Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
5,040 documents - page 1 of 252

Giulio V. Blanc papers

Creator:
Blanc, Giulio V.  Search this
Names:
Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture (Miami, Fla.)  Search this
Brito, María (1947-)  Search this
Cano, Margarita, 1932-  Search this
Cano, Pablo  Search this
Carreño, Mario  Search this
Carulla, Ramón, 1938-  Search this
Demi, 1955-  Search this
Garcia, Hernan, 1935-  Search this
Gattorno, Antonio  Search this
Gaztelu, A. (Angel)  Search this
Goldman, Shifra M., 1926-2011  Search this
Gómez-Peña, Guillermo  Search this
Lam, Wifredo  Search this
Larraz, Julio  Search this
Libin, Victoria  Search this
Macia, Carlos A., 1951-1994  Search this
Martínez-Cañas, María  Search this
Riverón, Enrique  Search this
Rodríguez, Arturo, 1956-  Search this
Sánchez, Juan, 1954-  Search this
Sí, Juan  Search this
Trasobares, César  Search this
Vater, Regina  Search this
Vázquez Lucio, Oscar E. (Oscar Edgardo), 1932-  Search this
Interviewee:
Cabrera, Lydia  Search this
Gómez Sicre, José  Search this
Extent:
11 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Date:
1920-1995
Summary:
The dates for the Giulio V. Blanc papers range from 1920-1995. Measuring a total of eleven linear feet and 0.001 GB, the collection provides documentation of the art exhibitions Blanc curated during his career, including original writings and exhibition catalogs. The extensive artists files in the collection provide information on numerous Latin American and Caribbean artists. The collection also provides historical information on the life and culture of Cuba.
Scope and Content Note:
The Giulio V. Blanc papers measure approximately 11 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from 1920 to 1995. Compiled by Blanc since the beginning of his curatorial, writing, and research career in the 1980s, the papers consist primarily of artist files on Cuban, Cuban-American, and Latin American artists (1920-1995 and undated). Also found is biographical information (1994-1995), interviews by Blanc (1984-1987, 1994) and miscellaneous letters from artists and friends (1983-1995 and undated).

The first series, Biographical Files, 1994-1995 includes information about Blanc's career. Series 2: Miscellaneous Letters, 1983-1995, undated, consists of letters from artists and friends on various topics. Series 3: Artist Files, 1920-1995, undated, represents the bulk of the collection (approximately 300 artists in all, 6 linear feet), and contain materials either collected by Blanc or received by Blanc from the artists themselves. These consist of biographical material about the artist, usually two or three paragraphs written by Blanc, scattered resumes and copies of fellowship applications. Also found are newspaper clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and letters or correspondence between Blanc and the artists. Of special interest in this series are numerous taped interviews with celebrated Cuban artists and art historians such as José Gómez Sícre, founder and first director of the Art Museum of the Americas, Organization of American States. Gómez-Sícre describes his early career and involvement with acquisitions for the museum's permanent collection as well as his working relationship with Alfred H. Barr, first director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gómez-Sícre's notable book, Pintura Cubana de Hoy, published in Havana in 1944 is included in the files.

Elena Peláez de Medero, another interviewee, discusses her sister, Cuban painter Amelia Peláez (1896-1968). Blanc interviewed Elena Peláez in Miami for his 1988 exhibition Amelia Peláez: A Retrospective. The Peláez file includes Blanc's correspondence with her as well as copies of rare 1930s and 1940s exhibition catalogs from Amelia Peláez's early career. Among the catalogs is a copy of Modern Cuban Painters from the 1944 exhibition held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Also found are rare French, German and Spanish newspaper clippings on Peláez dating back to the 1920s. Of interest is a copy of Amado Blanco's 1937 poetry book, Poema desesperado. Published in Havana, the book is dedicated to the memory of Federico García Lorca and includes illustrations by Peláez.

Another prominent artist whom Blanc interviewed was Enrique Riverón (b. 1901) leader of the Cuban vanguardia. He was a member of El Grupo de Montparnasse, a talented group of painters and writers living in the southern district of Paris in the late 1920s, an area noted for its boisterous after-hour activities. The interview was published in the Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts in 1997. Also found in the papers are illustrated letters and greeting cards addressed to Blanc and his parents, Baron Lodovico Blanc and María V. Blanc.

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1977-1995, undated, consists primarily of material Blanc compiled for exhibitions he curated. Found here are letters from museum directors, artists and colleagues, drafts and finished essays for exhibition catalogs, and printed material such as newspaper clippings of art reviews. This series also includes files on exhibitions Blanc did not curate.

Series 5: Subject Files, 1933-1995, undated, are files relating to Cuban art, culture, and society, the Cuban revolution, book projects, Biennials in Havana and São Paulo, the 1988 controversy surrounding the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture (Miami, FL) and other topics. Found are letters, drafts of writings, notes, printed material such as newspaper clippings and magazine articles, press releases, and exhibition announcements.

Particularly extensive is the documentation about the 1980s conflict at the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture. In April 1988, a fund-raising auction at the 24-year-old 'little Havana' institution resulted in heated disputes that escalated to violence. The works auctioned were by Cuban artists still living on the island. Many in Miami's Cuban community considered these artists to be supporters of the Communist regime and were outraged. One of the disputed works purchased the night of the auction, a drawing by Manuel Mendive, was taken across the street by its successful bidder and burned. In addition, the museum building was damaged by a pipe bomb shortly after the sale. In the National Public Radio news story (available in Blanc's papers on audio cassette) Helen Kohen, critic for the Miami Herald commented, "We're not talking about paintings. We're talking about `my brother's in jail'. That's what we're talking about." The situation intensified quickly; transcending local politics and involving the Treasury and Justice Departments, the American Civil Liberties Union, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Sotheby's and Christie's auction houses. Ramón Cernuda, the museum vice-president who organized the auction also had his personal collection of Cuban art impounded by the FBI. A second bombing took place in 1989 to protest an exhibition of Cuban artists who came to the U. S. during the early 1980s Mariel boatlift.

The seriousness of the conflicts in the Miami museum prompted the Museum of Modern Art in New York to withdraw an offer to lend three paintings to the Cuban museum for the 1988 exhibition Amelia Peláez: A Retrospective scheduled to open later that year. Curated by Giulio Blanc, it was the first U.S. retrospective of this important Cuban artist and the exhibition helped situate her work. The Cuban Museum of Art in Daytona Beach, an institution that helped start the Miami museum, also withdrew an offer to lend "Amelias". The result was an exhibition devoid of works owned by the Museum of Modern Art, important paintings created after 1963, the year President Kennedy imposed economic sanctions on Cuba.

To publicize the Peláez exhibition and boost attendance, the museum placed a public invitation in the Spanish section of the Miami Herald. The half page ad, also found in the Blanc papers, lists more than 100 intellectuals and professionals who supported the exhibition. Blanc stated in a letter to the Miami Herald, "It is horrifying to think there are those in Miami who would burn a painting for the sake of politics. This was the same reasoning utilized by Joseph Goebbels when he made bonfires of books and paintings by anti-Nazi and `degenerate' artists and writers in 1930s Germany... One can only pity the ignorance of those who play into the hands of the Castro regime by resorting to uncivilized tactics that can only hurt the image of the Cuban-exile community and of Miami in general."

The files concerning the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture contain exhibition announcements, copies of court orders, press releases and correspondence between Blanc and the Museum of Modern Art in New York regarding the museum and the Peláez exhibition. Also included are a great number of newspaper articles printed in two of Miami's major newspapers, the Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald which covered the story until it was resolved in the early 1990s. Offering additional information on the controversy are a number of letters addressed to either Blanc or his parents from artists and friends expressing either discontent with the museum's state of affairs or gratitude for the Blanc's financial support during the museum's reconstruction. These provide remarkable insight into a relatively heterogeneous Cuban community.

Series 6: Sound Recordings, 1992, 1994 consists of two untranscribed audio cassette tapes. One is of the 1992 College Art Association's session: Artistic Voices of Latin America: The Aesthetics of Anti-Colonialism held in Chicago, Illinois in which Giulio V. Blanc was a panelist. The other is a rare 1994 interview conducted by Blanc with poet-priest Monseñor Angel Gaztelu, a friend of many Cuban writers and artists, and who presided over Peláez's funeral service in 1968.

The last series, Series 7: Photographs, 1981-1993, undated, includes black and whiteportraits of artists, group shots of Blanc with "Miami Generation" artists María Brito, Pablo Cano, María Martínez-Cañas, Carlos Macía, Arturo Rodríguez, and César Trasobares, and photos of other artists.
Arrangement:
The Giulio V. Blanc papers are arranged into seven series primarily according to type of material. Within each series, materials are arranged chronologically, except for Artist Files and Subject Files which are arranged alphabetically by either name or subject.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Files, 1994-1995, undated (box 1; 3 folders)

Series 2: Miscellaneous Letters, 1983-1995, undated (box 1; 3 folders)

Series 3: Artist Files, 1920-1995, undated (boxes 1-8, ER01; 6 linear ft., 0.001 GB)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1977-1995, undated (box 8; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Subject Files, 1933-1995, undated (boxes 8-12; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Untranscribed Sound Recordings, 1992-1994 (box 12; 2 folders)

Series 7: Photographs, 1981, 1993, undated (box 12; 2 folders)
Biographical Note:
Cuban born independent curator, critic, art historian and consultant Giulio V. Blanc (1955-1995) specialized in Cuban and Latin American art history and in his lifetime collected a wealth of material on the subject. Through his numerous exhibitions and keen articles appearing in national and international art journals, Blanc became a leading authority on Latin American art and successfully established himself as a link between Cuban and Cuban-American artists and US galleries and museums. The Miami Generation (1983) and Amelia Peláez: A Retrospective (1988) are two significant exhibitions Blanc curated for Miami's Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture in addition to the celebrated Wifredo Lam and His Contemporaries, 1938-1952 (1992) for New York's Studio Museum in Harlem. Giulio V. Blanc was among the key figures that catapulted Latin American art onto the mainstream in the early 1980s.

Giulio V. Blanc was born in Havana in 1955 to Baron Lodovico Blanc and María V. Blanc. The Blanc name hails from Italy and the title of Baron was awarded to Alberto Blanc, Lodovico Blanc's grandfather, while he was Secretary of State in 1873 under Victor Emmanuel II of Italy. As young advocates of Cuban culture, the Blanc's collected a number of paintings by Cuban artists but were forced to leave behind the works of Cuban masters such as Carlos Enríquez, Victor Manuel, René Portocarrero, Fidelio Ponce and others to facilitate an uncomplicated exodus from the country during the revolution. Lodovico and María were in their thirties and Giulio was five years old when the family settled in Miami.

Giulio Blanc completed his undergraduate education at Harvard and proceeded to Brown University and the Institute of Fine Arts in New York for graduate work (1979-1980). During his career, he served as an independent curator and consultant to The Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture (Miami), The Metropolitan Museum (Miami), and The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art (New York) among others. He also lectured on Latin American art history at the Art Museum of the Americas, OAS (Organization of American States), Washington, DC, The University of Miami, and El Museo Nacional de Arte in La Paz, Bolivia. In addition, he worked as a consultant in the Latin American Paintings Department at Sotheby's auction house in New York and served on the editorial board of the magazine Art Nexus. Blanc was pursuing a doctoral degree in art history at the City University of New York before his premature death in 1995 at the age of thirty-nine.

Missing Title

1955 -- Born November 1 in Havana, Cuba to Baron Lodovico and Baroness María V. Blanc, young collectors of Cuban art. The title of Baron was awarded to Alberto Blanc, Lodovico Blanc's grandfather, in 1873 while Alberto was Secretary of State under Victor Emmanuel II of Italy.

1960 -- The Blanc family migrates to the United States because of the escalating revolution. Lodovico and Maria V. Blanc are in their thirties when they flee the island. The works of Cuban painters such as Carlos Enríquez, Victor Manuel, René Portocarrero, Fidelio Ponce and others were left behind to facilitate an uncomplicated exodus.

1976 -- Giulio V. Blanc serves as research assistant for one year at the Tozzer Library, Peabody Museum, Harvard University.

1977 -- Graduates cum laude from Harvard College with a B.A. in Archeology.

1979 -- Graduates from Brown University with a M.A. in Archeology. Was a research assistant until 1980 at the Gallery of the Center for Inter-American Relations, New York city.

1980 -- Receives a certificate in Museum Studies from the Graduate School of Arts and Science, New York University. Curates Emilio Sánchez: Lithographs which opens at the Pagoda, Ransom-Everglades School, Coconut Grove, Florida. Co-curates Cuba in the Nineteenth Century for Miami's Miami-Dade Public Library.

1981 -- Joins the Latin American Paintings Department, Sotheby's Auction House, New York and serves for two years.

1982 -- Co-curates Young Hispanics, USA which opens at the Lehigh University Museum, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and curates Ten Out of Cuba for INTAR Latin American Gallery in New York.

1983 -- Curates Cuban Fantasies at the Kouros Gallery in New York and Pablo Cano en Paris for the 4 Place de Saussaies in Paris, France. Also curates The Miami Generation: Nine Cuban-American Artists for the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture in Miami and the Meridian House in Washington, DC.

1984 -- Serves as independent curator and consultant to Miami's Metropolitan Museum and Art Center and The Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture; The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art in New York and other institutions. Lectures at the Art Museum of the Americas (Organization of American States) in Washington, DC; The University of Miami; The Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture (Miami); The Center for the Fine Arts (Miami); Rockland Center for the Arts (West Nyack, NY); and the National Museum of Art, La Paz, Bolivia. Curates Young Collector's of Latin American Art which opened at Miami's Metropolitan Museum and Art Center.

1985 -- Curates Dancing Faces: An Exhibition of Mexican Masks for the Metropolitan Museum and Art Center in Miami and Nuevas Vistas: Latin American Paintings which opens at the Wistariahurst, Holyoke, Massachusetts. Curates Architecture in Cuban Painting, for the Miami Dade Public Library.

1986 -- Receives and M.A. in Art History at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Curates Carlos Enríquez for the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture, Miami, Florida and Into the Mainstream: Ten Latin American Artists Working in New York for the Jersey City Museum in Jersey City, New Jersey.

1987 -- The exhibition Aurelia Muñoz: Selections, curated by Blanc, opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Miami, Florida. Serves as juror for Expresiones Hispanas: Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibition, Denver, Colorado. Curates Visions of Self: The American Latin Artist for the Miami-Dade Community College gallery.

1988 -- Receives a grant from the NY State Council on the Arts for research on Cuban artist Wifredo Lam for the exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York. Enrolls in the art history Ph.D. program at the City University Graduate Center, New York city. First bombing of the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture in Miami takes place. Blanc's Amelia Peláez: A Retrospective successfully opens at the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture despite much controversy.

1989 -- Curates Urgent Dream: New Work by Mario Bencomo at the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art (MoCHA), New York. Second bombing of the Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture, Miami FL.

1990 -- New York correspondent for Arte en Colombia, Bogota. Serves as adjunct lecturer at Queens College (CUNY) for the Fall semester. Curates the exhibition, The Post-Miami Generation for the Inter-American Gallery in Miami, Florida. Co-curates Figurative Perspectives: Six Artists of Latin American Background for the Rockland Center for the Arts, West Nyack, NY.

1991 -- Visiting scholar at University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Writes a small play, Tía Carmela: A Cuban Tragicomedy, illustrated by Cuban artist and friend Pablo Cano.

1995 -- Dies at the age of forty of AIDS related complications.
Related Materials:
Papers of Giulio V. Blanc, 1930-1982, are also located at the University of Miami Archival Collections.
Provenance:
Margherite Blanc, sister of Giulio V. Blanc, donated her brother's papers in 1998 to the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. This collection, along with numerous other Latino collections, was acquired through the 1996 Latino Art Documentation Project in South Florida. Initiated to chronicle the thriving art scene so apparent in the city's galleries, museums, and private collections, the project resulted in numerous acquisitions described in the revised edition of the Papers of Latino and Latin American Artists. Both the project and the publication were made possible, in part, with funding provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Latino Initiatives.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Florida -- Miami  Search this
Topic:
Cuban American art  Search this
Art, Latin American  Search this
Artists -- Cuba  Search this
Cuban American artists  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Giulio V. Blanc papers, 1920-1995. Smithsonian Institution. Archives of American Art.
Identifier:
AAA.blangiul
See more items in:
Giulio V. Blanc papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d3c414b1-dc78-4f66-889d-963690fe0282
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blangiul
Online Media:

Hugo Gellert papers

Creator:
Gellert, Hugo, 1892-1985  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Art of Today Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artist's Committee of Action (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Coordination Committee (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Council  Search this
Artists for Victory, Inc.  Search this
Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome  Search this
Hungarian Word, Inc.  Search this
National Society of Mural Painters (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Derkovits, Gyula, 1894-1934  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Fast, Howard, 1914-2003  Search this
Fiene, Ernest, 1894-  Search this
Gellert, Ernest  Search this
Gellert, Lawrence, 1898-1979  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Lie, Jonas, 1880-1940  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Reisman, Philip, 1904-  Search this
Sequenzia, Sofia  Search this
Extent:
6.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1916-1986
Summary:
The papers of graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert measure 6.9 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1986. They document his career as an artist and organizer for the radical political left through an interview, legal papers, financial records, family papers, artifacts, correspondence, writings, organizational records, extensive printed materials (many of them illustrated by Gellert), photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert measure 6.9 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1986. They document his career as an artist and organizer for the radical left through an oral interview conducted by Sofia Sequenzia, legal papers, financial records, family papers, artifacts, correspondence, writings, organizational records, clippings, exhibition catalogs, various printed materials illustrated by Gellert, pamphlets, periodicals, mass mailings, photographs, and artwork.

Biographical Material includes an audio interview with Gellert; official documents related to memberships, property, and legal matters; financial documents that include bills, receipts, and contracts related to professional activities; papers of Gellert's brothers, Lawrence and Ernest; and artifacts. Correspondence is with other artists, writers, publishers, activists, friends, and family, including Ernest Fiene, Rockwell Kent, Harry Gottlieb, William Gropper, Philip Evergood, Howard Fast, and Jonas Lie. Writings include essays, book projects, notes, and notebooks written by Gellert; and stories and articles by other authors, including typescripts of early twentieth-century Hungarian short stories collected by Gellert.

Organizational Records are related to political and art organizations in which Gellert was an active organizer, officer, and in some cases, a founder. Because of his central role in many of these organizations, records often contain unique documentation of their activities. Records are found for the American Artists Congress, the Art of Today Gallery, the Artists Committee of Action, the Artists Coordination Committee, the Artists Council, Artists for Victory, Inc., the Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome, Hungarian Word, Inc., the National Society of Mural Painters, and other organizations.

Printed materials include a variety of political publications and periodicals with illustrations by Gellert, including New Masses, Art Front, Magyar Szo, and American Dialog; clippings related to his career, exhibition catalogs, political pamphlets, Hungarian literature, and mass mailings received from political organizations. Photographs contain a few personal photographs but are mostly news and publicity photographs, many of which depict prominent Communists and other newsmakers. Artwork includes sketches, drawings, designs, prints, and production elements for Gellert's artwork, as well as prints and drawings by Philip Reisman, Gyula Derkovits, and Anton Refregier.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1917-1982 (Box 1 and OV 9; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1920-1986 (Boxes 1-2, 8; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1916-1970 (Boxes 2 and 8; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Organizational Records, circa 1920-1977 (Boxes 3, 8, and OV 9; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1920-1986 (Boxes 4-6, 8, and OV 9; 3 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1920-1959 (Boxes 6-7; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1927-1981 (Box 7, OV 10; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert was born Hugo Grünbaum in Budapest, Hungary in 1892, the oldest of six children. His family immigrated to New York City in 1906, eventually changing their family name to Gellert.

Gellert attended art school at Cooper Union and the National Academy of Design. As a student, he designed posters for movies and theater, and also worked for Tiffany Studios. A number of student art prizes with cash awards enabled him to travel to Europe in the summer of 1914, where he witnessed the outbreak of World War I, an experience which helped shape his political beliefs. Aesthetically, he was also influenced by a folk revival among Hungarian artists at the time of his trip, and was more impressed, he later said, with the street advertising in Paris than he was with the cubism he saw in the Louvre.

Returning to the United States, Gellert became involved in the Hungarian-American workers' movement, and contributed drawings to its newspaper, Elöre (Forward). He remained involved in Hungarian-American art and activism throughout his life, including membership in the anti-fascist group, the Anti-Horthy League. When members of the fascist Horthy government unveiled a statue of a Hungarian hero in New York in 1928, Gellert hired a pilot and dropped leaflets on the group, a stunt for which he was arrested. In the 1950s, Gellert served as director of Hungarian Word, Inc., a Hungarian-language publisher in New York.

Gellert's political commitment and art remained deeply intertwined throughout his life, as he continually sought to integrate his commitment to Communism, his hatred of fascism, and his dedication to civil liberties. Throughout the 1910s and 1920s, he contributed artwork to several magazines of the radical left, including Masses and its successors Liberator and New Masses, both of which featured Gellert's artwork on their inaugural issue. Through Masses, he came to know other radicals such as Mike Gold, John Reed, Louise Bryant, Max Eastman, Floyd Dell, Anton Refregier, William Gropper, Harry Gottlieb, Bob Minor, and Art Young, and with them he followed the events of the Bolshevik revolution in Russia with sympathy and growing political fervor.

His brother, Ernest Gellert, also a socialist and activist, was drafted into the military but refused to serve. He died of a gunshot wound under suspicious circumstances while imprisoned at Fort Hancock, New Jersey, as a conscientious objector. Traumatized by this event, Gellert fled to Mexico to avoid conscription. In 1920 to 1922, he taught art at the Stelton School in New Jersey, a radical, utopian community school. He participated in the cultural scene of Greenwich Village, working on set designs, publications, and graphic art for political productions. He founded the first John Reed Club in 1929 with a group of Communist artists and writers including Anton Refregier, Louis Lozowick, and William Gropper. Initially, the group held classes and exhibitions, and provided services for strikes and other working-class activism. Later, John Reed Clubs formed around the country and became a formal arm of the United States Communist Party (CPUSA).

In the late 1920s, Gellert became a member of the National Society of Mural Painters (which, partly due to Gellert's activism in the group, became the Mural Artists' Guild local 829 of the United Scenic Artists Union of the AFL-CIO in 1937. Other members included Rockwell Kent, Anton Refregier, Arshile Gorky, and Marion Greenwood). In 1928, he created a mural for the Worker's Cafeteria in Union Square, NY. Later murals include the Center Theater in Rockefeller Center, the National Maritime Union Headquarters, the Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union Building, NYC, the interior of the Communications Building at the 1939 World's Fair, and the Seward Park Housing Project in 1961.

In 1932, Gellert was invited to participate in a mural exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, and submitted a political mural about the robber barons of contemporary American politics and industry called Us Fellas Gotta Stick Together - Al Capone. The museum attempted to censor the mural, along with the murals of William Gropper and Ben Shahn. Other artists threatened to boycott the exhibition over the censorship and were successful in restoring them to the show.

The cooperation of artists in this controversy foreshadowed a larger protest in 1934, organized by Gellert, Saul Belman, Stuart Davis, and Zoltan Hecht, when Diego Rivera's pro-labor mural was destroyed at Rockefeller Center. After the incident, the group formed the Artists' Committee of Action and continued to fight censorship and advocate for artists' interests and welfare. They also co-published the magazine Art Front with the Artists' Union, a labor organization. Gellert served for a time as editor of Art Front, and chairman of the Artists' Committee of Action.

Gellert was active in producing both art and strategic policy for the cultural arm of the CPUSA, and he worked to mobilize the non-communist left, often referred to as the Popular Front. In 1933 he illustrated Karl Marx's Capital in Lithographs, and in 1935, he wrote a Marxist, illustrated satire called Comrade Gulliver, An Illustrated Account of Travel into that Strange Country the United States of America. Other published graphic works include Aesop Said So (1936) and a portfolio of silkscreen prints entitled Century of the Common Man (1943).

Other artist groups he helped to found and/or run include the American Artist's Congress, a Communist organization founded with Max Weber, Margaret Bourke-White, Stuart Davis, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Harry Sternberg, and others, which held symposia and exhibitions between 1936 and 1942; the Artists' Coordination Committee, an umbrella group of national organizations which sought protections for federally-employed and unionized artists; Artists for Victory, Inc., which formed in 1942 to mobilize artists in support of the war effort; and the Artists' Council, formed after the war to advocate for artists' welfare and employment.

Gellert maintained his loyalty to the Communist party throughout the post-war period despite growing disillusionment in the Popular Front over the actions of Josef Stalin, and despite the intense anti-communist crusades in the late 1940s and 1950s. He was investigated by the House of Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and was nearly deported. He spent a number of years during this period in his wife's native Australia. Returning to the United States in the early 1950s, he threw his efforts into the defense of others who faced prison, deportation, and the blacklist following the HUAC hearings. He established The Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome in 1951 when Jerome, the cultural commissioner of CPUSA, was convicted under the Smith Act. The writer Dorothy Parker was the group's treasurer.

In 1954, Gellert established the Art of Today Gallery in New York City with Rockwell Kent and Charles White to provide an exhibition venue for blacklisted artists. Exhibitions included Maurice Becker, Henry Glintenkamp, Harry Gottlieb, Kay Harris, and Rockwell Kent. Gellert served as the gallery's secretary until it closed in 1957.

In the 1960s until his death in 1985, Gellert continued his activism through involvement in grassroots political organizations. Unlike many of his radical contemporaries, Gellert lived to see the revival of some of the ideas of the progressive era of the thirties in the countercultural years of the late 1960s and early 1970s. There were retrospectives of his work in Moscow in 1967 and in his native Budapest in 1968, and he appeared in Warren Beatty's film Reds in 1981.

Sources used for this essay include James Wechsler's 2003 dissertation "The Art and Activism of Hugo Gellert: Embracing the Spectre of Communism," his essay "From World War I to the Popular Front: The Art and Activism of Hugo Gellert," ( Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts number 24, Spring 2002), and Jeff Kisseloff's biographical essay for the 1986 Hugo Gellert exhibition at the Mary Ryan Gallery.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are an oral history with Hugo Gellert from 1984, a recording of a lecture Gellert gave at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1985, and additional records of Artists for Victory, Inc., 1942-1946.

The Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University holds additional papers of Hugo Gellert.
Provenance:
A portion of the papers were donated in 1970 by Hugo Gellert. Additional papers were donated by Gellert and his wife, Livia Cinquegrana, in 1983 and 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Artists' writings  Search this
Politics in art  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Graphic artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Hugo Gellert papers, 1916-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gellhugo
See more items in:
Hugo Gellert papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9eb96ed42-b751-47f6-a0ca-038014c8800e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gellhugo
Online Media:

The Soul of Tengri Fashion Show: Celebrating and Reviving Kazakh Couture

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 26 Dec 2023 22:41:00 GMT
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more posts:
Festival Blog
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_f4c61bee9c052f3ccf6442e50fe6a59a

Lady in Red

Artist:
Aleksandra Aleksandrovna Exster, Ukrainian, b. Bialystok, Poland, 1882–1949  Search this
Medium:
Wood, paint, fabric, felt, metal, thread, and plastic
Dimensions:
including base: 36 1/2 x 11 x 7 5/8 in. (92.6 x 27.9 x 19.4 cm); figure: 20 3/4 x 11 x 5 3/4 in. (52.5 x 27.9 x 14.5 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(1926)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1977
Accession Number:
77.21
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
On View:
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden (Washington, DC), 2nd Floor
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py288d54941-9ebe-4098-a98b-ab35abb61ef3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_77.21

American Policeman

Artist:
Aleksandra Aleksandrovna Exster, Ukrainian, b. Bialystok, Poland, 1882–1949  Search this
Medium:
Wood, paint, fabric, felt, ribbon, metal, thread, and plastic
Dimensions:
including base: 37 1/8 x 9 1/4 x 11 3/4 in. (94.2 x 23.3 x 29.8 cm); figure: 23 1/2 x 9 1/4 x 9 1/8 in. (59.5 x 23.3 x 23.2 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(1926)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Leonard Hutton Galleries, New York, 1976
Accession Number:
77.23
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
On View:
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden (Washington, DC), 2nd Floor
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py23735aaca-b517-439f-b3f1-21cabcfd8aa2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_77.23

Yasuo Kuniyoshi

Artist:
Konrad Cramer, 1888 - 1963  Search this
Sitter:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi, 1 Sep 1889 - 14 May 1953  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 25.1 × 20 cm (9 7/8 × 7 7/8")
Mount: 42.3 × 33.7 cm (16 5/8 × 13 1/4")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
c. 1947
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Yasuo Kuniyoshi: Male  Search this
Yasuo Kuniyoshi: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.83.151
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Konrad Cramer, courtesy of the Howard Greenberg Gallery
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Location:
Currently not on view
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm458a47695-8dfc-4e60-9f85-401303b5e76c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.83.151

Hercules of the Union

Artist:
Unidentified Artist  Search this
Sitter:
Winfield Scott, 13 Jun 1786 - 29 May 1866  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs, 2 Jul 1810 - 15 Dec 1885  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens, 11 Feb 1812 - 4 Mar 1883  Search this
Jefferson Davis, 3 Jun 1808 - 6 Dec 1889  Search this
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, 28 May 1818 - 20 Feb 1893  Search this
David Emanuel Twiggs, 14 Feb 1790 - 15 Jul 1862  Search this
Francis Wilkinson Pickens, 1805 - 1869  Search this
John Buchanan Floyd, 1 Jun 1806 - 26 Aug 1863  Search this
Medium:
Lithograph on paper
Dimensions:
Image: 30.6 × 22.1 cm (12 1/16 × 8 11/16")
Sheet: 45.6 × 34.3 cm (17 15/16 × 13 1/2")
Mat: 56.1 × 40.7 cm (22 1/16 × 16")
Type:
Print
Date:
1861
Topic:
Weapon\Sword  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Epaulet  Search this
Weapon\Club  Search this
Costume\Footwear\Boots  Search this
Nature & Environment\Animal\Mythical  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Muttonchops  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Belt  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Male  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Literature\Writer  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Natural Resource Occupations\Agriculturist\Farmer  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Military and Intelligence\Soldier  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Politics and Government\Confederate President  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Politics and Government\US Congressman\Mississippi  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Politics and Government\US Senator\Mississippi  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Politics and Government\Cabinet member\Secretary of War  Search this
Jefferson Davis: Politics and Government\Governor\Mississippi  Search this
John Buchanan Floyd: Male  Search this
John Buchanan Floyd: Law and Crime\Lawyer  Search this
John Buchanan Floyd: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\Civil War\Confederate Army  Search this
John Buchanan Floyd: Politics and Government\Governor\Virginia  Search this
David Emanuel Twiggs: Male  Search this
Winfield Scott: Male  Search this
Winfield Scott: Literature\Writer  Search this
Winfield Scott: Politics and Government\Presidential candidate  Search this
Winfield Scott: Politics and Government\Public official  Search this
Winfield Scott: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\General  Search this
Winfield Scott: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\War of 1812  Search this
Winfield Scott: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\Mexican War  Search this
Winfield Scott: Congressional Gold Medal  Search this
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard: Male  Search this
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard: Literature\Writer  Search this
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\General  Search this
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\Civil War\Confederate Army  Search this
Francis Wilkinson Pickens: Male  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Male  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Law and Crime\Lawyer  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Journalism and Media\Newspaper publisher  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Politics and Government\US Congressman\Georgia  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Politics and Government\Governor\Georgia  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Politics and Government\State Legislator\Georgia  Search this
Alexander Hamilton Stephens: Politics and Government\Confederate Vice President  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Male  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Law and Crime\Lawyer  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Politics and Government\Statesman  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\Civil War  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\Civil War\Confederate Army  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Politics and Government\US Congressman\Georgia  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Natural Resource Occupations\Agriculturist\Planter  Search this
Robert Augustus Toombs: Politics and Government\US Senator\Georgia  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.84.102
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Location:
Currently not on view
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4e43929b2-fb0b-46f9-bae7-a061814db6ab
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.84.102

The Black Scholar Vol. 4 No. 2

Published by:
The Black Scholar, American, founded 1969  Search this
Owned by:
Jan Bailey, American, 1942 - 2010  Search this
Medium:
paper, ink, metal
Dimensions:
H x W: 10 × 7 1/8 × 1/8 in. (25.4 × 18.1 × 0.3 cm)
Type:
journals (periodicals)
Date:
1972
Topic:
African American  Search this
Civil Rights  Search this
Literature  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Prisons  Search this
Resistance  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2013.201.34
Restrictions & Rights:
© The Black World Foundation
Permission required for use. Proper usage is the responsibility of the user.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Books and Published Materials
Exhibition:
A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 1, C1 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd521585e14-037a-4a4a-9dc9-b2c1ba40686b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.201.34
3 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>The Black Scholar Vol. 4 No. 2</I> digital asset number 1
  • View <I>The Black Scholar Vol. 4 No. 2</I> digital asset number 2
  • View <I>The Black Scholar Vol. 4 No. 2</I> digital asset number 3

The Show-Down vol. 1 no. 9

Published by:
Show-Down Publishing Company, American, founded 1935  Search this
Edited by:
Sally J. Cathrell Jr., American, 1913 - 1981  Search this
Written by:
Maurice Dancer  Search this
Subject of:
Ethel Moses, American, 1904 - 1982  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper with metal
Dimensions:
H x W x D (Closed): 11 5/16 × 8 13/16 × 1/16 in. (28.8 × 22.4 × 0.2 cm)
H x W x D (Open): 11 5/16 × 17 7/16 × 1/4 in. (28.8 × 44.3 × 0.7 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place printed:
Saint Louis, Missouri, United States, North and Central America
Date:
September 1936
Topic:
African American  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Dance  Search this
Entertainers  Search this
Film  Search this
Hollywood (Film)  Search this
Jazz (Music)  Search this
Latin jazz (Music)  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Nightlife  Search this
Photography  Search this
Theatre  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2013.46.25.76
Restrictions & Rights:
Unknown - Restrictions Possible
Rights assessment and proper usage is the responsibility of the user.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
The Laura Cathrell Show-Down Magazine Collection
Classification:
Books and Published Materials
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd59d8acdb6-4ff1-4ed5-b4de-8706765cff98
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.46.25.76
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>The Show-Down vol. 1 no. 9</I> digital asset number 1

Flash Weekly Newspicture Magazine, May 3, 1938

Published by:
Flash Newspicture Magazine, American, 1937 - 1939  Search this
Owned by:
Charles "Teenie" Harris, American, 1908 - 1998  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 11 7/8 × 8 7/8 in. (30.2 × 22.5 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
May 3, 1938
Topic:
African American  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Children  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Photography  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Charles A. Harris and Beatrice Harris in memory of Charles "Teenie" Harris
Object number:
2014.302.4
Restrictions & Rights:
Unknown - Restrictions Possible
Rights assessment and proper usage is the responsibility of the user.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Photographs and Still Images
Books and Published Materials
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd58cd86058-279d-4ff8-997b-5b5732cbed77
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.302.4
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>Flash Weekly Newspicture Magazine, May 3, 1938</I> digital asset number 1

World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman]

Extent:
0.05 Cubic feet (1 folder, 4 leaflets, from 5.5 by 7.5 inches up to 10.75 by 8 inches)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1945
Summary:
This collection consists of one black and white and three color Japanese language psychological warfare propaganda leaflets (Nos. 112, 2001, 2010, and 2031) designed and printed by the United States Office of War Information (OWI) to be dropped by air over Japan and Japanese-occupied territories during World War II, circa mid-1945.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of four psychological warfare propaganda leaflets, printed on both sides, combining Japanese text with illustrations. The leaflets (Nos. 112, 2001, 2010, and 2031) were designed and printed by the United States Office of War Information (OWI) circa mid-1945 and were intended to be air dropped from American military aircraft over Japan and Japanese-occupied territories. They range in size from 5.5 by 7.5 inches up to 10.75 by 8 inches.
Arrangement:
The four leaflets which comprise this collection are arranged in numerical order by OWI number.
Biographical / Historical:
The United States Office of War Information (OWI) was formed during World War II on June 13, 1942, combining several preceding agencies to create a centralized unit to provide information about the ongoing war to the American public. The Domestic Branch of the OWI utilized printed materials, radio, and motion pictures to achieve their mission to help Americans understand the status and progress of the war effort; the Overseas Branch used print media to promote American war aims to foreign audiences and operated a Psychological Warfare Branch to use propaganda messages to target enemy troops and populations. In April 1944, the OWI office in Honolulu, Hawaii, added full-scale propaganda activities aimed at Japan to its war information duties, designing and printing Japanese-language propaganda leaflets to be dropped by air over Japan and Japanese-occupied territories by American military aircraft. By mid-1945 the OWI had established an office with a printing plant on Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands, putting them closer to the bases of the US Army Air Forces' XXI Bomber Command whose aircraft were tasked with the job of delivering the majority of the leaflets to their targets. By the end of the war, tens of millions of leaflets had been airdropped over Japan.

Leaflet No. 2010 is known to have been designed and illustrated by American-born woman artist Frances Lee Blakemore (neé Frances Lee Wismer) who spent over half of her life in Japan. Born in 1906, Blakemore studied art at the University of Washington, graduating in 1935 with a Batchelor of Arts degree. She married Glenn Frederic Baker and the couple moved to Tokyo. In 1940, the political situation in Japan prompted her to return to the United States to avoid internment. Blakemore settled in Honolulu, Hawaii, and joined the OWI Office there following the United States' entry in World War II in December 1941. In 1946, divorced from Baker, Blakemore returned to Japan to work for the Civil Information and Education Division of the office of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP) during the US occupation of Japan. In 1954 she married fellow American Thomas L. Blakemore; the couple continued to live and work in Japan until their retirement in the 1980s to the Seattle, Washington, area. In 1990 they founded the Blakemore Foundation to promote Americans' study of Asian language and arts.

The donor, I. A. Kurzman, served in the Pacific as a machinist mate, 2nd class, stationed aboard the US Navy aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18) from which aircraft carried propaganda leaflets to drop on Japan circa mid-August 1945, near the end of the war.
Related Materials:
See related collection World War II Propaganda Leaflets, NASM.XXXX.0846, containing OWI Leaflet Nos. 2094, 2097, and 2101.
Provenance:
I.A. Kurzman, Gift, 1985, NASM.2008.0018
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Propaganda  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Citation:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman], NASM.2008.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0018
See more items in:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2e44cb1b0-1176-4a9b-ac06-99b0e2b6a3c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2008-0018
Online Media:

US Office of War Information (OWI) Propaganda Leaflet No. 112

Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
United States Office of War Information (OWI) psychological warfare Leaflet No. 112, designed to be dropped by air over Japanese occupied territory prior to US military action in the area; mid 1945. Designed to stir up resentment for their officers in Japanese soldiers, the illustration in blue on front depicts two soldiers manning a machine gun in the foreground watching as officers board a waiting transport airplane in background; Japanese text reads: "Soldiers left behind - Your evacuation will be eliminated." Text on reverse makes reference to an instance of high-ranking military officers evacuating an island under threat leaving subordinates behind, and notes "Your lives are not so easy to live, and they are not lives that can be thrown away casually. If you think about it carefully, you will understand."
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman], NASM.2008.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0018, Item NASM-9A20824
See more items in:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2469d57ee-54a5-4120-bfc0-3ab0a06a6d0c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2008-0018-ref506

US Office of War Information (OWI) Propaganda Leaflet No. 2001

Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
United States Office of War Information (OWI) psychological warfare Leaflet No. 2001, designed to be dropped by air over Japan; mid 1945. Designed to increase distrust of government-sponsored war reporting, illustration on the front of this yellow-orange paper leaflet depicts a gagged man holding a microphone between the hands of two military officers holding out a book and a newspaper with ripped (censored) pages; in center foreground, a crowd of Japanese civilians reach upwards against a cloud. Text on reverse speaks of freedom of speech and urges the reader to "Demand the truth! Why are Japanese people forced to live in darkness?"
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman], NASM.2008.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0018, Item NASM-9A20825
See more items in:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg21a0be06d-4127-4a22-a5a8-6f97d767f8fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2008-0018-ref507

US Office of War Information (OWI) Propaganda Leaflet No. 2010

Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
United States Office of War Information (OWI) psychological warfare Leaflet No. 2010, designed to be dropped by air over Japan; mid 1945. Designed to play on fears of disease, illustration by artist Frances Lee (Wismer) Baker (Blakemore) depicts a Japanese military officer carrying a bloody sword (caricature of Hideki Tojo, Prime Minister and General of the Japanese Imperial Army); in his wake, a skull-headed figure craws over the bodies of dying Japanese women and children mired in a swarm of fanciful insects, snakes, and worms; text declares that every war brings disease. Text on reverse warns of that bombing will cause damage to infrastructure, difficulty in obtaining food and medicine, and spread filth and disease, and urges the reader to demand a ceasefire from the warlord who started the war. Black and white illustration with bright yellow highlights.
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman], NASM.2008.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0018, Item NASM-9A20826
See more items in:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2a0ae3ee0-3ca6-4c05-8918-adf8a63f0eb7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2008-0018-ref508

US Office of War Information (OWI) Propaganda Leaflet No. 2031

Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
United States Office of War Information (OWI) psychological warfare Leaflet No. 2031, designed to be dropped by air over Japan; mid 1945. Designed in a newspaper style, this black and white leaflet features several stories, including (on front) a surprise attack on southern Luzon (Philippines), bombing of a base in Singapore by the Twentieth Air Force (USAAF), and a 3-panel comic strip where an officer sees a shadow on his tent which he fears is a tank but is actually an elephant; on reverse: the reelection of Franklin D. Roosevelt as US President, a US attack on Ormoc Leyte (Philippines), and an aerial photograph captioned "Japanese planes continue their futile efforts to stop the US 14th Army Air Force from attacking Hong Kong."
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman], NASM.2008.0018, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2008.0018, Item NASM-9A20827
See more items in:
World War II Propaganda Leaflets [Kurzman]
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg23fd07183-3737-46dd-b5dc-6208e4f38a74
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2008-0018-ref509

Designing Place, Considering Power

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2023-03-31T05:46:26.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_tzL_2N22c20

This Video Exposes Hitler's Secret Illness

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-03-12T13:13:43.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0w3nsAaOpq4

This Glamorous Star Traded Nazi Germany for Hollywood

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-11-05T16:30:01.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Cf9NcxXALbM

Were the Letters Ordering the Assassination of Jefferson Davis Real?

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-02-26T16:30:04.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_SV5P7thQE_4

Why the Nazis Interviewed British POWs in Slick Film Segments 🎥 WWII Battles in Color | Smithsonian

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2023-02-23T17:00:29.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_lo6AzCw0K7o

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By