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Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive

Creator:
Freelon, Philip G., 1953-2019  Search this
Names:
American Institute of Architects  Search this
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup  Search this
Freelon Bond Architects  Search this
Freelon Group  Search this
Hampton University (Va.)  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. School of Architecture  Search this
National Museum of African American History and Culture  Search this
National Organization of Minority Architects (U.S.)  Search this
North Carolina Board of Architecture  Search this
NorthStar Church of the Arts  Search this
PPG Industries, Inc.  Search this
Perkins & Will  Search this
Adjaye, David, 1966-  Search this
Bond, J. Max, Jr.  Search this
Freelon, Allan Randall, 1895-1960  Search this
Extent:
5.1 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
North Carolina -- United States
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Durham County -- Durham
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Suffolk County -- Boston
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
United States of America -- New York -- New York
Date:
bulk 1939-2017
Scope and Contents:
The Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archival Collection documents the life and career of architect, educator, cultural heritage preservation advocate and artist Philip G. Freelon. The collection highlights his distinguished career from its inception to his role as the "architect of record" for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Freelon was one of the leading African American architects of his generation and he created a focus designing and constructing buildings that paid reverence to African Americans and other underrepresented communities. This collection is comprised of business records, photographic materials, ephemera, correspondence, architectural drawings, and clippings.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been separated into seven series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content and chronology. Within each series and sub-series, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Biographical / Historical:
Philip Goodwin Freelon was born March 26, 1953, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon, Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon. Freelon was greatly influenced by his grandfather, Allan Freelon Sr., a notable Harlem Renaissance visual artist, educator, and civil rights activist. His grandfather's values and artistry inspired him to create a career that focused on creating historical and cultural spaces in African American communities. Freelon attended high school at the former predominantly white elite all-boys school, Central High School located in upper North Philadelphia from 1967 to 1971. His attendance at this school during of the Civil Rights Movement afforded him the unique experience that inspired him to attend a historically Black college (HBCU). Freelon selected Hampton Institute (Hampton University) to develop his veneration of the composition and design of the buildings that held cultural and artistic treasures. Located in the Tidewater area of Virginia, Hampton was renowned among HBCUs for its architecture program. His professor and mentor at Hampton, John Spencer, pushed Freelon academically as he moved easily through the school's curriculum. After two years at Hampton, Spencer helped Freelon transition to a more challenging program at North Carolina State University (NCSU) in Raleigh, North Carolina. Freelon graduated in 1975 with a bachelor's in environmental design in architecture.

Later in the fall of 1975, Freelon enrolled at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to pursue a master's in architecture. During the summers, Freelon worked with one of former his NC State professors at the architectural firm of John D. Latimer and Associates. After graduating from MIT in 1977, Freelon returned to North Carolina to take his Architecture Registration Examination (ARE), becoming the firm's youngest person to receive licensure. He also began teaching classes at his alma mater, NC State. It was there that Freelon met his future wife, Nnenna Pierce. Pierce, a Massachusetts native was attending Simmons College in Boston at the time. The connection was immediate, and the pair was married in 1979 and welcomed their first son, Deen in 1980. After a brief employment for a large Texas firm 3/D International, Freelon returned to Durham to join O'Brien Atkins Associates. He was the firm's youngest partner, eventually serving as principal and vice president of architecture. Freelon worked on a wide variety of projects throughout the state including learning centers, university buildings, churches, and parking garages. Along with Freelon's budding career, his family was expanding as well. Phil and Nnenna welcomed their daughter Maya in 1982 and their son, Pierce in 1983. During this time, Freelon was being highly recognized for his work. The American of Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded him the Honor Award for his design of Terminal 2 of the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, which has since been rebuilt.

By the end of the decade, Freelon and his wife Nnenna needed a change of pace. Nnenna pursued a professional career in music while Phil took a break from his career to expand his skillset and reinforce his intellectual approach to design. In 1989, Freelon was granted the Loeb Fellowship for one year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He also pursued a longtime hobby of furniture design, calling the practice "small architecture". He received industry awards like first prize in the PPG Industries, Inc. Furniture Design Competition as well as AIA Honor Award for conference table designs. With a year away from the field to clarify his vision, Freelon opened his own firm, simply titled, the Freelon Group in 1990. Beginning as a one-man operation, the Freelon Group grew to become one of the largest African American owned architectural firms in the country with over 50 employees, forty percent of which were women, and thirty percent were people of color. With freedom within his own firm, Freelon focused on designing learning centers, libraries and museums and vowed to never build anything that did not bring cultural and intellectual value to a community.

Over the next twenty years, Freelon would assert himself as a force in designing notable cultural institutions and community-driven projects in and around the country including the Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC), Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD), Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA), Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC), the Anacostia and Tenley-Friendship branches of the District of Columbia Public Library , National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA), Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX). Alongside his architectural career, Freelon served as a lecturer and adjunct professor at several colleges and universities including North Carolina State University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Maryland College Park, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Syracuse University, and the Florence, Italy program at Kent State University. Freelon was awarded a full-time appointment as professor of Professional Practice at MIT in 2008. The Professional Practice (4.222) course was a requirement for the master's in architecture and he used examples from his extensive career and personal experience to illustrate legal, ethical, and management concepts. Nnenna's music career was also thriving. She would go on to record twelve albums and be nominated for six Grammys. This fusion of education, the arts, and music inspired another generation of Freelons: their son, Pierce Freelon is a hip-hop artist, educator, and political activist; daughter Maya Freelon is a visual artist; and son Deen Freelon is a professor.

In 2001, George W. Bush established a commission to create a new museum on the National Mall. Freelon wanted to enter his firm to participate in the international design competition. Freelon would partner with famed African American New York City architect, J. Max Bond, Jr. and by 2006 the two officially formed the Freelon Bond Architects.The Freelon Bond group submitted their proposal and soon after were elected to create programming and pre-design work for the museum. When the official design competition for the museum was announced in 2008, UK-based architect David Adjaye joined the team as the lead designer, and along with the partnering firm SmithGroup, the new architectural team became Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup. The three black architects combined a variety of distinctive elements from Africa and the Americas to create the building's unique, historically significant design. The Freelon Group served as the "architect of record" and were responsible for ensuring that key design ideas were upheld. Freelon and key firm members such as Zena Howard were active as on-site project managers during the museum's construction process to certify that the building would be developed according to plan. Freelon, Adjaye, and Bond were tasked with taking the collective history of the African American experience-- generations of pain, triumph, and perseverance-- and forming it into a structure. The team looked to African sources, such as Yoruban architecture, for inspiration. They sought to connect the building's design to the geographic and cultural roots of African Americans. Their design choices also reference the contributions of enslaved and free black metalworkers made to the landscape of the American South. Their goal was to make the museum an extension of its contents, and an expression of the stories told inside. By the groundbreaking for NMAAHC in 2012, Freelon had been appointed to the U.S. Commission of the Fine Arts by President Barack Obama. In an effort to broaden his resources and expand his firm, The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a firm originating in Chicago that grew to have offices across the United States. Freelon was appointed the managing director and later lead design director at the firm's North Carolina offices in Charlotte and Durham in 2014. By the next year, Freelon understood that his work in architecture and education was a necessary voice to preserve, which he did through donation of the bulk of his personal papers to his alma mater, NC State University. The year 2016 proved to be a year of triumph for Freelon as NMAAHC opened its doors on September 24th to much jubilation and celebration. That same year, Freelon's legacy was further cemented as the Phil Freelon Fellowship Fund was established at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a fellowship designed to broaden opportunities for African Americans and other underrepresented communities in architecture and design.

Unfortunately, this triumphant year was met with difficulty as Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive disease that affects the nervous system. He would continue to work and lecture for the next two years until it became too challenging. One of those projects was the renovation and opening of The NorthStar Church of the Arts in early 2019. A passion project with his wife and son, Pierce, a former church was renovated and repurposed as an arts and cultural space for all. This space was created in an effort to support the Durham cultural community as it began to feel the effects of gentrification. When Freelon lost his battle with ALS on July 9, 2019, in his home in Durham, North Carolina, the family requested that in lieu of flowers that donations be sent to the NorthStar Church to continue the center's mission and Phil's dream to give back to the Durham community.

Historical Timeline

1953 -- Philip Goodwin Freelon was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon.

1971 -- Freelon graduated from Central High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and entered School of Architecture, Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia as a design student.

1973 -- Freelon transferred to College of Design at the North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

1975 -- Graduated with a Bachelor's in Environmental Design in Architecture from NC State University. He received the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Book Award for Outstanding Work in Architectural Design. In the fall, he began his master's program in architecture at MIT.

1976 -- Began working as aide for architectural firm, John D. Latimer and Associates.

1977 -- Graduated with a Master's in Architecture and Design from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT.)

1978 -- Freelon became youngest architect to pass the North Carolina Architecture Registration Exam. Freelon started teaching at North Carolina State University.

1979 -- Married Chinyere "Nnenna" Pierce. Freelon began working for, 3/D International in Houston, Texas.

1980 -- Son Deen Freelon was born.

1981 -- Freelon returned to Durham, NC to join O'Brien Atkins Associates as the firm's youngest partner.

1982 -- Daughter Maya Freelon was born.

1983 -- Son Pierce Freelon was born.

1989-1990 -- Received Loeb Fellowship for independent study at Harvard University. Freelon received AIA Honor Award for American Airlines Terminal 2 at Raleigh-Durham Airport, NC (RDU).

1990 -- Freelon left O'Brien Atkins Associates to open his own firm The Freelon Group.

1991 -- Won first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition.

1992 -- Won the AIA Honor Award for Conference Table Designs.

2001 -- Won the AIA Firm Award for The Freelon Group and the AIA Design Award for Parking Structure, RDU Airport. Began attending meetings of President George W. Bush's commission on new National Mall museum dedicated to African American history and culture.

2003 -- Freelon merged his firm with New York architect Max Bond to create Freelon Bond Architects.

2004 -- Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC) was completed.

2005 -- Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD) and Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA) were both completed.

2008 -- UK-based architect David Adjaye and Washington, DC based architecture firm, Smithgroup joined the team, creating the Freelon Adjaye Bond Group/SmithGroup Freelon began teaching at MIT's school of Architecture and Design.

2009 -- Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup won the official design for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC) was completed.

2010 -- Anacostia branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2011 -- Tenley-Friendship branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2012 -- Construction began on NMAAHC.

2014 -- The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a much larger architectural firm. Freelon became managing director and lead design director of the North Carolina branches in Durham and Charlotte. National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA) was completed.

2016 -- Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

2017 -- Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX) were completed.

2019 -- Freelon died in his home in Durham, North Carolina at age 66 on July 9.
Related Materials:
Phil Freelon Papers, 1975-2019 at North Carolina State University Libraries.
Provenance:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Philip G. Freelon.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Business  Search this
Construction  Search this
Entrepreneurship  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
Design  Search this
Education  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Philip G. Freelon Archival Collection, 1939-2017. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2017.51
See more items in:
Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3ba3ca2a2-5495-45cf-801c-f3d66a7002fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2017-51

Cherokee Days 2016 - Cherokee Geneaology

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-06-21T21:01:05.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_2HVxE_r-9h8

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 6 - Developing a Trans-African Aesthetic

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-11-06T15:07:29.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_YfZInL_X4wk

Exhibition Records

Extent:
27 cu. ft. (27 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Date:
circa 1983-1994 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records that document the planning, development, and installation of American Encounters, a permanent exhibition at the National Museum of American History (NMAH) commemorating the Columbus Quincentenary. The exhibition opened in 1992. The records primarily include the correspondence, memoranda, and research files of NMAH staff involved in the project, namely: Lonn Taylor, Curator/Project Director; Harold A. Closter, Project Manager; Rayna Green, Curator; Richard E. Ahlborn, Curator; Howard Alexander Morrison, Writer; Hank Grasso, Designer; Lisa Falk, Educator; Susan Ostroff, Collections Manager; and Howard Bass, Music Program Coordinator. Also includes exhibition proposals and scripts; meeting minutes; photographs, slides, negatives, and contact sheets of subjects and objects for the exhibition; and audiotape recordings of Native American/Hispanic music. Some materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Historical museums  Search this
Science museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 00-002, National Museum of American History, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 00-002
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa00-002

Dallas -- Barbara Hunt Crow Garden

Architect:
Davis, Richard Drummond  Search this
Landscape architect:
Presnall, Betty  Search this
Landscape designer:
Johnston, Kelly  Search this
Simpson, David  Search this
Stone mason:
Gialdi, Lazaro  Search this
Horticulturist:
Gant, Hillary  Search this
Erickson, Helena  Search this
Turner, Jimmy  Search this
Cauble, Chad  Search this
Cauble, Emily  Search this
Clint, Chip  Search this
Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Dallas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Barbara Hunt Crow Garden (Dallas, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Dallas
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes an information sheet, a features plan, a slide view plan, a slide list and a plant list.
General:
The Barbara Hunt Crow Garden is a less than one acre garden in the Old Highland Park neighborhood in Dallas, Texas. It was established in 2001 and is comprised of multiple gardens rooms, including a cottage garden, a woodland garden, a shade garden, a stone terrace and two small meditation gardens. Prominent features of this garden include a large lawn in front of the house, high holly hedges, a large oak tree, perennial garden beds and a wide variety of plants suited for the Texas climate and soil.
This garden was redocumented in 2013 to show the addition of hte Peggy Martin Rose
Persons associated with the property include: Betty Presnall (landscape architect, 1999-2001), Kelly Johnston (landscape designer and project manager, 1999-2001), David Simpson (landscape designer of the rear terrace and fountain, 2001-2002), Lazaro Gialdi (stone mason of the rear terrace and fountain, 2002), Hillary Gant (horticulturist, 2002-2005), Helena Erickson (horticulturist, 2001-2003), Jimmy Turner (horticulturist, 2005-present), Chad and Emily Cauble (horticulturists, 2005-present) and Chip Clint (horticulturist, 1998-present).
Related Materials:
Barbara Hunt Crow Garden related holdings consist of 2 folders (17 35 mm. slides (photographs) + 1 photographic print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Dallas  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX082
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb61bde0469-d20e-49d3-bd6c-7d4de46baaeb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13471
Online Media:

Englewood -- Flat Rock Brook Nature Center

Landscape designer:
Wheeler, Charlotte Phillips  Search this
Horticulturist:
O'Hara, Mercer W.  Search this
Zikopoulos, Marianthi  Search this
Project manager:
Scott, Lyn  Search this
Designer:
Pitkin, Louise  Search this
Editor:
Pitkin, Louise  Search this
Creator:
Garden Club of Englewood  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Flat Rock Brook Nature Center (Englewood, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Bergen County -- Englewood
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, a narrative description and history, garden plans, a plant list, and copies of articles and brochures about the garden and nature center.
General:
Within this 150-acre nature center, located only two miles from the George Washington Bridge, is a specialized three-acre habitat area. The Backyard Habitat for Wildlife is a demonstration garden of native plants selected to be both ornamental and useful to wildlife. The habitat provides four basic elements: food, water, cover, and places for creatures to raise their young. The habitat is comprised of two sections: the Gazebo Garden, which illustrates a particular design for a backyard area, and the Quarry Meadow, which displays a variety of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous natives available for habitat use. Both areas were designed to show how plants native to an area can create a sense of place, bringing beauty to gardens and benefits to wildlife. Built on the site of an old stone quarry and dump, the gardens were developed by the Garden Club of Englewood in the early 1990s with the assistance of grant funding and volunteers from other organizations. The areas were designed to be seen in all four seasons and feature such plants as native grasses, red twig dogwood, azalea, and red maples. Birds and other wild creatures make their homes in the habitat areas, providing clear evidence of the success of this demonstration garden.
Persons associated with the garden include: Charlotte Phillips Wheeler (landscape designer, 1992-1996); Mercer W. O'Hara (horticulturist, 1992-1996); Marianthi Zikopoulos (horticulturist, 1992-1996); Lyn Scott (project manager, 1992-1996); and Louise Pitkin (designer and editor, 1992-1996).
Related Materials:
Flat Rock Brook Nature Center related holdings consist of 1 folder (12 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Englewood  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ299
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6345e1a63-8342-48e3-b9f3-ae56cdf8c1cb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20071

Chickaloonies Comic Art

Creator:
Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2022-03-30T00:18:42.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Arctic Studies;Alaska;Alaska Natives;Native Art;Indigenous Art  Search this
See more by:
Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska channel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
YouTube Channel:
Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_oKuQIP-axDA

Naoko Wowsugi – Tea(r)ism

Creator:
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-07T05:18:37.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Asian Americans  Search this
See more by:
apacenter
Data Source:
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
YouTube Channel:
apacenter
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_OpHEEXLnZEs

Beyond Books: Redefining the Civic Role of Public Libraries

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2017-03-10T01:21:16.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_BQJLkKy9qNQ

AAHDS Symposium: Welcome, & "Re-visioning the Archive"

Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-01-06T21:29:51.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAAA
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAAA
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_7YciAm-8wUw

Satellite, Vanguard TV 3

Manufacturer:
Naval Research Laboratory  Search this
Materials:
Magnesium-aluminum frame; silicon monoxide solar cells
Dimensions:
3-D (As Displayed): 76 × 46 × 30cm (29 15/16 × 18 1/8 × 11 13/16 in.)
3-D (Body, Open): 25 × 19 × 19cm (9 13/16 × 7 1/2 × 7 1/2 in.)
3-D (Arms, Each): 31 × 0.5cm (12 3/16 × 3/16 in.)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Uncrewed
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Gift of Dr. John P. Hagan
Inventory Number:
A19761857000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv92fe153d3-04bb-421a-bde8-4f84ba83b9f2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19761857000

Science on Station: What's New in Aerospace

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-12-01T20:15:45.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Aeronautics;Flight;Space Sciences  Search this
See more by:
airandspace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
YouTube Channel:
airandspace
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_WAy2i2RcVJo

Sikorsky XR-5

Manufacturer:
Sikorsky Aircraft Company  Search this
Dimensions:
Rotor diameter 48 feet, height 13 feet, length 57 feet 1 inch.
Type:
CRAFT-Rotary Wing
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the U.S. Air Force
Inventory Number:
A19600308000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9e0ea0250-ec7f-4262-bc93-c79ffe1d363f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19600308000
Online Media:

Design for the Other 90% Panel - Modesta Nyirenda-Zabula

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-04-22T22:11:04.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_KxD2ogXBnyI

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 8 - Reframing the Traditional/Historical

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-11-06T15:07:29.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_F__N8B-iXfQ

Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.26 Cubic feet (1 box, 1 oversized box.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1898-1988
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition presented by the Anacostia Community Museum measure 2.26 cubic feet and date from 1898 to 1988. Included are exhibit administrative files, lists of images, press releases for the promotion of the exhibit, oral history transcripts and permission forms, and extensive research files into the Anacostia community in southeast Washington D.C.

Exhibit Records include an outline for exhibit themes and proposed layouts, administrative files that include work plans and meeting notes, lists of exhibit images, promotional press releases, and related correspondence. Subjects relate to project management and community engagement.

Oral History of Anacostia Project Files include transcripts of the audio collected from the Oral History of Anacostia Project. This includes a list of interviewees and their interviewers.

Neighborhood Background Research Files represent two-thirds of the collection. Research files include news clippings, publications, unpublished articles, project files, and research material. Subjects include local figures and the Barry's Farm neighborhood, unpublished historical narratives, and project records related to archaeological investigations and neighborhood development programs.
Arrangement:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records is arranged in 3 series.

Series 1: Exhibit Records

Series 2: Oral History of Anacostia Project Files

Series 3: Neighborhood Background Research Files
Historical Note:
An exhibition on history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington D.C. post-World War II. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum) and held there from January 1, 1972 to December 31, 1972.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Story: 1608-1930 Exhibition Records, M03-039.
Provenance:
Records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition were created by the Anacostia Community Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75cac2f00-94cc-479a-bf58-1c9a3dd1ced4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-040
Online Media:

Fred J. Tharpe papers relating to Florence Knoll Bassett, circa 1932-2019

Creator:
Tharpe, Fred J.  Search this
Subject:
Knoll, Florence  Search this
Citation:
Fred J. Tharpe papers relating to Florence Knoll Bassett, circa 1932-2019. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women designers  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6015
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)235020
AAA_collcode_tharfred
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_235020

Jan Van der Marck papers

Creator:
Van der Marck, Jan, 1929-2010  Search this
Sculptor:
Arman, 1928-2005  Search this
Artist:
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Indiana, Robert, 1928-  Search this
Names:
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
O'Doherty, Brian  Search this
Pepper, Beverly  Search this
Segal, George, 1924-2000  Search this
Extent:
9 Linear feet
5.36 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Photographs
Journals (accounts)
Date:
1942-2010
Summary:
The papers or curator and arts administrator Jan Van der Marck measure 9.0 linear feet and 5.36 gigabytes and date from 1944 to 2010. His career is documented through biographical material, files on artists and art historians, museum administration records, and other professional records. Also found are papers concerning Van der Marck's personal interest and research on modern bookbinding.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of curator and arts administrator Jan Van der Marck measure 9.0 linear feet and 5.36 gigabytes and date from 1944 to 2010. His career is documented through biographical material, files on artists and art historians, museum administration records, and other professional records. Also found are papers concerning Van der Marck's personal interest and research on modern bookbinding.

Biographical material includes records of Van der Marck's personal collection of artwork, books, and photographs; early records consisting primarily of school documents, writings, and photographs; and one journal. Additionally there are copies of published interviews, one file of letters from friends, and several photographs of Van der Marck. Files on artists and art historians may include correspondence, photographs, slides, news clippings, exhibition catalogs, lists of artworks, exhibition planning documents, as well as articles or other writings by Van der Marck about the artist. Of note are files on Arman, Robert Indiana, Christo, Jacques Lipchitz, George Segal, Beverly Pepper, and Brian O'Doherty.

Museum Administration records document Van der Marck's activities as director or curator at various museums. Files may include museum exhibition planning records, administrative records, printed material, correspondence, and photographs. Also found are records of Van der Marck's other professional activities, such as his participation as guest curator of exhibitions, committee participant, and exhibition juror, as well as lecture files containing invitations, press materials, and drafts of his lectures. Additionally there are a few research files and copies of his published articles.

Papers concerning bookbinding document Van der Marck's research and personal collection of contemporary bookbinding and book arts. Included are files on bookbinders, slides and photographs of bindings, correspondence with libraries, and records of his purchase or donation of these works.
Biographical / Historical:
Jan Van der Marck (1929-2010) was a curator and museum administrator in Detroit, Mich., Chicago, Ill., and Miami, Fla.

Van der Marck was born in Roermond, the Netherlands, in 1929. His family owned a printing and publishing business. He studied art history at the University of Nijmegen and earned his doctorate in 1956 with a dissertation on 19th-century Belgian book illustration. In 1957 he came to the United States on a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to research the relationship between museums and their audiences and studied briefly at Columbia University. In 1962 he was assistant director of fine arts exhibitions at the Seattle World's Fair. Van der Marck became curator at the Walker Art Center in 1963 and became the founding director of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago in 1967. While in Chicago he invited Christo and Jeanne-Claude to wrap the museum building in canvas. He later served as project manager for their "Valley Curtain" project in 1971 and 1972.

After leaving the Museum of Contemporary Art, Van der Marck worked briefly at the University of Washington in Seattle, and then served as director of the Dartmouth College Galleries and Collections from 1974 to 1980. At Dartmouth he continued to support non-traditional artworks and oversaw the installation of the lawn sculpture "X-Delta" by Mark di Suvero, despite negative campus reactions. In 1980 he became the director of the new Center for the Fine Arts in Miami. After a disagreement with trustees he left the Center and became chief curator at the Detroit Institute of Arts in 1986. In 1995 he lost his job at the Detroit Institute when it was ruled that he violated a city residential requirement.

Aside from his work as an arts administrator, Van der Marck wrote and published many catalog essays, articles, and monographs on artists, lectured on contemporary art, and participated in arts organizations. He also maintained an interest in contemporary bookbinding.
Provenance:
The papers were donated in 2011 by Sheila Van der Marck, Jan Van der Marck's widow.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Bookbinding  Search this
Curators -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Journals (accounts)
Citation:
Jan Van der Marck papers, 1942-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.vandjan
See more items in:
Jan Van der Marck papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw922f16e77-4c7f-4368-85ee-77a9c7732eb4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-vandjan
Online Media:

Kenya: Mambo Poa

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Kenya is a country of deeply rooted traditions and a vibrant cultural crossroads. Some of the oldest artifacts of human communities have been discovered in Kenya, making the East African country truly a cradle of humanity.

Today, it is a dynamic nation that links its prehistoric past to new cultural expressions in a land of great environmental contrasts. Kenya's diverse landscapes stretch from snow-capped mountains to the Great Rift Valley, from deserts to lakes, vast savannahs, lush forests, and a sparkling coastare reflected in the rich diversity of the Kenyan people and their traditions.

Occurring just after the fiftieth anniversary of Kenya's independence from the British Empire, the Kenya: Mambo Poa program presented the ways in which the people of Kenya are balancing protection of their valued cultural and natural heritage with the challenges and opportunities for change in the twenty-first century.

Festival visitors interacted with exemplary craftspeople who work with everything from clay to soapstone to recycled materials, learned about important fossil discoveries by taking part in a model dig site from the Great Rift Valley, ran with Kenya's Olympic athletes, danced to both traditional and contemporary music from many regions of the country, discovered how Kenyans live among and work with some of the most magnificent wildlife on the continent, and experienced Kenyan life in the United States.

All of this took place in venues and spaces that reflect the creative and dynamic experiences of the Kenyan people, whether they live in urban or rural, coastal or inland environments.

Preston Scott was Program Curator and Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator; Elizabeth Ouma was Kenya Project Manager.

The program was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in partnership with the Government of Kenya. Additional support was provided by the U.S. Agency for lnternational Development, the HENRY Foundation, the Curtis & Edith Munson Foundation, Deborah Santana, and the Consortium for World Cultures of the Smithsonian lnstitution.
Presenters, Research, and Technical Committee:
Nicholas Odhiambo Abonyo, Patrick Abungu, Aghan Odero Agan, Patrick Ondiek Agengo, David Amunga, Silas Amunga, Tume Tari Arero, Jane Atudo, Muhammed Wako Dase, Nuria Golo, Emily Gumba, Emma lrungu, Jillo Guyo Jillo, Qabale Jirma, Caroline Kariuki, Jimbi Katana, Joseph Kibunja, Qabale Jirma Kinato, Eric Kotonya, Charlotte Sara Kwena, Nyavanga Lugalia, Khisa Mbotela, Callistus Musiomi, Alex Muigai Njuguna, Martha Njunguna, Charles Nziivo, Thomas Wasonga Ogola, Joseph O. Oindi, Wilfred N. Okibegwa, Samson M. Ong'esa, Denis Opudo, Dorothy Auma Otieno, Malakì A. Sam, Dokatu H. Wako, Susan Wanjaria
Participants:
Coast

Ali Abdalla Ali, 1973-, dhow carpenter, Lamu, Kenya

Ali Bakari Bwana Madi, 1967-, dhow carpenter, Lamu, Kenya

Ahmed Yusuf Suleiman, 1979-, plaster worker, Lamu, Kenya

Salim Mohamed Atwaa, turtle conservationist

Pastoral

Teresia Mbula Kimei, basket weaver, Machakos, Kenya

Victoria Munini Mutua, basket weaver, Machakos, Kenya

Lucy Agutu Okundu, 1967-, basket weaver, Kisumu, Kenya

Apollo Omondi Omware, 1977-, basket weaver, Kisumu, Kenya

Susana Chemakwany Daniel, bead worker, Nairobi, Kenya

Susan Naserian Nketoria, 1977-, bead worker, Ngong Hills, Kenya

Rahab Wjuhi Kinyanjui, 1975-, human origins researcher, Nairobi, Kenya

Fredrick Kyalo Manthi, 1967-, human origins researcher, Nairobi, Kenya

Joshua Nzioki Mativo, 1972-, human origins researcher

Musyoka Kilonzi Mwangangi, 1962-, human origins researcher

Living and Working with Wildlife -- Living and Working with WildlifeMunira Kavosa Anyonge, 1957-, The Nature Conservancy, Nairobi, KenyaCelina Nabalayo Butali, 1978-, Northern Rangelands Trust, Isiolo, KenyaJosephat Bwire, 1983-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, KenyaOmar Godana Dida, 1956-, Nasuulu Conservancy, Isiolo, KenyaJohn Lopulo Ekai, 1991-, Nakuprat-Gotu Conservancy, Nairobi, KenyaJosephine Scopio Ekiru, 1984-, Nakurpat Wildlife Conservancy, Isiolo, KenyaMwanamisi Ghofwa Haodo, Kenya Wildlife ServiceTom Jonathan Lalampaa, 1979-, Northern Rangelands Trust, Isiolo, KenyaBeatrice Namunyak Lempaira, 1984-, Naibunga Wildlife Conservancy, Nanyuki, KenyaRichard Austine Lokorukou, 1984-, Namunyak Conservancy, Wamba, KenyaJackson Kibui Marubu, 1981-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, KenyaCatherine Mwihaki Wateri, 1976-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, KenyaPhilemon Kimutai Ngengo, 1982-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, KenyaIbrahim Abdi Ogle, 1957-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, KenyaSolomon Kipkemoi Tanui, 1987-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, KenyaEdwin Wanjala Wanyonyi, 1975-, Kenya Wildlife Service, Nairobi, Kenya

Henry Wanyoike, 1974-, marathon runner, Nairobi, Kenya

Joseph Kibunja, marathon runner

Mwanajuma Malika Badiri, 1983-, Pokomo hut builder, Tana River, Kenya

Salma Ndoge Maro, 1973-, Pokomo hut builder, Mombasa, Kenya

Dina Anyango Adipo, potter, Homabay, Kenya

Grace Akinyi Jakoyo, 1955-, potter, Homabay, Kenya

Elkana Omweri Ong'esa, 1944-, soapstone carver, Nairobi, Kenya

Mark Obara Zebedee, 1957-, soapstone carver, Kisi, Kenya

Meshack Ndunda Kivuva, 1948-, wood carver, Nairobi, Kenya

Mutunga Japheth Munya, 1960-, wood carver, Nairobi, Kenya

Urban

Jane Wanjiru Maina, 1973-, hair braider, Nairobi, Kenya

Farida Rashid Mohamed, 1962-, henna painter, Mombasa, Kenya

Fatuma Simba Bakediye, henna painter, Mombasa, Kenya

Isaac Maina Kibe, 1974-, recycling artist, muralist, Nairobi, Kenya

Patrick Thuita Kibe, 1987-, recycling artist, muralist, Nairobi, Kenya

Francis Mutua Muvua, recycling artist, carver

Jonathan Lenato, 1982-, recycling artist, carver

Hellen Alumbe Namai, 1975-, storyteller, Nairobi, Kenya

Newton Zadock Kweya, 1985-, storyteller, Nairobi, Kenya

Mohamed Hussein Abdulkader Kaderdina, 1964-, textile worker, Mombasa, Kenya

Abdulhamid Muneeb Kaderdina, 1975-, textile worker, Mombasa, Kenya

Ahmed Mohamed Nongodha, 1955-, textile worker, Lamu, Kenya

Cooks

Fatma Ali Mohamed Busaidy, 1964-, cook, Lamu, Kenya

Alice Awuor Oduor, 1975-, cook, Nairobi, Kenya

Emily Ondese Oduor, 1967-, cook, Nairobi, Kenya

Amina Harith Swaleh, 1966-, cook, Mombasa, Kenya

Dancers

Ramogi Dancers from Homa Bay County -- Ramogi Dancers from Homa Bay CountyPaul Orwa Apiyo, 1960-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaDaniel Akumu Mandha, 1980-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaAlfred Anyango Migure, 1945-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaJames Ojuok Ochieng', 1954-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaKennedy Odhiambo Olela, 1973-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaJohn Ooyi Ooyi, 1962-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaJoseph Aludo Owaka, 1947-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaJohn Owuor Oyugi, 1959-, dancer, Nyangweso, KenyaStanbradox Odhiambo Oyugi, 1992-, dancer, Nyangweso, Kenya

Musicians

Gargar -- GargarLuli Bashir Muge Abdi, 1973-, vocals, Lamu, KenyaAmina Bashir Elmoge, 1984-, vocals, Garissa, KenyaAnab Gure Ibrahim, 1972-, vocals, Garissa, Kenya

Kenge Kenge -- Kenge KengeTobias Onyango Agola, 1977-, drums, lead vocals, Nairobi, KenyaBoaz Otieno Aketch, 1987-, orutu fiddle, oporo horn, Nairobi, KenyaJoseph Ojunga Kungu, 1974-, horn, Kisumu, KenyaGeorge Achieng' Odero, 1975-, orutu fiddle, Nairobi, Kenya

Lelele Afrika -- Lelele AfrikaMwanaisha Abdalla Mohamed (Nyota Ndogo), 1981-, vocals, Mombasa, KenyaMbarak Ali Haji Msuo, 1958-, harmonium, Mombasa, KenyaMohammed Adio Shigo, 1946-, taishokoto zither, Mombasa, Kenya

Featured Artists -- Featured ArtistsCharles Odero Ademson (Makadem), 1972-, guitar, kalimba, nyatiti, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaPeter Akwabi Okutoi, 1946-, guitar, Nairobi, KenyaPoloycarp Onyango Awino (Winyo), 1982-, guitar, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaKadir Roba Duba (Kadir Kotola), 1984-, guitar, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaBosco Mutua Mulwa, guitar, vocalsDaniel Kamau (DK) Mwai, vocals, Thika, KenyaSamba Mapangala, vocalsMohamed Said Ngana (Bado), 1980, vocals, Watamu, KenyaJohn Amutabi Nzenze, 1938-, guitar, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaBeatrice Achieng' Odhiambo (Iddi Achieng'), 1975-, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaMusa Odhiambo Omondi (Olith Ratego), 1974-, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaRonald Ontiri Onchuru (Ontiri Bikundo), 1976-, obokano, vocals, Kisii, KenyaJob Ouko Seda (Ayub Ogada), 1956-, nyatiti, Nairobi, KenyaSusan Adhiambo Owiyo (Suzanna Owiyo), 1974-, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaEric James Wainaina Mwaniki, 1973-, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaJob Ouko Seda, musician, actorCarol Lynn Atemi Oyungu, singerWalter Kivure Mwangombe, keyboards

Session Musicians, Band 1 -- Session Musicians, Band 1Linda Wangechi Muthama, 1983-, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaMarvin Maveke Mutisya (Marvo), 1985-, drums, Nairobi, KenyaIsaac Gem Ojwang (Izzo Gem), 1974-, bass, Nairobi, KenyaDavid Lawrence Otieno, guitar, Nairobi, KenyaJulius Mathew Wakake Otieno, 1975-, percussion, Nairobi, Kenya

Session Musicians, Band 2 -- Session Musicians, Band 2Thobias Imani Koech, 1982-, guitar, Nairobi, KenyaShadrack Muithya Makau (Shaddy), 1981-, keyboards, Nairobi, KenyaJackline Kasiva Mutua, 1988-, percussion, Nairobi, KenyaLydia Mwango Ogoti Onchangu, 1975-, vocals, Nairobi, KenyaCharles Otieno Owino (Chao), bass, Nairobi, KenyaMathew Omondi Rabala (Matayo), drums, Nairobi, Kenya

Session Musicians, Band 3 -- Session Musicians, Band 3Kombo Chokwe Burns, 1973-, guitar, Nairobi, KenyaIddi Aziz Kunya, 1980-, bass, Nairobi, KenyaRobert Christopher Oyoo (Chris Adwar), 1979-, keyboards, Nairobi, KenyaHenry Ndenge Saha, 1975-, drums, Nairobi, KenyaAllan Gituthu Wanjohi, 1990-, bass, Nairobi, Kenya

Support -- SupportNicholas Odhiambo Abonyo, 1988-, presenter, technical support, Nairobi, KenyaPatrick Ondiek Agengo, 1982-, presenter, technical support, Nairobi, KenyaWalter Mon'gare (Nyambane), liaison, Nairobi, KenyaStephen Kubutia Murembe (Steve 64), 1977-, roadie, technical manager, Nairobi, KenyaWilliam Ogutu Osusa (Tabu Osusa), 1954-, band, ensemble manager, Nairobi, Kenya
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2014, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk54ae8a33f-6361-4e7c-9bd2-d83fb0df3ecc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2014-ref25

Rhythm and Blues: Tell It Like It Is

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The 2011 Rhythm and Blues program was an exploration of the rich historical, cultural, and musical matrix of R&B. Through music and dance performances, workshops, and narrative discussions, the program considered R&B as a collaborative art form shaped by composers, performers, producers, and communities of listeners. Most importantly, it highlighted how music provides a dynamic lens to explore the relationship of African American history and experiences to American popular culture.

The history of R&B and the breadth of what it encompasses - socially, commercially, and artistically - suggests that it is not monolithic. It tells a complex story of many strands and experiences. A distinctly African American music drawing from the deep tributaries of African American expressive culture, it is an amalgam of jump blues, big band swing, gospel, boogie, and blues that was initially developed during a thirty-year period that bridges the era of legally sanctioned racial segregation, international conflicts, and the struggle for civil rights. Its formal qualities, stylistic range, marketing and consumption trends, and worldwide currency thus reflect not only the changing social and political landscapes of American race relations, but also urban life, culture, and popular entertainment in mainstream America.

This music that speaks about a history of marginalization and exclusion also tells a story about resilience and resistance. The 2011 Festival program underlined these latter qualities. It celebrated pioneers and iconoclasts, soloists and studio musicians, and relationships and collaborations through which a younger generation was taking ownership of the music. This was perhaps most dynamically revealed in the participation of the Stax Music Academy, a group of Memphis high school musicians who are learning leadership and teamwork skills through music that (in their own words) "embodies the spirit of harmony, respect and cooperation that defined Memphis' legendary Stax Records." These students not only learn the historic importance of the music, but also experience R&B through collaboration and practice as a living art form - an art form that Festival visitors in Washington could also experience vividly and directly on the National Mall.

Mark Puryear was Curator and Arlene Reiniger was Program Coordinator. Portia Maultsby, Bob Santelli, and Michael White constituted the Curatorial Advisory Committee. For the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Project Staff included: Lonnie G. Bunch, Director; Kinshasha Holman Conwill, Deputy Director; Timothy Anne Burnside, Research Assistant; Dorey Butter, Project Manager; Deirdre Cross, Public Programs Coordinator; Delphia York Duckens, Associate Director for External Affairs; Rex Ellis, Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs; Cheryl Johnson, Government Relations Officer; LaFleur Paysour, Media Relations and Public Affairs; Dwandalyn Reece, Curator of Music and Performing Arts; and Kevin Strait, Project Historian.

The program was produced in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Presenters:
Lawrence Bradford, Timothy Anne Burnside, Rex Ellis, Tuliza Fleming, John Franklin, Charles Hughes, Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, Kip Lornell, Barry Lee Pearson, Jeff Place, Dwandalyn Reece, Tulani Salahu-Din, Randy Short, Kevin Strait
Participants:
WILLIAM BELL

William Bell, 1939-, singer, Atlanta, Georgia

Performing with the Stax Music Academy

THE DIXIE CUPS®

Barbara A. Hawkins, 1942-, vocals, Tampa, Florida

Rosa L. Hawkins, 1945-, vocals, Tampa, Florida

Athelgra Neville, 1944-, vocals, New Orleans, Louisiana

Marc Adams, 1952-, keyboards, vocals, New Orleans, Louisiana

Anthony Brown, 1960-, guitar, New Orleans, Louisiana

Gerald French, 1970-, drums, vocals, New Orleans, Louisiana

James Markway, 1952-, bass, Covington, Louisiana

Joseph Saulsbury, 1951-, saxophone, New Orleans, Louisiana

NAT DOVE

Nat Dove, 1939-, keyboards, vocals, Bakersfield, California

David Cole, 1957-, guitar, Berwyn Heights, Maryland

Emory Diggs, 1958-, bass, Oxon Hill, Maryland

DeAndrey Howard, 1954-, drums, Washington, D.C.

THE FUNK BROTHERS

Bob Babbitt, bass, Nashville, Tennessee

Donna Curtin, 1959-, vocals, Detroit, Michigan

Rob Jones, 1952-, keyboards, Detroit, Michigan

Ray Monette, 1946-, guitar, Livonia, Michigan

Delbert Nelson, 1954-, vocals, Farmington, Michigan

Kenneth "Spider Webb" Rice, 1944-, drums, Detroit, Michigan

Eddie Willis, Jr., 1936-, guitar, Gore Springs, Mississippi

Treaty Womack, 1953-, percussion, Detroit, Michigan

George McGregor, 1940-, drums, Detroit, Michigan

Wondel E. Brown, 1950-, trombone, Prince Frederick, Maryland

Clarence Knight, Jr., 1936-, tenor saxophone, Bowie, Maryland

Keith A. Mathis, 1958-, horn section coordinator, trumpet, flugelhorn, Washington, D.C.

GLOBE POSTER PRINTING

Bob Cicero, 1947-, owner, Pasadena, Maryland

THE JEWELS

Sandra Bears, 1943-, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Marjorie Clarke, 1945-, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Grace Ruffin, 1944-, vocals, District Heights, Maryland

Ronald Campbell, 1951-, bass, Washington, D.C.

Ronald Ford, 1951-, drums, Washington, D.C.

Joe Phillips, 1951-, guitar, Suitland, Maryland

Ron Reace, 1956-, keyboards, Hyattsville, Maryland

DR. MABLE JOHN

Mable John, 1930-, musician, Los Angeles California

Performing with the Stax Music Academy Accompanists -- Performing with the Stax Music Academy AccompanistsMildred Spikes, 1942-, vocals, East Orange, New JerseyNorma Jenkins Williams, 1948-, vocals, Gaithersburg, Maryland

FERNANDO JONES

Fernando Jones, 1964-, guitar, Chicago, Illinois

Roy Boyd, 1955-, drums, vocals, Chicago, Illinois

Chip Ratliff, 1965-, bass, vocals, Morton Grove, Illinois

SHIRLEY JONES OF THE JONES GIRLS

Shirley Jones, 1953-, vocals, McDonough, Georgia

Farnetta L. Baker, 1967-, vocals, Bryans Road, Maryland

Anissa Hargrove, 1969-, vocals, Waldorf, Maryland

Lorree K. Slye, 1962-, vocals, Washington, D.C.

Keith D. Busey, 1960-, bass, Silver Spring, Maryland

Charles Jerome Deas, 1964-, percussion, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Jeno Marcus Meyer, 1972-, keyboards, Oxon Hill, Maryland

Derrick Tobias Northan, guitar, Baltimore, Maryland

Arthur Scribner, Jr., 1955-, keyboards, Baltimore, Maryland

Kevin "Bam-Bam" Sykes, 1968-, drums, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

Michael "Airplay" Austin, 1958-, manager, Atlanta, Georgia

HAROLD MELVIN'S BLUENOTES

Latrice Barnwell, bass

Anthony Brooks, vocals

Angela Caldwell

John Gillespie, vocals

Calvin Harrisson, guitar

Ovelia Melvin

Trudy Melvin, manager

John Morris, vocals

Harvey Perry, keyboards

George Prettyman, sound technician

John Thompson, drums

Rufus Thorne, Jr., vocals

THE MONITORS

Bill Myers, 1932-, keyboards, Wilson, North Carolina

Willie Dupree, 1950-, saxophone, Wilson, North Carolina

Gerald Hunter, 1945-, guitar, vocals, Wilson, North Carolina

Mollie Hunter, 1958-, vocals, Wilson, North Carolina

Dick Knight, 1943-, trumpet, vocals, Kinston, North Carolina

Sam Lathan, 1929-, drums, vocals, Wilson, North Carolina

Jerome Morgan, 1968-, bass, Wilson, North Carolina

THE NATIONAL HAND DANCE ASSOCIATION

Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, 1953-, president, Fort Washington, Maryland -- Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, 1953-, president, Fort Washington, MarylandLawrence Bradford, Willie-Mae Brown, Levet Brown, Jr., Earl Calloway, Jr., Melvin Copeland, Patricia Duncan-Clark, Kim Frazier, Nathan Giles, Maxine Grant, James Green, Leroy J. Green, Farnese Hicks, Alwanda Higgins, Dominic A. Johnson, Megan Johnson, William Johnson, Nadene Jones, Dyone Mitchell, Patricia Mitchell, Myra Morgan-Martin, Adrienne Poteat, Addie Robinson, Markus Lamont Smith, Greg Steele, Mary Thomas, Ronald Van Doorn, Melvin Walker, Darlene Wallace

SONNY TIL'S ORIOLES

Diz Russell, 1933-, vocals, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Ray Apollo Allen, 1941-, vocals, Fort Washington, Maryland

Clark Walker, 1948-, vocals, guitar, Largo, Maryland

David Warren, 1945-, vocals, Arlington, Virginia

Sam Paladino, 1941-, keyboards, La Plata, Maryland

Gary Smith, bass, Capitol Heights, Maryland

James Thomas, 1943-, drums, Hyattsville, Maryland

Millie Russell, 1938-, manager, Capitol Heights, Maryland

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL RECORDS, GAMBLE-HUFF MUSIC

Kenneth Gamble, founder

Leon Huff, founder

Charles Gamble

Kenneth Gamble

Grace Warner ("Amazing Grace Little")

RADIO DJs

Robert "Captain Fly" Frye, 1949-, WPFW, Washington, D.C.

Carroll Hynson, 1936-, WHUR, Washington, D.C.

Herb Kent, 1928-, WVAZ, Chicago, Illinois

Bob Porter, 1940-, WBGO, Newark, New Jersey

MISS MARTHA REEVES

Martha Reeves, 1941-, singer, Detroit, Michigan

Christopher Beck, 1982, drums, Jersey City, New Jersey

Isaac Daniel, guitar

Dupor Georges, trombone

Bryan Dundee Holt, 1956-, New York, New York

Richard Kessler, trumpet

Alonzo McKenzie, keyboards, Southfield, Michigan

Darrell Smith, 1962-, bass, Detroit, Michigan

Lorenzo Wheatley, baritone sax

Davey Yarborough, tenor sax

SMOOTH & EZ HAND DANCE INSTITUTE

Lawrence Bradford, 1944-, director, Washington, D.C. -- Lawrence Bradford, 1944-, director, Washington, D.C.William Coleman, Milton English, Francina R. Ferguson, Victor Howard, Lisa Lawson, Gregory Meads, Jonathan V. Newton, Nilajah Nyasuma, Gregory L. Owens, Sr., Betty Parker, Kirby Parker, James Portis, Tia Quander, Renee Reed, Carolyn Rhone, Patricia Russo, Helen Victoria Swann, Angela Tindle, Cynthia Trueheart, Gerald Woodford, Gloria Woodfork, Alexis Wright-Portis

SOUL SURVIVORS

Michael DiMatrinis, 1956-, guitar, vocals, Sicklerville, New Jersey

Charles Ingui, vocals, Ridgely, Maryland

Richard Ingui, 1946-, vocals, Shamong, New Jersey

Kevin Irvine, 1954-, keyboard, vocals, New Hope, Pennsylvania

Jay MacLean, 1956-, drums, Williamstown, New Jersey

Frank Pagliante, 1956-, bass, Mt. Laurel, New Jersey

SOUL TRAIN

Kenard Gibbs, 1964-, CEO, Soul Train Holdings, Chappaqua, New York

Tony Cornelius, President/CEO, Akabueze Productions Inc.

Tyrone Proctor, 1953-, original Soul Train dancer, New York, New York

Nicholas "NickFRESH" Puzo, 1983-, DJ, founder, SoulTrainFans, Orange Park, Florida

Questlove, 1971-, DJ, producer, drummer for the Roots, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Urban Artistry, dancers -- Urban Artistry, dancersTasha Barnes, 1980-, dancer, Arlington, VirginiaJunious "HOUSE" Brickhouse, 1974-, dancer, Bethesda, MarylandRashaad Pearson, 1983-, dancer, Rockville, MarylandToyin Sogunro, 1987-, dancer, New Carrollton, MarylandRyan Webb, 1986-, dancer, Springfield, VirginiaBaronhawk Williams, 1988-, dancer, Beltsville, Maryland

STAX MUSIC ACADEMY

Paul B. McKinney, 1969-, music director, Memphis, Tennessee

Justin Merrick, 1987-, vocal instructor, Memphis, Tennessee

Leona Johnson, 1961-, program assistant, Memphis, Tennessee

Tasmine Ballentine, vocals

Stephanie Brownlee, 1995-, keyboards, Memphis, Tennessee

Brandon Chornes, 1994-, drums, vocals, Memphis, Tennessee

Preston Edward Clark, 1994-, bass, Memphis, Tennessee

Justin Hicks, 1995-, vocals, Cordova, Tennessee

Clifton A. Jackson, 1994-, trombone, Memphis, Tennessee

Tangela Mathis, 1994-, vocals, Memphis, Tennessee

Amber Robinson, 1992-, vocals, Memphis, Tennessee

Andrew Saino, 1993-, electric guitar, Collierville, Tennessee

Baye Slappy, 1993-, vocals, Memphis, Tennessee

Kelvin Walters, 1994-, alto saxophone, Memphis, Tennessee

Deanie Parker, 1945-, former administrator and composer for Stax Records, Memphis, Tennessee

THE SWALLOWS

William "Til" George, 1935-, vocals, Pikesville, Maryland

Leroy Miller, 1946-, vocals, Baltimore, Maryland

Eddie Rich, 1931-, vocals, Baltimore, Maryland

Clarence O. Robinson, 1956-, vocals, Baltimore, Maryland

Johnny Styl, 1952-, vocals, Randallstown, Maryland

Backing Band -- Backing BandJohnnel Gray, 1948-, keyboards, Washington, D.C.Lenny Harris, 1955-, saxophone, White Plains, MarylandEddie Jones, 1953-, band leader, guitar, Washington, D.C.Antonio Robinson, 1961-, drums, Hyattsville, MarylandJerry Wilder, bass

SWAMP DOGG

Jerry "Swamp Dogg" Williams, 1942-, keyboards, vocals, Canoga Park, California

Billy Haynes, 1949-, bass, vocals, Bakersfield, California

Craig Kimbrough, 1956-, drums, Los Angeles, California

Vera Lee, 1921-, vocals, Las Vegas, Nevada

Lucky Lloyd, 1955-, guitar, Sylmar, California

MoogStar, 1965-, keyboards, Northridge, California

Michael Murphy, 1948-, keyboards, Sherman Oaks, California

Horn Section -- Horn SectionVaughn Ambrose, 1975-, tenor saxophone, Alexandria, VirginiaDoug Gilchrist, 1970-, trombone, Silver Spring, MarylandGilbert E. Pryor, Jr., 1950-, trumpet, flugelhorn, Landover, Maryland

FRED WESLEY AND THE NEW JBs

Fred Wesley, 1943-, trombone, Manning, South Carolina

Bruce Cox, 1959-, drums, Brooklyn, New York

Dwayne Dolphin, 1963-, bass, Sewickley, Pennsylvania

Ernie Fields, Jr., 1934-, saxophone, flute, bagpipes, Los Angeles, California

Freddie Hendrix, 1976-, trumpet, Teaneck, New Jersey

Barney McAll, 1966-, keyboards, Brooklyn, New York

Reggie Ward, 1949-, guitar, Lawrenceville, Georgia

Joya Wesley, 1966-, group manager, Greensboro, North Carolina

KIM WESTON

Kim Weston, 1939-, singer, Detroit, Michigan

Performing with the Funk Brothers
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2011 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2011, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2011 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f281a357-4fa3-4c1d-9261-6824615e3eda
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2011-ref36

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