), Mary Sophia, Thomas Stanley (1800-1874), Alfred, Sarah Ann, Matilda, and Rebecca Maria.

James worked as a farm manager for Benjamin Oden near Upper Marlborough, Prince George's County. (Oden Papers, Maryland Historical Society) The Robinsons and their children, moved to Wood County, Virginia (now West Virginia) by April 18, 1818 where James acted as Oden's land agent (Deed Book 6, pg. 123, Land Records of Wood County, West Virginia). They brought with them three enslaved described in the above reference as, "Kate a woman 45 years of age very black; Colonel a boy aged 8 years yellow complexion: and George a boy aged six years of a dark brown complexion." They settled on part of what was known as the "Burnt Mill" tract in the general area where the Hughes River meets the Little Kanawha River. (Deed Book 9, pg. 110 and Deed Book 14, pg. 40, Land Records of Wood County)

Thomas Wells Robinson may not have accompanied his family to Virginia as he has a presence in Prince George's County prior to 1822 and was employed as a farm manager for Benjamin Oden at least until 1832. He married Elizabeth J. Richards on December 15, 1829 (Robinson Family Bible). They had nine children; Richard Thomas (1831 1906), Rebecca Maria (1832-1895), Mary Wynn (1834-1916), James George (1835-1883), Virlinda Victoria (1837-1838), Elizabeth Ann (1839-1916), Sarah Ann Sophia (1840-1874), Franklin Alexander (1841-1905) and John Alfred (1843); seven lived to maturity. (Robinson Family Bible) Elizabeth died on August 17, 1843 from complications in childbirth. She was buried in the graveyard of Page's Chapel (later known as St. Thomas Episcopal Church), Croom, Prince George's County. In 1843, Thomas purchased the plantation of Dr. Benjamin B. Hodges for $10,000 or approximately $15 an acre. Hodges was a brother-in-law of Benjamin Oden. The deed dated September 7, 1843 describes the parcel as containing, "Six hundred and twenty nine acres of land more or less and constitute that plantation or Estate of the said Benjamin Oden heretofore commonly called "Brown's Quarter Place" being the Land tracts and parcels of land sold by the said Benjamin Oden to the said Benjamin B. Hodges and by deed bearing date the tenth day of December eighteen hundred and thirty five and recorded in Liber AB no. 10 folio 162 also one of the land Records of the County aforesaid". (JBB no. 3 pgs. 312 314, Land Records of Prince George's County) The land was level to rolling bordered on the north by a tributary of Piscataway Creek and generally termed "white oak land". Underlying the whole property was a large strata of gravel and sand. The entire parcel went by the name, Potomac Landing.

Thomas supplemented his land holdings with later purchases. With the exception of twenty acres purchased from Sarah Talbert in 1844, (JBB no. 3 pg. 475, Land Records of Prince George's County) and the purchase of lot #3 consisting of 195 acres, part of the estate of John Townshend in 1856, these purchases were not contiguous to Potomac Landing. By the time of his death in 1869 these non-contiguous parcels had been sold. Thomas sold eighty-six acres of Potomac Landing and Jeffries to Edward Eversfield in October of 1843. (JBB no. 3, pg. 198, Land Records of Prince George's County) On January 13, 1846 Thomas married the widow Martha Ann Walls, daughter of George and Martha Naylor Walls. They had two sons; Benjamin Wells (1848-1849) and Robert Henry (1851-1937).

In addition to his sons, Thomas owned enslaved. The number varied from six in 1849 (JBB 6, folio 186, Land Records of Prince Georges' County) to eleven as noted in the census for 1850, and finally six as noted in the census of 1860. The 1867 Maryland Slave Statistics noted that, "at the time of the adoption of the Constitution of Maryland, in the year 1864, . . ." Thomas owned six enslaved, their names and ages being; Isaac Franklin age 31, Alfred West age 19, Susan West age 17, Margaret Franklin age 14, Fannie Franklin age 12, and Peter Franklin age 9. All were noted as being in good physical condition. (Prince Georges' County Slave Statistics 1867 1869, C 1307 1, MdHR:6198, page 185, MSA)

Thomas's financial problems began in the mid-1800s when Deeds of Trust appear in the county records securing outstanding loans. In 1856 and 1857 Thomas joined with others as bondsman for his son, Richard who was serving as "Collector of the State and County Taxes" for the 4th collection district, making he and the other signatories liable for any uncollected taxes. This, coupled with poor investments, led to his almost being "sold out" in 1859-1860 by J.W. & E. Reynolds of Baltimore to pay his debts. He executed three drafts on Penn & Mitchell, also of Baltimore, to pay off J.W. & E. Reynolds. (Equity Case #597, Prince Georges' County) Thomas was in poor health and his son James managed the farm in 1857 and 1858, and again from 1861 to October of 1862 (Equity Case #873, Prince Georges' County)

In October of 1862 Thomas' two sons, James and Franklin, traveled to Richmond to join the Confederate States Army. James enrolled in the 5th Battalion, Local Defense Arsenal and Franklin enrolled in the 5th Virginia Infantry, the Stonewall Brigade. (CSA Military Records, National Archives) James visited home frequently but was captured by the Union Army in St. Mary's County, Maryland on May 15, 1864 and spent the remainder of the war in Point Lookout Prison Camp. He was released on May 14, 1865. Franklin was not able to visit home at all during the war but survived to return home in 1865. In 1865, Thomas surveyed a parcel of 172 acres for his daughter Rebecca Maria. Rebecca had married her second cousin, William B. Robertson, on November 18, 1855. He made a gift of fifty acres, and Rebecca agreed to purchase the remainder. The Robertsons named this parcel Holly Grove. In Equity Case #849 (1872) filed after Thomas' death, his widow Martha and Samuel H. Berry, as executrix and executor, sought to recover payment for this land. At that time, William B. Robertson described this 172 acres of Potomac Landing: "There was no fences on the line which separated this land from the old gentleman's land, but he was to put a fence on it which he agreed to do before we agreed to come there. The land was thin, unimproved, with gullies and scrubby pine. If witness had been a judge of land he would not have given five dollars for it. All the improvements were one comfortable quarter the other indifferent with a poor oak shingle roof, worn out which made it not tenantable." Further along in his testimony, William gave an account of a conversation, "In a few days my father in law Thos. W. Robinson came to Washington and told me there his children had returned from the South, his two sons, that his debts were small and he was a happy man." Rebecca and William built a house on the property, a side-hall, double parlor plan that most likely her brother James was builder. They also built accompanying farm structures. (Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, Equity Case #849, MSA)

Thomas' son, Franklin, managed the farm after the War. In December 1868 Thomas entered into a sharecropping agreement with Edward Hanson, an African-American. After about a year-long illness, on May 16, 1869, Thomas died, deeply in debt. He was buried beside Elizabeth in the graveyard at St. Thomas' Church. He named as executrix his wife, Martha, and his friend and lawyer, Samuel H. Berry, as executor. His will divided the farm into thirds, one third going to his wife and their son Robert Henry, one third to his son James, and one third to his son Franklin. The land was surveyed according to the will. His personal property was sold but not enough profit was realized to pay off his creditors. The Commissioners of Prince George's County sued the estate on behalf of Thomas' creditors. The outcome was that in 1876 the property was sold at public auction. The Notice of Sale dated September 1, 1876 in the local county newspaper, The Prince Georgian, describes the farm as, "containing 514 2/3 acres More or less. The Improvements consist of a SMALL DWELLING, Three Barns, Stabling, and other necessary outbuildings. It is well wooded and watered, and the soil of fair quality. It has recently been divided into three lots and will be offered in lots, a description of which will be given at the time of sale." The sale was held on September 27, 1876, Lot No. 1 was purchased by Robert for $6.00 an acre, Lot #2 was purchased by Franklin for $5.00 an acre and Lot #3 was purchased by James for $4.00 per acre. Robert and Franklin eventually paid off their mortgage, but James defaulted on his purchase and later moved to St. Mary's County, Maryland. His portion later came to be owned by the Hawkins family, some members who had worked on the Robinson farm. (Equity Case #873, Prince Georges' County, MSA)

Lot #1, purchased by Robert from his fathers' estate, consisted of 177-1/3 acres, including the dwelling and farm buildings. On July 24, 1872, he married Amanda Malvina Baden (1849-1940), daughter of Robert W. G. and Margaret Caroline Early Baden. The Baden and Early families were both prominent south county families. Robert and Amanda had eight children; Caroline Early (1873 1967), Lucy Tennent (1875 1958), Albert Henry (1878 1914), Martha Perry (1880 1961), Robert Gover (1882 1882), Frank Alexander (1883 1970), Margaret Baden (1886 1956) and Grace Malvina (1889 1965).

By 1880 Robert had paid off his debt on the property and was fully engaged in farming. Unlike his father, or perhaps because of his father, Robert did not add to his land holdings, choosing to remain relatively debt free for his lifetime. The only land transactions he participated in were the sales of 79-3/4 acres in 1921 of Amanda's inheritance from her father and her interest in two smaller parcels of her father's land sold in 1894 and 1928 respectively. In 1928 he transferred 3.09 acres to his son Frank.

As late as the Federal census of 1880, Franklin was living with Robert and his household, both men engaged in farming. Sometime after 1880, Franklin took up residence on his part of Potomac Landing. His brother James most likely built the side-hall double parlor house that copied the main house at Potomac Landing. On February 18, 1897, Martha Robinson, died at the age of ninety. She was buried in the graveyyard of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baden, Prince George's County. Robert continued cultivation of tobacco and small grains as his father before him. The first reference to the farm being named Ferndale is found in the "Communion Record" of Robert's daughter, Martha Perry "Pattie", dated 1896. (Robinson and Via Family Papers) The exact origin or reason for this new name is lost but perhaps the name Potomac Landing held such bitter memories of debt and hardship that, as a symbolic break with the past, a new name was found. It also may have simply been a way to distinguish this portion of Potomac Landing from the others. The farm continued to be listed on tax bills as Potomac Landing well into the 20th century, but was known to the general public and businesses as the Ferndale Farm. (Robinson and Via Family Papers)

Robert served as deputy inspector at the State Tobacco Warehouse in Baltimore for eight years under W.B. Bowie. He also served on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Brandywine. In July of 1905, Franklin died, a bachelor farmer. He was buried facing south in the graveyard of the Church of the Atonement, Cheltenham, (a chapel in St. Thomas' Episcopal Parish) where he had served as vestryman, treasurer, and cemetery custodian. Franklin died intestate and a lengthy process of dividing his estate began. This resulted in the sale of his part of Potomac Landing (Lot #2) in July 1908 to William E. Boswell. The court declared Robert ineligible for any inheritance due to his being " . . . a brother of the half blood." The Boswell family later sold the property to the Billingsley family of St. Mary's County. (Equity Case 3209, Prince George's County)

In 1910, after living in the farm's original home for approximately sixty seven years, the Robinson family built a new home. It was described in a 1956 insurance policy as, "2 story, frame, metal roof, 16x43, wing 14x28, 9 rooms." (Robinson and Via Family Papers) The house design was a simple Victorian with plastered walls, and lit by carbide gas. Electrical lighting was installed in 1951. The house was built with monies from Robert and Amanda, and their son Frank, who served as builder and contractor.

On Tuesday March 9, 1937, "During a celebration in honor of his wifes birthday anniversary, Mr. Robinson collapsed at the table and died immediately without a word or a sigh." (Robinson and Via Family Papers) Robert was buried beside his mother in the cemetery at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baden.

At Robert's death, Ferndale Farm was valued at $30.00 an acre, the total acreage, 174 acres, being valued in the whole at $5,220.00. Robert died intestate, again the fate of the land was in question. He left eight heirs, his widow, Amanda, six of his children and his son Albert Henry's only surviving child, R. Henry Robinson. Rather than have the farm sold and his mother's life disrupted, Frank purchased the estate and personal property from the heirs. Before this could take place, a deed had to be granted the heirs for the property since one had never been recorded after the 1876 sale. Equity case 873 was reopened sixty-two years after its supposed resolution. Frank testified, "over a period of about thirty years I would on a number of occasions, talk about the fact that he had purchased and paid for this property and that a deed had never been executed to him and [he] kept saying he was going to have someone straighten this matter out for him." It was discovered that Robert had fully paid for his part of Potomac Landing. On February 14, 1938 the farm was deeded from Amanda along with Robert''s heirs to Frank. (Book 499, page 334, Land Records of Prince George's County) According to the deed and a 1937 fire insurance policy the farm consisted of 177 1/3 acres, "1 two story dwelling, one tenant house, 1 barrack, 1 tobacco barn, 1 corn house & cow stable, 1 Stable, and 1 Granary & Stable." (Robinson and Via Family Papers)

Frank A. Robinson, now the sole owner of Ferndale Farm, was born August 17, 1883. He learned farming and in addition took up the trade of builder and contractor. As a young man, he worked in the general store of his uncle Robert Baden. He was the contractor for the first Bank of Brandywine and many homes in and around the town of Brandywine, including the home of his cousin Robert E. Baden, DDS. He was secretary of the Building Committee for construction of the Chapel of the Incarnation in Brandywine, a mission chapel for St. Thomas' Episcopal Parish. His success in the building trade gave him disposable income that he invested in land. His first purchase was in August, 1915 of a 2-9/100 acre of land in Brandywine that was being sold by the Board of County School Commissioners; the purchase price was $300. In March 1916 he purchased 38.09 acres of his Uncle Franklin's farm. This property adjoined Ferndale Farm. Over the next fifty-four years of his life, Frank bought and sold many pieces of real estate. Perhaps his most significant purchases were: 18-1/3 acres purchased from The German American Colonization Land Company of Maryland in October 1915 (Book 115, pg. 140, Land Records of Prince George's County); 147.99 acres purchased from August and Wilhelmina Noltensmeir in December 1917 (Book 129, pg. 263, Land Records of Prince George's County) and 320 acres called the Vineyard purchased from William M. Wilson in March 1928. Frank used these three parcels as collateral for other purchases. Never once did he mortgage Ferndale Farm, insuring that no matter what financial stormy seas might blow, his home was secure. Over the course of his life, especially in the case of the Noltensmeir farm, when cash was needed a parcel of land would be surveyed off and sold. He inherited his grandfather Thomas' love of land but had fortunately developed a shrewd business sense to go along with it.

On November 20, 1929, he married Elizabeth Freeland Bourne, daughter of Joseph Blake and Maria Gantt Bourne of Calvert County, Maryland. They had three children: Mary Elizabeth (1930-2009), Franklin Alexander (1932), and Robert Lee (1935-1997). In addition to his construction business he continued farming, raising tobacco, hay, and small grains. He engaged in sharecropping with tenants on his various properties. He was active in community affairs serving on the Board of The Maryland Tobacco Growers Association (MTGA), the Vestry of St. Thomas Parish, and as sheriff of Brandywine. On January 9, 1940 Amanda Baden Robinson died. She was buried next to her husband at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baden. In February 1958, Frank and Elizabeth conveyed 1.57 acres of Ferndale Farm to son Franklin where he and his fiancée, Adina M. Via, were building their new home prior to their marriage in July of that same year.

The booming economy and suburbanization of the Washington metropolitan area in the early 1960's led to the high quality gravel lying beneath Ferndale into becoming a valuable commodity. In October 1962, Franklin and his parents granted a three-year lease to William C. Nolte for mining sand and gravel on the Ferndale Farm at .174 per yard. (Book 2747, pg. 11, Land Records of Prince George's County) From now until 1975 when the property was sold, gravel would be mined from under the farm by various companies. In November 1962, Elizabeth and Frank transferred to Franklin the 38.09 acres Frank had purchased from Fitzhugh Billingsley in 1916. (Book 2754, pg. 99, Land Records of Prince George's County) That same year they transferred 6.754 acres, part of the Vineyard, to son Robert and his wife Lois, (Book 2765, pg. 201, Land Records of Prince George's County)

On December 28, 1965, Frank and Elizabeth participated in a land exchange/purchase of the farm of Ralph W. and Cordelia H. Brown located along the Patuxent River in Benedict, Charles County, Maryland. Franklin had rented this farm the year before and was impressed enough by its location and arability to work out a purchase. Frank and Elizabeth traded 65.9920 acres that would eventually become Franklin's under Frank's will. On February 21, 1966 they deeded the Charles County farm to Franklin and Adina. Adina named this property Serenity Farm. The property consisted of 480.66 acres. (Liber 179, page 708 etc., Land Records of Charles County)

On February 5, 1970, after a short illness, Frank died at Cafritz Memorial Hospital. He was buried at St. Paul's Episcopal Church near his parents. In his will, probated March 4, 1970 he left thirty acres of the property purchased from the German American Land Company and A. Noltensmeir to Elizabeth. He willed forty acres of the same parcel to daughter Mary Robinson Conner. The remainder of Ferndale Farm was willed to Franklin and the remaining acreage of the Vineyard was left to Robert Lee. Franklin Alexander Robinson was born August 13, 1932 at the Garfield Hospital in Washington, D.C.. He received his schooling in the public school system of Prince George's County, graduating from Gwynn Park High School in June 1951. He was a charter member of Gwynn Park's chapter of The Future Farmers of America. He was extremely active in FFA, achieving the Degree of Maryland Farmer in 1950 and their highest award, the Degree of American Farmer at their convention in Kansas City, Missouri in October 1953. He obtained his private pilots license in 1954. He entered the United States Army in February 1955 and went through basic training at Camp Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. After basic training he was transferred to Camp Hanford, Washington State. There he worked part time on the farm of Dick and Theresa Laurent during his off duty hours and began a lifelong friendship with them. He returned home to farming on an agricultural discharge in October of 1956. On July 27, 1958 he married his high school sweetheart, Adina Mae Via, daughter of Robert Milton and Virginia Woods Via. They had three children: Franklin Alexander (1959), Robert David (1962), and Adina Theresa (1963).

Franklin continued expanding and improving the farming operation by modern methods and means. At times, he farmed over one thousand acres, both owned and rented. On February 21, 1966, his parents deeded their purchase of the Ralph W. and Cordelia H. Brown farm in Benedict to he and Adina, later known as Serenity Farm Franklin and Adina engaged an architect to draft house plans for an anticipated new residence. A small A frame vacation home was built on the property so the family could spend weekends there.

On December 14, 1966, after a long illness, Adina died from complications associated with Hodgkin's Disease. She was buried in Trinity Memorial Gardens, Waldorf, Charles County. Franklin married Margaret Walker Lennox (nee Tallen, known as Rita) on August 21, 1970 (Marriage Records of Prince George's County, Maryland). This marriage ended in divorce in 1977. There were no children from this marriage.

On July 14, 1975 the Robinson family, Franklin, his second wife, Margaret, her daughter Margaret W. Lennox, Franklin, Jr., R. David, A. Theresa and Elizabeth B. Robinson, moved to Serenity Farm. On July 17, 1975 Franklin and Elizabeth sold the remaining acreage of Ferndale Farm to Brandywine Sand and Gravel, thus ending 131 years of ownership by the Robinson family. Elizabeth Bourne Robinson died on July 15, 1976 and was buried beside her husband at St. Paul's Church, Baden. Franklin married Hiltrud (Ceddie) Harris (nee Sedlacek) on July 15, 1978. (Robinson Family Bible) This marriage ended in divorce in 1986. There were no children from this marriage. Franklin married Diedre Gale Merhiage on April 19, 1989; this marriage ended in divorce in 1997. There were no children from this marriage. He married Remelda Henega Buenavista on January 13, 2007.

The Robinson family continue day-to-day operations of Serenity Farm. The land is well suited to the growing of tobacco and small grains, which crops, (with the exception of tobacco) along with a flock of sheep, are cultivated there to the present time. After the crop year 2001 the Robinson family took the tobacco buyout program offered by the state of Maryland and ceased growing tobacco. Franklin is active in farming and community affairs having served on the vestry of St. Thomas Episcopal Parish, the Board of Directors of the Maryland Tobacco Growers Association (MTGA), the Board of the Production Credit Association, the Boards of three schools, Holy Trinity Day School, Queen Anne School, and Calverton School, and numerous other organizations. Currently the farm consists of approximately 275 acres. In 1981 a state agricultural land preservation district of 222.755 acres was created. This was the first such district in Charles County and one of the first in the state of Maryland.

Via Family

The Via family traces its origins to the colony of Virginia, where the probable progenitor of the line, Amer Via, a French Huguenot, settled in Manakin Town, Albemarle County between 1670-1700. It is impossible to trace the Via line definitively due to the loss of Virginia county records during the Civil War.

The Via family line covered in this collection can be definitively traced to William Via of Fredericksville Parish, Louisa (later Albemarle) County, Virginia. The William Via family lived west of the present day town of Whitehall at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains, an area commonly known as Sugar Hollow. William Via III served in the Virginia Line during the Revolutionary War. He married Mary Craig, daughter of Thomas Craig and Jane Jameson, on March 17, 1784. William died on June 27, 1836, in Albemarle County (Rev. War Pension Appl. 6363, National Archives). His son Thomas married Sally, widow Griffin, on January 1, 1811 (Albemarle County Marriage Records). Their son, Hiram Karl Via (1812-1893), married Harriet Ardenia Naylor by license dated March 7, 1836 (Albemarle County Marriage Records).

Hiram and Harriet's son, Robert St. Clair Via (1844-1925), served as a private in Company I, 7th Virginia Infantry of the Confederate States Army (CSA Military Service Records, National Archives). After the war he married his first cousin, Mary Frances Naylor, daughter of Samuel Chapman Naylor and Eliza Jane Gardner, on April 3, 1866 in Rockingham County (Rockingham County, Virginia, Marriage Records). Sometime between 1870 and 1872, they moved to Linn County, Missouri, and settled about seven miles from the town of Bucklin. Their son, Hiram Chapman Via (1872-1933), was born there. In 1893, the family returned to Virginia, and settled on a farm in Greene County near the town of Stanardsville.

Hiram Chapman Via operated a mill as well as a farm. On March 15, 1899, he married Adina Eleanor Eusebia Runkle, daughter of Milton D. L. Runkle and Roberta A. Beadles (Greene County, Virginia, Marriage Records). They had three children: Bernice Olive (1902-1999), Robert Milton (1906-1983), and Deward Daniel (1909-1977).

Robert moved to Washington, D.C.. In December 1927 he began employment with the Capitol Traction Company as a streetcar conductor (Robinson and Via Family Papers). During the early 1930s, Robert rented a townhouse at 715 A St., SE, where he lived with his sister Bernice V. McMullan and her son, William C. McMullan; his brother and sister in law, and his parents. Next door, at 717, lived the Moses Albright family, including Moses's stepdaughter Ida Virginia Woods (1914-2010), daughter of Jesse Lee Woods (1894-1918) and Donna Mae Barker (1896-1928) of Frederick County, Maryland. Robert and Virginia began a courtship and on September 3, 1932 were married in Frederick, Frederick County, Maryland (Frederick County, Maryland, Marriage Records).

After their marriage, Robert and Virginia lived in various locations in the Washington metropolitan area. Their first child, Robert Delano, was born on March 24, 1933, and their second child, Adina Mae, was born on April 12, 1937. Virginia was employed outside the home while her children were in school. Her first job before her marriage had been with Woolworth's in Martinsburg, WV working the candy counter and then before the birth of her son at The Hecht Company on F St. in Washington, D.C.. After her marriage she worked briefly for the United States Postal Service in Capitol Heights, Maryland. Beginning in the 1950s, she worked first at the Hecht Company department store on 7th Street in the District and later for Charles of the Ritz as a receptionist in their beauty salon located in Woodward & Lothrop's F Street store in Washington, D.C.. She also worked as salon manager at the Charles of the Ritz salons in the Woodward & Lothrop stores in Seven Corners, Virginia, and Chevy Chase, Maryland. She retired due to health reasons in 1973.

On September 10, 1941, Robert and Virginia purchased Lot #43 in Woodlane subdivision in Prince George's County. (Book 619, pg. 12, Land Records of Prince George's County) A house was designed for them for this lot by Clyde E. Phillips. They did not construct a home on this property due to the outbreak of World War II. Robert, due to his employment in public transportation, did not serve with the Armed Services in World War II. On October 18, 1946, they purchased approximately thirty acres bordering on Burch's Creek near the towns of Clinton, also know as Surrattsville, and T.B. in Prince George's County from Joseph H. and M. Pauline Blandford. (Book 873, pg. 483, Land Records of Prince George's County) Over the next three years, hiring private contractors, doing work themselves, and with the help of Robert's brother Deward, they built the two story house designed by Phillips in 1941. They moved to the farm from Capitol Heights in 1949. Robert raised hogs, small grains and a crop of tobacco yearly on this farm and also maintained his job with Capitol Transit (formerly Capitol Traction). In 1954, Robert and Virginia purchased a farm of approximately 150 acres in Island Creek, Calvert County, Maryland. The intention was for Robert and his son to enter into a full time farming operation on expanded acreage. Robert D. Via, known as Delano, graduated from Gwynn Park High School in June 1951. Delano was a part-time farmer and pursued a career as a country and western singer with Bashful Bob and the Rhythm Rangers, he being Bashful Bob. He was employed in various jobs, and began a tour in the Army in 1953. By the time the Via family moved to Calvert County in 1956, he decided to pursue careers other than farming. He eventually traveled and worked in various parts of the United States. He married first Delores Cooper, second Gloria J. Irick, and finally Candice Marinelli in December 1974, they had two children, Robert Marin (1975) and Kirstin Marin (1976).

On June 1, 1956 Robert resigned from his position at Capitol Transit due to health reasons. He and his family moved to the farm in Island Creek, Calvert County where he began full time farming. He and Virginia sold the thirty-acre farm in Prince George's County on June 21, 1956 to Melvin C. and Geraldine H. Rardia. (Book 2003, pg. 564, Land Records of Prince George's County) Virginia continued her employment with Charles of the Ritz. Adina, now a graduate of Gwynn Park High School, was employed by the USAF at Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs, Maryland. They both commuted daily from Calvert County to their places of employment.

Robert farmed in Calvert County, raising hogs, cattle, small grains and tobacco. Over the course of the next twenty-seven years, Robert and Virginia sold smaller parcels off the farm. In 1974, Robert and Virginia built a small retirement home designed for them by Calvert Masonry Contractors. Robert died on December 22, 1983. He was buried beside his daughter Adina in Trinity Memorial Gardens. At the time of Robert's death, the farm consisted of 28.694 acres. In 1998, Virginia deeded the remainder of the farm, then less than six acres, to her grandson, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. who sold all but a one-acre lot in April 1999.

Virginia continued to live on the farm in Calvert County, maintaining a small herd of cattle. In the fall of 1989 Franklin, Jr. went to live with her. In 1993, the onset of Alzheimer's Disease required her to move to Serenity Farm and take up residence with her granddaughter A. Theresa. Virginia participated in various studies on Alzheimer's Disease conducted by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland beginning in 1992. She was profiled in the September 1997 issue of Washingtonian Magazine. In October of 1998 she moved to All American Senior Care in Brandywine, Maryland and in 1999 she moved to Morningside, an elderly care facility in Waldorf, Maryland. In 2002, she moved to St. Mary's Nursing Center in Leonardtown, Maryland. The remainder of the farm was sold in 1999 and 2002. She died January 14, 2010 and was buried at Trinity Memorial Gardens in Waldorf.

Adina Mae Via was born April 12, 1937 at the Homeopathic Hospital in Washington, D.C.. Adina grew up in Washington, D.C. attending public schools. She moved with her family to the Burch's Creek farm, Prince George's County, in 1949. She enrolled in the Prince George's County school system, and graduated from Gwynn Park High School in June of 1955. After graduation, she was employed by the USAF at Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs.

In July of 1956, she moved with her family to the Via farm in Island Creek, Calvert County. On July 27, 1958 she married Franklin A. Robinson at the Chapel of the Incarnation. They had three children: Franklin Alexander (1959), Robert David (1962) and Adina Theresa (1963). In the fall of 1958, she and Franklin took up residence in the home they had built on Ferndale Farm. She resigned from her position with the USAF in 1959.

On December 14, 1966, at Providence Hospital in Washington, DC, Adina died from complications due to Hodgkin's Disease. She had been battling this disease for many years prior to her death. She was buried in Trinity Memorial Gardens, Charles County.
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

The Maryland Historical Society holds items (costume, farming related implements) related to the Robinson and Via families.
Separated Materials:
Materials at the National Museum of American History

The Division of Work and Industry (Agriculture Collection) holds agricultural implements and artifacts associated with both the Robinson farms and the Via farm; the Division of Home and Community Life holds clothing, textiles (crib quilt), jewelry, cosmetics and Adina M. Robinson's sewing box and dress patterns; (Costume and Textiles Collection). See accession numbers: 1989.0688, 1990.0394, 1991.0010; 1991.0722, 1992.0184, 1992.0283, 1992.0321, 1992.0474, 1992.3106, 1994.0064, 1994.0304, 1997.0327, 1998.0038, 1998.0129, 2001.0196, 2002.0087, 2003.0015, 2005.0009.

Division of Armed Forces History (now Division of Olitical and Military History, National Numismatics Collection) holds the Robert M. Via Trolley Token Collection.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Museum of American History, Archives Center, by Franklin A. Robinson, Jr., in November 1993.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but negatives and audiovisuial materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Some papers of living persons are restricted. Access to restricted portions may be arranged by request to the donor. Gloves required for unprotected photographs. Viewing film portions of the collection and listening to LP recording requires special appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
The Archives Center does not own exclusive rights to these materials. Copyright for all materials is retained by the donor, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr.; permission for commercial use and/or publication may be requested from the donor through the Archives Center. Military Records for Franklin A. Robinson (b. 1932) and correspondence from Richard I. Damalouji (1961-2014) are restricted; written permission is needed to research these files. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Farms -- Maryland  Search this
Holidays  Search this
Amusement parks -- California  Search this
Children's parties  Search this
Rural women  Search this
Sheep ranches  Search this
Parks -- California  Search this
Rural families  Search this
Tobacco -- Harvesting  Search this
Tobacco -- Storage  Search this
Street-railroads  Search this
Street-railroads -- Employees  Search this
Travel  Search this
Urban transportation  Search this
Work and family  Search this
Tobacco curing  Search this
Women in agriculture  Search this
Farm equipment  Search this
Farm buildings  Search this
Family recreation  Search this
Family festivals  Search this
Farm ownership  Search this
Farm life -- 20th century  Search this
Farm management  Search this
Illiterate persons  Search this
Christmas  Search this
Soldiers  Search this
Students  Search this
Family -- 20th century  Search this
Family farms  Search this
Easter  Search this
Electric railroads  Search this
Acting -- 1980-2000  Search this
Amateur films  Search this
Agricultural machinery  Search this
Agriculture -- 20th century -- Maryland  Search this
Tobacco farmers  Search this
Housewives -- United States  Search this
Weddings  Search this
Farmers  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Photographs -- 20th century
Postcards
Baby books
Phonograph records
Postcard albums
Ephemera
School yearbooks
Diaries
Albums
Housebooks
Photographs -- 19th century
Snapshots
Home movies
Family papers
Scrapbooks
Funeral registers
Architectural drawings
Citation:
The Robinson and Via Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0475
See more items in:
Robinson and Via Family Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86b1972cf-a789-45ec-8f3e-fb780d43456d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0475
Online Media:

[Robinson and Via family travel]

Collection Collector:
Robinson, Franklin A., Jr., 1959- (actor)  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film (Duration: 22 minutes, 30 seconds, A compilation reel of smaller reels., Camera original; 8mm; Kodacrome reversal)
Container:
Box 26, Item OF475.12, Item See RV475.9
Type:
Archival materials
Motion picture films
Date:
1970-1979
Scope and Contents:
1. Tonto Park and Roosevelt Lake, Arizona, 1970

Persons: Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. and Sr., Robert D. Robinson, A. Theresa Robinson, Margaret T. Lennox, Margaret W. Lennox

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Sr.

2. Disneyland, Anaheim, California, August 1970

Persons: Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. and Sr., Robert D. Robinson, A. Theresa Robinson, Margaret T. Lennox, Margaret W. Lennox

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Sr.

3. Puerto Rico and St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, April 1971

Persons: Franklin A. Robinson, Sr. and Margaret W. Robinson

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Sr., Margaret W. Robinson

4. Via trip to California; Emily Abbott, Glendale, California, December-January,1979-1980 (reel 1)

Persons: Robert M. Via, Ida Virginia Via, Emily Abbott

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Jr.

5. Via trip to California; Emily Abbott, Glendale, California, December-January,1979-1980 (reel 2)

Persons: Robert M. Via, Ida Virginia Via, Emily Abbott

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Jr.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but negatives and audiovisuial materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Some papers of living persons are restricted. Access to restricted portions may be arranged by request to the donor. Gloves required for unprotected photographs. Viewing film portions of the collection and listening to LP recording requires special appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
The Archives Center does not own exclusive rights to these materials. Copyright for all materials is retained by the donor, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr.; permission for commercial use and/or publication may be requested from the donor through the Archives Center. Military Records for Franklin A. Robinson (b. 1932) and correspondence from Richard I. Damalouji (1961-2014) are restricted; written permission is needed to research these files. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
The Robinson and Via Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Robinson and Via Family Papers
Robinson and Via Family Papers / Series 7: Audiovisual / 7.2: Travel
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8aca245c5-4683-4939-90fd-942b76c5efd5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0475-ref370

Manuscript and Pamphlet File

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. National Museum of Natural History. Department of Anthropology. Division of Ethnology  Search this
Mason, Otis Tufton, 1838-1908  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Williams, Talcott  Search this
Hawley, Edwin H.  Search this
Wilson, Thomas  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
41 Linear feet
Culture:
Baubi  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Innuit  Search this
Jamomadi  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Mission  Search this
Moro  Search this
Naltunnetunne  Search this
Pygmies  Search this
Tesuque  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Modoc  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Osage  Search this
Dyak  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Haida  Search this
Makah  Search this
Maya  Search this
Carib  Search this
Shuar/Achuar  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Seri  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Chinook  Search this
Washo Indians  Search this
Nez Percé Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Cuna  Search this
Bannock  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Oto  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Samoan  Search this
Cossacks  Search this
Arabs  Search this
Diegueño Indians  Search this
Goajira  Search this
Hittites  Search this
Kabyles  Search this
Kirghese  Search this
Luiseño Indians  Search this
Maori (New Zealand people)  Search this
Wichí (Mataco)  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Parsee  Search this
Quichua  Search this
Quinaielt  Search this
Tonga?  Search this
Tulalip  Search this
Dayak (Indonesian people)  Search this
Samoans  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Inuit  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Letters
Notes
Drawings
Maps
Photographs
Printed materials
Processed materials
Paper specimens
Reports
Manuscripts
Catalogs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Bibliographies
Place:
British Columbia
District of Columbia
Europe
Hawaii
India
Iran
Ireland
Japan
Korea
Madagascar
Madeira Islands
Micronesia
Mongolia
Morocco
New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
Peru
Nubia
Puerto Rico
Spain
Tahiti
Philippines
Thailand
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Date:
1840s
1860-1962
1972
1997
Scope and Contents:
For those who are searching for anthropologically substantive materials, special note should be made of the Manuscript and Pamphlet File. A potpourri of documents, the file includes correspondence, notes, drawings, maps, photographs, printed and processed materials, paper specimens, reports, writings, catalogs, motion picture film (now in the Smithsonian's Human Studies Film Archives), bibliographies, and other types of documents. Of concern is a wide variety of subjects such as anthropological specimens, museology and museums, Smithsonian history, archaeological and ethnological methods, exhibits, expeditions, history of anthropology, and so forth.

The file seems to have been maintained in the Division of Ethnology — in one document it was referred to as Herbert W. Krieger's morgue — and the subject matter is largely ethnological. Nevertheless, some documents relate to archeology and physical anthropology. The file also contains administrative materials, such as records relating to the Department of Anthropology's use of Work Projects Administration workers during the 1930s. In addition, the file is the main location of materials not generally accepted as being strictly anthropological in the modern sense. It includes, for example, material on period costumes, fish and fisheries, whaling, religions, armor, biblical studies, modern appliances, the seal industry, European music and musical instruments, lace, aeronautics, and other similar subjects. In addition, the file includes sets of papers of Edwin H. Hawley ,Walter Hough, Otis T. Mason, Talcott Williams and Thomas Wilson. Some documents, both primary and secondary research materials, concern the following cultural groups and geographic areas: Arabs, Bannock, Baubi, Blackfoot, British Columbia, Caddo, Carib, Chinook, Cochiti, Comanche, Cossacks, Cuna, Delaware, Diegueño, District of Columbia, Dyak, Eskimo, Europe, Fox, Goajira, Haida, Hawaii, Hittites, Hupa, India, Innuit, Iran, Ireland, Jamomadi, Japan, Jivaro, Kabyles, Kiowa, Kirghese, Klamath, Korea, Luiseño, Madagascar, Madiera, Maidu, Makah, Maori, Mataco, Maya, Micmac, Micronesia, Mission, Modoc, Mohave, Mongolia, Moro, Morocco, Naltunnetunne, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navaho, New Guinea, Nez Perce, Nubia, Omaha, Onandaga, Osage, Oto, Papua, Parsee, Pawnee, Peru, Philippines, Pomo, Pueblo, Puerto Rico, Pygmies, Quichua, Quinaielt, Samoa, Sauk, Seminole, Seri, Shoshoni, Spain, Tahiti, Tesuque, Thailand, Texas, Tolowa, Tonga, Tulalip, Utah, Virginia, Washo, Wichita, Wintun, Yavapai, and Zuni.
The manuscript and pamphlet file is virtually a potpourri of documents, including correspondence, notes, drawings, maps, photographs, printed and processed materials, paper specimens, reports, writings, catalogs, motion picture film, bibliographies, and other types of documents. Of concern is a wide variety of subjects such as anthropological specimens, museology and museums, Smithsonian history, archeological and ethnological methods, exhibits, expeditions, history of anthropology, and so forth. The file seems to have been maintained in the Division of Ethnology--in one document it was referred to as being Herbert W. Krieger's morgue--and the subject matter is largely ethnological.

Some documents, however, concern archeology and physical anthropology. The file also contains some administrative materials--records relating to the Department of Anthropology's use of Work Projects Administration workers, for example. In addition, it is the main location of materials not generally accepted as being strictly anthropological in the modern sense. It includes, for example, material on the First Ladies' Gown exhibit now in the National Museum of American History, fish and fisheries, whaling, religions, armour, biblical studies, modern appliances, the seal industry, European music and musical instruments, lace, aeronautics, and other similar subjects.

The file includes the papers of many different persons. The file also includes sets of papers of Otis Tufton Mason, Walter Hough, Talcott Williams, Edwin H. Hawley, and Thomas Wilson. It includes documents, sometimes of a secondary nature, about the following cultural groups and geographic areas; Arabs, Bannock, Baubi, Blackfoot, British Columbia, Caddo, Chinook, Cochiti, Comanche, Cossacks, Cuna, Delaware, Diegueno, District of Columbia, Dyak, Eskimo, Europe, Fox, Goajira, Haida, Hawaii, Hittites, Hupa, India, Innuit, Iran, Ireland, Jamomadi, Japan, Jivaro, Kabyles, Kiowa, Kirghese, Klamath, Korea, Luiseno, Madagascar, Madeira, Maidu, Makah, Maori, Mataco, Maya, Micmac, Micronesia, Mission, Modoc, Mohave, Mongolia, Moro, Morocco, Naltunnetunne, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navaho,

New Guinea, Nez Perce, Nubia, Omaha, Onandaga, Osage, Oto, Papua, Parsee, Pawnee, Peru, Philippines, Pomo, Pueblo, Puerto Rico, Pygmies, Quichua, Quinaielt, Samoa, Sauk, Seminole, Seri, Shoshoni, Spain, Tahiti, Tesuque, Thailand, Texas, Tolowa, Tonga, Tulalip, Utah, Virginia, Washo, Wichita, Wintun, Yavapai, and Zuni.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Lace and lace making  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Seal industry  Search this
Electric apparatus and appliances  Search this
Fish and fisheries  Search this
First Ladies' Gowns  Search this
Whaling  Search this
Religions  Search this
Armor  Search this
Biblical studies  Search this
Tipai-Ipai  Search this
Luiseno  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Sauk & Fox  Search this
Otoe  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Eskimo ?  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters
Notes
Drawings
Maps
Photographs
Printed materials
Processed materials
Paper specimens
Reports
Manuscripts
Catalogs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Bibliographies
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0311, Subseries 17.1
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b2f3180c-4348-4175-ab6f-c61e477eafc5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref53

George Morren films

Collector:
Morren, George E. B.  Search this
Film editor:
Castle, Eugene W.  Search this
Extent:
4 Film reels (black-and-white silent; 1429 feet)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Silent films
Place:
Africa, Southern
Caribbean Area
Oceania
South Africa
Southeast Asia
Puerto Rico
Bali (Indonesia : Province)
Date:
circa 1930s
Scope and Contents:
Collection consists of four four travelogues collected by George Morren.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Provenance:
Received from George Morren in 1993.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Travelogues (Motion pictures)  Search this
Genre/Form:
silent films
Citation:
George Morren films, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
HSFA.1993.03
See more items in:
George Morren films
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9f59c8ca4-acf4-49e7-9aa9-66e4311364bf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-1993-03

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Negatives
Video recordings
Contracts
Business records
Plans (drawings)
Notes
Videotapes
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Digital images
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Latin America
Haiti
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2004
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Haiti: Freedom and Creativity from the Mountains to the Sea

Series 3: Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture

Series 4: Special Events

Series 5: Water Ways: Mid-Atlantic Maritime Communities
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 2004, the Festival continued its long tradition of presenting the diverse cultural heritage of the people of the United States and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way, with three major programs and the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert honoring longtime collaborator, Roland Freeman.

In 2004, the Haitian people marked the bicentennial of their independence. In 1804, inspired by American and French ideals, Haitians fought for their own freedom, abolished slavery, and created the second independent nation in the Western Hemisphere. Haitians have sought freedom and liberty ever since, and through tough times have relied on their rich culture and seemingly boundless creativity to persevere. The Festival program, in the planning for several years, came at what was obviously an important time for Haitians and Americans - particularly Haitian Americans. It provided an excellent opportunity for Haitians to tell their own stories through their skill and artistry, and for Festival visitors to learn from them.

The inaugural program in a planned multi-year sequence, the Latino music program helped the Smithsonian reach out to a major segment of the American population not only as audience, but also as presenters, performers, and spokespeople for their own cultural expressions. Latino music includes a wide variety of traditions now energizing social and community life in the United States. Some are centuries old and reach back to early indigenous, European, and African roots. Others have come to us more recently, with immigrants from south of our border. Sharing these traditions broadly at the Festival contributed to a valuable and needed cultural dialogue, particularly one involving the growing number of Washingtonians of Latino heritage.

The Mid-Atlantic maritime program allowed the Smithsonian to convene a public discussion of "water ways" spanning six eastern seaboard states. Many people and communities depend upon the ocean, coast, bays, and rivers for their livelihoods - whether through commercial fishing and aquaculture or recreation and tourism. At the time of the Festival, homes, jobs, and ways of life were facing unprecedented economic and ecological challenges. The Festival program brought together scores of workers, professionals, and officials who used, monitored, and regulated these water ways to demonstrate their knowledge and inform visitors about the key issues facing them.

The 2004 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2004 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with versions in Kreyòl and Spanish of the respective essays).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Director and Curator; Anthony Seeger, Director Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Save Our Sounds: Frank Proschan, Project Director; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corinne Kratz, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Sam-Ang Sam, Laura Schneider, Rajeev Sethi, Chucho Valdez, Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli, Ricardo Trimillos, John Herzog (ex-officio)

Folkways Advisory Council

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex-officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Terry R. Carlstrom, Regional Director, National Capital Region

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. Major funding for this year's programs came from Whole Foods Market and the Music Performance Fund, a Festival sponsor for 34 years. Telecommunications support for the Festival was provided by Motorola, Nextel, Pegasus, and Icom America. Media partners included WAMU 88.5 FM, American University Radio, and WashingtonPost.com, with in-kind support from Signature Systems and Go-Ped.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Correspondence
Negatives
Video recordings
Contracts
Business records
Plans (drawings)
Notes
Videotapes
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Digital images
Audiotapes
Audiocassettes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2004
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk55ccc5401-3a5b-49e2-9690-18dafed37081
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2004

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Place:
Caribbean Area
Central America
Latin America
Puerto Rico
Cuba
El Salvador
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2005
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Food Culture USA

Series 3: Forest Service, Culture, and Community

Series 4: Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture

Series 5: Oman: Desert, Oasis, and Sea

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In its 39th year, the Festival once again presented a sample of the diverse cultural heritage of America and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way on the National Mall of the United States. True to form, the Festival illustrated the living, vital aspect of cultural heritage and provided a forum for discussion on matters of contemporary concern.

For the first time, a full-scale Festival program was devoted to an Arab nation, Oman. Oman is at the edge of the Arabian Peninsula, both geographically and historically situated between East Africa and the Indian Ocean. Trade routes, frankincense, silverwork, Islam, a strategic location, and oil have connected it to the cultures of the Middle East, Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean region, and beyond. Contemporary Omanis live poised between a long and rich past and a future they are in the midst of defining. New roads, hospitals, schools, businesses, high-tech occupations, and opportunities for women are developing alongside traditionally valued religion, family life, artistry, and architecture. Omanis are well aware of the challenges of safeguarding their cultural heritage in an era of globalization. The Festival program provided a vivid illustration of the approaches they have taken and enabled American visitors and Omanis to engage in open, two-way interchange.

During the Festival, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Programs in previous years have illustrated the traditions of White House workers and of Smithsonian workers. This Festival examined the occupational culture of Forest Service rangers, smokejumpers, scientists, tree doctors, and many others devoted to the health and preservation of our nation's forests. They were joined by artists and workers from communities that depend upon the forests for their livelihood or sustenance. The Festival offered the opportunity for an active discussion of the significance of our national forests and rangelands to the American people.

Food Culture USA examined the evolution of our nation's palate over the preceding generation. New produce, new foods, new cooking techniques, and even new culinary communities have developed as a result of immigrant groups taking their place in our society, the rise of organic agriculture, and the growing celebrity of ethnic and regional chefs on a national stage. A diversity of growers, food inspectors, gardeners, educators, home cooks and prominent chefs shared their knowledge and creativity as they demonstrated the continuity and innovation in America's culinary culture.

The program in Latino music continued with a series of evening concerts. The 2004 program drew many Latinos to the National Mall, helping the Smithsonian reach out to a major segment of the American population. Audiences in both 2004 and 2005 were thrilled by the performances, as were the musicians who presented their own cultural expressions and thus helped educate their fellow citizens of the nation and the world. Smithsonian Folkways released recordings of three of the groups that had performed the previous year, and one later went on to be nominated for a Grammy award.

The 2005 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2005 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with a Spanish version of the Latino music essay).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings/Smithsonian Global Sound: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Frank Proschan, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Research Associates: Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Patrick Delatour, Kip Lornell, Mara Mayor, Joan Nathan, Sam-Ang Sam, Preston Scott, Chucho Valdez, Patrick Vilaire, Nilda Villalta; Rockefeller Humanities Fellows (2004-05): Robert Albro, Jane Anderson, Lesley Fordred-Green, Christina Kreps, Tong Lam, Lillian Manzor, Marya McQuirter, Sita Reddy

Folklife Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, John Herzog (ex-officio), Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli, Ricardo Trimillos

Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex-officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director, National Capital Region

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. Support for this year's Festival came from the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support provided through Motorola, NEXTEL, WAMU 88.5 FM, WashingtonPost.com, Pegasus Radio Corp., and Icom America.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2005
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5762f551c-a3bb-49a3-98fd-cd5d64e7199b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2005

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Negatives
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Video recordings
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Audiocassettes
Notes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Latin America
Mexico
Colombia
Guatemala
Peru
El Salvador
Chile
Belize
Brazil
Cuba
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 30-July 11, 2006
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Alberta at the Smithsonian

Series 3: Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions

Series 4: Nuestra Música: Latino Chicago

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 2006 Festival, celebrating its 40th year on the National Mall of the United States, again presented a compelling, research-based sampling of the diverse traditions of America and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way. Employing a format it had both pioneered and mastered, the Festival illustrated the vital, living aspect of cultural heritage and provided a forum for discussion of issues of contemporary concern.

For the first time, the Festival featured a Canadian province - Alberta, which had just completed its own celebration of its centennial. Albertans have created a dynamic home for diverse peoples - aboriginal inhabitants, settlers, and later immigrants - in a varied and dramatic landscape. They've built large world-class industries - oil and gas, ranching, farming, forestry - as well as two large, modern metropolises, Calgary and Edmonton, all the while being creative in the arts and sciences. Festival visitors could see how Alberta's oil sands are mined and processed, witness ranching skills, appreciate fine Native craftsmanship, hear ballads from talented singer-songwriters, and experience their contemporary "Theatresports." The Festival program resulted from close collaboration between the Smithsonian and its Albertan partners, and was a testament to how good will and common purpose can effectively cross borders and serve the educational and cultural interests of Canadians, Americans, and a broader visiting public.

The same kind of engaged collaborative partnership was illustrated through the Carriers of Culture program that brought together the Festival, the National Museum of the American Indian, Michigan State University Museum, and a network of Native basket makers' organizations around the United States. The collaboration was built upon the needs of basket makers themselves, in the face of various challenges to their living heritage. Basket makers need access to trees, bushes, and plants untainted by pollutants; they need recognition, appreciation, and access to markets as well as opportunities to train the next generation. Festival visitors could meet scores of basket makers from dozens of Native communities from every part of the United States. They demonstrated their masterful techniques, making baskets of meaning and delight in every imaginable shape and texture. Their participation in the Festival, including sales at the marketplace and related public programs and consultations at the National Museum of the American Indian, was part of a cultural self-help strategy, shaped by participatory research, and aiming to assure the vitality of long-lived traditions.

Nuestra Música: Latino Chicago reflected another substantive partnership. The Festival joined the Smithsonian Latino Center and Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music to present a small sampler of Chicago's Latino cultural heritage. More than a million Latinos - largely from Mexico, but also from Puerto Rico and just about every nation in Latin America - have made the Chicago area their home. Cultural institutions, dozens of community-based dance groups, and myriad shops, clubs, and restaurants indicate the growth and vitality of the community. Music is both a measure and symbol of that vitality. On the Mall, visitors joined in Mexican folk and contemporary dances, heard the beat of Puerto Rican bomba and plena, and enjoyed Andean music and song. Through the Festival's live performances, as well as through the related Grammy-nominated Smithsonian Folkways series of Latino recordings, the Smithsonian sought to provide a means for Americans to understand each other, to speak, listen, and be heard.

Finally, the Been in the Storm So Long concert series at the Festival represented an important collaboration between the Festival and the new National Museum of African American History and Culture. The Festival itself grew in part from events on the Mall during the Civil Rights Movement, and thousands of leading figures of African American culture have graced its stages and illustrated their traditions through its programs over the preceding four decades. To initiate the partnership, the Museum and the Festival featured musicians from New Orleans: folks who were hit with the devastation of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, but nonetheless strove, with determination and grace, to continue the cultural traditions that give their communities their unique character and uplifting spirit so admired and appreciated around the world. Concerts featured New Orleans jazz, rhythm & blues, and sacred music.

The 2006 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 30-July 4 and July 7-11) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 7th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and Special Events that included the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert and Been in the Storm So Long.

The 2006 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with a Spanish version of the Latino music essay).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings/Smithsonian Global Sound: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Counts Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Frank Proschan, Peter Seitel (Emeritus), Cynthia Vidaurri, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Research Associates: Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Carla Borden, Patrick Delatour, Roland Freeman, Kip Lornell, Mara Mayor, Joan Nathan, Sita Reddy, Sam-Ang Sam, Preston Scott, Cynthia Vidaurri, Patrick Vilaire, Nilda Villalta; Fellows: Bernard L. Bakaye, Gary Burns, Julie Chenot, Chiara Bortolotto, Sharon C. Clarke, Trinidad Gonzales, Navina Jafa, Susan Keitumetse, Mary Kenny, Reina Prado, Laurajane Smith, Will Walker, Amy Winston

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Asch (ex officio), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, John Herzog (ex officio), Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli

Smithsonian Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director; Vikki Keys, Superintendent, National Mall and Memorial Parks

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. General support for this year's programs included the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support for the Festival provided through Motorola, Nextel, WAMU 88.5-FM, WashingtonPost.com, Whole Foods Market, Pegasus Radio Corp., and Icom America. The Folklore Society of Greater Washington generously provided hospitality for participants, as it had for many years. The Festival was co-sponsored by the National Park Service.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Negatives
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Video recordings
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Audiocassettes
Notes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2006
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53e1d2935-ccf8-4dc1-bb79-89ef3219ceaa
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2006

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Memorandums
Contracts
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Notes
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Correspondence
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Negatives
Place:
Caribbean Area
Latin America
Puerto Rico
Chile
Colombia
Cuba
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Guatemala
Paraguay
Venezuela
Date:
June 24-July 5, 2009
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Las Américas: Un mundo musical/The Americas: A Musical World

Series 3: Giving Voice: The Power of Words in African American Culture

Series 4: Special Events

Series 5: Wales Smithsonian Cymru
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The twentieth century saw an unprecedented, worldwide acceleration of social change. Often, such rapid evolution outpaced time-honored values and practices, eroding their currency, overwhelming cultural self-determination and displacing the local with the foreign. In a time-span as short as a single generation, entire languages, musical traditions, and other expressive cultural systems were abandoned in favor of cultural trappings invented by others. The 43rd annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 2009 told another version of this story, inviting visitors to explore the process of cultural evolution from the other side of the equation. Festival audiences were able to experience the creativity, resilience, and fortitude of people, institutions, and cultures that follow their own path amid a torrent of contrarian voices.

Wales Smithsonian Cymru provided a forum for discovering how the Welsh people successfully integrate both the tradition and the change that are part of their cultural heritage. On the one hand, about one-fifth of the country's three million inhabitants speak Welsh (Cymru is the Welsh word for Wales). And the people of Wales still work to preserve the rustic rural landscapes that have long informed their sense of self. On the other hand, the Welsh can lay claim to the nineteenth-century mantle of being "the first industrialized nation," and they take pride in their ongoing innovative spirit. How have the Welsh managed to navigate the turbulent waters of continuity and change to shepherd an economically and culturally sustainable society into the future? The Festival offered visitors the chance to find out firsthand from this "living exhibition" of Welsh heritage.

Giving Voice: The Power of Words in African American Culture presented living testimony to the resilience and imagination of a people. Out of three centuries of subjugation came a distinctive and separate black world, a source of refuge and endurance in the face of cruel and wrenching societal decimation. Tapping the power and the play of African American oral traditions and verbal arts, the program "gave voice" to this poignant, powerful, and quintessentially American story of cultural transcendence. Organized in partnership with the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Giving Voice explored the realm of African American cultural creation via verbal expression, considering it as both a means of social resistance and a major contributor to contemporary American life. Festival visitors could listen and be moved by compelling stories about the history, struggles, and creativity of African Americans, told through six tracks of programming: storytelling, oral poetry, interpretive drama, children's and youth culture, humor, and radio.

Las Américas: Un mundo musical/The Americas: A Musical World showed how the seemingly monolithic term música latina refers in reality to an inviting rainbow of musical sounds, styles, and traditions. The program also supplied vivid proof that music can amount to much more than just music. Each tradition represented in Las Américas is a musical flag of identity, a beacon that unites cultural communities, and a means of cultural self-actualization. This Festival program, the result of eight years of research and documentation, was the fourth and final in a series dedicated to exploring Latino music as a window into the cultures that give it meaning. The overarching project, entitled Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture, began with the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings series Tradiciones/Traditions. The series produced thirty recordings that had, as of the 2009 Festival, earned eight GRAMMY nominations, one GRAMMY, and one Latin GRAMMY. Additionally, the project included Música del Pueblo: A Smithsonian Virtual Exhibition ( musicadelpueblo.org), that featured dozens of video mini-documentaries of grassroots Latino musicians from the United States, Puerto Rico, and several Latin American countries.

The 2009 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 24-28 and July 1-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2009 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays (or, for Wales, a set of short essays) provided background on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Daniel Sheehy, Acting Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Stephen Kidd, Production Manager; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director (emeritus); D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Counts Early, Director; Sita Reddy, Fellow; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist (emeritus); Betty J. Belanus, James Deutsch, Marjorie Hunt, Richard Kennedy (emeritus), Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel (emeritus), Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Carla Borden, Irene Chagall, Patrick Delatour, Roland Freeman, Nancy Groce, Frank Proschan, Sita Reddy, Jesús "Chucho" Valdés, Patrick Vilaire, Research Associates

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), J. Scott Raecker (vice chair), Michael Asch (ex officio), Mounir Bouchenaki, G. Wayne Clough (ex officio), Anthony Gittens, Mickey Hart, John Herzog, Debora Kodish, Richard Kurin (ex officio), Ellen McCulloch-Lovell, Libby O'Connell, Robert Santelli, Cathy Sulzberger

Smithsonian Folkways Advisory Council

Michael Asch (chair), Patricia Campbell, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Sandra Gibson, Suni Paz, Anthony Seeger, Fred Silber

National Park Service

Daniel N. Wenk, Acting Director; Peggy O'Dell, Regional Director; Lis Mendelson-Ielmini, Acting Superintendent, National Mall and Memorial Parks

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. General support for this year's Festival came from the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support provided by WAMU-88.5 FM and WashingtonPost.com.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Memorandums
Contracts
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Notes
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Correspondence
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2009
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2009 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e247a1d1-1f20-4bde-834d-e14879bbfd12
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2009

Technology Review

Collection Creator:
Brooks, Arthur Raymond, 1895-1991  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 17
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
November 1961
1961-05
1930-07
Scope and Contents:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, vol. 32, no. 8, July 1930; vol. 63, no. 7, May 1961; and vol. 64, no. 1, November 1961.
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Arthur Raymond Brooks Collection, NASM.1989.0104, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Arthur Raymond Brooks Collection
Arthur Raymond Brooks Collection / Series 1: Professional Materials / 1.8: Magazines
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg288ce95ba-ac2d-47f0-b0ac-10a81731849a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1989-0104-ref314
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Technology Review digital asset number 1

Spanish Language Broadcasting Collection

Creator:
WKAQ (Television station : San Juan, Puerto Rico)  Search this
WNJU (Television station : New York, NY)  Search this
Telemundo Group, Inc.  Search this
Univisión (Television network)  Search this
Mirós, Gilda  Search this
Aguilar, Héctor  Search this
Gazcón, Edgardo  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Cubic feet (27 boxes, 8 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Advertisements
Floor plans
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Statistics
Programs
Resumes
Scripts (documents)
Videocassettes
Writings
Immigration records
Letters (correspondence)
Diplomas
Commercials
Appointment books
Certificates
Clippings
Contracts
Dvds
Place:
Puerto Rico -- 20th century
Date:
1940-2017
Summary:
The collection documents Spanish language television stations in America, and the Telemundo network.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents Spanish language television stations in America, and the Telemundo network. The WNJU portion includes photographs of reporters and other station personnel; portrait shots of on-air personalities, both negatives and prints; photographs of the reporters at the anchor desk, including both negatives and pritns; a reel of motion picture film of a children's show.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into four series.

Series 1: Gilda Mirós

Subseries 1.1: Personal Papers

Subseries 1.2: Audiovisual Materials

Series 2: Hector Aguilar

Subseries 2.1: Personal Papers

Subseries 2.2: Audiovisual Materials

Series 3: Telemundo Group, Incorporated.

Subseries 3.1: WKAQ Television Station

Subseries 3.3.1: Maria Kapetanakis Files

Subseries 3.3.2: Ariel Lipiz Files

Subseries 3.3.3: Alicia Soriano Files

Subseries 3.3.4: Susan Solano Vila Files

Subseries 3.3.5: Maria Cristina Barros Files Subseries 3.3.6: Marilys Llanos Files Subseries 3.3.7: Manuel M. Martinez Files Subseries 3.3.8: Audiovisual Materials

Subseries 3.2: WNJU Television Station

Subseries 3.3: WSCV Television Station

Series 4: Univision

Subseries 4.1: Edgardo Gazón Files

Subseries 4.2: Mayda Delgado Files

Subseries 4.3: Ismael Moctezuma Files

Subseries 4.4: Eduardo Kachscovsky Files
Biographical / Historical:
WNJU was the second television station to broadcast in Spanish in the United States. It eventually was owned by Telemundo. WKAQ was the first television station to broadcast in Spanish in the United States. Telemundo stations provide diverse programming, including variety shows, telenovelas, sports, reality television, news programming, and films. Their target audience is the Hispanic and Latin American population in America.
Provenance:
Initial donation by by Jose Cancela, President of WNJU, 2016. The 2016 accrual was donated by station WKAQ. The television stations WKAQ, WNJU, and WSCV also donated materials in 2017.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Actresses  Search this
advertising  Search this
Broadcasting -- New York  Search this
Broadcasting -- United States  Search this
Ethnic television broadcasting  Search this
Minorities in broadcasting  Search this
Radio broadcasting  Search this
Television  Search this
Television broadcasting  Search this
Television journalists  Search this
Television advertising  Search this
Television stations  Search this
Theater  Search this
Notebooks  Search this
Awards  Search this
Genre/Form:
Advertisements -- 20th century
Advertisements -- 21st century
Floor plans
Motion pictures (visual works) -- 20th century
Motion pictures (visual works) -- 21st century
Photographs -- Color negatives -- Acetate film -- 1980-2000
Photographs -- Color photoprints -- 21st century
Photographs -- Color photoprints -- 1980-2000
Photographs -- Color negatives -- Acetate film -- 21st century
Statistics
Programs
Resumes
Scripts (documents)
Videocassettes
Writings
Immigration records
Letters (correspondence)
Diplomas
Commercials
Appointment books
Certificates
Clippings
Contracts
DVDs
Citation:
Spanish Language Broadcasting Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1404
See more items in:
Spanish Language Broadcasting Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8f72776c3-355d-48d4-aca0-49639fbecd73
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1404
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