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Alexander Brook papers, 1900-1982

Creator:
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Subject:
Bacon, Peggy  Search this
Biddle, George  Search this
Brett, Catherine  Search this
Covarrubias, Miguel  Search this
Pollock, Jackson  Search this
Spencer, Niles  Search this
Knee, Gina  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Watercolors
Sketches
Transcriptions
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Etchings
Illustrations
Topic:
Post-impressionism (Art)  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Diaries  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6833
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208960
AAA_collcode_brooalex
Theme:
Diaries
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208960
Online Media:

Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961

Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Subject:
Wildenstein, Felix  Search this
Phillips, Duncan  Search this
Hays, Lee  Search this
Untermeyer, Louis  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl  Search this
Robeson, Paul  Search this
DuBois, W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt)  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano)  Search this
Ruggles, Carl  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur  Search this
Nearing, Helen  Search this
Nearing, Scott  Search this
Pach, Walter  Search this
Rasmussen, Knud  Search this
Reeves, Ruth  Search this
Seeger, Pete  Search this
Daniel, Charles  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland)  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen)  Search this
Chamberlain, J. E.  Search this
Boyesen, Bayard  Search this
Chase, William Merritt  Search this
Freuchen, Peter  Search this
Gellert, Hugo  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry  Search this
Hartley, Marsden  Search this
Fitzgerald, James  Search this
Keller, Charles  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
Jones, Dan Burne  Search this
United American Artists  Search this
United Office and Professional Workers of America  Search this
United Scenic Artists  Search this
National Farmers' Union (U.S.)  Search this
National Maritime Union of America  Search this
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists League of America  Search this
Citizens' Committee for Government Arts Projects  Search this
Farmers Union of the New York Milk Shed  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Federal Writers' Project  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
International Workers Order  Search this
Type:
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Topic:
Designers -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Politics and culture  Search this
Authors -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States -- Political aspects  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Illustration of books  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Art and war  Search this
Commercial art  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9557
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211757
AAA_collcode_kentrock
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211757
Online Media:

Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records

Creator:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries  Search this
Names:
Bartlett, Frederic Clay, 1873-1953  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Chappell, Warren, 1904-  Search this
Clancy, John C., 1897-1981  Search this
Coleman, Glenn O., 1887-1932  Search this
Cook, Howard Norton, 1901-1980  Search this
Cuthbert, Virginia, 1908-2001  Search this
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Gellatly, John, 1853-1931  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Hopper, Jo N. (Josephine Nivison), 1883-1968  Search this
James, Alexander, 1890-1946  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Luks, George Benjamin, 1867-1933  Search this
Mangravite, Peppino, 1896-  Search this
Marsh, Felicia Meyer, 1912-1978  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
McFee, Henry Lee, 1886-1953  Search this
Melchers, Gari, 1860-1932  Search this
Orton, J. Robert  Search this
Pepper, Charles Hovey, 1864-1950  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Poor, Henry Varnum, 1887-1970  Search this
Russo, Alexander  Search this
Spalding, John T.  Search this
Sparhawk-Jones, Elizabeth, 1885-1968  Search this
Speicher, Eugene Edward, 1883-1962  Search this
Spruance, Benton, 1904-1967  Search this
Strater, Henry, 1896-  Search this
Tucker, Allen, 1866-1939  Search this
Tucker, Richard Derby, 1903-  Search this
Winters, Denny Sonke, 1907-1985  Search this
Young, Mahonri Mackintosh, 1877-1957  Search this
Extent:
21.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1858-1969
bulk 1919-1968
Summary:
The Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records measure 21.8 linear feet and are dated 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). The records consist mainly of business correspondence with collectors, artists, museums and arts organizations, colleagues, and others. A small amount of Frank K. M. Rehns personal correspondence and a few stray personal papers of individual artists are interfiled. Also included are financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, miscellaneous records, and photographs documenting most of the history of a highly regarded New York City art gallery devoted to American painting.
Scope and Content Note:
The Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records measure 21.8 linear feet and are dated 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). The records consist mainly of business correspondence with collectors, artists, museums and arts organizations, colleagues, and others. A small amount of Frank K. M. Rehn's personal correspondence and a few stray personal papers of individual artists are interfiled. Also included are financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, miscellaneous records, and photographs documenting most of the history of a highly regarded New York art gallery devoted to American painting.

Series 1: Correspondence contains correspondence with artists, museums and arts organizations, collectors, colleagues, and others documents the workings of Rehn Galleries from its earliest days through 1968. A small amount of Frank K. M. Rehn's personal correspondence and a few scattered personal papers of individual artists are interfiled with the business correspondence.

Series 2: Financial Records includes banking, insurance, and investment records, tax returns and related documentation, miscellaneous financial records and paid bills. Among the insurance records are detailed monthly schedules listing paintings with titles, artists, and insurance values. Miscellaneous financial records include inventories of gallery stock, notes regarding business expenses and income, and receipt books recording incoming paintings. Also included are a small number of items concerning the personal business of Frank Rehn and John Clancy.

Five volumes of Scrapbooks (Series 3) contain clippings and a small number of exhibition catalogs documenting the activities of Rehn Galleries and many of its associated artists. Additional Printed Matter in Series 4 includes material relating to Rehn Galleries and its artists, as well as publications produced by Rehn Galleries. General, art-related printed matter consists of articles, auction catalogs, advertisements, and publications of various museums, arts organizations, and schools. There is also material about artists not affiliated with Rehn Galleries. Additional printed items concern miscellaneous subjects that are not art-related.

Series 5: Miscellaneous Records, includes artwork, lists and notes, and writings. Photographs in Series 6 are of people including artists represented by Rehn as well as several not affiliated with the gallery. Noticeably absent are likenesses of Frank Rehn and John Clancy. Photographs of works of art are by Rehn Galleries' artists and others. Reginald Marsh's photographs consist of family and personal photographs that were either given to Rehn Galleries or perhaps loaned for research use, and include views of Marsh from early childhood through later life, photographs of family and friends, and a small family album. Also included are photographs are of Marsh's childhood drawings.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Correspondence is arranged alphabetically and Series 3: Scrapbooks is in rough chronological order. Series 2, and 4-6 are arranged in categories, as indicated in the Series Descriptions/Container Listing. Unless otherwise noted, items within each folder are arranged chronologically.

The collection is arranged into 6 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1858-1969, undated (Boxes 1-15; 14.4 linear ft.; Reels 5849-5869)

Series 2: Financial Records, 1919-1968, undated (Boxes 15-17; 2.6 linear ft; Reel 5869)

Series 3: Scrapbooks, 1919-1940 (Boxes 23-24; 0.6 linear ft.; Reels 5869-5870)

Series 4: Printed Matter, 1882-1969, undated (Boxes 18-20; 2.4 linear ft.; Reels 5870-5872)

Series 5: Miscellaneous Records, circa 1920-1968 (Boxes 20-21; 0.7 linear ft; Reel 5872)

Series 6: Photographs, 1871-1966, undated (Boxes 22, 24, OV 25; 1.0 linear ft.; Reel 5872)
Historical Note:
Frank K. M. Rehn (1886-1956), son of the marine painter Frank Knox Morton Rehn, after several years' experience as an employee of the Milch Galleries and as exhibition manager for the Salmagundi Club, opened his own art gallery in 1918. In its earliest years, the gallery operated as the Galleries of Frank K. M. Rehn. From the mid 1920s through the mid 1940s, the name used was Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries. As early as 1946, the gallery was referred to simply as Rehn Galleries. The gallery closed in 1981.

Throughout its existence, Rehn Galleries specialized in representing American painters. During the first five years Rehn's operation was a private gallery at 6 West 50th Street, New York City. Among the artists he first represented were older, established men such as J. Alden Weir, George Inness, Alexander Wyant, Theodore Robinson, Thomas Dewing, and John H. Twachtman. Occasionally, Rehn handled works by such luminaries of the period as Robert Henri, George Luks, and John Singer Sargent. Among the living artists affiliated with the gallery in its first years were Daniel Garber, Walter Griffin, Dodge MacKnight, and Robert Spencer. Rehn's most popular artist during this time was Childe Hassam, who sued for recovery of a painting that, although acquired by Rehn through a reputable dealer, had been stolen from Hassam's studio many years earlier.

Despite the newspaper publicity surrounding Hassam's lawsuit, the business was a successful venture almost immediately. Very early, a number of important collectors including Duncan Phillips, John Gellatly, John T. Spaulding, Albert McVitty, E. W. Root, and C. Vanderbilt Barton displayed confidence in Rehn's judgment and integrity, which enhanced his gallery's reputation and stature among both collectors and artists. In 1923, the gallery moved to 693 Fifth Avenue and began operating as Rehn Galleries, a commercial gallery in the same building that housed in a building that housed Kennedy and Company and the Bourgeois Galleries. At this time, Rehn hired an assistant, John C. Clancy (1897-1981), who had formerly been with Henry Reinhardt and Son and M. Knoedler.

The Rehn Galleries soon enjoyed a regular following among museum curators and collectors visiting from out of town. The gallery's roster of artists grew along with its reputation. Rehn focused almost exclusively on American painters, occasionally showing drawings and prints by artists who were primarily painters; notable exceptions were sculptor Mahonri Young and Henry Varnum Poor who, in addition to being a painter, was known for his work in ceramics. Among the painters eventually represented were: Peggy Bacon, George Bellows, Alexander Brook, Charles Burchfield, John F. Carlson, John Carroll, Howard Cook, Jon Corbino, Virginia Cuthbert, Andrew Dasberg, Sidney Gross, Edward Hopper, Alexander James, Irving Kaufmann, Yeffe Kimball, Leon Kroll, Peppino Mangravite, Reginald and Felicia Meyer Marsh, Henry Mattson, Henry Lee McFee, Kenneth Hayes Miller, Charles Rosen, Robert Riggs, Alexander Russo, Elizabeth Sparhawk-Jones, Eugene Speicher, Henry Strater, Richard Derby Tucker, Franklin C. Watkins, and Denny Winters.

In 1930, Rehn Galleries moved one block south to the Air France Building at 683 Fifth Avenue, and remained there for thirty years. John C. Clancy, Rehn's long-time assistant, became Gallery Director in 1953 after a stroke prevented Rehn from continuing to run his business in an active capacity. Eventually, Rehn's widow sold Clancy the gallery, which he continued to operate under varying names, including Rehn Gallery, Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries, Frank Rehn Gallery, and Rehn Galleries. From 1960 until 1966, The Rehn Galleries were at 36 East 61st Street from 1960 until 1966, when the gallery moved to a space formerly occupied by Kootz Gallery at 855 Madison Avenue, where it remained in business for another fifteen years.
Related Material:
John Clancy interview by Paul Cummings, July 10, 1970. Oral History Program, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Samuel Adler Papers, 1902-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Contains a recording (1 cassette; untranscribed) of Beverly Chesler interviewing John Clancy about the history of Rehn Galleries, 1973; Samuel Adler is present and participates briefly in the interview.
Provenance:
The Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records were loaned by John Clancy for microfilming in 1959; in 1966, this same material was donated to the Archives. Mr. Clancy made subsequent gifts of additional gallery records in 1978 and 1981. In 1985, the Whitney Museum of American Art donated to the Archives correspondence with Edward Hopper that John Clancy had loaned the museum many years earlier. A death mask of George Luks received with the collection is on extended loan to the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records, 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.franrehg
See more items in:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b5275f6d-e2b7-4f51-a515-53b316671902
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-franrehg
Online Media:

Fairfield Porter papers

Creator:
Porter, Fairfield  Search this
Names:
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Tibor de Nagy Gallery  Search this
Brainard, Joe, 1942-  Search this
Burkhardt, Rudy  Search this
Button, John, 1929-1982  Search this
Day, Lucien B., 1916-  Search this
Downes, Rackstraw  Search this
Elmslie, Kenward  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Frielicher, Jane  Search this
Giardelli, Arthur  Search this
Guest, Barbara  Search this
Hartl, Léon, 1889-  Search this
Hess, Thomas B.  Search this
Katz, Alex, 1927-  Search this
Koch, Kenneth, 1925-  Search this
Laning, Edward, 1906-1981  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Morse, Carl  Search this
Myers, John Bernard  Search this
O'Hara, Frank, 1926-1966  Search this
Padgett, Ron  Search this
Porter, Ruth W., 1875-1942  Search this
Rivers, Larry, 1925-  Search this
Schloss, Edith, 1919-  Search this
Schuyler, James  Search this
Shapiro, David, 1947-  Search this
Stankiewicz, Richard, 1922-  Search this
Vasilieff, Nicholas  Search this
Extent:
9.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Travel diaries
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1888-2001
bulk 1924-1975
Summary:
The papers of New York-based painter, lithographer, art critic, and poet Fairfield Porter measure 9.3 linear feet and date from 1888 to 2001, with the bulk of material dating from 1924 to 1975. Papers document Porter's life and career through correspondence, writings, business records, printed materials, photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York-based painter, lithographer, art critic, and poet Fairfield Porter measure 9.3 linear feet and date from 1888 to 2001, with the bulk of material dating from 1924 to 1975. The collection includes a biographical chronology; certificates, awards, and diplomas; letters to Fairfield and Anne Porter; scattered outgoing correspondence; and reviews, essays, notes, poems, and translations written by Porter and others. Among the writings are poetry manuscripts written by several New York School Poets including Frank O'Hara, James Schuyler, and Kenneth Koch. Also found are gallery records, inventories and appraisals, financial records, exhibition catalogs, clippings, posters, and records of Anne Porter's efforts to place his collection and document and publish his work after his death. Photographs of Porter, his homes, and his family are also present, as well as sketchbooks, loose sketches, and drawings spanning his entire career.

Significant correspondence is present from the Porters' many poet friends, including Kenneth Koch, James Schuyler, Ron Padgett, Kenward Elmslie, Barbara Guest, Carl Morse, David Shapiro, and others. Among the letters are poetry manuscripts by Koch, Morse, Schuyler, Padgett, and Shapiro. Some letters are actually written in verse, especially those from Kenneth Koch.

Artists with letters in the collection include Joe Brainard, Rudy Burkhardt, John Button, Lucien Day, Rackstraw Downes, Philip Evergood, Jane Frielicher, Arthur Giardelli, Leon Hartl, Alex Katz, Edward Laning, Roy Lichtenstein, Larry Rivers, Richard Stankiewicz, Nicolas Vasilieff, among others. Other art world figures represented include John Bernard Myers, curator at the Tibor de Nagy gallery (New York), and Tom Hess, editor of ArtNews. Artwork found within the correspondence includes an illustrated letter from Ron Padgett and an original print on a holiday card by Edith Schloss.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into the following nine series. See the series descriptions below for more information about the content of each series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1916-1975 (Box 1 and 11; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1918-1996 (Boxes 1-2; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings by Fairfield Porter, 1924-1975 (Box 2; 0.6)

Series 4: Writings by Others, 1888-1992 (Boxes 2-3; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1944-1996 (Boxes 3-4; 1 linear foot)

Series 6: Anne Porter's Posthumous Projects, 1980-1988 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1934-2001 (Boxes 4-6 and 11; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1880-1990 (Boxes 6 and 11; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, 1918-1975 (Boxes 7-10 and 12-17; 2.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Fairfield Porter was born near Chicago in 1907, the fourth of five children of James and Ruth Furness Porter. His father was an architect, his mother a poet from a literary family, and Porter grew up in an environment where art and literature were highly valued. His father designed the family homes in Winnetka, Illinois and on Great Spruce Head Island, an island in Maine that he purchased for the family in 1912. Fairfield Porter spent summers there from the age of six, and views of the island, its structures, and neighboring towns were the subjects of many paintings.

Porter attended Harvard from 1924 to 1928, studying fine art with Arthur Pope and philosophy with Alfred North Whitehead. After graduating from Harvard, Porter moved to New York City and took studio classes at the Art Students League from 1928 until 1930, studying with Boardman Robinson and Thomas Hart Benton, and immersing himself in the art and radical politics of Greenwich Village. In the 1940s, he studied at Parson's School of Design with art restorer Jacques Maroger, adopting the Maroger recipe for an oil medium in his own painting.

To further his education as an artist, Porter traveled to Europe in 1931, where he spent time with expatriate art theorist Bernard Berenson and his circle. When he returned to New York, he allied himself with progressive, socialist organizations, and like many of his contemporaries, worked at creating socially relevant art. He did artwork for the John Reed Club, a communist group; taught drawing classes for Rebel Arts, a socialist arts organization; wrote for their magazine, Arise!; and created a mural for the Queens branch of the Socialist Party. Living in the Chicago area for several years in the 1930s, he illustrated chapbooks for the socialist poet John Wheelwright's Poems for a Dime and Poems for Two Bits series. Porter's financial contributions to the radical Chicago publication Living Marxism kept it afloat for several years.

In 1932, Porter married Anne Channing, a poet from Boston, and they settled in New York. The Porters had five children, and their first son, born in 1934, suffered from a severe form of autism. In the next decade, they had two more sons, and spent three years in Porter's hometown of Winnetka, where he had his first solo exhibition of paintings. When they returned to New York in 1939, the Porters became friends with Edwin Denby, Rudy Burkhardt, and Elaine and Willem de Kooning. Porter became an earnest admirer of Willem de Kooning's artwork and was among the first to review and purchase it.

In 1949, the Porters moved to the small, seaside town of Southampton, New York. Their two daughters were born in 1950 and 1956. Like the family home on Great Spruce Head Island, Southampton became the setting of many of Porter's paintings. In fact, almost all of his mature paintings depict family homes, surrounding landscapes, family members, and friends. Porter was an individualistic painter who embraced figurative art in the late 1940s and 1950s, when abstract expressionism was the prevailing aesthetic trend. Porter once made a comment that his commitment to figurative painting was made just to spite art critic Clement Greenberg, a respected critic and ideologue who had championed abstract expressionism and denigrated realism as passé.

Porter established his reputation as a painter and as a writer in the 1950s. John Bernard Myers of the vanguard Tibor de Nagy gallery gave Porter his first New York exhibition in 1951 and represented him for the next twenty years. That same year Tom Hess, editor of ArtNews, hired Porter to write art features and reviews. Porter went on to contribute to ArtNews until 1967 and also became art editor for The Nation beginning in 1959, the same year his article on Willem de Kooning won the Longview Foundation Award in art criticism. As a critic, Porter visited countless galleries and studios, and he gained a reputation for writing about art with the understanding and vested interest of an artist, and with the same independence from fashionable ideas that he demonstrated in his artwork.

The 1950s and 1960s were prolific years for Porter's writing and art, and saw the development of his critical ideas and the maturation of his painting. Porter enjoyed an elder status among a circle of younger artists such as Jane Freilicher, Larry Rivers, and Alex Katz, and their many poet friends, now known as the New York School of Poetry: Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, James Schuyler, Kenneth Koch, Barbara Guest, and others. Porter himself wrote poetry and was published in the 1950s, sometimes alongside poems by his wife, who had been publishing poetry since the 1930s (twice in the vanguard Chicago journal, Poetry). The Porters' correspondence is laced with poems they and their friends sent back and forth, often about and dedicated to each other.

Besides his annual exhibitions at Tibor de Nagy and later Hirschl and Adler Galleries, Porter exhibited regularly at the Whitney, and had one-man exhibitions at many museums including the Rhode Island School of Design (1959), The University of Alabama (1963), Cleveland Museum of Art (his first retrospective, 1966), Trinity College (1967), the Parrish Art Museum (1971), the Maryland Institute of Art (1973), and the 1968 Venice Biennale. He also had residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (1964) and Amherst College (1969). Porter died in 1975 at age 68. A full-scale retrospective of his artwork was held at the Boston Museum of Fine Art, Boston in 1983, and a study center and permanent home for his artwork was established at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton through a donation made by Anne Porter. A posthumous collection of his poems was published by Tibor de Nagy Editions in 1985, and a catalogue raisonnée, edited by Joan Ludman, was published in 2001.

This biography relies heavily on information found in Justin Spring's biography of Porter, Fairfield Porter: A Life in Art (Yale University Press, 2000).
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds an oral history of Fairfield Porter conducted by Paul Cummings in 1968.
Provenance:
The papers of Fairfield Porter were given to the Archives of American Art by the artist's wife, Anne Porter, in five separate accessions between 1977 and 1997.
Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- Southampton  Search this
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Southampton  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Poets  Search this
Lithographers -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Travel diaries
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Fairfield Porter papers, 1888-2001 (bulk 1924-1975). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.portfair
See more items in:
Fairfield Porter papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c9535998-330e-4c23-9f84-9c4dff3569e5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-portfair
Online Media:

Louise Nevelson papers

Creator:
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Extent:
30.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1903-1982
Summary:
The papers of Louise Nevelson measure 30.5 linear feet and date from circa 1903 to 1988. The collection documents aspects of the life and work of the sculptor, focusing especially on her later career. Papers include correspondence, personal business records, writings, scrapbooks, early art work, photographs, interviews, awards and honorary degrees, books, and an extensive amount of printed material.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Louise Nevelson measure 30.5 linear feet and date from circa 1903 to 1988. The collection documents aspects of the life and work of the sculptor, focusing especially on her later career. Papers include correspondence, personal business records, writings, scrapbooks, some of Nevelson's early art work, photographs, interviews, awards and honorary degrees, books, and an extensive amount of printed material.

Interviews, awards, and honorary degrees comprise a series of biographical material, along with scattered personal papers such as a graduation program, wedding announcement, teaching certificate, invitations, miscellaneous notes, and material relating to Nevelson's family. Correspondence consists of letters and enclosures from a wide range of professional contacts, including museums and art centers, universities, art associations, women's and charitable organizations, artists, and philanthropists, among others, concerning the exhibition, sale, and donation of Nevelson's art work, and her various arts-related activities, as well as some letters from friends and family. Correspondence can also be found amongst the subject files, which also include clippings, notes, printed and other material organized according to subject and relating to certain exhibitions, and various artistic and professional activities. Whether this organization originates with Nevelson, one of her assistants, or Archives staff is unknown.

Found amongst Nevelson's business records are consignment receipts, statements, correspondence, inventories, disposition cards, notebooks, and lists, stemming from her business dealings with the Martha Jackson Gallery and related matters, usually carried out by her assistant at the time. Business records relate in particular to the large and complex project of inventorying Nevelson's art work undertaken sometime in the early-1960s. Nevelson's writings consist of poems and poem fragments, a short-lived dream journal, scattered writings on art, and drafts from Dawns and Dusks: Taped Conversations with Diana MacKown by Louise Nevelson and Diana MacKown. Also found are a large number of scrapbooks and an extensive amount of printed material, which likely stem in large part from Nevelson's concern to document and keep a record of her accomplishments. Scrapbooks contain clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and other material documenting Nevelson's early career from roughly the mid-1930s to the mid-1950s. Also included are loose items comprising a scrapbook of sorts on son Mike Nevelson and various scrapbooks compiled by others as mementos of particular events. Printed material includes an extensive amount of clippings and publications, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and a variety of other printed material relating or referring to Nevelson or merely featuring her name in print. Also included are several books, some of which are about or feature segments on Nevelson. This material documents both her critical and commercial success, and her role as personality and minor celebrity in the mass media later in her career, especially during the 1960s and 1970s.

Art work consists of early drawings and watercolors made by Nevelson as a child and adolescent and while studying art in high school and New York, which document her artistic tendencies as youth and her early development as an artist and which provide an interesting contrast to her later work in sculpture. Photographs include ones of the Berliawsky family and Nevelson as a child, adolescent, and young woman in the 1920s and 1930s before she became known as an artist; ones of Nevelson from the mid-1950s to the 1980s, once she had become known, and began to be honored, as an artist; and ones of Nevelson's art work, as well as of various exibitions and installations of her work. Also included are a number of slides of the artist and her art work, including photographs taken by Dorothy Dehner in the mid-1950s at Louise Nevelson's house on Thirtieth Street.
Arrangement:
The Louise Nevelson papers are arranged into nine series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1918-1985 (Boxes 1, 17, OV 21, 30, 31, Sol 42; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-1984 (Boxes 1-2, 31-35, Sol 42; 6 linear feet)

Series 3: Subject Files, 1955-1988 (Box 3, 35-36; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Business Records, 1946-1981 (Boxes 3-5, 36-38, Sol 42; 3.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings, 1936-1980 (Box 5, 38, Sol 42; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1935-1983 (Boxes 5, 18-19, OV 22-27, 38, Sol 42; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 7:Books and Printed Material, 1904-1985 (Boxes 6-13, 19, OV 28, 38-40, Sol 43; 9.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Art Work, 1905-1982 (Boxes 13, 20, 40, Sol 43; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1903-1980s (Boxes 14-15, 20, OV 29, 40-41, Sol 43; 3.5 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Louise Nevelson was born in 1899 in Kiev, Russia. Her parents, Isaac and Minna Berliawsky, and their children emigrated to America in 1905 and settled in Rockland, Maine, where the young Louise grew up as a bit of an outsider in local society. She decided upon a career in art at an early age and took some drawing classes in high school, before graduating in 1918. Two years later, she married Charles Nevelson, a wealthy businessman, and moved to New York. She proceeded to study painting, drawing, singing, acting, and eventually dancing. In 1922, Nevelson gave birth to a son, Myron (later called Mike). She eventually separated from her husband in the winter of 1932-1933; and they divorced officially in 1941.

Beginning in 1929, Nevelson began to study art full-time at the Art Students League, where she took classes with Kenneth Hayes Miller and Kimon Nicolaides. In 1931, she went to Europe and studied with Hans Hofmann in Munich before traveling to Italy and France. She returned to New York in 1932 and again studied for a time with Hofmann, who was by now a guest instructor at the Art Students League. In 1933, she met Diego Rivera while he was in New York working on his mural for Rockefeller Center and casually worked as his assistant for a short period. Shortly thereafter, she began to work in sculpture and joined a sculpture class taught by Chaim Gross at the Educational Alliance. She continued to draw and paint, and even took up etching, lithography, and other techniques at different points in her career, but from this time on, she concentrated on sculpture. Her early sculptures were primarily in plaster, clay, and tattistone.

During the thirties, Nevelson exhibited in a number of group shows (both non-juried and competitive ones), garnering some recognition for her work. In 1935, she taught mural painting at the Flatbush Boys Club in Brooklyn, as part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), then went on to work in the fine-arts division as an easel painter and sculptor until 1939. In 1941, Nevelson had her first solo exhibition at the Nierendorf Gallery, run by Karl Nierendorf who represented her until his death in 1947. Both this and a one-woman show the following year received favorable reviews. It was around this time that she discovered the decorated shoeshine box of Joe Milone, a local tradesman, and arranged to have it exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, an occasion which received much notice in the press.

In the 1940s, Nevelson produced a great many works in stone, bronze, terra cotta, and wood, most of them being cubist studies of the figure. In 1943, she had a show titled "The Clown as the Center of his World" at the Norlyst Gallery, which featured works on a circus theme constructed from discarded pieces of wood and other material. This new work was not very well received at the time, and it wasn't until the mid-1950s that she began to work with discarded and found objects on a regular basis.

During the early-1950s, Nevelson attempted to exhibit her work as often as possible, eventually receiving various prizes and notices for her work in the press. She continued to struggle financially though and began to teach sculpture classes in the adult education program of the Great Neck, Long Island public schools in order to make ends meet. In 1955, she joined he Grand Central Moderns Gallery, which was run by Colette Roberts, and had several one-woman shows there. These included: "Ancient Games and Ancient Places" in 1955, featuring Bride of the Black Moon, "The Forest" in 1957, featuring First Personage, and "Moon Garden + One" in 1958, featuring her first wall, Sky Cathedral. During this period, she was painting her wood black and putting together entirely black exhibits; she went on to create works in white and gold in the early-1960s. Around this time, she also began to enclose her small sculptures within wooden boxes.

Nevelson joined the Martha Jackson Gallery in 1958, where she received a guaranteed income and finally achieved a certain degree of financial security. Her first show at the gallery, "Sky Columns Presence," took place in the fall of 1959. In 1960, she had her first one-woman exhibition in Europe at the Galerie Daniel Cordier in Paris. Later that year, her work, grouped together as "Dawn's Wedding Feast," was included in the group show, "Sixteen Americans," at the Museum of Modern Art, alongside the work of Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenburg, and other younger artists. She made her first museum sale in 1962 when the Whitney Museum of American Art purchased the black wall, Young Shadows. That same year, Nevelson's work was selected for the thirty-first Biennale in Venice.

Over the years, Nevelson took on several assistants, including Teddy Haseltine, Tom Kendall, and Diana Mackown, to help in the studio and with daily affairs. She also participated in various artists' groups, and served as President of the New York Chapter of Artists' Equity from 1957 to 1958, and as President of the national organization from 1962 to 1964. She left the Martha Jackson Gallery in 1962, and after a brief, unhappy stint with the Sidney Janis Gallery, she joined the Pace Gallery, which was run by Arnold Glimcher, in the fall of 1963. She proceeded to have shows of new work there about every two years for the remainder of her career. She had her first museum retrospective at the Whitney Museum in 1967, which featured over a hundred of her works from her drawings from the 1930s to her latest constructions. And in 1968, she was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters. By this time, Nevelson had achieved both critical and commercial success as an artist.

Nevelson always experimented with new materials; she continued to construct her black wood walls, but also went on make constructions from aluminium, plastic, and metal. In the fall of 1969, she was commissioned by Princeton University to do a monumental outdoor sculpture in Cor-ten steel (her first), and went on to do commissioned works for the Philadelphia Federal Courthouse, and Chase Manhattan Bank in New York, among others. In 1973, the Walker Art Center organized a major exhibition of Nevelson work which traveled around the country over the next two years. In 1975, she designed the chapel for St. Peter's Lutheran Church in midtown Manhattan.

Nevelson was widely honored for her work during her lifetime. Over the years, she received honorary degrees from Rutgers University and Harvard University, among other schools, as well as numerous awards, including the Brandeis University Creative Arts Award in Sculpture and the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture in 1971, the gold medal for sculpture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1983, and the National Medal of the Arts in 1985. By the time of her death on April 17, 1988, Nevelson was considered by and large one of the most important American sculptors of the twentieth century.

Sources consulted for this biographical note include Louise Nevelson: A Passionate Life by Laurie Lisle and Louise Nevelson by Arnold Glimcher.
Related Material:
Other resources relating to Louise Nevelson in the Archives include oral history interviews with Nevelson conducted by Dorothy Seckler, June 1964-January 14, 1964, and Arnold Glimcher, January 30, 1972. Also related are a 4 part untranscribed audio recording of an interview with Nevelson by Barbaralee Diamonstein, an audio recording of an interview with Nevelson conducted by Barbara Braun in 1983, and a video recording of Nevelson's 1958 exhibition installation at Grand Central Moderns gallery.
Provenance:
Donated 1966-1979 by Louise Nevelson and in 2018 by the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland, Maine via Michael Komanecky, Chief Curator. The Farnsworth Art Museum received the materials from Louise Nevelson, her son Mike Nevelson, brother Nathan Berliawksy, and others that were close to the artist.
Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website, with the exception of the 2017 addition. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Sculpture -- Exhibitions  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Louise Nevelson papers, circa 1903-1982. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.neveloui
See more items in:
Louise Nevelson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99c8dde75-538a-43a6-a68e-fa1db8e7d535
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-neveloui
Online Media:

Western Union Telegraph Company Records

Creator:
United Telegraph Workers.  Search this
Western Union Telegraph Company  Search this
Extent:
452 Cubic feet (871 boxes and 23 map folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs
Patents
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks
Specifications
Technical documents
Date:
circa 1820-1995
Summary:
The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Scope and Contents:
The collection is divided into twenty-six (26) series and consists of approximately 400 cubic feet. The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into twenty-seven series.

Series 1: Historical and Background Information, 1851-1994

Series 2: Subsidiaries of Western Union, 1844-1986

Series 3: Executive Records, 1848-1987

Series 4: Presidential Letterbooks and Writings, 1865-1911

Series 5: Correspondence, 1837-1985

Series 6: Cyrus W. Field Papers, 1840-1892

Series 7: Secretary's Files, 1844-1987

Series 8: Financial Records, 1859-1995

Series 9: Legal Records, 1867-1968

Series 10: Railroad Records, 1854-1945

Series 11: Law Department Records, 1868-1979

Series 12: Patent Materials, 1840-1970

Series 13: Operating Records, 1868-1970s

Series 14: Westar VI-S, 1974, 1983-1986

Series 15: Engineering Department Records, 1874-1970

Series 16: Plant Department Records, 1867-1937, 1963

Series 17: Superintendent of Supplies Records, 1888-1948

Series 18: Employee/Personnel Records 1852-1985

Series 19: Public Relations Department Records, 1858-1980

Series 20: Western Union Museum, 1913-1971

Series 21: Maps, 1820-1964

Series 22: Telegrams, 1852-1960s

Series 23: Photographs, circa 1870-1980

Series 24: Scrapbooks, 1835-1956

Series 25: Notebooks, 1880-1942

Series 26: Audio Visual Materials, 1925-1994

Series 27: Addenda
Biographical / Historical:
In 1832 Samuel F. B. Morse, assisted by Alfred Vail, conceived of the idea for an electromechanical telegraph, which he called the "Recording Telegraph." This commercial application of electricity was made tangible by their construction of a crude working model in 1835-36. This instrument probably was never used outside of Professor Morse's rooms where it was, however, operated in a number of demonstrations. This original telegraph instrument was in the hands of the Western Union Telegraph Company and had been kept carefully over the years in a glass case. It was moved several times in New York as the Western Union headquarters building changed location over the years. The company presented it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1950.

The telegraph was further refined by Morse, Vail, and a colleague, Leonard Gale, into working mechanical form in 1837. In this year Morse filed a caveat for it at the U.S. Patent Office. Electricity, provided by Joseph Henry's 1836 "intensity batteries", was sent over a wire. The flow of electricity through the wire was interrupted for shorter or longer periods by holding down the key of the device. The resulting dots or dashes were recorded on a printer or could be interpreted orally. In 1838 Morse perfected his sending and receiving code and organized a corporation, making Vail and Gale his partners.

In 1843 Morse received funds from Congress to set-up a demonstration line between Washington and Baltimore. Unfortunately, Morse was not an astute businessman and had no practical plan for constructing a line. After an unsuccessful attempt at laying underground cables with Ezra Cornell, the inventor of a trench digger, Morse switched to the erection of telegraph poles and was more successful. On May 24, 1844, Morse, in the U.S. Supreme Court Chambers in Washington, sent by telegraph the oft-quoted message to his colleague Vail in Baltimore, "What hath God wrought!"

In 1845 Morse hired Andrew Jackson's former postmaster general, Amos Kendall, as his agent in locating potential buyers of the telegraph. Kendall realized the value of the device, and had little trouble convincing others of its potential for profit. By the spring he had attracted a small group of investors. They subscribed $15,000 and formed the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Many new telegraph companies were formed as Morse sold licenses wherever he could.

The first commercial telegraph line was completed between Washington, D.C., and New York City in the spring of 1846 by the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Shortly thereafter, F. O. J. Smith, one of the patent owners, built a line between New York City and Boston. Most of these early companies were licensed by owners of Samuel Morse patents. The Morse messages were sent and received in a code of dots and dashes.

At this time other telegraph systems based on rival technologies were being built. Some companies used the printing telegraph, a device invented by a Vermonter, Royal E. House, whose messages were printed on paper or tape in Roman letters. In 1848 a Scotch scientist, Alexander Bain, received his patents on a telegraph. These were but two of many competing and incompatible technologies that had developed. The result was confusion, inefficiency, and a rash of suits and counter suits.

By 1851 there were over fifty separate telegraph companies operating in the United States. This corporate cornucopia developed because the owners of the telegraph patents had been unsuccessful in convincing the United States and other governments of the invention's potential usefulness. In the private sector, the owners had difficulty convincing capitalists of the commercial value of the invention. This led to the owners' willingness to sell licenses to many purchasers who organized separate companies and then built independent telegraph lines in various sections of the country.

Hiram Sibley moved to Rochester, New York, in 1838 to pursue banking and real estate. Later he was elected sheriff of Monroe County. In Rochester he was introduced to Judge Samuel L. Selden who held the House Telegraph patent rights. In 1849 Selden and Sibley organized the New York State Printing Telegraph Company, but they found it hard to compete with the existing New York, Albany, and Buffalo Telegraph Company.

After this experience Selden suggested that instead of creating a new line, the two should try to acquire all the companies west of Buffalo and unite them into a single unified system. Selden secured an agency for the extension throughout the United States of the House system. In an effort to expand this line west, Judge Selden called on friends and the people in Rochester. This led, in April 1851, to the organization of a company and the filing in Albany of the Articles of Association for the "New York and Mississippi Valley Printing Telegraph Company" (NYMVPTC), a company which later evolved into the Western Union Telegraph Company.

In 1854 there were two rival systems of the NYMVPTC in the West. These two systems consisted of thirteen separate companies. All the companies were using Morse patents in the five states north of the Ohio River. This created a struggle between three separate entities, leading to an unreliable and inefficient telegraph service. The owners of these rival companies eventually decided to invest their money elsewhere and arrangements were made for the NYMVPTC to purchase their interests.

Hiram Sibley recapitalized the company in 1854 under the same name and began a program of construction and acquisition. The most important takeover was carried out by Sibley when he negotiated the purchase of the Morse patent rights for the Midwest for $50,000 from Jeptha H. Wade and John J. Speed, without the knowledge of Ezra Cornell, their partner in the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company (EMTC). With this acquisition Sibley proceeded to switch to the superior Morse system. He also hired Wade, a very capable manager, who became his protege and later his successor. After a bitter struggle Morse and Wade obtained the EMTC from Cornell in 1855, thus assuring dominance by the NYMVPTC in the Midwest. In 1856 the company name was changed to the "Western Union Telegraph Company," indicating the union of the Western lines into one compact system. In December, 1857, the Company paid stockholders their first dividend.

Between 1857 and 1861 similar consolidations of telegraph companies took place in other areas of the country so that most of the telegraph interests of the United States had merged into six systems. These were the American Telegraph Company (covering the Atlantic and some Gulf states), The Western Union Telegraph Company (covering states North of the Ohio River and parts of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Minnesota), the New York Albany and Buffalo Electro-Magnetic Telegraph Company (covering New York State), the Atlantic and Ohio Telegraph Company (covering Pennsylvania), the Illinois & Mississippi Telegraph Company (covering sections of Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois), and the New Orleans & Ohio Telegraph Company (covering the southern Mississippi Valley and the Southwest). All these companies worked together in a mutually friendly alliance, and other small companies cooperated with the six systems, particularly some on the West Coast.

By the time of the Civil War, there was a strong commercial incentive to construct a telegraph line across the western plains to link the two coasts of America. Many companies, however, believed the line would be impossible to build and maintain.

In 1860 Congress passed, and President James Buchanan signed, the Pacific Telegraph Act, which authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to seek bids for a project to construct a transcontinental line. When two bidders dropped out, Hiram Sibley, representing Western Union, was the only bidder left. By default Sibley won the contract. The Pacific Telegraph Company was organized for the purpose of building the eastern section of the line. Sibley sent Wade to California, where he consolidated the small local companies into the California State Telegraph Company. This entity then organized the Overland Telegraph Company, which handled construction eastward from Carson City, Nevada, joining the existing California lines, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Sibley's Pacific Telegraph Company built westward from Omaha, Nebraska. Sibley put most of his resources into the venture. The line was completed in October, 1861. Both companies were soon merged into Western Union. This accomplishment made Hiram Sibley leader of the telegraph industry.

Further consolidations took place over the next several years. Many companies merged into the American Telegraph Company. With the expiration of the Morse patents, several organizations were combined in 1864 under the name of "The U.S. Telegraph Company." In 1866 the final consolidation took place, with Western Union exchanging stock for the stock of the other two organizations. The general office of Western Union moved at this time from Rochester to 145 Broadway, New York City. In 1875 the main office moved to 195 Broadway, where it remained until 1930 when it relocated to 60 Hudson Street.

In 1873 Western Union purchased a majority of shares in the International Ocean Telegraph Company. This was an important move because it marked Western Union's entry into the foreign telegraph market. Having previously worked with foreign companies, Western Union now began competing for overseas business.

In the late 1870s Western Union, led by William H. Vanderbilt, attempted to wrest control of the major telephone patents, and the new telephone industry, away from the Bell Telephone Company. But due to new Bell leadership and a subsequent hostile takeover attempt of Western Union by Jay Gould, Western Union discontinued its fight and Bell Telephone prevailed.

Despite these corporate calisthenics, Western Union remained in the public eye. The sight of a uniformed Western Union messenger boy was familiar in small towns and big cities all over the country for many years. Some of Western Union's top officials in fact began their careers as messenger boys.

Throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century the telegraph became one of the most important factors in the development of social and commercial life of America. In spite of improvements to the telegraph, however, two new inventions--the telephone (nineteenth century) and the radio (twentieth century)--eventually replaced the telegraph as the leaders of the communication revolution for most Americans.

At the turn of the century, Bell abandoned its struggles to maintain a monopoly through patent suits, and entered into direct competition with the many independent telephone companies. Around this time, the company adopted its new name, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T).

In 1908 AT&T gained control of Western Union. This proved beneficial to Western Union, because the companies were able to share lines when needed, and it became possible to order telegrams by telephone. However, it was only possible to order Western Union telegrams, and this hurt the business of Western Union's main competitor, the Postal Telegraph Company. In 1913, however, as part of a move to prevent the government from invoking antitrust laws, AT&T completely separated itself from Western Union.

Western Union continued to prosper and it received commendations from the U.S. armed forces for service during both world wars. In 1945 Western Union finally merged with its longtime rival, the Postal Telegraph Company. As part of that merger, Western Union agreed to separate domestic and foreign business. In 1963 Western Union International Incorporated, a private company completely separate from the Western Union Telegraph Company, was formed and an agreement with the Postal Telegraph Company was completed. In 1994, Western Union Financial Services, Inc. was acquired by First Financial Management Corporation. In 1995, First Financial Management Corporation merged with First Data Corporation making Western Union a First Data subsidiary.

Many technological advancements followed the telegraph's development. The following are among the more important:

The first advancement of the telegraph occurred around 1850 when operators realized that the clicks of the recording instrument portrayed a sound pattern, understandable by the operators as dots and dashes. This allowed the operator to hear the message by ear and simultaneously write it down. This ability transformed the telegraph into a versatile and speedy system.

Duplex Telegraphy, 1871-72, was invented by the president of the Franklin Telegraph Company. Unable to sell his invention to his own company, he found a willing buyer in Western Union. Utilizing this invention, two messages were sent over the wire simultaneously, one in each direction.

As business blossomed and demand surged, new devices appeared. Thomas Edison's Quadruplex allowed four messages to be sent over the same wire simultaneously, two in one direction and two in the other.

An English automatic signaling arrangement, Wheatstone's Automatic Telegraph, 1883, allowed larger numbers of words to be transmitted over a wire at once. It could only be used advantageously, however, on circuits where there was a heavy volume of business.

Buckingham's Machine Telegraph was an improvement on the House system. It printed received messages in plain Roman letters quickly and legibly on a message blank, ready for delivery.

Vibroplex, c. 1890, a semi-automatic key sometimes called a "bug key," made the dots automatically. This relieved the operator of much physical strain.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Additional moving image about Western Union Telegraph Company can be found in the Industry on Parade Collection (AC0507). This includes Cable to Cuba! by Bell Laboratory, AT & T, featuring the cable ship, the C.S. Lord Kelvin, and Communications Centennial! by the Western Union Company.

Materials at Other Organizations

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware.

Western Union International Records form part of the MCI International, Inc. Records at the First Data Corporation, Greenwood Village, Colorado.

Records of First Data Corporation and its predecessors, including Western Union, First Financial Management Corporation (Atlanta) and First Data Resources (Omaha). Western Union collection supports research of telegraphy and related technologies, and includes company records, annual reports, photographs, print and broadcast advertising, telegraph equipment, and messenger uniforms.

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1865-1867

This collection includes correspondence, mostly to Spencer F. Baird, from members of the Scientific Corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, including Kennicott, Dall, Bannister, and Elliott; copies of reports submitted to divisional chiefs from expedition staff members; newspaper clippings concerning the expedition; copies of notes on natural history taken by Robert Kennicott; and a journal containing meteorological data recorded by Henry M. Bannister from March to August, 1866.
Separated Materials:
Artifacts (apparatus and equipment) were donated to the Division of Information Technology and Society, now known as the Division of Work & Industry, National Museum of American History.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Western Union in September of 1971.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but Series 11 and films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made to view some of the audiovisual materials. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Communications equipment  Search this
Communication -- International cooperation  Search this
Electric engineering  Search this
Electric engineers  Search this
Electrical equipment  Search this
Electrical science and technology  Search this
Telegraphers  Search this
Telegraph  Search this
Genre/Form:
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Patents
Photographs -- 20th century
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks -- 19th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Specifications
Technical documents
Citation:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0205
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8b72e8493-288c-4bd0-84d5-011155da30a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0205
Online Media:

Kraushaar Galleries records

Creator:
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Carnegie Institute  Search this
Cleveland Museum of Art  Search this
Ernest Brown and Co.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New Britain Institute. Art Museum  Search this
Toledo Museum of Art  Search this
University of Nebraska--Lincoln. Department of Art  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Wichita Art Museum  Search this
Albrizio, Humbert, 1901-1970  Search this
Allard, J.  Search this
Arnest, Bernard, 1917-  Search this
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956  Search this
Beal, Reynolds, 1866-1951  Search this
Bignou, Etienne  Search this
Bouché, Louis, 1896-1969  Search this
Brueming, Karen  Search this
Cantene, David  Search this
Cowles, Russell, 1887-1979  Search this
DeLonga, Leonard  Search this
Demuth, Charles, 1883-1935  Search this
Evett, Kenneth Warnock, 1913-  Search this
Fausett, Dean, 1913-  Search this
Flannery, Vaughn  Search this
Glackens, Edith  Search this
Glackens, William J., 1870-1938  Search this
Guillaume, Paul, 1891-1934  Search this
Halberstadt, Ernst, 1910-1987  Search this
Hardy, Thomas, 1921-  Search this
Harrison, Preston  Search this
Hartell, John  Search this
Heliker, John, 1909-2000  Search this
Juley, Peter A., 1862-1937  Search this
Kirsch, Frederick D. (Frederick Dwight), b. 1899  Search this
Kraushaar, Antoinette M., 1902-1992  Search this
Kraushaar, John F., 1871-1946  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935  Search this
Lasker, Joe  Search this
Laurent, Robert, 1890-1970  Search this
Lechay, James  Search this
Luks, George Benjamin, 1867-1933  Search this
Miller, Harriette  Search this
Morris, Carl, 1911-1993  Search this
Murdock, Roland P. -- Art collections  Search this
Navas, Elizabeth S., 1885-1979  Search this
Penney, James, 1910-1982  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Prendergast, Charles, 1863-1948  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Robinson, Boardman, 1876-1952  Search this
Ruellan, Andrée, 1905-2006  Search this
Schnakenberg, H. E. (Henry Ernest), 1892-1970  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Smalley, David, 1940-  Search this
Smith, Vernon, 1894-1969  Search this
Stanley, Alix W.  Search this
Williams, Esther, 1907-1969  Search this
Wilson, Ralph L.  Search this
Extent:
100.3 Linear feet
0.181 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sketches
Drawings
Exhibition catalogs
Financial records
Notes
Sketchbooks
Date:
1877-2006
Summary:
The records of New York City Kraushaar Galleries measure 100.3 linear feet and 0.181 GB and date from 1877 to 2006. Three-fourths of the collection documents the gallery's handling of contemporary American paintings, drawings, and sculpture through correspondence with artists, private collectors, museums, galleries, and other art institutions, interspersed with scattered exhibition catalogs and other materials. Also included are John F. Kraushaar's estate records; artists' files; financial ledgers documenting sales and gallery transactions; consignment and loan records; photographs of artwork; sketchbooks and drawings by James Penney, Louis Bouché, and others; and two scrapbooks.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of New York City Kraushaar Galleries measure 100.3 linear feet and 0.181 GB and date from 1877 to 2006. Three-fourths of the collection documents the gallery's handling of contemporary American paintings, drawings, and sculpture through correspondence with artists, private collectors, museums, galleries, and other art institutions, interspersed with scattered exhibition catalogs and other materials. Also included are John F. Kraushaar's estate records; artists' files; financial ledgers documenting sales and gallery transactions; consignment and loan records; photographs of artwork; sketchbooks and drawings by James Penney, Louis Bouché, and others; and two scrapbooks.

The collection reflects all activities conducted in the day-to-day administration of the business and relates to the acquisition, consignment, loan, sale, and exhibition of art by twentieth-century American artists and European artists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The records document specific arrangements for loans and exhibitions, artist-dealer relations, relationships with public and private collectors, interaction with the art dealer community, and routine requests for information.

Much of the artist correspondence relates to practical arrangements for exhibitions of artwork, but in many cases also documents the development of individual artists and the effect of their relationship with the galleries on their ability to produce marketable work. Many of the artists represented in the collection also wrote lengthy letters, particularly to Antoinette Kraushaar, describing their attitudes to their work and providing insight into how that work was shaped by events in their personal lives.

The bulk of the correspondence with museums and institutions concerns practical arrangements for loans of artwork and provides detailed information about market prices and insurance values. It offers insight into the general climate of opinion toward particular artists and styles at any given time. Correspondence with other galleries and dealers also concerns loans and sales of artwork but, due to the typically cordial and cooperative nature of relations between the Kraushaars and their contemporaries, may also provide a more extensive and personal view of relationships and trends in the art dealer community. Similarly, while a portion of the correspondence with private collectors concerns routine requests for information and loans of art on approval, there is also substantive correspondence documenting the development of the artistic vision of collectors such as Preston Harrison, Elizabeth S. Navas, and Duncan Phillips.

From 1917 to the mid-1930s correspondence was handled mainly by John Kraushaar, and the bulk of that relating to European galleries and European art can be found during these years. Although there are only a handful of materials before 1926, records from the 1920s and 1930s document Kraushaar Galleries' growing commitment to American artists and the climate of the market for their work. The financial hardships of the Depression are vividly depicted in the numerous letters written during the 1930s seeking payment on accounts receivable and requesting extensions on accounts payable.

From the mid-1930s to 1968 correspondence was conducted primarily by Antoinette Kraushaar and, to some degree, by her assistants in later years. As the galleries' focus on American art increased, so did the volume of correspondence with artists, and the collection is particularly rich during the 1940s and early 1960s. In later years to 2006, most of the correspondence was conducted by Carol Pesner and gallery assistants.

The exhibition catalogs included in the collection do not represent a complete set. Those found are working copies used by the galleries in preparation for exhibitions and are often annotated with prices or insurance values. Additional exhibition catalogs can be found on the microfilm described in the Administrative Information section of this finding aid.

The majority of Kraushaar Galleries' insurance records can be found in files relating to the company Wm. E. Goodridge & Son, later known as Wm. E. Goodridge, Inc. Shipping and transportation records are generally filed under the names of the companies used for such transactions and can primarily be found under Davies, Turner & Co., Hudson Forwarding & Shipping Co., Railway Express Agency, Inc., and W. S. Budworth & Son, and to a lesser degree under American Railway Express Company, Arthur Lenars & Cie., C. B. Richard & Co., De La Rancheraye & Co., Hayes Storage, Packing & Removal Service, Inc., and Willis, Faber & Co. Ltd.

The 2008-2017 additions include correspondence similar in content and with correspondents as described above, as well as some artists' Christmas cards. However, the bulk of the additional correspondence dates from 1965-1989, with a handful of miscellaneous correspondence from 1877 to the mid-twentieth century. Also found are financial and business records including records from the closing of the John F. Kraushaar estate; over 40 ledgers providing nearly complete documentation of the gallery's sales and transactions from its establishment to 1946; incoming consignment records, including account statements and correspondence with artists, from the 1940s to 2006; and outgoing consignment and loan records from 1899-2006. The gallery's representation of its stable of artists is documented through artists' files containing printed and digital materials, exhibition catalogs and announcements, price lists, and biographical information, as well as containers of photographs and negatives of artwork. Also found is a 1933 sketchbook by James Penney, drawings and sketchbooks by Louis Bouché, and two scrapbooks.

See Appendix for a list of Kraushaar Galleries exhibitions
Arrangement:
Kraushaar Galleries generally filed all types of records together with correspondence in a combination of alphabetical and chronological files. Thus financial records, insurance records, receipts, photographs, and exhibition catalogs can be found interfiled with general correspondence in Series 1-3. A group of photographs of artwork maintained separately by Kraushaar Galleries constitutes Series 4. Series 6 was minimally processed separately from Series 1-5, and the arrangement reflects the original order of the addition for the most part.

Records in Series 1-3 were originally filed alphabetically by name of correspondent and then by month, by a span of several months, or by year. The alphabetical arrangement has been retained, but to facilitate access the collection was rearranged so that correspondence was collated by year. From 1901 to 1944 outgoing letters and incoming letters are filed separately; in 1945 some outgoing letters are filed separately, with the bulk of the material filed together as correspondence; from 1946 to 1968 incoming and outgoing letters are filed together as correspondence.

For Series 1-3 organizations or individuals represented by at least 15 letters are filed in separate file folders. All other correspondents are arranged in general files by letters of the alphabet, with selected correspondents and subjects noted in parentheses after the folder title.

Series 2 and several boxes in Series 3 contain a variety of notes and receipts received and created by Kraushaar Galleries that were originally unfoldered. The notes can be found in folders adjacent to the receipts and include handwritten notes of customer names and addresses, financial notes and calculations, catalogs of exhibitions, invitations and announcements to exhibitions frequently used as note paper, and other miscellany. Although most of the miscellaneous notes are undated, they are filed, with the receipts, at the end of the year to which they appear to relate. For the years 1929 and 1930 Kraushaar Galleries created separate alphabetical files for some of the billing statements received from other businesses. These have been filed adjacent to "Miscellaneous Notes" and "Receipts" in the appropriate years.

Kraushaar Galleries tended to file correspondence with businesses alphabetically according to the letter of the last name: for example, Wm. E. Goodridge & Son would be filed under G rather than W.

Missing Title

Series 1: Outgoing Letters, 1920-1945 (boxes 1-9; 9 linear ft.)

Series 2: Incoming Letters (boxes 10-26; 16.25 linear ft.)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1945-1968 (boxes 26-53; 27.75 linear ft.)

Series 4: Photographs, undated (box 54; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Artwork, [1926, 1938] (box 53; 2 items)

Series 6: Addition to the Kraushaar Galleries Records, 1877-2006 (boxes 55-99, 101-111, BV100; 46.8 linear feet, ER01-ER02; 0.181 GB)
Historical Note:
Charles W. Kraushaar established Kraushaar Galleries in 1885 as a small store on Broadway near Thirty-first Street in New York City. Initially the store sold artist materials, photogravures, and reproductions. Drawing on his previous experience working with William Schause, a leading dealer in European paintings, Kraushaar soon progressed to selling original watercolors, paintings, and engravings by European artists, primarily landscapes of the Barbizon School.

In 1901 Kraushaar moved the business to 260 Fifth Avenue and with the assistance of his brother, John F. Kraushaar, began adding more modern French and American painters to the inventory. Of particular interest to John Kraushaar was the group of American realists known as "The Eight," who had held a self-selected, self-organized exhibition at the Macbeth Gallery in 1908. The Eight were Arthur B. Davies, William Glackens, Robert Henri, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan. Luks, whom John Kraushaar met around 1902, was probably the first major American artist represented at Kraushaar Galleries. In 1917 John Sloan was invited to hold his first one-person show at the galleries despite accusations that his exhibition at the Whitney Studio the previous year had represented a brutal depiction of life that lacked subtlety and sensitivity.

When Charles Kraushaar died suddenly in 1917, John assumed control of the galleries and soon enlisted the assistance of his daughter, Antoinette Kraushaar. Antoinette had suffered a bout of pneumonia during the influenza epidemic of 1918 that cut short her education; grooming her for a career in the galleries was a logical step. Following the end of the First World War, Kraushaar resumed his buying trips to Europe, often accompanied by Antoinette, and exhibited works by European artists such as André Derain, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Vincent Van Gogh. However, it was the increasing commitment to contemporary American artists for which the galleries would become best known. In addition to The Eight, the Kraushaars developed their inventory of American paintings and etchings with exhibitions of work by artists such as Gifford Beal, Charles Demuth, Guy Pène Du Bois, Gaston Lachaise, Jerome Myers, Charles Prendergast, and Henry Schnakenberg.

Returning from a buying trip to Europe in 1929, John Kraushaar wrote to California collector Preston Harrision on July 26 that "the prices over there, especially for modern pictures are astounding." Nevertheless, Kraushaar believed that investing in modern art would yield benefits within the next five years, and he refused to be influenced by museums and critics outside of New York who were reluctant to agree. He exhibited a healthy disrespect for museum directors in general, whom he referred to in his letters to Harrision as "dead heads" who ought to be sent to different art centers of the world in order to "get in touch with what is going on there" (March 11, 1929).

Like most of its contemporaries, Kraushaar Galleries suffered considerably during the Depression of the 1930s and struggled to collect and, in turn, pay accounts due. On October 5, 1931, John Kraushaar confessed to H. S. Southam, "Business is very bad with us, and I know that you will treat it confidentially when I tell you that I have had to sacrifice a good part of my personal holdings to provide cash for my own business." By 1934 the rent on the galleries' current location at 680 Fifth Avenue, where Kraushaar had moved in 1919, was out of all proportion to the amount of business that was being generated. In 1936, a timely move to 730 Fifth Avenue allowed the family to effect substantial economies without a disproportionate loss of business.

During the 1930s, John Kraushaar's health began to fail, and he was frequently absent from the galleries. Consequently, Antoinette Kraushaar took on greater responsibility for the operation of the business with the assistance of her brother Charles. Although Antoinette was one of few women to hold such a prominent position in the art business at that time, there is no evidence in the records to suggest that artists or customers who had been accustomed to dealing with John Kraushaar had any difficulty accepting the transition in management from father to daughter.

Nevertheless, collecting accounts remained difficult, and although business had improved by 1938 it was now stymied by the threat of war in Europe. The warmth of relations between the Kraushaars and the artists they handled, and their colleagues, was crucial to Antoinette during these years. She repeatedly expressed her gratitude for their understanding and assistance in her letters as she struggled to meet financial obligations and operate the business in her father's absence, experimenting with different strategies as she evolved an approach that would sustain the business. In a letter to Gifford Beal dated August 6, 1941, she spoke of "hellish times" and stressed, "I have learned a great many things during the past few years and hope that we are groping our way towards a working solution of our own affairs at least."

While there is no question that Antoinette Kraushaar shared her father's genuine interest in contemporary American artists, the growing commitment to these artists that was forged during these years was driven in large part by necessity. By increasing her stock of American art and adding "younger painters of promise," she was able to sell work in a much broader price range. Consequently she could reach a wider audience and increase the likelihood that the business would remain solvent. This method of business also suited her personality far more than having a very specialized inventory of highly priced work, an approach that she confessed to J. Lionberger Davis on December 3, 1940, "requires a particular kind of temperament, and frankly I neither like it nor believe in it."

Throughout her career Antoinette imbued the business with her personal style. She understood that elitism alienated art buyers of moderate income, who constituted her bread and butter, and believed strongly that the gallery environment should not be intimidating to potential customers. She corresponded at length with old and new clients alike, patiently offering advice when asked and maintaining liberal policies for those who wished to borrow artwork on approval. She also participated in events that promoted efforts to make art available to a wider audience, such as a 1951 exhibition and seminar at the Florida Gulf Coast Art Center that addressed problems of buying and selling art. She was a two-time board member of the Art Dealers Association of America and considered the organization to be an important source of support for the gallery community.

In her dealings with other commercial galleries and art institutions, Antoinette Kraushaar exhibited a strong spirit of cooperation and enthusiasm, consistently lending art to small, locally owned businesses and community organizations as well as to more established galleries and world-class museums. She also developed long and mutually beneficial associations with the art departments of many educational institutions across the country, which proved to be fertile ground for young and upcoming artists.

Antoinette Kraushaar exhibited the same honesty and fairness in dealing with artists as her father had, expressing her opinions of their work in a forthright manner and maintaining a policy of always looking at the work of any artist who came to her. She understood the inherent difficulties of dealing with living artists but relished the excitement of encouraging their work and watching them develop. On November 14, 1947, in reply to a letter from the artist Bernard Arnest, in which Arnest apologized for burdening her with his worries, she reminded him, "One of the functions of a dealer is to act as a safety valve. Didn't you know?"

Although she would not retain artists indefinitely if she felt their work had deteriorated in quality, Antoinette often stressed that she was prepared to accept little or no initial financial return on the work of artists who showed promise or whose work held a particular appeal for her. In a letter of December 30, 1940, she reassured Walt Dehner that the lack of sales from his recent exhibition would not lead her to withdraw his work from the galleries. In typically unassuming style she advised Dehner to "go on painting whatever interests you. We have found that there is no recipe for success, either artistic or material."

In the early 1940s Antoinette Kraushaar implemented two changes to her inventory. Sensing that interest in sculpture was growing, she rearranged the space to give that medium more room and attention. The market for etchings had been declining since the late 1930s, and as she reduced this part of her inventory she also acted on her personal passion for drawings by opening a small gallery devoted to contemporary American drawings that were priced well within the range of most customers.

By the time Kraushaar Galleries moved to 32 East Fifty-seventh Street, late in 1944, American art had become the main focus of the business. While the long-standing interest in The Eight and other artists of that period continued, the galleries also handled contemporaries such as Louis Bouché, Samuel Brecher, John Heliker, Andrée Ruellan, and Karl Schrag. When John Kraushaar died in December 1946, Antoinette and Charles legally assumed control of the business. This partnership continued until 1950, when Antoinette assumed sole ownership of the gallery.

In 1955 the galleries moved uptown to smaller quarters at 1055 Madison Avenue, and Antoinette Kraushaar gave up the greater part of her print business. She was inundated with requests from artists to be allowed a chance to show her their work, and the galleries' exhibition schedule was always full. Contemporary artists she now represented included Bernard Arnest, Peggy Bacon, Russell Cowles, Kenneth Evett, William Dean Fausett, William Kienbusch, Joe Lasker, and George Rickey, and she continued to exhibit artwork by Charles Demuth, William Glackens, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Boardman Robinson, and John Sloan.

By the late 1950s the artists of the generation that her father had promoted in the early part of the century had died, but Antoinette Kraushaar had the pleasure of seeing his faith in them come to fruition. In a letter to Ralph Wilson dated October 20, 1958, she stated with satisfaction, "The Boston Museum is taking (at long last) a deep interest in (Maurice) Prendergast, and they will probably do an important show within the next year." Her correspondence with William Glackens's son Ira in the 1960s reveals the extent to which Glackens's popularity had grown since his death in 1938, and the market for John Sloan's work had been increasing steadily since the late 1920s. In 1962 James Penney summed up Kraushaar Galleries' success in the foreword of a catalog for an exhibition of paintings and sculpture the galleries had organized with the Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute at Hamilton College:

Missing Title

1854 -- Charles W. Kraushaar born

1871 -- John F. Kraushaar born

1885 -- Kraushaar Galleries established on Broadway near Thirty-first Street

1901 -- Galleries moved to 260 Fifth Avenue

1902 -- Antoinette Kraushaar born

1917 -- Charles W. Kraushaar died; John Kraushaar assumed control of the business, increasing inventory of modern American and European artists; first John Sloan exhibition

1919 -- Galleries moved to 680 Fifth Avenue

[1920] -- Antoinette Kraushaar began assisting with the business

1924 -- Maurice Prendergast died

1936 -- Galleries moved to the Heckscher Building at 730 Fifth Avenue

1938 -- William J. Glackens died

1944 -- Galleries moved to the Rolls Royce Building at 32 East Fifty-seventh Street; American art now the main focus of the business

1946 -- John Kraushaar died; Antoinette and Charles Kraushaar assumed control of the business

1948 -- Charles Prendergast died

1950 -- Antoinette Kraushaar assumed sole ownership of Kraushaar Galleries

1951 -- John Sloan died

1955 -- Galleries moved to 1055 Madison Avenue

1959 -- Carole Pesner joined Kraushaar Galleries

1964 -- Galleries extended into adjacent building

1981 -- Galleries moved to 724 Fifth Avenue

1986 -- Katherine Kaplan joined Kraushaar Galleries

1988 -- Antoinette Kraushaar retired from day-to-day management of the business

1992 -- Antoinette Kraushaar died
Appendix: List of Kraushaar Galleries Exhibitions:
The Archives of American Art does not hold a complete collection of catalogs from exhibitions held at Kraushaar Galleries; therefore the dates and titles of exhibitions provided in this appendix are inferred from a variety of sources including correspondence, notes, artists' files, and requests for advertising. Italics indicate that the exact title of an exhibition is known.

Missing Title

Jan., 1912 -- Paintings by Gustave Courbet and Henri Fantin-Latour

Apr., 1912 -- Paintings by Frank Brangwyn and Henri Le Sidaner

Jan., 1913 -- Paintings by Ignacio Zuloaga

May, 1913 -- Etchings by Seymour Haden

June, 1913 -- Paintings and Lithographs by Henri Fantin-Latour

Oct., 1913 -- Etchings by Frank Brangwyn

Jan., 1914 -- Ignacio Zuloaga

Mar., 1914 -- Paintings by Alphonse Legros

Apr., 1914 -- George Luks

May, 1914 -- Seven Modern Masterpieces including Gustave Courbet, Henri Fantin-Latour, Alphonse Legros, Matthew Maris, and James McNeill Whistler

undated, 1915 -- Paintings by John Lavery

Jan.-Feb., 1917 -- James McNeill Whistler's White Girl

Feb.-Mar., 1917 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar.-Apr., 1917 -- Paintings and Etchings by John Sloan

Summer, 1917 -- Works by French artists including A. L. Bouche, Josef Israels, Gaston La Touche, and Alphonse Legros

Oct., 1917 -- Monoprints by Salvatore Antonio Guarino

Nov., 1917 -- Etchings and Mezzotints by Albany E. Howarth

Jan., 1918 -- Recent Paintings by John Lavery

Jan.-Feb., 1918 -- Paintings and Watercolors by George Luks

Feb.-Mar., 1918 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1918 -- Paintings by John Sloan

Apr.-May, 1918 -- Paintings by A. L. Bouche

May, 1918 -- War Paintings by J. Mortimer Block, Charles S. Chapman, Guy Pène Du Bois, H. B. Fuller, George Luks, W. Ritschell, John Sloan, and Augustus Vincent Tack

Oct., 1918 -- Oil Paintings by William Scott Pyle

Nov., 1918 -- Paintings by Gustave Courbet, Henri Fantin-Latour, Alphonse Legros, Edouard Manet, Antoine Vollon, James McNeill Whistler, and Ignacio Zuloaga, and bronzes by Antoine Louis Bayre, Emile Antoine Bourdelle, and Mahonri Young

Apr., 1919 -- Paintings and Monoprints by Salvatore Anthonio Guarino

Jan.-Feb., 1919 -- Decorative Panels and Other Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1919 -- Paintings and Drawings by John Sloan

May, 1919 -- Paintings by George Luks, Monticelli, and A. P. Ryder

Sept., 1919 -- Work by Jean Louis Forain

Oct., 1919 -- Etchings and Lithographs by Alphonse Legros

Jan., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by George Luks

Feb., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by John Sloan

Feb., 1920 -- Paintings by William Scott Pyle

Mar., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by Gifford Beal

Apr., 1920 -- Recent Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Apr., 1920 -- Paintings by Henri Le Sidaner

Apr., 1920 -- Paintings and Drawings by Jean Louis Forain

Apr.-May, 1920 -- Paintings and Drawings by Jerome Myers

May, 1920 -- Paintings by Henrietta M. Shore

Jan., 1921 -- Paintings by French and American Artists

Jan.-Feb., 1921 -- Paintings by George Luks

Feb., 1921 -- New Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Apr., 1921 -- John Sloan Retrospective

Summer, 1921 -- French and American Artists

Oct., 1921 -- Paintings of Mountford Coolidge

Oct., 1921 -- Works by Henri Fantin-Latour and Henri Le Sidaner

Nov., 1921 -- Frank Van Vleet Tompkins

Dec., 1921 -- Paintings and Bronzes by Modern Masters of American and European Art

Jan., 1922 -- Exhibition of Recent Paintings and Watercolors by George Luks

Feb., 1922 -- Paintings by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1922 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Gifford Beal

Apr., 1922 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Summer, 1922 -- Paintings by Modern Masters of American and European Art

Oct., 1922 -- Recent Paintings of the Maine Coast by George Luks

Jan., 1923 -- Exhibition of Paintings by George Luks

Feb., 1923 -- Paintings and Decorative Panels by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1923 -- Landscapes by Will Shuster

Mar., 1923 -- Paintings by Samuel Halpert

Apr., 1923 -- Marine Figures and Landscapes by Gifford Beal

Apr.-May, 1923 -- Paintings by John Sloan

May, 1923 -- Paintings by Frank Van Vleet Tompkins

June, 1923 -- Etchings by Marius A. J. Bauer

Oct., 1923 -- American Watercolors by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, and William Zorach

Dec., 1923 -- Etchings and Lithographs by Alphonse Legros

Dec., 1923 -- Paintings, Drawings, and Pastels by Charles Adolphe Bischoff

Jan., 1924 -- Paintings by Celebrated American Artists

Mar., 1924 -- Paintings and Drawings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Apr., 1924 -- New Paintings by George Luks

May, 1924 -- Paintings by Marjorie Phillips

Summer, 1924 -- French and American Modern Artists

Oct., 1924 -- Painting, Watercolors, and Sculpture by William Zorach

Nov., 1924 -- Watercolors by Seven Americans

Dec., 1924 -- French Paintings

Jan., 1925 -- Paintings by John Sloan

Jan.-Feb., 1925 -- Maurice Prendergast Memorial Exhibition

Mar., 1925 -- Plans and Photographs of Work in Landscape Architecture by Charles Downing Lay

Apr., 1925 -- Paintings by William J. Glackens

Dec., 1925 -- Watercolors by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Carl Broemel, Richard Lahey Jerome Myers, Maurice Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, Abraham Walkowitz, and William Zorach

undated, 1926 -- Lower Broadway by W. Walcot

Feb., 1926 -- Paintings by Paul Burlin

Feb., 1926 -- Portraits of Duncan Phillips, Esq. Charles B. Rogers, Esq. & The Hon. Elihu Root Painted by Augustus Vincent Tack

Mar., 1926 -- Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings by Gifford Beal

Apr., 1926 -- John Sloan

Sept.-Oct., 1926 -- Exhibition of Etchings by C. R. W. Nevinson

Oct., 1926 -- Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by Nineteenth-Century French Artists

Oct., 1926 -- Paintings and Drawings by Mathieu Verdilhan

Dec., 1926 -- Exhibition of Watercolors by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Carl Broemel, Guy Pène Du Bois, Ernest Fiene, Samuel Halpert, Henry Keller, Louis Kronberg, Richard Lahey, Charles Lay, Jerome Myers, Maurice Prendergast, Henry

Dec., 1926 -- Schnakenberg, A. Walkowitz, Martha Walters, William Zorach

Jan., 1927 -- French Drawings and Prints

Feb., 1927 -- Paintings, Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by John Sloan

Mar., 1927 -- Gifford Beal

Mar.-Apr., 1927 -- Decorative Panels and Watercolors by Margarett Sargent

Mar.-Apr., 1927 -- Exhibition of Drawings and Lithographs of New York by Adriaan Lubbers

Apr., 1927 -- Paintings and Etchings by Walter Pach

Apr.-May, 1927 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Leopold Survage

Apr.-May, 1927 -- Etchings and Woodcuts by D. Galanis

May, 1927 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Summer, 1927 -- Paintings by American Artists

Summer, 1927 -- Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings by Georges Braque, Honoré Daumier, Edgar Degas, André Derain, Henri Fantin-Latour, Jean Louis Forain, Constantin Guys, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Edouard Manet, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, Morissot, Pablo Picasso, Camille Pissarro, Odilon Redon, Segonzac, and Georges Seurat

Oct.-Nov., 1927 -- Exhibition of Etchings in Color by Bernard Boutet de Monvel

Nov., 1927 -- Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings, Lithographs, and Watercolors by Ernest Fiene

Dec., 1927 -- Watercolors by American Artists including Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Carl Broemel, Charles Demuth, Guy Pène Du Bois, Ernest Fiene, Henry G. Keller, Richard Lahey, Charles Downing Lay, Howard Ashman Patterson, [Maurice] Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, Abraham Walkowitz, Frank Nelson Wilcox, and [William] Zorach

Dec., 1927 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Dec., 1927 -- Paintings, Sculpture, and Decorative Media by George Biddle

Jan.-Feb., 1928 -- Paintings by S. J. Peploe

Feb., 1928 -- Drawings by Henri Fantin-Latour

Feb., 1928 -- Pastels and Drawings by Margarett Sargent

Feb., 1928 -- Drawings for Balzac's Les Contes Drolatiques by Ralph Barton

Feb.-Mar., 1928 -- Sculpture by William Zorach

Mar., 1928 -- Recent Paintings by Marjorie Phillips

Mar.-Apr., 1928 -- Exhibition of Paintings by William Glackens

Apr., 1928 -- Paintings, Drawings and Lithographs by R. H. Sauter of London, England

Oct., 1928 -- Modern French Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1928 -- Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by Richard Lahey

Nov., 1928 -- Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by J. D. Fergusson

Nov.-Dec., 1928 -- Paintings, Drawings and Etchings by Walter Pach

Dec., 1928 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Abraham Walkowitz

Jan., 1929 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Margarett Sargent

Jan., 1929 -- Watercolors by Rodin

Jan.-Feb., 1929 -- Exhibition of Sculpture by Arnold Geissbuhler

Feb., 1929 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Guy Pène Du Bois

Feb.-Mar., 1929 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Mar., 1929 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Adriaan Lubbers

Mar.-Apr., 1929 -- Exhibition of Etchings by Gifford Beal, Frank W. Benson, Childe Hassam, Kenneth Hayes Miller, and John Sloan

Apr., 1929 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Arnold Friedman

Apr., 1929 -- Sculpture by Harriette G. Miller

May, 1929 -- Paintings by Howard Ashman Patterson

May, 1929 -- Paintings by William Meyerowitz

Oct., 1929 -- Exhibition of Modern French Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings

Nov., 1929 -- Modern French and American Paintings, Watercolors, Prints, and Sculpture (at Gage Galleries in Cleveland)

Jan., 1930 -- Paintings by Paul Bartlett

Feb., 1930 -- Watercolors by Auguste Rodin

Feb.-Mar., 1930 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Summer, 1930 -- Paintings by American Artists

Oct., 1930 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Maurice Prendergast

Nov., 1930 -- Paintings by Ruth Jonas

Nov., 1930 -- Sculpture by Harriette G. Miller

Jan., 1931 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Richard Lahey

Jan.-Feb., 1931 -- Paintings by Erle Loran Johnson

Feb.-Mar., 1931 -- Paintings, Watercolors and Etchings by Gifford Beal

Mar., 1931 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Walter Pach

Mar.-Apr., 1931 -- Paintings, Drawings, and Etchings by Rudolf H. Sauter

May, 1931 -- Exhibition of Watercolors by John La Farge, Gifford Beal, H. E. Schnakenberg, Maurice Prendergast, Guy Pène Du Bois, Richard Lahey

Fall, 1931 -- Modern French Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings

Dec., 1931 -- Exhibition of Drawings and Watercolors by D. Y. Cameron, Joseph Gray, Henry Rushbury, Muirhead Bone, Edmund Blampied, Gwen John

Dec., 1931 -- Lithographs and Posters by H. de Toulouse-Lautrec

Jan., 1932 -- Watercolors by Pierre Brissaud

Feb., 1932 -- Paintings and Drawings by A. S. Baylinson

Mar., 1932 -- Watercolors and Pastels by French and American Artists

Apr., 1932 -- Paintings by Nan Watson

May, 1932 -- Sculpture by Behn, Bourdelle, Geissbuhler, Lachaise, Maillol, Miller, Nadelman, Renoir, Young, Zorach; Decorative Panels by Max Kuehne, and Charles Prendergast

June-Aug., 1932 -- Paintings and Watercolors by American Artists

Oct.-Nov., 1932 -- Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings by Various Artists

Jan., 1933 -- Paintings by Paul Bartlett

Jan.-Feb., 1933 -- Lithographs by Henri Fantin-Latour

Feb., 1933 -- Etchings of Dogs by Bert Cobb

Feb.-Mar., 1933 -- Paintings by American Artists

Feb.-Apr., 1933 -- Paintings by Contemporary Americans

Apr., 1933 -- Paintings by Maurice Prendergast

Oct., 1933 -- Exhibition of French Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1933 -- Drawings by Emily W. Miles

Oct.-Nov., 1933 -- Exhibition of Etchings and Lithographs

Nov., 1933 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Henry E. Schnakenberg

Dec., 1933 -- Watercolors by Gifford Beal

Jan., 1934 -- Exhibition of Drawings by Denys Wortman for "Metropolitan Movies"

Summer, 1934 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Isabel Bishop, Ann Brockman, Preston Dickinson, Guy Pène Du Bois, William J. Glackens, Richard Lahey, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Harriette Miller, Maurice Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, and John Sloan

Oct.-Nov., 1934 -- Exhibition of Etchings and Lithographs

Nov.-Dec., 1934 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Mar., 1935 -- Complete Collection of Etchings by Mahonri Young

July-Aug., 1935 -- Paintings by American Artists including Gifford Beal, Reynolds Beal, Ann Brockman, Guy Pène Du Bois, William J. Glackens, Max Kuehne, Richard Lahey, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Harriette G. Miller, Maurice Prendergast, Henry E. Schnakenberg, John Sloan, and Abraham Walkowitz

Oct.-Nov., 1935 -- Decorative Panels by Charles Prendergast

Nov., 1935 -- Exhibition of Paintings by H. E. Schnakenberg

Mar., 1936 -- Paintings by Louis Bouché

Apr., 1936 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Oct.-Nov., 1936 -- Loan Collection of French Paintings

Dec., 1936 -- Monotypes in Color by Maurice Prendergast

Jan., 1937 -- Recent Watercolors by H. E. Schnakenberg

Jan., 1937 -- Paintings of Flowers by William J. Glackens

Feb., 1937 -- Etchings by John Sloan

Feb., 1937 -- A Group of American Paintings

Sept., 1937 -- A Group of Paintings by Gifford Beal, Louis Bouché, Guy Pène Du Bois, William J. Glackens, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, Theodore Robinson, John Sloan, J. Alden Weir

Oct.-Nov., 1937 -- Decorative Panels by Charles Prendergast

Dec., 1937 -- American Watercolors

Jan.-Feb., 1938 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Feb.-Mar., 1938 -- Drawings by William Glackens, Guy Pène Du Bois, John Sloan, Denys Wortman

Apr., 1938 -- Paintings by Louis Bouché

May, 1938 -- Paintings and Pastels by Randall Davey

Oct., 1938 -- Selected Paintings by Modern French and American Artists

Nov., 1938 -- Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois from 1908 to 1938

Nov., 1938 -- Paintings and Sculpture by Harriette G. Miller

Dec., 1938 -- Watercolors by Prendergast, Keller, Demuth, Wilcox and Others

Jan., 1939 -- Paintings by H. H. Newton

Oct., 1939 -- French and American Paintings

Oct.-Nov., 1939 -- Drawings by William Glackens of Spanish-American War Scenes

Nov., 1939 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Russell Cowles

Jan.-Feb., 1940 -- Recent Paintings by Louis Bouché

Feb.-Mar., 1940 -- Paintings by Henry Schnakenberg

Mar.-Apr., 1940 -- Paintings by Maurice Prendergast

Apr.-May, 1940 -- Watercolors by Charles Kaeselau

May-June, 1940 -- A Group of Recent Paintings by Gifford Beal, Russell Cowles, John Koch, Henry Schnakenberg, Esther Williams, Louis Bouché, Guy Pène Du Bois, Harriette G. Miller, John Sloan, Edmund Yaghjian

Oct., 1940 -- Drawings by American Artists

Nov., 1940 -- Walt Dehner

Mar., 1941 -- John Koch

May-June, 1941 -- Watercolors and Small Paintings by Gifford Beal

Oct.-Nov., 1941 -- Recent Paintings by Russell Cowles

Nov.-Dec., 1941 -- Paintings and Watercolors by Henry E. Schnakenberg

Dec., 1941 -- Charles Prendergast

Jan., 1942 -- Paintings by Samuel Brecher

Jan.-Feb., 1942 -- Recent Paintings by Guy Pène Du Bois

Mar.-Apr., 1942 -- Recent Paintings by Louis Bouché

Mar.-Apr., 1942 -- Illustrations by Boardman Robinson Commissioned by the Limited Editions Club for Edgar Lee Masters' "Spoon River Anthology"

Dec., 1942 -- Paintings from the Period of the Last War

Feb., 1943 -- Paintings and Watercolors by William Dean Fausett

Mar., 1943 -- Paintings by John Hartell

May-July, 1943 -- Watercolors by Contemporary American Artists

Feb.-Mar., 1944 -- Samuel Brecher

Feb.-Mar., 1944 -- Paintings, Gouaches, and Drawings by Andrée Ruellan

Mar., 1944 -- Vaughn Flannery

Mar.-Apr., 1944 -- Recent Paintings by Russell Cowles

Apr.-May, 1944 -- Recent Paintings by Louis Bouché

May-June, 1944 -- Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings and Watercolors by Henry G. Keller

Oct., 1944 -- Esther Williams

Nov.-Dec., 1944 -- Paintings and Watercolors of France by Maurice Prendergast

Dec., 1944 -- William J. Glackens Sixth Memorial Exhibition

Dec., 1944 -- Kraushaar Galleries Sixtieth Anniversary Exhibition of Paintings by William J. Glackens, Ernest Lawson, George Luks, Maurice Prendergast, and John Sloan

Jan.-Feb., 1945 -- Paintings by Gifford Beal

Feb.-Mar., 1945 -- Paintings by Andrée Ruellan

Apr.-May, 1945 -- Charles Locke

May-June, 1945 -- William Dean Fausett

Oct., 1945 -- Paintings by John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1945 -- Recent Watercolors by Marion Monks Chase

Nov.-Dec., 1945 -- Gouaches by Cecil Bell

Dec., 1945 -- Memorial Exhibition of Paintings and Watercolors by Ann Brockman

undated, 1946 -- Russell Cowles

Jan.-Feb., 1946 -- Richard Lahey

Feb., 1946 -- John Koch

Feb.-Mar., 1946 -- Paintings by Ernst Halberstadt

Mar., 1946 -- Paintings of Mexico and Guatemala by Henry E. Schnakenberg

Mar., 1946 -- Iver Rose

Apr., 1946 -- Louis Bouché

Apr.-May, 1946 -- Russell Cowles

May-June, 1946 -- Paintings by Bernard Arnest, Charles Harsanyi, Irving Katzenstein, Anna Licht, James Penney, Etienne Ret, and Vernon Smith

Sept., 1946 -- Retrospective Exhibition of the Work of Boardman Robinson

Nov., 1946 -- Guy Pène Du Bois

Nov.-Dec., 1946 -- William J. Glackens Eighth Memorial Exhibition

Jan., 1947 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1947 -- Sculpture by Robert Laurent

Feb.-Mar., 1947 -- Paintings by Iver Rose

Feb.-Mar., 1947 -- Recent Paintings by Vernon Smith

Apr., 1947 -- Charles Prendergast

Apr., 1947 -- Louis Bouché

Apr.-May, 1947 -- Esther Williams

Oct.-Nov., 1947 -- Anna Licht

Nov., 1947 -- William J. Glackens Ninth Memorial Exhibition, with Works by Lenna Glackens

Mar., 1948 -- Russell Cowles

Apr.-May, 1948 -- Bernard Arnest

Aug.-Sept., 1948 -- New York Paintings and Watercolors

Oct.-Nov., 1948 -- Kenneth Evett

Nov.-Dec., 1948 -- Watercolors and Pastels by Harriette G. Miller

Jan.-Feb., 1949 -- John Hartell

Sept.-Oct., 1949 -- Contemporary American Watercolors and Gouaches

Oct., 1949 -- Contemporary Paintings

Jan., 1950 -- Maurice Prendergast Retrospective of Oils and Watercolors

Jan.-Feb., 1950 -- James Penney

Feb.-Mar., 1950 -- Paintings by Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1950 -- Russell Cowles

Jan.-Feb., 1951 -- William Sommer

Feb., 1951 -- Prints and Drawings by Various Artists

Feb., 1951 -- Paintings by Louis Bouché

Mar., 1951 -- Kenneth Evett

Apr.-May, 1951 -- Paintings by Gallery Artists

May-July, 1951 -- Contemporary American Watercolors

July-Aug., 1951 -- Paintings on the Summer Theme

Sept.-Oct., 1951 -- Vaughn Flannery

Oct.-Nov., 1951 -- Recent Paintings by Gallery Artists

Nov., 1951 -- Paintings by John Koch

Nov.-Dec., 1951 -- Joe Lasker

Dec., 1951 -- Small Prints and Drawings

Jan., 1952 -- Recent Gouaches by William Kienbusch

Jan., 1952 -- John Sloan: Recent Etchings from 1944-1951, and Etchings and Drawings Selected from All Periods of His Career

Feb.-Mar., 1952 -- Andrée Ruellan

Mar.-Apr., 1952 -- Bernard Arnest

Apr.-May, 1952 -- Recent Sculpture by Robert Laurent

May, 1952 -- Recent Paintings by Contemporary American Artists

May-June, 1952 -- Watercolors by Joseph Barber, Edward Christiana, Walt Dehner, Sidney Eaton, Wray Manning, and Woldemar Neufeld

July-Aug., 1952 -- Color Prints (Woodcuts, Etchings, and Lithographs) by Eleanor Coen, Caroline Durieux, Max Kahn, Tom Lias, Woldemar Neufeld, James Penney, George Remaily, Ann Ryan, and Karl Schrag

Nov., 1952 -- Karl Schrag

Dec., 1952-Jan. 1953 -- Eight Oregon Artists

Jan., 1953 -- Charles Prendergast Memorial Exhibition

Jan.-Feb., 1953 -- John Hartell

May, 1953 -- John Heliker

June, 1953 -- Humbert Alberizio, Vaughn Flannery, William Kienbusch, George Rickey, Andrée Ruellan, and Karl Schrag

Sept., 1953 -- Works by Gifford Beal, Kenneth Evett, Tom Hardy, John Koch, and James Lechay

Sept.-Oct., 1953 -- Paintings by Glackens, Lawson, Prendergast, Sloan

Oct.-Nov., 1953 -- Paintings by E. Powis Jones

Oct.-Nov., 1953 -- Recent Works by John Koch

Nov., 1953 -- Kenneth Evett: Drawings from Greek Mythology

Nov.-Dec., 1953 -- Recent Metal Sculptures by Tom Hardy

Nov.-Dec., 1953 -- Pastels, Drawings and Prints by Peggy Bacon

Nov.-Dec., 1953 -- Recent Paintings by Ralph Dubin

Feb.-Mar., 1954 -- Russell Cowles

Mar.-Apr., 1954 -- James Penney

Nov.-Dec., 1954 -- Tom Hardy: Metal Sculptures

Jan., 1955 -- Mobiles, Machines, and Kinetic Sculpture by George Rickey

Jan.-Feb., 1955 -- James Lechay

Feb., 1955 -- Mobiles by George Rickey

Feb.-Mar., 1955 -- Drawings, Etchings, and Lithographs by John Sloan (with a selection of prints by artists whose work influenced him in his early years: Rembrandt, Hogarth, Goya, Rops, Daumier, Rowlandson and others, to mark the publication of John Sloan: A Painter's Life by Van Wyck Brooks)

Mar.-Apr., 1955 -- Jane Wasey

Apr., 1955 -- Recent Work by Joe Lasker

May-June, 1955 -- Sculpture and Drawings by Contemporary American Artists

Jan., 1956 -- Carl Morris

Jan.-Feb., 1956 -- John Laurent

Feb.-Mar., 1956 -- William Kienbusch

Mar., 1956 -- Andrée Ruellan

Mar.-Apr., 1956 -- Karl Schrag

Apr.-May, 1956 -- John Heliker

May, 1956 -- Monotypes by Maurice Prendergast

Oct., 1956 -- The Eight

Jan.-Feb., 1957 -- Paintings by John Hartell

Apr., 1957 -- James Penney

Apr.-May, 1957 -- John Heliker

May-June, 1957 -- Fourteen Painter-Printmakers (American Federation of Arts exhibition)

June-July, 1957 -- 20th Century American Artists

Nov., 1957 -- William Glackens and His Friends (based on the book by Ira Glackens)

Nov., 1957 -- Marguerite Zorach

Jan., 1958 -- Gouches, Drawings and Small Glyphs by Ulfert Wilke

Jan.-Feb., 1958 -- Tom Hardy

Feb.-Mar., 1958 -- John Koch

Feb.-Mar., 1958 -- Still Life Exhibition with Works by William J. Glackens and Maurice Prendergast

Feb.-Mar., 1958 -- Cecil Bell

Mar., 1958 -- Karl Schrag

Mar., 1958 -- Carl Morris

Mar.-Apr., 1958 -- Louis Bouché

Apr., 1958 -- Paintings and Drawings by Joe Lasker

Apr.-May, 1958 -- Paintings and Drawings by Walter Feldman

Apr.-May, 1958 -- Sculpture by Henry Mitchell

May-June, 1958 -- Works in Casein and Gouache by Bernard Arnest, William Kienbusch, Carl Morris, and Karl Schrag

July, 1958 -- Still Life Paintings and Watercolors by American Artists

Oct.-Nov., 1958 -- Kenneth Evett

Nov., 1958 -- Elsie Manville

Nov.-Dec., 1958 -- John Laurent

Jan., 1959 -- Kinetic Sculpture by George Rickey

Jan.-Feb., 1959 -- Bernard Arnest

Mar., 1959 -- Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1959 -- Paintings by Joe Lasker

Apr.-May, 1959 -- Henry Mitchell

Sept.-Oct., 1959 -- Robert Searle

Oct.-Nov., 1959 -- Russell Cowles

Nov., 1959 -- Caseins and Paintings by William Kienbusch

Dec., 1959 -- Paintings by Vaughn Flannery

Feb., 1960 -- James Lechay

Apr., 1960 -- Landscapes by John Sloan

Apr.-May, 1960 -- John Guerin

May-June, 1960 -- Drawings and Small Sculpture by Gallery Artists

Oct., 1960 -- Ainslie Burke

Oct.-Nov., 1960 -- Leon Goldin

Nov.-Dec., 1960 -- Ulfert Wilke

Jan., 1961 -- Leonard DeLonga

Jan., 1961 -- Kenneth Evett

Jan.-Feb., 1961 -- Walter Feldman

Feb.-Mar., 1961 -- Watercolors and Pastels by Early Twentieth-Century American Artists

Mar., 1961 -- Paintings by Ralph Dubin

Mar.-Apr., 1961 -- James Penney

Apr.-May, 1961 -- John Koch

June, 1961 -- Works by Humbert Albrizio, Bernard Arnest, Cecil Bell, Louis Bouché, Ralph Dubin, Kenneth Evett, Walter Feldman, John Hartell, John Heliker, William Kienbusch, John Koch, Robert Laurent, James Lechay, Elsie Manville, Henry Mitchell, James Penney, George Rickey, Andrée Ruellan, Henry E. Schnakenberg, Karl Schrag, Jane Wasey, and Marguerite Zorach

Sept., 1961 -- Works by Contemporary Americans

Oct., 1961 -- George Rickey: Kinetic Sculpture

Oct.-Nov., 1961 -- Carl Morris

Nov.-Dec., 1961 -- Peggy Bacon

Dec., 1961 -- Selected Works by Twentieth-Century Americans

Jan., 1962 -- Polymer Resin and Sumi Ink Paintings by Kenneth Evett

Jan.-Feb., 1962 -- Louis Bouché

Feb.-Mar., 1962 -- Karl Schrag

Mar., 1962 -- Marguerite Zorach

Apr., 1962 -- John Laurent

Apr.-May, 1962 -- Sculpture by Tom Hardy

May-June, 1962 -- Drawings by Contemporary American Artists

July-Aug., 1962 -- Group Exhibitions - Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture by 20th Century American Artists

Oct., 1962 -- Bernard Arnest

Feb., 1963 -- William Kienbusch

Feb.-Mar., 1963 -- John Guerin

Mar., 1963 -- John Hartell

Sept.-Oct., 1963 -- Andrée Ruellan

Oct.-Nov., 1963 -- Ainslie Burke

Nov., 1963 -- Walter Feldman

Dec., 1963 -- Drawings by John Koch

Dec., 1963 -- Paintings by Contemporary Americans

Jan., 1964 -- Leonard DeLonga

Jan.-Feb., 1964 -- Joe Lasker

Feb.-Mar., 1964 -- Leon Goldin

Mar., 1964 -- Paintings by Ralph Dubin

Apr., 1964 -- Carl Morris

Apr.-May, 1964 -- Paintings and Drawings by John Heliker

Oct.-Nov., 1964 -- Louis Bouché

Nov.-Dec., 1964 -- Karl Schrag

Dec., 1964 -- Kenneth Evett

Feb., 1965 -- Russell Cowles

Feb.-Mar., 1965 -- James Lechay

Mar.-Apr., 1965 -- James Penney

Apr.-May, 1965 -- Gifford Beal

Feb., 1966 -- Dennis Leon

Feb.-Mar., 1966 -- Henry Schnakenberg

Mar.-Apr., 1966 -- John Hartell

Apr., 1966 -- Elsie Manville

Oct., 1966 -- Contrasts - Early and Late Works by Selected Contemporaries

Oct.-Nov., 1966 -- Tom Hardy

Nov.-Dec., 1966 -- Francis Chapin

Dec., 1966-Jan., 1967 -- Karl Schrag: Etchings and Lithographs

Jan.-Feb., 1967 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb.-Mar., 1967 -- Carl Morris

Mar.-Apr., 1967 -- Ainslie Burke

Apr.-May, 1967 -- John Heliker: Paintings, Drawings, and Watercolors

May-June, 1967 -- William Glackens

Oct., 1967 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct.-Nov., 1967 -- John Laurent

Jan.-Feb., 1968 -- Dennis Leon

Feb.-Mar., 1968 -- Robert La Hotan

Apr., 1968 -- John Guerin

Apr.-May, 1968 -- Leon Goldin

Sept.-Oct., 1968 -- Contemporary Sculpture and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1968 -- Karl Schrag

Nov.-Dec., 1968 -- James Lechay: Portraits and Landscapes

Dec., 1968-Jan., 1969 -- Group Exhibition

Jan., 1969 -- Elsie Manville

Mar., 1969 -- Kenneth Evett

Apr.-May, 1969 -- James Penney

Sept.-Oct., 1969 -- New Works by Contemporary Artists

Oct.-Nov., 1969 -- John Hartell: Exhibition

Nov., 1969 -- Peggy Bacon

Dec., 1969 -- Selected Examples by American Artists 1900-1930

Jan., 1970 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb., 1970 -- Joe Lasker

Mar., 1970 -- Group Exhibition

Mar.-Apr., 1970 -- Dennis Leon

Apr.-May, 1970 -- Jerome Myers

Oct.-Nov., 1970 -- Tom Hardy

Jan.-Feb., 1971 -- Jane Wasey

Mar.-Apr., 1971 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct., 1971 -- Ainslie Burke

Nov.-Dec., 1971 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1972 -- John Koch

Mar.-Apr., 1972 -- Robert La Hotan

Apr.-May, 1972 -- Leon Goldin

May-June, 1972 -- Selected Works by 20th Century Americans

Sept.-Oct., 1972 -- Gallery Collection: American Watercolors and Drawings

Oct.-Nov., 1972 -- John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1972 -- Peggy Bacon

Dec., 1972 -- 20th Century Americans

Jan., 1973 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb., 1973 -- Carl Morris

Mar., 1973 -- James Lechay

Mar.-Apr., 1973 -- Russell Cowles: Landscape Paintings

Apr.-May, 1973 -- Jerome Witkin

May-June, 1973 -- Kenneth Evett: Watercolors

Oct.-Nov., 1973 -- Kenneth Callahan

Jan., 1974 -- Joe Lasker

Jan.-Feb., 1974 -- Bernard Arnest

Feb.-Mar., 1974 -- Concetta Scaravaglione

Oct., 1974 -- Ainslie Burke

Oct.-Nov., 1974 -- James Penney

Jan., 1975 -- Tom Hardy

Jan.-Feb., 1975 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1975 -- Robert La Hotan

Mar.-Apr., 1975 -- William Kienbusch

Apr., 1975 -- Elsie Manville

Apr.-May, 1975 -- Gifford Beal

Oct.-Nov., 1975 -- John Hartell

Nov., 1975 -- Daniel O'Sullivan

Mar., 1976 -- Jerome Witkin

May, 1976 -- Linda Sokolowski

Sept.-Oct., 1976 -- Joe Lasker, Illustrations from Merry Ever After

Oct., 1976 -- Leonard DeLonga

Nov.-Dec., 1976 -- Kenneth Callahan

Jan., 1977 -- James Lechay

Mar., 1977 -- Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1977 -- David Cantine

Oct.-Nov., 1977 -- John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1977 -- Ainslie Burke

Feb., 1978 -- Robert La Hotan

Apr., 1978 -- Elsie Manville

Oct., 1978 -- Tom Hardy

Oct.-Nov., 1978 -- Jerome Witkin

Jan.-Feb., 1979 -- Joe Lasker

Feb., 1979 -- Kenneth Evett

Feb.-Mar., 1979 -- Karl Schrag

Mar.-Apr., 1979 -- Carl Morris

Apr.-May, 1979 -- Linda Sokolowski

Oct.-Nov., 1979 -- Daniel O'Sullivan

Feb.-Mar., 1980 -- Kenneth Callahan

Mar., 1980 -- Ainslie Burke

Oct., 1980 -- John Hartell

Jan., 1981 -- Leonard DeLonga

Feb., 1981 -- James Lechay

Feb.-Mar., 1981 -- Robert La Hotan

Mar.-Apr., 1981 -- Jerry Atkins

Apr.-May, 1981 -- Ben Frank Moss

Jan.-Feb., 1982 -- Jerome Witkin

Feb.-Mar., 1982 -- Elsie Manville

Mar.-Apr., 1982 -- Karl Schrag

Apr.-May, 1982 -- Linda Sokolowski

May-June, 1982 -- David Cantine

Sept.-Oct., 1982 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct.-Nov., 1982 -- Joe Lasker

Nov.-Dec., 1982 -- Daniel O'Sullivan

Jan.-Feb., 1983 -- William Kienbusch: Memorial Exhibition

Feb.-Mar., 1983 -- Jerry Atkins

Mar.-Apr., 1983 -- John Hartell

Apr.-May, 1983 -- John Heliker

May-June, 1983 -- Kenneth Evett

Oct., 1983 -- Concetta Scaravaglione

Oct.-Nov., 1983 -- Ben Frank Moss

Nov.-Dec., 1983 -- Russell Cowles

Dec., 1983-Jan., 1984 -- 20th Century Americans

Jan.-Feb., 1984 -- Marguerite Zorach: Paintings at Home and Abroad

Feb.-Mar., 1984 -- Robert La Hotan

Mar., 1984 -- David Smalley

Apr., 1984 -- Carl Morris

May, 1984 -- Karl Schrag

July, 1984 -- Drawings by 20th Century Americans

July-Aug., 1984 -- Collages and Drawings by Joseph Heil

Aug.-Sept., 1984 -- Drawings and Prints by Tom Hardy

Sept.-Oct., 1984 -- James Penney: Memorial Exhibition

Oct.-Nov., 1984 -- Paintings and Drawings by Leon Goldin

Nov.-Dec., 1984 -- Isabelle Siegel

Dec., 1984-Jan., 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Contemporary American Paintings and Sculpture

Jan.-Feb., 1985 -- James Lechay

Feb.-Mar., 1985 -- Ainslie Burke

Mar., 1985 -- Karen Breunig

Apr., 1985 -- Kenneth Callahan

Oct., 1985 -- Elsie Manville

Oct.-Nov., 1985 -- William Glackens

Jan.-Feb., 1986 -- Linda Sokolowski

Feb.-Mar., 1986 -- Jerry Atkins

Apr.-May, 1986 -- Jane Wasey

Oct.-Nov., 1986 -- John Hartell

Nov.-Dec., 1986 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1987 -- Kenneth Evett

Apr.-May, 1987 -- Ben Frank Moss

May-June, 1987 -- David Smalley

Oct.-Nov., 1987 -- Isabelle Siegel

Feb.-Mar., 1988 -- Karen Breunig

Mar.-Apr., 1988 -- Leon Goldin

Sept.-Oct., 1988 -- Elsie Manville

Oct.-Nov., 1988 -- James Lechay

Jan.-Feb., 1989 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1989 -- Linda Sokolowski

Jan.-Feb., 1990 -- Kenneth Callahan: Works of the Fifties

Jan.-Feb., 1990 -- Gifford Beal: Watercolors

Mar., 1990 -- Robert La Hotan: Recent Paintings

Mar.-Apr., 1990 -- Sonia Gechtoff: New Paintings

May-June, 1990 -- David Smalley: Recent Sculpture

May-June, 1990 -- Andrée Ruellan: Sixty Years of Drawing...

Oct., 1990 -- Isabelle Siegel

Nov., 1990 -- Leon Goldin

Jan.-Feb., 1991 -- Karl Schrag

Feb.-Mar., 1991 -- Joe Lasker

Apr., 1991 -- Ainslie Burke

Nov.-Dec., 1991 -- Linda Sokolowski: Oils, Collages, Monotypes

Dec., 1991-Jan., 1992 -- Elsie Manville: Small Works on Paper

Mar., 1992 -- Tabitha Vevers

May-June, 1992 -- Sonia Gechtoff

Oct.-Nov., 1992 -- James Lechay

Nov.-Dec., 1992 -- Karl Schrag

Mar., 1993 -- Leon Goldin: Works on Paper

Apr.-May, 1993 -- Robert La Hotan

Oct., 1993 -- David Smalley: Sculpture Inside and Out

Oct., 1993 -- Andrée Ruellan: Works on Paper 1920-1980

Mar.-Apr., 1994 -- Kenneth Evett: Travels: Themes and Variations (Watercolors of Italy, Greece, Arizona, Maine and California)

Mar.-Apr., 1994 -- Tabitha Vevers

Oct.-Nov., 1994 -- Linda Sokolowski

Nov.-Dec., 1994 -- Karl Schrag

Jan.-Feb., 1995 -- Langdon Quin

Mar.-Apr., 1995 -- Robert La Hotan

Sept.-Oct., 1995 -- Sonia Gechtoff

Jan.-Feb., 1996 -- Elsie Manville: Paintings and Works on Paper

Oct.-Nov., 1996 -- Karl Schrag: A Self Portrait Retrospective, 1940-1995

Jan.-Feb., 1997 -- Joe Lasker: Paintings and Watercolors

Mar.-Apr., 1997 -- Tabitha Vevers

Oct.-Nov., 1997 -- James Lechay

Feb.-Mar., 1998 -- Linda Sokolowski: Canyon Suite: Works from the Southwest

Mar.-Apr., 1998 -- Leon Goldin: Paintings on Paper

Sept.-Oct., 1998 -- Sonia Gechtoff: Mysteries in the Sphere

Oct.-Nov., 1998 -- Langdon Quin: Recent Paintings

Nov.-Dec., 1998 -- John Gill

Jan.-Feb., 1999 -- Robert La Hotan

Feb.-Mar., 1999 -- Ann Sperry: Where Is Your Heart

Nov.-Dec., 1999 -- Kathryn Wall

Jan.-Feb., 2000 -- Elsie Manville

Sept.-Oct., 2000 -- Joe Lasker

Oct.-Nov., 2000 -- James Lechay

Oct.-Nov., 2000 -- Tabitha Vevers

May-June, 2001 -- Kenneth Callahan: Drawings

Dec., 2001-Jan., 2002 -- Sur La Table: A Selection of Paintings and Works on Paper

Jan.-Feb., 2002 -- Karl Schrag: Theme and Variations II: The Meadow

undated, 2003 -- Ann Sperry

Jan.-Feb., 2003 -- Andrée Ruellan: Works on Paper from the 1920s and 1930s

Oct.-Nov., 2003 -- Joe Lasker: Muses and Amusements

Nov.-Dec., 2003 -- Tabitha Vevers

Mar.-Apr., 2004 -- Leon Goldin: Five Decades of Works on Paper

May-July, 2004 -- Anne Frank: A Private Photo Album

Jan.-Feb., 2005 -- John Gill: Ceramics

Sept.-Oct., 2005 -- Karl Schrag: The Painter of Bright Nights
Related Material:
An untranscribed oral history interview with Antoinette Kraushaar was conducted for the Archives of American Art by Avis Berman in 1982, and is available on five audio cassettes at the Archives' Washington D.C. research facility.
Separated Material:
In addition to the records described in this finding aid, the following materials were lent to the Archives for filming in 1956 and are available on microfilm reels NKR1-NKR3 and for interlibrary loan: a book of clippings from 1907 to 1930, primarily of exhibition reviews; loose clippings and catalogs of exhibitions from 1930 to 1946; and a group of photographs and clippings relating to George Luks and other artists. These materials were returned to Kraushaar Galleries after microfilming.
Provenance:
53.5 linear feet of records were donated to the Archives of American Art by Kraushaar Galleries in three separate accessions in 1959, 1994, and 1996. Katherine Kaplan of Kraushaar Galleries donated an additional 38.4 linear feet in 2008-2009. Katherine Degn of Kraushaar Galleries donated an additional 8.4 linear feet in 2012-2017.
Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment. A fragile original scrapbook is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from Katherine Kaplan Degn, Kraushaar Galleries. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Depressions -- 1929  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Drawings
Exhibition catalogs
Financial records
Notes
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Kraushaar Galleries records, 1877-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kraugall
See more items in:
Kraushaar Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9507d7d92-d503-4ed4-9ed6-12975adb8473
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kraugall

Lucy R. Lippard papers

Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Names:
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Alliance for Cultural Democracy  Search this
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Printed Matter, Inc.  Search this
Studio International (Firm)  Search this
University of Colorado -- Faculty  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Henes, Donna  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
70.5 Linear feet
0.454 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1930s-2010
bulk 1960-1990
Summary:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

A small amount of biographical material comprises resumes and an address book.

Correspondence files document all aspects of Lippard's professional life including her relationships with artists such as Carl Andre, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ray Johnson, Sol LeWitt, and Henry Pearson; feminist artists including Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Donna Henes, and May Stevens; political and art-related activist groups such as Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Art Workers Coalition, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Printed Matter, and Women's Caucus for Art; galleries and museums including Addison Gallery of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and publishers including Art International and Art Forum. The series also traces the development of Lippard's involvement in activist causes including censorship and the rights of artists, Central America and the impact of U.S. policy on the region, and equality and reproductive rights for women, as well as her interest in conceptual and minimalist art. The series includes scattered artwork and photographs of artists.

Writings are primarily by Lippard and include correspondence, manuscript drafts, extensive notes, and publication records for some of her best-known books such as The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood (1966), Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973), Eva Hesse (1976), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), as well as essays for publications such as Art Forum and Studio International and contributions to exhibition catalogs. Also found are edited transcripts from conferences, symposia and interviews conducted by and of Lippard, some audio recordings of interviews and symposia, including an interview with Donald Judd, and notes and typescripts for lectures and speeches.

A small number of files document Lippard's teaching work during the 1970s and 1980s, primarily at the University of Colorado, Boulder where she taught several courses and seminars.

Exhibition files document Lippard's involvement with exhibitions she helped to organize or curate such as A Different War: Vietnam in Art (1989-1991) 557,087 and 955,000 (1969, 1970), 2,972, 453 (1971) c.7,500 (1973-1974) and those for which she wrote catalog contributions.

Printed material includes a collection of articles written by Lippard and a small amount of material concerning events, such as speaking engagements, in which Lippard was involved. Other printed material reflects Lippard's wide range of artistic, political and activist interests and documents exhibitions and performances and the activities of art-related and political groups. Material includes many exhibition catalogs, announcements, invitations, printed posters, news clippings, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets and other publications.

Artwork includes sixteen items by unidentified artists, including two by children. Photographs consist primarily of photographs of works of art in addition to a small number of photos of exhibition installations.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960s-circa 1980s (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950s-2006 (Boxes 1-28, 51, OVs 54-63; 28.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1930s-1990s (Boxes 28-41, 51-52, OVs 64-66; 13.24 linear feet, ER01; 0.454 GB)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1966-1993 (Boxes 41, 52; 0.76 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibitions, 1960s-1990s (Boxes 42-45, 52, OVs 67-68; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940s-2007 (Boxes 45-49, 52, OVs 69-77; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork and Ephemera, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53; 4 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1950s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53, OV 71; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1965-2010, (Boxes 78-94; 17.0 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
New York and New Mexico writer and art critic, Lucy R. Lippard, is the curator of numerous exhibitions and the author of over twenty-four books and other writings that trace the emergence of minimalist and conceptual art and document Lippard's commitment to feminism and political activism.

Born in New York City in 1937, Lippard earned a B.A. from Smith College in 1958 and an M.A. in 1962 from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. In the 1960s she began writing art criticism for the journals Art International and Artforum. In 1966 she curated the landmark exhibition Eccentric Abstraction at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City. Lippard then curated the first of four defining conceptual art exhibitions that became known as her "numbers" shows, each titled after the populations of the cities in which they took place, with catalogs in the form of a set of 10 x 15 cm index cards. Opening at the Seattle Art Museum in 1969, 557,087 was followed by 955,000 in Vancouver, Canada, a few months later. 2,972,453 was held at the Centro de Arte y Comunicacíon in Buenos Aires in 1971 and c.7500 opened in Valencia, California, in 1973-1974 before traveling to several other venues in the United States and Europe.

Lippard's first book, The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood was published in 1966, followed by Pop Art the same year, and a collection of her early essays, Changing, in 1971. Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973) and From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976) documented the emergence of conceptual art and the early years of feminist art respectively. In 1976 Lippard published her seminal book on the life and work of Eva Hesse.

Between 1977 and 1978 Lippard lived on a farm in Devon, England, and worked on a novel, The First Stone, about the role of politics in the lives of three generations of women. During her walks across the English countryside she became interested in landscape art and conceived of her book Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory which was subsequently published in 1983. Other books include Get the Message?: A Decade Of Art For Social Change (1984), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990). Lippard has also written regular columns on art and politics for the Village Voice, In These Times and Z Magazine, and has been a contributing editor of Art in America.

Lippard was radicalized during a trip to Argentina in 1968 when she was invited to be a juror at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. On her return to the United States she became heavily involved in anti-war activities and the Art Workers Coalition. She is a co-founder of several feminist and artist organizations including the feminist collective Heresies, which produced Heresies: A Feminist Journal on Art and Politics from 1977-1992, Ad Hoc Women Artists, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Women's Action Coalition, and Women's Art Registry. In 1976 she was a founder of Printed Matter, a New York nonprofit dedicated to producing artists' publications. She also worked closely with Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space devoted to the promotion of artists' books, installation art, and video and performance art, and served on the organization's International Committee.

Lippard has been a visiting professor at the School of Visual Arts, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the University of Queensland, Australia, and was Eminent Artist in Residence at the University of Wyoming Department of Art in 2015. She has received honorary doctorates in fine arts from Maine College of Art, the Massachusetts College of Art, Moore College of Art, San Francisco Art Institute, and others, and awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Smith College Medal, the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts, and the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Excellence.

Lippard has lived in New Mexico since 1992 and works as a freelance writer and speaker.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lucy Lippard conducted in 2011 March 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
Provenance:
Lucy R. Lippard donated her papers in several increments between 1972-1995, 2006, 2015 and 2021.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- Political activity  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9101c6a69-dde9-42ed-94cc-d03650c249ed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipplucy
Online Media:

Don Raymond David and Andrée Golbin papers

Creator:
David, Don Raymond, 1910-  Search this
Golbin, Andrée, 1923-2006  Search this
Names:
Donneson, Seena  Search this
Konzal, Joseph, 1905-1994  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Lockspeiser, Eleanore, 1900-1986  Search this
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Sleigh, Sylvia  Search this
Stefanotti, Robert, 1947-  Search this
Vogel, Dorothy  Search this
Vogel, Herbert  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Date:
1930-1980
Scope and Contents:
Biographical information, correspondence, writings, financial records, works of art, photographs, and printed material regarding the careers of painter Don Raymond David and illustrator Andrée Golbin.
Biographical information includes an address book and date books. Correspondence is with Joseph Konzal, Lucy Lippard, Harold Rosenberg, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, Seena Donneson, Sylvia Sleigh, Eleanor Lockspeiser, Robert Stefanotti, and others. Writings include essays, Golbin's diaries, notes, and notebooks primarily dealing with art. Financial records consist of receipts, contracts, bills, and account books. Works of art, by both David and Golbin, include drawings, prints, geometric sketches, and sketchbooks, some with notations and illustrations by Golbin for publications. Printed material includes announcements, catalogs, and clippings.
Biographical / Historical:
Don Raymond David (1910- ) is a painter and instructor in New York, N.Y. David's wife, Andrée Golbin, is an illustrator from Germany.
Provenance:
Donated 1977 by Don David and 1981 by David and Golbin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.davidon
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99086f3c9-0410-48d2-9b7a-7a69ee46ad67
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-davidon

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Breuer, Marcel, 1902-  Search this
Extent:
5.3 Linear feet (Boxes 1-6, OV 47; Reels 5708-5717)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1923-1986
Scope and Contents note:
Correspondents in this series include a wide range of international architects, designers, and artists who interacted with Breuer. The letters discuss his training and the execution of his hundreds of architectural projects and designs for furnishings. Researchers will find the letters between Breuer and his Bauhaus colleagues, including Josef Albers, Herbert Bayer, Walter Gropius, and László Moholy-Nagy, of particular interest.

Appendix A: List of Notable Correspondents from Series 2: Correspondence
Arrangement note:
The files are arranged chronologically, with the undated letters arranged alphabetically according to the correspondents' surnames.
Appendix A: List of Notable Correspondents from Series 2: Correspondence:
Missing Title

Aalto, Alvar, 1964 (1 invitation): to reception honoring Aalto

Abercrombie, Stan (architect), 1964-1977 (8 letters)

Abramovitz, Max (Harrison & Abramovitz, Architects), 1947 (3 letters) and 1963 invitation from Brandeis University in honor of Abramovitz

Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1975 (2 letters): from Breuer's office Académie d'Architecture, 1976-1979 (4 letters)

Acme Laboratory Equipment Company, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office ács, Gábor and Anikó, 1956 (1 letter)

Adelaide Festival of Arts, 1959 (1 letter)

Adler, Bruno, 1937 (1 letter) ágasvári, Vilmos, 1957-1958 (2 letters)

Agel, Jerome B. (Agel & Friend), 1959 (1 letter): includes press release

Agostini, Edward (Becker and Becker Associates), 1969 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Airflow Refrigeration, 1954: (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947 (1 letter)

Albers, Josef ("Juppy") and Anni (Black Mountain College), 1933-1958 (11 letters): a 1956 letter includes miscellaneous typescripts by Albers and clippings; a 1965 letter to the Phoenix Art Museum from William A. Leonard of the Contemporary Arts Center concerns an Albers exhibition and includes a list of works; a 1967 letter from Breuer to National Institute of Arts and Letters includes a typescript concerning Albers

Albert, Edouard (architect), 1956-1958 (2 letters)

Albright Art Gallery, 1959 (3 letters)

Alexander, H. J. W. (Architectural Association), 1957-1958 (4 letters)

Alpern, Robert, 1964 (letter from Breuer)

B. Altman & Company, 1951 (1 letter)

Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA), 1946-1964 (2 letters)

Aluminum Import Corporation, 1946 (2 letters)

Alvarez, Raúl J., 1968 (1 letter)

American Academy in Rome, 1947-1961 (4 letters): request recommendations for Frederic S. Coolidge, Arthur Myhrum, and Thomas B. Simmons

American Academy of Arts and Letters, 1965-1978 (10 letters): a letter 1967 is a nomination by Walter Gropius for Sigfried Giedion's honorary membership in American Academy of Arts and Letters and National Institute of Arts and Letters; see National Institute of Arts and Letters

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1977 (1 letter)

American Academy of Political and Social Science, 1946 (1 letter)

American Arbitration Association, 1960-1968 (52 letters)

American Church in Paris, 1966 (1 letter): from Robert F. Gatje

American Council for Emigres in the Professions, Inc., undated: letter introduces Viola Kondor

American Craftsmen's Council (Mrs. Vanderbilt Webb), 1967 (1 letter)

American Designer's Institute, 1947 (convention schedule)

American Export and Isbrandtsen Lines, 1963 (1 letter)

American Federation of Arts, 1958-1967 (8 letters)

American Field Service, 1956 (1 ): letter from Breuer on behalf of Danielle Eyquem

American Fork & Hoe Company, 1944 (1 letter)

American Hungarian Studies Foundation (August J. Molnár), 1964-1968 (10 letters): a 1967 invitation is to George Washington Awards Dinner in honor of Breuer, Watson Kirkconnel, and Hans Selye

American Institute of Architects, 1946-1976 (45 letters): membership applications for Edward Larrabee Barnes, Landis Gores, John MacL. Johansen, George Sherman Lewis, A. McVoy McIntyre, Robert Hays Rosenberg, Bernard Rudofsky); a 1963 letter from Breuer's office concerns a Skyscraper Architecture survey team from Japan; a 1968 letter concerns the Comité Organizador de Los Juegos de la XIX Olimpiada

American Institute of Architects, College of Fellows, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

American Institute of Architects, Jury of Fellows, 1960 (3 letters): from Breuer

American Institute of Architects, Library Buildings Award Program, 1967 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

American Institute of Architects, New York Chapter, 1945-1963 (16 letters)

American Institute of Decorators (Richard F. Bach), 1956 (1 letter)

American Institute of Interior Design in Switzerland (Charles D. Gandy and Susan Zimmermann), 1977-1978 (2 letters)

American-Jewish Congress: see Commission on Community Interrelations (CCI)

American Library Association, 1951-1968 (2 letters)

American Planning and Civic Association, undated: membership notice

American Press Institute, 1974-1975 (5 letters): from Breuer

American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corporation, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

American Shakespeare Festival, 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

American Society for Church Architecture, 1965-1966 (4 letters)

American Society for Friendship with Switzerland, 1969 (1 letter)

American Society of Interior Decorators, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA), 1945-1947 (12 letters)

Anderson, Lawrence B., 1945-1965 (2 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA)

András, Ivánka, 1957 (1 letter)

Andrews, Robert, 1956 (1 letter)

Aoyagi, Nobuo, 1964 (1 letter)

Aoyagi, Tetsu, 1965 (1 letter)

Arbelaez, Carlos, 1952 (1 letter): from Breuer)

Architects & Engineers Institute, 1959 (1 letter)

Architects' Collaborative, 1946-1959 (3 letters): see McMillan, Louis and Peggy

Architectural Association, London, 1965-1969 (7 letters): see project file for UNESCO for correspondence with Edward J. Carter Architectural Design, 1960 (1 letter): from Ernesto Fuenmayor and Manuel Sayago of Centro Profesional del Este)

Architectural Forum, 1960 (1 letter): from Leonard J. Currie

Architectural Group, (W. D. Wilson), 1947 (1 letter)

Architectural League of New York, 1947-1975: (26 letters and minutes from 6 meetings): see Ketchum, Morris

Architectural Record, 1946-1959 (9 letters)

Architectural Students Association, 1958 (1 letter)

Architecture Formes Fonctions, 1971 (3 letters): includes a typescript "Design Research in Concrete" for July 1971 magazine

Architektur + Wohnwelt, 1975 (3 letters)

Argan, Giulio Carlo, 1955-1957 (6 letters)

Arizona, University of, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Arnold, Randolph, undated: illustrated Christmas card

Arp, Hans Jean, 1954-1959 (5 letters): a 1959 letter on Arp's behalf from Marguerite Hagenbach; a 1959 wedding announcement for

Arp and Hagenbach

Arseniev, Milko, 1975 (1 letter)

Art Circus: see Long Beach Art Association, Inc.

Art Directors Club, Inc., 1975 (5 letters)

Artek-Pascoe (Clifford Pascoe), 1941-1946 (2 letters)

Artigas, Josep Llorens (ceramist colleague of Joan Miró), undated and 1960-1963 (5 letters)

Arts Council of Great Britain, 1962 (4 letters): concern an

Alexander Calder sculpture

Art Squad, Inc. (Ernest Costa), 1952 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Asfia, H. E. Dr. Safi (Iranian deputy prime minister), 1974 (1 telegram): from Breuer

Ashihara, Yoshinobu ("Yosh"), undated and 1954-1970 (26 letters): a 1955 letter encloses a photograph of Ashihara and a model of his project

Association of Hungarian Students in North America, undated and 1958 (4 letters)

Atelier International, Ltd., 1968 (2 phone messages)

Atkin, William Wilson (Silvermine Publishers), 1965 (1 letter)

Atlanta Central Library, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Atlantic Refining Company, Inc., 1956 (1 letter)

Atlas Tile & Marble Company, 1955 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Auchincloss, Lily and Douglas, undated and 1963 (5 letters)

Auckland University College, 1945 (2 letters): 1 letter from Walter Gropius

Aufricht, Gustave and Maria, 1955-1970 (4 letters)

Aujame, Roger and Edith (and María Feuyo McVitty), undated (1 letter)

Australian National Gallery, Canberra, 1975 (3 letters): from Breuer

Austrian Consulate General, 1951 (2 letters)

Austrian Institute and Mrs. Schlag, 1964 (invitation to reception)

Auzelle, Robert (architect), 1956 (1 letter): see Académie d'Architecture

Babarovic, Gretchen and John, undated and 1963 (2 letters)

Bacal, Jacob, 1967 (1 letter)

Bachem, Hans Peter (architect), 1950 (1 letter)

Baer, David C. (AIA), 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Bak, Joseph, 1950 (1 letter)

Baker, James (Tower Development), 1981 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Baldes, Jeannette, 1948 (1 letter)

Baldwin, Benjamin, undated (2 letters)

Ballard, Robert F. R., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Bard Civic Award Trust Fund: see City Club of New York, Albert S. Bard Civic Award Trust Fund

Bárdos, Tamés, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Barnes, Belva Jane ("B. J."), undated and 1956-1957 (4 letters)

Barnes, Edward Larrabee (architect), 1945-1955 (5 letters)

Barnett, Steven G., 1966 (1 letter)

Barroso, Nicolás Mariscal (VIII Congreso Panamericano de Arquitectos, México), 1952 (2 letters)

Barry, Gerald, 1951 (1 invitation): mentions Barry

Bartholdy & Klein, 1933 (1 letter)

Bartlett, Allan J., 1950 (1 letter): from Robert W. Gumbel

Bartolozzi, Goffredo (Vetro Italiano di Sicurezza, Milan [VIS]), 1959 (1 letter)

Bassetti, Fred (Bassetti & Morse, Architects), 1951 (2 letters)

Bauen + Wohnen, 1974-1975 (5 letters): from Breuer

Baughman, George F. (New York University), 1959 (1 letter)

Bauhaus-Archiv, Bibliothek und Schausammlung, 1972 (1 letter): to Knoll International

Bauhaus Archiv E. V., 1960 (1 letter)

Bayer, Herbert and Joella, undated and 1933-1966 (87 letters)

Beaux Arts Club, 1968 (1 letter)

Beaux-Arts Institute of Design, 1946-1947 (3 letters)

B.E.B. Consultants, 1982 (1 letter): from Robert F. Gatje

Bechtol, Ron (Lance Larcade & Bechtol), 1968-1976 (3 letters)

Beck, Martin (New York University), 1962-1964 (2 letters): from Hamilton Smith

Beckhard, Herbert and Ellie and Susan, undated and 1954-1980 (45 letters)

Bee, Anton, 1957 (1 letter)

Beekman, Rev. Gerardus, 1955 (1 letter): from Breuer

Begrow, Harold J., 1954 (3 letters)

Behar, Esther, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Belgiojoso, Lodovico (Lodovico B. Belgiojoso, Enrico Peressutti, Ernesto N. Rogers, architects), 1950 (1 letter)

Belluschi, Pietro (MIT School of Architecture and Planning), 1954-1968 (3 letters)

Bemis, Frances, 1954 (1 letter)

Bemo Shipping Company, 1954-1956 (2 letters)

Bender, Richard (Harvard University), 1952 (2 letters)

Benesch, Edward M. (Gomprecht & Benesch), 1955 (1 letter)

Benglia, Christine (architect; married architect Alistair Bevington), 1964 (1 letter)

Bennett, Richard M. (Loebl, Schlossman & Bennett), 1958 (1 letter)

Benton & Bowles, Inc., Advertising, 1955 (1 letter)

Beothy, E., undated (1 letter)

Bergen County Cut Stone Company, 1967 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Bergen, Emiel, 1956 (1 letter)

Berger, Donald (North Dakota Agricultural College), 1953 (1 letter)

Berger, George, 1950 (1 letter)

Berger, Otti, undated and 1934-1937 (7 letters)

Berger, Sanford and Helen (architects), 1945 (1 letter): from

Breuer to László Moholy-Nagy and Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe introducing the Bergers

Berger, Stephen E., 1959 (1 letter)

Berizzi, Sergio, 1959 (4 letters): letters of introduction

Berko, Franz, 1946-1947 (5 letters): including one from László Moholy-Nagy

Berlin Interbau, (International Building Exhibition), 1957 (1 letter): from mayor of Berlin

Berndt, Marianne, 1933 (1 letter)

Berti, Vincent, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Better-Philadelphia Exhibition (Richard A. Protheroe, Harry

B. Nason, Hugh B. Sutherland), 1947 (1 letter)

Bevington, Alistair M., 1959 (1 letter): includes résumé

Bevington, Mariette (stained-glass designer), 1967 (1 letter): to Herbert Beckhart

Bharadwaj, Ajaya, 1955 (2 letters)

Biasini, E. J. (French prime minister), 1972 (1 letter)

Biddle, Mrs. Francis, 1962-1968 (3 letters): includes a funeral announcement for her husband)

Biddle, George, 1965 (4 letters): 3 from Breuer

Bier, Justus (University of Louisville), 1938 (3 letters)

Bigeleisen, Jacob (University of Rochester), 1970 (1 letter) Ronald S. Biggins and Associates, 1958 (1 letter)

Bijenkorfbeheer N.V., Amsterdam, 1967-1974 (2 letters): from Breuer

Bill, Alexander H., Jr., undated (1 calling card)

Blake, Peter (architect), undated and 1950-1976 (41 letters): a 1958 letter from Breuer is illustrated with a hand-drawn map by

Blake of Easthampton property

Blanton, John A., 1951 (1 letter)

Blaustein, Morton K., 1963-1965 (2 letters)

Bliss, Douglas P. (Glasgow School of Art), 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Bloeme, Sidney, 1963 (1 memorandum): from James S. Plaut

Blum, Kurt (photographer), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Bode, Paul (architect), 1956 (1 letter)

Bodri, Ferenc, 1967-1975 (3 letters): 2 1975 letters from Breuer

Boehringer Ingelheim, Ltd., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Bogner, Walter, 1938-1960 (4 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Boissonnas, Eric and Sylvie, undated and 1960-1978 (20 letters)

Bollingen Foundation, 1964 (1 invitation): to reception in honor of Sigfried Giedion

Bonaparte, Mrs. Robert L., 1955 (1 letter)

Bonomi, Maria, undated and 1958 (2 letters)

Bookman, Mrs. John, 1964 (1 letter)

Borbíró, Virgil (Hungarian architect), 1945-1956 (2 letters): includes Borbíró's obituary

Borglum, Paul, 1950 (1 letter): see Project File for UNESCO

Born, Karl, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Borsódy, István ("Stephen"; historian; Hungarian Legation) and Zsóka, 1946-1965 (5 letters): 1951 letter includes a biographical sketch of Borsódy by Aladár Szegedy-Maszák

Bortfeldt, Hermann (Büro Willy Brandt), 1963 (1 letter)

Bosch, Robert, 1934 (2 letters)

Bosserman, Joseph Norwood, 1963-1967 (2 letters)

Bosshard, J., 1956 (1 letter)

Boston Architectural Center, 1968 (1 letter)

Boston Redevelopment Authority, 1970 (1 letter)

Boston Society of Architects, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer to John R. Abbott

Botond, Stephen G. ("Pista"; architect), 1958-1960 (2 letters): includes wedding announcement for Botond and Patricia Potter Luce

Bouchet, Maxime, 1953 (5 letters)

Bourget, Inc., 1955 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Bower, John, 1954 (1 letter)

Bozzola, Vittorio, 1964 (2 letters)

Bradford, Carol (Mrs. Amory H. Bradford), 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer

Brandon-Jones, John, 1958 (1 letter)

Brandstätter, Elsbeth, 1936-1937 (2 letters)

Brassaï, Gyula Halász (Romanian photographer), undated (1 calling card): no signature

Peter Bratti Associates, 1974-1975 (2 letters): from Breuer

Bratti, Peter (A. Tozzini Tile Works, Inc.), 1958 (1 letter)

Braun, Wolfgang, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Braziller, George, 1966 (1 letter)

Bremer, Paul and Nina, 1975 (2 letters)

Breuer, Constance (née Leighton), 1947-1982 (22 letters): from Breuer and Breuer's office; a 1967 letter, 1967, from French filmmaker Gerard Calisti is routed from Robert Osborn; an invitation from M. Knoedler and Company concerns reception for Lina Kandinsky

Breuer, Francesca, undated and 1966-1973 (3 letters): includes a letter of recommendation from Tician Papachristou

Breuer, Hermina, 1950 (1 telegram): from Breuer

Brewer-Cantelmo Company, Inc., 1966 (3 letters): from Breuer's office

Brewer, Joseph, 1965 (1 letter)

Brewster, George W. W., Jr., undated and 1946 (2 letters)

Brey, David M. (architect), 1950 (1 letter)

Breydert, Katherine, 1946 (1 letter)

Brickel/Eppinger, Inc., 1963 (3 letters)

Brigham, Richard C., 1954 (1 letter)

Brion, Maud (secretary to Eric Cercler), 1966-1972 (10 letters)

Brissenden, Norine (Mrs. P. R. Brissenden), 1947 (1 letter)

British Chair Company, 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Brodovitch, Alexey (Harper's Bazaar), 1954-1961 (16): 13 letters from Breuer's office

Broner, Gisela (wife of Erwin Broner, architect), undated (1 letter)

Brooklyn College Library, 1958 (1 letter)

Brooklyn Museum, 1944 (1 letter)

Brooks, J. H. (Putnam & Company), 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer

Brooks, Kenneth, 1968 (2 letters)

Brown, Elliott, 1951 (4 letters)

Brown, Graham, 1954 (1 letter)

Brown, Helen M., 1958 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Brown, Jane M. (Mrs. Elliott Brown), 1975 (1 letter): letter is illustrated with drawing of Alexander Calder mobile

Brown, Joseph, 1955 (1 letter): includes transcript of

Brown's lecture at Princeton University

Browne, Robert Bradford (architect), 1968 (1 letter)

Brumwell, Marcus, 1944 (1 letter)

Brun, Jacques D. (architect), 1958 (1 letter)

Bryn Mawr School for Girls, 1981 (1 letter): from Betsy Prioleau

Bryson, Clayton J., 1950 (1 letter)

Budapest Muszaki Egyetem (István Benke), 1970 (1 letter)

W. S. Budworth and Son, Inc., 1963 (1 letter): from Charles H. Sawyer

Builders Publishing Company, 1954 (1 letter): to Rufus Stillman

Building Progress, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Bujdosó, Ferenc, 1963 (2 letters)

Bulova, Arthur, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Burchard, Charles (architect), 1945-1960 (10 letters)

Burchard, John E., 1967-1971 (2 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA)

Burkland, Howard (Shere Naven Corporation), 1951 (1 letter): from Stamo Papadaki

Burton, Véra, undated (1 letter)

Buyoucos, James V., 1952 (1 letter): from Breuer

Byrd, Dale, 1950-1968 (5 letters)

Cabinet Norbert Guerle, 1953-1954 (10 letters)

Caesar, Harry I. (Leslie Stillman's father, married to sculptor Doris Caesar), 1954-1955 (4 letters): 3 from Breuer's office

Calder, Alexander, 1938-1975 (12 letters): a 1947 letter is illustrated with a map; a 1975 letter contains a typescript about

Calder

Calico Museum of Textiles, India, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

California Council, AIA, 1960 (5 letters)

California, University of, Berkeley, 1957-1964 (3 letters)

Calisti, Gerard (French filmmaker): see Breuer, Constance

Canaday, John (New York Times), 1959 (1 letter): from Rufus Stillman

Canadian Architect, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Canavesi, Schifra, undated and 1935-1957 (8 letters)

Candela, Felix (Cubiertas ALA S.A.) and Dorothy, undated and 1956 (3 letters)

Caplan, Frank (Creative Playthings), 1950 (1 letter)

Cardinal Stritch College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1970 (1 letter)

Cardot, Vera (photographer), 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Carmel, Moty, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Carpanelli, Franco, 1951 (1 letter)

Carpentier, Jacques H., 1960 (1 letter)

Carré, Louis, 1964 (1 letter and 1 picture postcard): postcard shows map to Maison Carré and house designed by Alvar Aalto

Carreras, Guillermo and Margarita, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Carson, Alice Morgan (Museum of Modern Art), undated and 1943 (3 letters)

Carstensen, William (Carstensen, Inc.), 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Carter, Edward J. ("Bobby"; librarian, UNESCO): see, Architectural Association, London; see Project File for UNESCO

Carter, Stephen Newhall, 1976 (1 letter)

Cassinello, F. (Instituto Tecnico de la Construcción y de Cemento), 1960 (1 letter)

Catalano, Eduardo Fernando, 1945-1968 (8 letters)

Catan-Rose Institute of Art, 1965 (invitation): to reception at Gracie Mansion

Cavazzuti, Ugo, 1969-1970 (2 letters)

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 1975-1976 (3 letters): from Breuer's office

Central School of Arts and Crafts, London, 1947-1950 (2 letters): includes an invitation to the school's presentation of diplomas by Sir Kenneth Clark

Central State AIA Conference, Omaha, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Century Association, 1976 (1 letter)

Century Club, 1974-1976 (3 letters): 2 letters from Breuer's office

Century Lighting Company, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer's office concerning Torrington, Connecticut factory

Cepero, Carlos Celis (architect), 1965 (1 letter)

Cercle d'études Architecturales, 1953 (1 letter)

Cercler, Eric: see Brion, Maud

Chase Manhattan Bank, 1955-1965 (5 letters): from Breuer's office

Chatfield, Ayla K. (architect), 1975 (2 letters)

Checkman, Louis (photographer), 1955 (1 letter)

Cheever, John, 1967 (1 letter)

Chelsea Association for Planning and Action, 1941 (1 letter)

Cheng, Tzu-tsai, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Chermayeff and Cutting, Architects and Industrial Designers, 1956 (2 letters)

Chermayeff, Ivan, 1957-1975 (2 letters): from Breuer's office; a 1957 letter concerns a 70th birthday greeting for Le Corbusier

Chermayeff, Serge (Erich Mendelsohn & Serge Chermayeff, Architects), 1936-1978 (10 letters)

Cherry, Ned, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Chiang, Helen and Arthur, 1950 (envelope only) and 1970 (1 letter)

Chicago Housing Authority, 1946 (2 letters)

Chien, Alan Shue Shih, 1969 (2 letters)

Children's Recreation Foundation, Inc., 1967 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Chinoy, Rustam, 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Churchill, Henry S. (Churchill-Fulmer Associates), 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Ciampi, Mario J. (architect), 1968 (1 letter)

Cidor, Ruth, 1971 (1 letter)

Citizens Committee for a Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 (1 letter): see also Van Doren, Mark

City Club of New York, 1963-1964 (3 letters)

City Club of New York, Albert S. Bard Civic Award Trust Fund, 1968 (6 letters)

Ciudad Universitaria de México, 1952 (1 invitation): to VIII Congreso Panamericano de Arquitectos

Clark, Donald and Dallas (Associated Seed Growers), 1954 (1 letter): see Project File for UNESCO

Clarke, Arundell, 1950 (1 letter)

Clergue, Lucien (photographer), 1966-1967 (5 letters)

Cleveland Museum of Art, 1967 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Cleveland Trust Company, 1970 (1 letter)

Clyne, Harry, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Cochran, Alexander S. (architect), 1950-1967 (4 letters)

Coderch, J. A. (architect), 1961 (1 greeting card): includes photograph of exhibition

C. Coggeshall Design, 1944 (3 letters)

Cohen, Ken, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Cold Spring Granite Company, 1960-1965 (11 letters): a 1964 letter has a design for a candle holder

Cole, Howard I. (Rutgers University), 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer

Coleman, Albert, 1945 (1 letter)

Colen, Eszter and Bruce, 1963 (2 letters)

Colorado, University of, Boulder, Student Chapter of AIA, 1958 (1 letter)

Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Columbia University, 1964-1977 (6 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Comité Français de l'American Field Service, 1956 (1 letter)

Comité Organizador de Los Juegos de la XIX Olimpiada, 1968 (4 letters)

Commission on Community Interrelations (CCI) of the American-Jewish Congress, 1945 (8 letters)

Compagnie Française de Transports Internationaux, 1954 (1 letter)

Compton, W. Danforth, 1950 (1 letter)

Concha, Gonzales, 1952 (1 letter): from Breuer

Concrete Industry Board, Inc., 1969 (2 letters)

Condé Nast Publications, Inc., 1955 (1 letter)

Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM),

Chapter for Relief and Post-War Planning, 1944-1956 (27 letters)

Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne, Mars Group (British branch of CIAM), 1946-1947 (5 letters)

Conklin, George W. (architect), 1956 (2 letters)

Connecticut Chapter of AIA, 1963 (2 letters)

Connecticut Public School Building Commission, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer

Connecticut Society of Architects (Norman L. Raymond), 1963 (1 letter)

Contemporary Arts Association, 1952 (2 letters)

Contemporary Arts Center, 1965 (3 letters): concerning Josef Albers exhibition

Contemporary Authors, 1963 (1 letter)

Contini, Paolo and Jeanne, 1968 (1 letter)

Contreras, Carlos (XVI Congreso Internacional de Planificacion y de la Habitación, México), 1938 (2 letters)

Conway, Harvi, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Cooke, Maymay (Mrs. Francis Cooke), 1947 (1 letter)

Coolidge, Frederic S. and Anne, 1947 (1 letter)

Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Design, 1975 (2 letters): from Breuer

Cooper Union, 1958 (2 letters)

Cooper, Wyatt Emory, undated (1 letter): mentions Eugene J. McCarthy

Corcoran, Kostelanetz, Gladstone & Lowell, 1959 (1 letter)

Cordos, Stephan, undated (1 letter)

Corkran, D. C. (Charles F. Orvis Company), 1944 (5 letters)

Cornigliano S.p.A. ("Società per Azioni"; limited company which installs exhibitions), 1958 (3 letters)

Corson, Richard A., 1950 (1 letter)

Coulson, Anthony J., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

County Roofing Company, 1957 (1 letter)

Crampton, Nancy (photographer), 1975 (1 letter)

Creighton, Thomas H., 1950 (1 letter): written with Katherine Morrow Ford

Crohn, Norma and Richard, 1968 (1 letter)

Croll, Jean, 1939 (1 letter)

Cromley, Don, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Crotin, 1934-1935 (5 letters)

Crowther, J. G. (author) and Fransiska, 1936 (2 letters)

Csernyei, Zsuszi, 1939 (1 letter)

Cuevas de Vera, Adela ("Tota"), 1933-1934 (7 letters)

Cunningham, Allen, 1957 (1 letter)

Currie, Leonard (architect), undated and 1944-1978 (29 letters): see Architectural Forum

F. B. Curry Company (Frank B. Curry), 1945 (3 letters)

Cushing, Tom, 1937 (3 letters)

Cutler Farm (Lily C. Johanson), 1951 (1 letter)

Cutler, Robert W., 1968 (1 letter)

Czike, Dr. Gyuláné, 1957 (3 letters)

Dach, Joseph, 1944 (1 letter)

Daidone, Anthony J., 1958 (1 letter)

Damora, Robert (photographer), 1955-1967 (3 letters)

D'Andrea Brothers, Inc., 1957 (1 letter)

Bernard Danenberg Galleries, 1974-1975 (3 letters): from Breuer

Danielsson, Lars (Swedish architect), 1956 (3 letters)

D'Arcy, Frank (architect), 1957 (1 letter)

Dauber, Deanna L., 1975 (2 letters)

Daurel, Paul (architect), 1970 (1 letter)

Davenport, Keith H., 1946 (1 letter)

Daves, L. Joan, 1951 (1 letter)

Davis, Arthur, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Davis, Brody, Chermayeff, Geismar, deHarak, Associates, 1969 (2 letters)

Davis, Columbus, 1946 (1 letter)

Davis, Paul (photographer), 1955 (1 letter): from Breuer

de Bever, Leo J., 1958-1960 (2 letters)

de Bodard, Connie, 1956 (1 letter)

De Carli, Carlo (Politecnico Milano), 1968 (1 letter)

Decima Triennale di Milano, 1954 (1 letter)

Decker, H. Carlton (architect), 1968 (1 letter): concerns Interama

DeCoene, Pierre, 1966-1968 (2 letters)

Dedet, Dr. Jacques (and Mme. Georges Cexier, Mme. Pierre

Dedet, Mme. André Laurenti), undated (1 letter)

De Hausner, Mrs. Djin Lilli S., undated and 1935-1936 (11 letters)

Deimel, Klöckner, Koebel, 1959 (1 letter)

Del Buttero Enzo (Vetro Italiano di Sicurezza [VIS], Milan), 1959 (1 letter)

De Leu Dulles, Mrs. J., undated (1 letter)

Delft Student Debating Society "Vrije Studie," 1957-1958 (6 letters)

DeMars, Vernon (DeMars and Wells), 1967 (1 letter)

Democratic National Committee, 1960 (1 letter)

De Rivera, José, 1946 (1 letter)

Derome, Leon, 1953 (1 letter)

Deschamps, Julio, 1950 (1 letter): includes 4 photographs of a house under construction

design magazine, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Design Quarterly, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Design Research, 1965 (2 letters)

de Spirlet, André (Cie. Belge de Chemins de Fer et d'Enterprises), 1963 (1 letter)

Dévényi, Iván, undated (1 letter)

De Vries & Company, 1953 (1 letter)

de Waldner, C. (IBM, France), 1970 (1 letter)

Dewey [Thomas E. Dewey], Ballantine, Bushby, Palmer & Wood, 1955-1969 (5 letters)

de Zwart, J., 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer

d'Harnoncourt, René, 1950-1951 (3 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Diamant-Berger, Renée, 1954 (2 letters): from Evelyn Rocourt

Dicke, Hendrik Adolph (civil engineer), 1976 (1 death announcement)

Dickey, Thomas A., 1954 (1 letter)

Eugene Dietzgen Company, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Dodd, Betty, undated (1 letter)

Dodd, Mead & Company (Edward Dodd), 1949-1960 (33 letters)

Doerr, Harold J. (interior decorating), 1975 (1 letter)

Doherty, Neil (photographer), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Domela, Cesar (Dutch artist who worked at the Bauhaus), 1961 (2 letters)

Dominick & Dominick, 1936 (1 letter)

Domus magazine, 1947 (1 letter)

Dorner, Alexander (Brown University), 1947 (1 letter)

Drabkin, Murray (Kaler, Worsley, Daniel & Hollman), 1970-1978 (10 letters)

Dreier, Theodore and Barbara, 1956 (1 letter)

Drew, Jane B. (Fry, Drew, Drake & Lasdun), 1958 (1 letter)

Dreyer-Dufer, B., 1953 (1 letter)

Duane, Duane & Cahill, Architects (Franklin J. Duane), 1969 (1 letter)

Fred S. Dubin Associates, 1954-1958 (12 letters): 9 letters from Breuer's office

Dubsky, Caroline (Svoboda & Company), 1968 (1 letter)

Dufau, Pierre, 1963 (2 letters): from Breuer

Duhart, Emile and Raquel, undated (1 illustrated Christmas card)

Dunkel, E., 1934 (1 letter)

Dunn, Frederick, 1955 (1 letter): from Marvin Halverson concerning Commission on Architecture meeting

Dunning, James O., 1969 (1 letter)

DuPont, Henry B., 1958 (1 letter): from Rufus Stillman

Eastern Schokbeton Corporation, 1969 (1 letter)

Edwards, David J. (Georgia Institute of Technology), 1951-1968 (2 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Egender, Karl, 1947 (1 letter)

Eggington, Geoff, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Eken, Andrew J. (Starrett Brothers and Eken, Inc.), 1952 (1 letter): from Sherley W. Morgan, Princeton University; see Project File for UNESCO

Eldredge, Joseph L., 1948 (1 letter)

Electric Arts Intermix, Inc., 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Elkington, Robert (architect), 1968 (1 letter)

Elliott, Edward Proctor, 1945 (calling card)

Ellis, W. A., 1936 (1 letter)

Ellwood, Craig, 1966 (1 letter)

Elsbree, E., 1947 (1 letter)

Elsner, Werner, 1968 (1 letter)

Elte, Hans (School of Architecture, University of Toronto), 1950 (2 letters)

Elzas, A. (architect) and Hermine, 1956-1978 (18 letters)

Embru-Werken, 1950 (2 letters)

Emery, P., 1947 (1 letter)

Emslie, Murray Sims, 1954-1964 (20 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1951-1964 (3 letters)

Engel de Janosi, Karl, 1950 (1 letter)

English-Speaking Union, 1951 (1 invitation): to reception in honor of Gerald Barry

Entenza, John D. (Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts), 1968 (1 letter)

Epler, Robert E., 1966 (1 letter)

Escoffier, Pierre, 1963 (1 letter)

Escrito Trading Post, New Mexico, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

European Investment Bank, Luxembourg, 1974-1978 (5 letters): 3 letters from Breuer

Evans, T. Randall (Yorke Rosenberg Mardall, Architects), undated and 1947-1965 (3 letters)

Eyquem, Danielle, 1956 (3 letters)

Fairweather, W. Ross, 1958 (1 letter)

Farkas, Nicholas (Farkas & Barron, consulting engineers), 1955-1969 (3 letters)

Farnsworth, S. W. (Torrington Manufacturing Company), 1956 (1 letter)

Farris, Mary E. (Breuer's secretary), 1964-1968 (13 letters)

Faudon, M. J. (European Investment Bank, Luxembourg), 1974-1975 (4 letters): from Breuer

Fédération Internationale du Film d'Art (FIFA), 1956 (1 letter)

Fehér, Nicolaus, 1966-1967 (4 letters)

Fejér, George (Selection Engineering Company, Ltd.), 1946-1947 (2 letters)

Ferguson, E. S., 1946 (1 letter)

Ferry, W. Hawkins, 1963 (1 letter)

Ficks Reed Furniture Company, 1951 (1 letter)

Fifth Avenue Association, Inc., 1968 (2 letters)

Finger, Sally L. (Mrs. W. L. Finger), 1950 (2 letters)

Finn, Herman L. (Abbe & Finn), 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer

Finn, Michael (from Breuer's office), 1972 (3 letters)

Finsler, Hans (photographer), 1936-1937 (3 letters)

Fintel, Nat, 1976 (1 letter)

Fiocchi, Annibale (architect), 1955 (1 letter)

Firma l.u.c. arnold, 1934 (1 letter)

Firmage, Margaret ("Peg"; Mrs. Charles Firmage; Breuer's secretary), 1947-1964 (48 letters)

First Hanover Corporation, 1967 (1 letter)

Fischer, Edward L., 1943 (1 letter)

Fischer, Eta, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Fischer, John, 1956-1957 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Fischer, Joseph (Hungarian architect), undated and 1923-1966 (17 letters)

Fischer, Margrit (Mrs. Edward L.; sculptor at Bauhaus), undated and 1934-1950 (5 letters)

Fitzgibbons, Frank, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Fitzhugh, Greene, 1946 (1 letter)

Fjödl, Fjeinrich, 1964 (1 letter)

Flansburgh, Earl F. (Earl F. Flansburgh and Associates), 1976 (1 letter): from Robert F. Gatje

Fletcher, Jean Bodman (architect), 1947 (1 letter)

Flick, Miriam Hilliard (formerly Miriam Flick White), 1950 (1 letter)

Flos, Merano, 1963 (1 letter)

Földes, Dr. István ("Pista"), 1933-1934 (7 letters)

Foote, Elliott and Caroline, 1960-1967 (4 letters)

Forbàt, Alfréd ("Fred"; Hungarian architect), 1938 (2 letters): see Congrès, Les Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM)

Forberg, Kurt, 1975 (1 letter)

Forbes, E. W., undated (1 letter)

Forbes, Marla, 1939 (1 letter)

Forbes, R. E. and Pauline, undated (1 letter)

Ford, Katherine Morrow (Mrs. James Ford), 1950-1951 (2 letters): 1950 letter written with Thomas H. Creighton

Fornells-Pla, Francisco, 1969 (1 letter)

Forrest, Robert E. (Princeton University), 1952 (2 letters)

Forum of Contemporary Arts, 1958 (1 letter)

Foundation for the Arts and Humanities, 1967 (1 letter)

Foundation for the Arts, Religion and Culture, 1963-1965 (4 letters)

Fox, John P. (Murray Hill Assn., Inc.), 1949-1957 (2 letters)

Foyle, Christina, 1947 (1 letter)

France: French Embassy, Washington, D.C. (François De Laboulaye, ambassador), 1978 (1 invitation): to presentation of Médaille d'Or to Breuer

Frank, Oswald, 1947 (1 letter)

Frank, Mrs. Robert J., 1940 (1 letter)

Frantz, Al (Edward Gottlieb & Associates), 1958 (2 letters)

Franzen, Ulrich ("Rickey"; architect), 1956-1968 (2 letters)

Fratelli Salvadori, 1964 (1 letter)

Frazer, Peter M., 1950 (1 letter)

Freck, Byron, 1945 (1 letter)

Freeman, Elizabeth E. (Wellfleet Real Estate), 1947 (1 letter)

Freeth, Evelyn (Royal West of England Academy), 1958 (2 letters)

Frey, Emil (Motorfahrzeuge), 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Friedman, B. H. (Bob), 1970 (1 letter)

Friedrich, Clara, 1935 (1 letter)

Frost, Frederick G. (Frederick G. Frost Jr. & Associates, Architects), 1960 (1 letter)

Frost, Henry A. (Harvard University), 1947 (2 letters)

Fry, Louis Edwin (architect), 1945-1946 (3 letters)

Fry, Lynn W. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), 1951 (1 letter): see Project File for UNESCO

Fry, Maxwell, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Fuenmayor, Ernesto (Centro Profesional del Este), 1960 (3 letters)

Fulde, Philip, 1965 (1 telegram): from Breuer

Fürbeth, Albrecht, 1974 (1 letter)

Gabetti, Gianluigi, 1969 (1 letter): from Breuer

Gabo, Naum, 1938 (2 letters)

Gábor, László ("Laci"; graphic designer for Kaufmann), undated and 1938 (3 letters)

Gagarin, Andrew (Torrington Manufacturing Company) and Jamie, 1953-1975 (15 letters)

Galhidy, László, undated and 1960-1963 (4 letters)

Gambaro, E. James (architect), 1968 (1 letter)

Gane, Crofton Endres, undated and 1945-1967 (25 letters)

Gantschi, Edith, 1934 (1 letter)

Gardella, Ignazio, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Gardner-Medwin, R. J. (Liverpool School of Architecture), 1957-1959 (5 letters): see also Selwood, Christopher

Gargas, Klára, 1970 (3 letters)

Gastón, Miguel (Gastón y Dominguez, S.A.), 1950-1967 (6 letters): 1951 letter contains 2 floor plans and 7 photographs of Gastón's house

Gatje Papachristou & Smith, 1984-1985 (3 letters)

Gatje, Robert Frederick, undated and 1954-1982 (45 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Gautschi, Dr. Georg, 1936 (1 letter)

Gavina, Dino (furniture manufacturer), 1962-1976 (111 letters)

Geberta, Victor F., undated (1 letter)

Geisler, Howard, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Gelb, Mr., 1963 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Gelland, Carolyn (Breuer's secretary), 1972-1974 (8 letters)

Geller, Bert and Phyllis, 1963-1968 (2 letters)

General Electric Appliances, Inc., 1947 (1 letter)

General Electric Company, 1943-1950 (6 letters)

General Fireproofing Company, 1943-1946 (4 letters)

Georges, Alexandre (photographer), 1974-1976 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Geraghty, Margaret, 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Gerbman, Joyce, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Giedion-Welcker, Sigfried and Carola, undated and 1932-1976 (62 letters): see Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM; Chapter for Relief and Post-War Planning)

Girsberger, H., 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer

Glazier, Helen, 1946 (1 letter)

Gogolák, Ludwig, 1958 (1 letter)

Goldinger, Harry, 1946 (1 letter)

Goldings, Morris M. (Mahoney, McGrath, Atwood, Piper & Goldings), 1970 (1 letter)

Goldman, Paul (Plymold Corporation), 1945 (2 letters): from Breuer

Goldman Sokolow Copeland, 1984-1985 (3 letters)

Gömöri, Herman Iván, 1956-1957 (2 letters)

Goodman, Mrs. Alvin Malcolm, 1967 (1 letter): from Breuer

Goodman, Charles, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Goodman, Percival, 1968 (1 letter)

B. F. Goodrich Company, 1965 (1 letter)

Goodwin, Philip L. (architect), 1947-1955 (3 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Gores, Landis, 1947-1951 (2 letters): from Breuer

Gorlich Editore, 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Gorn, Samuel G. (Gorn Brothers, Inc.), 1956 (1 letter)

Gottscho-Schleisner (photographer), 1955-1956 (2 letters): from Breuer

Goudsmit, Alfred and Gertie, 1963-1970 (2 letters)

Gould, Eleanor J. (Mrs. J. Howard Gould), 1966 (1 letter)

Graber, Rudolf (Wohnbedarf furniture store), undated and 1938-1969 (21 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Gramling, Hdikó, 1975 (1 letter)

Grand Coulee Dam Project, 1974-1975 (2 letters): from Breuer; see United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation

Grant, Barbara, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Grayboff, Ira, 1955 (2 letters)

Green, Lynda, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Grefe, Richard (McDonald & Smart, Inc.), 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer

Grieco, Vito (Grieco Bros., Inc.), 1958-1959 (3 letters)

Griffis, Nixon (Hemphill, Noyes & Company), 1946 (1 letter)

Griffith, J. Neal, undated (1 letter)

Grimball, Henry G. (Harvard University), 1950 (1 letter)

Gropius, Walter ("Pius") and Ise ("Pia"), undated and 1933-1969 (120 letters): see Harvard University, Graduate School of Design; Project File for UNESCO

Grosse Pointe Public Library, 1960 (1 letter)

Grossi, Olindo (Architectural League of New York), 1957 (4 letters): see Pratt Institute; see Project File for UNESCO

Grosswirth, M. (New York University, College of Engineering), 1958 (1 letter)

Gröte, Dr. Andreas and Laura, 1961-1967 (3 letters)

Gröte, Ludwig and Gertrud Maud, 1956-1967 (5 letters)

Groupe Espace, 1952-1954 (5 letters)

Gruber, Gerd, 1965-1967 (2 letters)

Gruber, Richard D. (Independent Oil Company of Connecticut, Inc.), 1970 (1 letter)

Gruzen, Barney Sumner, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Gstrein, Kassian, 1936 (1 letter)

Guenther, Carl Frederic, 1958 (1 letter)

Guerrero, Pedro E. (photographer), 1955 (1 letter): from Breuer

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1964 (1 letter): concerns the loan from Breuer of an Alexander Calder work

Guilford Leather Company, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Gumbel, Robert W., 1950 (1 letter)

Gutheim, Polly (Mrs. Frederick A. Gutheim), 1946 (1 letter)

Haas, Robert (Ram Press), 1954-1957 (8 letters): from Breuer's office

Hächler, W. (architect), 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hack, Lynda, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hackett, Gabriel D. (photographer), 1963 (1 letter)

Hackley Art Museum, 1977 (3 letters)

Hagenbach, Marguerite: see Arp, Hans Jean

Hagerty, Francis (Hagerty Company), 1945 (2 letters)

Hagerty, John, 1958 (1 letter)

Haggerty, Brian (Sacred Heart Seminary), 1964 (1 letter)

Hagmann, John S. (and Robert A. M. Stern), undated (1 letter)

Hagood, M. Lindsey (Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Architectural Speakers Committee), 1952 (3 letters)

Hahn, Alexander, 1957-1958 (2 letters)

Halász, Dezso (International Union of Local Authorities), 1957-1959 (3 letters)

Halász, Ferenc, 1959 (2 letters)

Halborg, Rev. John E. (Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Advent), 1968 (1 letter)

Hall, John Hughes (Nardin & Radoczy), 1956-1957 (2 letters)

Halprin, Lawrence, 1966-1970 (2 letters)

Halverson, Marvin (National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA), 1955-1956 (4 letters)

Halvorson, Roy E., 1956-1971 (4 letters)

Hambuechen, Dr. Eva-Dorothee, 1937 (1 letter)

Hamer, R. D. (Aluminium Laboratories Ltd.), 1946 (1 letter)

Hammett, Ralph W., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Hancy, L., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Hansen, Thomas L. (University of Colorado, Boulder), 1956 (1 letter)

Hanson, B. (Mrs. John Hanson), 1955-1967 (3 letters)

Haraszty, Eszter, undated and 1956 (2 letters)

Harbert, Guido, 1950 (1 letter)

Hardoy, Jorge Ferrari (architect), 1965 (1 letter)

Hardy, Holzmann, Pfeiffer (Christine Donovan), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Harkness, Elaine, 1960 (2 letters)

Harnischmacher, Paul and Marianne, undated and 1933-1964 (41 letters)

Harper's Bazaar, 1954-1955 (4 letters)

Harris, James L., 1946 (1 letter)

Harris, S. I. (Keasbey & Mattison Company), 1956 (1 letter)

Harrison, Wallace K. (architect) and Ellen, 1937-1956 (3 letters)

Hars, Anthony, 1964 (1 letter)

Hartgen, Vincent A. (University of Maine, Orono), 1956-1957 (4 letters)

Hartung, Herrn Dipl. Eng. (Staatshochbauamt Dusseldorf), 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer

Harvard Club of New Canaan, Connecticut, 1951 (1 letter)

Harvard Club of New York City, 1946-1950 (6 letters)

Harvard University, Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, 1966-1970 (10 letters)

Harvard University, Graduate School of Design, 1938-1953 (49 letters)

Harvard University Society of Fellows, 1967-1970 (5 letters)

Harvard-Yenching Library, 1954 (1 letter)

Haskell, Douglas (architect; Architectural Forum), 1958 (1 letter)

Hassenpflug, Gustav (architect), undated and 1933-1955 (20 letters)

Hatje, Gerd (Verlag Gerd Hatje GMBH), 1955-1964 (111 letters): see Kaspar, Karl

Hauf, Harold D. (Edwards Street Laboratory, Yale University) and Dorothy, 1951-1954 (3 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Haughwout, John L., 1950 (1 letter)

Havinden, Ashley, 1969 (2 letters)

Hayes, Mrs. Alfred Hayes, undated (2 letters)

Hayes, Bartlett H. (Addison Gallery of American Art), 1955 (2 letters)

Hayes, Peggy, 1963 (1 letter)

Hayes, Thom, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hayoz, Marcel, 1957 (2 letters)

Headquarters First Service Command, 1945 (1 letter)

Healy, Estelle, undated (1 letter)

Hebert, Elmer T., 1951-1974 (3 letters): from Breuer

Heckscher, August, undated and 1962-1970

Hedrich, E. (Hedrich-Blessing Photographers), 1967-1975 (2 letters)

Heinz, H. J. and Drue Maher, undated and 1954 (3 letters)

Heiser, Bruce, 1950 (1 invitation): for luncheon honoring Heiser

Helsel, Marjorie (M. Helsel Interiors), 1966 (1 letter)

Helseth, Glenn, undated (1 letter)

Henderson, Priscilla A. B., 1954 (1 letter)

Hendry, Charles E. ("Chick"; University of Tornoto), 1950 (2 letters): see Commission on Community Interrelations (CCI) of the American Jewish Congress

Henin, Mme. S., 1956 (2 letters)

Henze, Wilfried, 1964 (1 letter)

Herbe, Paul (architect), 1963 (1 letter)

Herford, Julius G., 1945 (1 letter)

Herman, Harold M., undated (1 letter)

Hermanson, Ray T. (Trynor & Hermanson, Architects), 1957 (1 letter)

Herrera, Alberto Rodriguez (El Recreo, Centro Profesional del Este), 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Herrey, Hermann (architect), 1946-1947 (3 letters)

Herter, Susan and Chris, undated (1 letter)

Hertner, W. (architect), 1939 (1 letter)

Hertzell, Tage (Meningsblad for Unge Arkitekter), 1956 (1 letter)

Hervé, Lucien, 1960 (4 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Herz, Alexandra, 1965-1967 (2 letters)

Hess, Orvan W., 1976 (1 letter)

Hester, James M. (New York University, Washington Square), 1963-1970 (2 letters)

Hetényi, George, 1954 (1 letter)

Heyer, Paul O., 1965-1970 (11 letters)

Heyman, Marla, undated (1 letter)

Heywood-Wakefield Company (Mr. Greenwood, Mr. Paul Posser), 1944 (6 letters)

Higgins, Ambrose S. (architect), 1947 (1 letter)

Hill, Albert Henry, 1950-1951 (2 letters)

Hill and Knowlton, Inc., 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Hill, Henry and Heather, 1950-1964 (7 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Hirschfeld, Ludwig, undated and 1935-1963 (18 letters)

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 1975 (2 letters): from Breuer

Hitchcock, Henry-Russell, Jr., 1937-1938 (4 letters)

Hobart Manufacturing Company (KitchenAid Home Dishwasher Division), 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Hockaday Associates, Inc., 1954 (2 letters)

Hödl, Heinrich, 1964 (1 letter)

Hoffman, Mildred, 1966 (1 letter)

Hoffman, Tom, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hoffmann, Alfred, 1938 (1 letter)

Hofmann, Hans (from Weimar), 1947 (1 letter)

Julius Hoffmann Verlag Stuttgart, 1955-1961 (2 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Hoffmeyer, Ted (Marcel Breuer and Associates field office), 1963-1970 (3 letters)

Hogan, P. A., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Holden, Thomas S. (F. W. Dodge Corporation), 1954-1958 (3 letters)

Holland Shade Company, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Holzmann, Philipp, 1975-1977 (2 letters)

Hooper, Edith Ferry, undated and 1963 (2 letters)

Hooper, Elizabeth, 1969 (1 letter)

Hooykaas, J. A. (Nederlandse Natuursteen Importeurs), 1957 (1 letter)

Hopfe, Charles T. (Hop-Mac, Inc.), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Horizon, 1970 (1 letter)

Hosei University, 1954 (1 letter)

House & Garden -- , 1970 (1 letter)

House and Home magazine, 1954 (1 letter)

Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Department of, 1968 (1 invitation): to dedication

Houston, University of, Architectural Society, 1953-1955 (4 letters)

Edward F. Howard Company, 1956 (1 letter)

Howard, Herbert Seymour, 1946 (1 letter)

Howe, George (Yale University), 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer

Howland, Mrs. John, 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Hsin-Yieh Architects & Associates, undated (1 letter)

Hu, Kuang-Yu, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Huber, Karl, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hudnut, Joseph ("Vi"; Harvard University) and Claire, undated and 1946-1947 (3 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA); Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM), Chapter for Relief and Post-War Planning; Harvard University, Graduate School of Design

Hug, Hattula Moholy-Nagy (daughter of László Moholy-Nagy), 1976 (1 letter)

Hughes, Ella C., 1937 (1 letter)

Hughes, Jennifer, 1964 (2 letters)

Hughes, K. E., undated (1 letter)

Hultberg, Hilary (Rudi Blesh's daughter ?), 1957 (3 letters)

Hungarian Alumni Association, undated (1 letter): includes a hand-drawn map, 8 photographs of Hungarian cityscapes, 4 photographs of city views, and a drawing of the facade of a building

Hunter, Louise, 1947 (1 letter)

Hurley, Jane C., 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hurwitz, Joe, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Hutchhausen, Walther, 1937 (1 letter)

Hutchins, John Jay (Law Offices of S. G. Archibald), 1963-1969 (14 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Hutton: E. F. Hutton Company, 1946-1951 (7 letters)

Huygens, W., 1957 (1 letter)

Ichban [?], Hans ("Zero"), undated and 1939 (2 letters)

Ikuta, Tsutomu, 1951 (1 letter)

Illinois, University of, Chapter of AIA, 1959 (2 letters)

Illinois, University of, Urbana, 1957-1964 (4 letters)

Ilmanen, J. William, 1955-1956 (2 letters)

Immanuel, M., 1946 (2 letters)

India, ambassador from, 1965 (1 invitation): to Nehru

N.V. Induventa, 1935 (1 letter)

Ingrand, Max, undated (2 letters)

Institute der Schwestern, Baldegg, Switzerland, 1970-1975 (5 letters): 4 from Breuer

Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, 1970 (1 letter)

Institute of Contemporary Art, 1954-1956 (3 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Institute of Contemporary Art, Department of Design in Industry, 1951 (3 notices of meetings)

Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1953-1959 (6 letters)

Institute of International Education, 1960-1961 (4 letters)

Instituto Internazionale di Arte Liturgica, 1970 (1 letter)

Interiors Incorporated, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Interiors International, 1963 (4 letters)

Interiors magazine, 1950 (1 letter)

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), 1963-1974 (4 letters): 2 from Breuer

International Business Machines (IBM) Deutschland, 1970 (1 letter)

International Congress for Engineering Education, 1947 (2 letters)

International Congress for Modern Architecture: see Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM)

International Contract Furnishings, Inc., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

International Design Conference, Aspen, Colorado, 1953-1955 (4 letters)

International Lighting Review, 1961 (1 letter)

International Rescue Committee, Inc., undated (1 letter)

Iowa State College, 1960 (1 letter): see Myers, John S.

Iran, empress of, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Irving & Casson/A. H. Davenport Company, 1945 (1 letter): see Commission on Community Interrelations (CCI)

Irving, Michael H. (Irving and Jacob), undated and 1968-1971 (4 letters)

Isokon (Lawn Road) Limited, 1936-1966 (2 letters)

Istituto Italiano di Cultura, 1967 (1 letter)

Jackson, Huson (Plan-Tech Associates), 1945-1958 (3 letters)

Jacobs, Robert Allan (Kahn & Jacobs), 1958 (2 letters)

Jacobson, Egbert (Container Corporation of America), 1950 (1 letter)

Janis Gallery (Sidney Janis), 1955-1970 (2 letters): concerning Josef Albers exhibition

Japan Architect Company, Ltd., 1977 (2 letters)

Japan House Gallery, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Japan Society, Inc., 1964-1975 (3 letters)

Jaredat, Nizar and Ellen, 1946-1958 (4 letters)

Jaritz, András, 1934 (1 letter)

Jarrell, Katherine O., 1960 (2 letters)

Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture, 1968 (1 letter)

G. A. Jellicoe & Partners, Architects, undated (1 letter)

Georg Jensen, Inc., 1946-1947 (4 letters)

Jewish Community Center of Cleveland, 1965 (3 letters)

Jobco Incorporated, 1980 (1 letter): from Herbert Beckhard

Johansen, John MacL.("Jo") and Mary Ellen, undated and 1947-1970 (7 letters)

Johns Hopkins University, 1981 (2 letters)

Johnson, Dan Rhodes, 1965 (1 letter)

Johnson, Frances, 1950-1951 (2 letters): from Breuer

Johnson, Lyndon Baines, 1965 (1 invitation): to presidential inauguration

Johnson, Marian Willard: see Willard, Marian G.

Johnson, Philip (architect), 1945-1948 (10 letters): 4 letters from Breuer: see Project File for UNESCO

Johnson, Reid B., 1964 (1 letter)

Johnstone, William (Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center), 1949 (1 letter)

Joly, Pierre (photographer), 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Jomain, Pierre, 1960 (1 letter)

Jones, Adolph (U.S. Embassy, The Hague), 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Jones, Cranston and Jean, 1958-1966 (10 letters)

Jones, Cyrus C., 1945 (1 letter): from Breuer

Jones, Douglas (University of Bristol, U.K.), 1967 (1 letter)

Jones, Noel W. (district engineer, OCS), 1968 (1 letter)

Jones, Paul K. (mayor of Shaker Heights, Ohio), 1970 (1 letter)

Jones, Theodore S. (Institute of Contemporary Art), 1950-1951 (2 letters)

Joraschek, Josef (architect), 1965 (1 letter)

Jordi, Beat, 1970-1976 (13 letters): 12 from Breuer

Jordy, William H. (Yale University), 1951 (2 letters)

Jossa, Mario, 1966-1976 (37 letters): 28 from Breuer

Joyce, Nora, 1934 (1 letter)

Junyer, Joan [?]1961 (1 letter)

Kacmarcik, Frank, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Kaffka, Péter (C. E. Pratt & Péter Kaffka, Architects), 1950 (1 letter)

Kahlen, Wolfgang, 1965 (1 letter)

Kahn, Hugo, 1968 (1 letter)

Kahn, Louis I. (Oscar Stonorov and Louis I. Kahn Associated Architects), 1945-1966 (5 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA)

Kalmai, K., 1924 (1 letter)

Kálmán, Timon, 1967 (2 letters)

Kalnay, Ferenc, 1938 (1 letter)

Kamer, Henri A. (Kamer, Inc.), 1964-1966 (2 letters)

Kamphoefner, Henry L. (School of Design, North Carolina State College), 1951-1954 (6 letters)

Kandinsky, Lina, 1969-1976 (mentioned in 2 letters from Constance Breuer)

Kane, Ervin (Viewtone Television), 1946 (2 letters)

Kaneko, Masanori (Kagawa Prefectural Government, Japan), 1970 (1 letter)

Kann, Henry Robert, 1951 (1 letter)

Karajabey, Ayla, 1966 (telegram from Breuer)

Karlock, Michael (Benton & Bowles), 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Karsten, Thomas and Marilyn (American Trading Company), 1963-1975 (8 letters)

Kaspar, Karl (Verlag Gerd Hatje GMBH), 1955 (2 letters)

Kass, Gertrud [?], 1939 (1 letter)

Katsuyama, S., undated (1 letter)

Kaufman, Stanley Lloyd, 1950 (1 letter): see Project File for UNESCO

Kaufmann, Edgar J. (Kaufmann Department Store), 1954-1963 (2 letters)

Kazi, Abdul-Rassak, 1966 (2 letters)

Kazin, Alfred, 1971 (1 letter)

W. R. Keating & Company, 1962 (1 letter): concerns shipment of Alexander Calder sculpture

Keller, Dieter, 1965 (2 letters)

Kelly, John Terence (architect), 1964 (1 letter)

Kelly, Virginia Whitmore, 1949 (1 letter)

Kennedy, Edith (Robert Woods Kennedy's mother), 1939 (1 letter)

Kennedy, John Fitzgerald, 1961-1963 (3 letters): from the White House

Kennedy, Robert Woods (first architect in Gropius-Breuer office, Cambridge, Massachusetts), undated and 1950 (3 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA)

Kennerly, Albert (Kennerly Construction Company, Inc.), 1947 (1 letter)

Keogh, Eugene J. (Halpin, Keogh & St. John), 1970 (1 letter)

Kepes, György (architect) and Juliet, undated and 1924-1978 (29 letters)

Kertész, André, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Kertész, Gyula, 1938 (1 letter)

Kessler-Gallacher & Burton, Seagram-Distillers Corporation, 1954-1963 (5 letters)

Ketchum, Morris (Ketchum, Gina & Sharp, Architects), 1957-1963 (25 letters)

Ketchum, Phillips (Ketchum Building Corporation), 1967 (4 letters)

Keyser, William, 1964 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Kida, Miho, 1975 (2 letters)

Kiley, Dan, 1955 (1 letter)

Kilham, Walter H. (R. B. O'Connor and W. H. Kilham, Architects), 1951-1960 (2 letters)

Kimura, Akira, 1965 (1 letter): includes photograph of family E. & F. King & Company, 1946 (2 letters)

King, Helen (William Morrow & Company, Inc., Publishers), 1951 (1 letter)

Kipnis, Leonid (Leonid Kipnis Gallery), 1954 (1 letter)

Kirkconnell, Watson, 1967 (1 invitation): to George Washington Awards Dinner in honor of Breuer, Kirkconnell, and Hans Selye

Kistler, Daniel, undated and 1964 (2 letters)

Kivett & Myers & McCallum (Architects - Engineers), undated (1 letter)

Kleyer, Bertel and Erwin Kleyer, 1946-1954 (10 letters)

Klöckner (Deimel, Klöckner, Koebel), 1959 (1 letter)

Kniffin, Ogden ("Nif"; inventor of Colorforms) and Kitty, 1950-1960 (5 letters): 3 from Breuer

Knoll, Hans G. and Florence (H. G. Knoll Associates, Inc.), undated and 1945-1961 (12 letters); see Project File for UNESCO

Knoll International, Inc., 1971-1977 (7 letters): see Vidal, Yves

Knox, Sanka (New York Times), 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Kobler, John (Saturday Evening Post), 1959 (1 letter)

Koch, Alexander, 1948-1961 (2 letters)

Koerfer, Jacques and Christina, undated and 1964-1977 (18 letters)

Kolozsváry-Kiss, árpád, 1957 (2 letters)

Kondor, E. ("Pista"), 1937 (1 letter)

König, Dr. Heinrich, 1954-1959 (3 letters)

Konwiser, Inc., 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Kootz, Samuel B. (Kootz Art Gallery), 1954-1956 (2 letters)

Koran, Spencer, 1974-1975 (4 letters): from Breuer's office

Korn, Arthur (Architectural Association School of Architecture), 1947-1956 (2 letters)

Kornfeld, Albert, 1956 (1 letter)

Kortan, Enis (Turkish architect), 1956-1960 (3 letters)

Koudela, E. Hugi (Deeter Ritchey Sippel), 1968 (1 letter)

Koyama, Shin (photographer), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Kósa, Zoltán, 1962 (1 letter)

Kozlowski, Jean Paul and Shirley, 1960-1972 (2 letters)

Kraemer, Friedrich Wilhelm (architect), 1955 (1 letter)

Kramer, Edwin R., 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Krausz, László, 1957-1968 (2 letters)

Krivátsky-Szüts, ádám (Hungarian architect), 1960 (1 letter)

Kri anac, Dr. Matko, 1974 (1 letter)

Ku, Danna Morison, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Kuenzle, Creed (Swiss architect), 1959 (1 letter)

Kuh, Katharine (Art Institute of Chicago), undated and 1951 (2 letters)

Kulkarni, Ashok, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Keith R. Kunhardt Associates, Inc., 1966 (1 letter)

Kunst Kabinett Klihm, Munich, 1956 (1 letter)

Kuwayama, A. (Kuwayama & Company, Inc.), 1945 (1 letter)

Laaff, George, 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Laboratoires Sarget, 1970 (1 letter)

Lacey, Joseph (Eero Saarinen Associates), 1957 (2 letters)

Ladd, Fred, 1965 (1 letter)

LaFarge, Bancel: see American Institute of Architects

La Joie Par Les Livres, 1964 (1 letter)

Lalonde, Gisele and Jean-Louis, undated and 1955 (2 letters)

Laminated Veneers, Inc., 1948 (2 letters)

Lamson, Jarvis (Functional Furniture, Inc.), 1947-1948 (9 letters): see Noyes, Eliot

Landram, Fred, 1947 (1 letter)

M. Landsberg Stationery Company, 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Landsberg, William W., 1953-1959 (5 letters)

Lang, George E. (Restaurant & Waldorf Associates, Inc.), 1967-1968 (2 letters)

Lányi, George, 1939-1946 (2 letters)

L'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui, 1954 (3 letters)

La Rinascente Compasso d'Oro, 1955-1965 (43 letters)

Larson, Else M. (Mrs. Arthur W. Larson), 1963 (2 letters)

Laseau, Paul, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

László, Carl, 1964 (1 letter)

Lauck, Peter (Morton Sundour Company, Inc.), 1950 (1 letter)

Lauper, Peter (Fraser's), 1955 (1 letter)

Laurenti, André, 1959-1968 (8 letters)

Lautman, Robert C. (photographer), 1973 (1 letter): from Herbert Beckhard

La Verne Originals, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Lavigueur, Gilles (architect), 1967 (1 letter): includes 2 photographs of a chair

Lawrence, John W. (Tulane University), 1953 (1 letter)

Le Corbusier, 1957 (1 letter): from Walter Gropius to friends concerning Le Corbusier's 70th birthday; see also Project File for UNESCO

Lee, Duk, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Lee, Richard C. (mayor of New Haven), 1964 (1 letter): from Breuer

Al Paul Lefton Company, Inc., Advertising, 1949-1950 (2 letters)

Lehigh Furniture Corporation, 1951 (1 letter)

Leibowitz, Matthew, 1946 (1 letter)

Leight, Lillian, 1972 (1 letter)

Leighton, O. S., 1946-1951 (11 letters)

Lemm, H. J. , undated (1 letter)

Lennon, Jacques E., 1975 (1 letter)

Leontieff, Wassily, 1947 (1 letter)

Lercaro, His Eminence Jacques Cardinal, 1969-1970 (2 letters)

Lescaze, William (architect), 1954 (1 letter)

Lever, Lance, 1966 (1 letter)

Levin, Arnold B., 1954 (1 letter)

Levine, Leon, 1971 (1 letter)

Lévy, Vilmos (Hungarian sculptor), undated and 1938 (2 letters)

Lewin, Kurt and G., 1944-1947 (4 letters)

Lewis, George Sherman (architect), 1946-1954 (4 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Li, Ying, 1947 (1 letter)

Liberman, Tatiana and Alexander, 1969 (1 invitation): for cocktails with Helen Frankenthaler Librairie d'Art Ancien et Moderne, 1962-1963 (2 letters)

Librairie Ernest Flammarion, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Lili, S. Braun, 1936-1939 (8 letters)

Lilinthal, Benjamin, 1956 (1 letter)

Limbach, Scott (Limbach Company), 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Lincoln Warehouse Corporation, 1951 (1 letter)

Lindsay, John V. (mayor of New York) and Mary, 1967-1969 (5 letters)

L'Industria Italiana del Cemento, 1975 (2 letters)

Linke, Siegfried, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Lionni, Leonardo and Nora, 1962 (1 letter): see also International Design Conference, Aspen

Littke, George, 1950 (1 letter)

Liverant, Mrs. M. J., 1960 (1 letter)

Lloyd, Eleanor B. (Mrs. H. Gates Lloyd), 1959 (1 letter)

Lloyd, Miss M. E., 1939 (1 letter)

Lobell, Mimi, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

L'Oeil, 1974-1975 (2 letters): from Breuer

Lohse, Richard P. (editor, Bauen + Wohnen), 1950 (1 letter)

Lombard, M. A. (M. A. Lombard & Son, Company, General Contractors), 1966 (1 letter)

Long Beach Art Association, Inc., 1954 (1 letter)

Longmans, Green & Company, Ltd., 1958 (1 letter)

Lortz, R., 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Louisiana State University, Department of Architecture, 1964 (1 letter)

Lubroth, I. (Lubroth y Henriquez, Estudio de Arquitectura), 1975 (1 letter)

Ludolf, H. G., 1933-1934 (2 letters)

Lundy, Victor A., 1950-1951 (3 letters)

Lunning, Just, 1956 (1 letter)

Lurie, H. Lee, 1946-1947 (4 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Lutz, Pierre, 1961-1968 (2 letters): from Breuer Lydakis, George (Precision Metal Model Corporation), 1950-1955 (2 letters)

Lydon, Ken, 1972 (1 letter)

Lyles, Bissett, Carlisle & Wolff, 1955 (2 letters)

Lyman, Bill, 1946 (3 letters)

Lyn, Robert J., 1951 (2 letters)

Lyndon, Maynard (architect), 1965 (1 letter)

Maas, Carl ("Happy"/"Hap"; editor, House Beautiful), 1937-1946 (6 letters)

Maas, Walter, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Macomber, George A. (Cambridge Trust Company), 1947 (2 letters)

Madison, Bob, 1951 (1 letter)

I. Magnin, San Francisco, 1961 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Magyar Album, 1956 (1 letter)

Magyar épitomuvészek Szövetsége magazine, 1956-1977 (4 letters)

Maki, Fumihiko (Harvard University), 1963 (1 letter) George E. Mallison Importing Company, 1950-1955 (2 letters)

Manders, Dave, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Mandl, Zoltán, 1939 (1 letter)

Manfred, Ernest F., 1966 (1 letter)

Mang, Karl (architect), 1967 (1 letter)

Manitoba, University of, Students' Architectural Society, 1953 (1 letter)

Mantel, H. J., 1951 (1 letter)

Manton, Mr. and Mrs. John, 1967 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Marbleloid, Inc., 1946 (1 letter)

Marine-Air-Research Corporation, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Maroy, Jean-Paul, 1981 (1 letter): from Robert F. Gatje William L. Marshall, Ltd., 1944-1947 (8 letters)

Marson, Bernard A. (architect), 1968 (1 letter)

Marston, Natalie (Institute of Contemporary Art), 1951 (1 letter)

Martens, Michel (Hedendaagse Kerkelijke Kunst), 1956-1957 (2 letters)

Martignetti, Antonio, 1956 (1 letter)

Martin, J. L. (architect), 1938 (1 letter)

Martin, Leslie and Sadie, undated and 1954 (3 letters)

Mary College and the Annunciation Priory, 1963-1976 (6 letters)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Art Committee, 1968 (1 letter)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Office of the President, 1961-1965 (2 letters)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, 1958-1960 (4 letters)

Massachusetts, University of, Amherst, 1968 (1 letter)

Massenot, J. P. (éditions Techniques), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office Master, Dipak C. (Master Sathe and Kothari, Architects), 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Mathews, Joseph F., 1956 (1 letter)

Maucher, Helmut, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Maurer, Laurie, undated (3 letters)

Mauser Kommandit-Gesellschaft, 1966 (1 letter)

Mayekawa, Kunio, 1963 (1 letter)

McClean-Smith, Betty, 1940 (1 letter)

McComb, Peter K. and Karen, 1954-1956 (4 letters)

McGarry, Ann M., 1947 (1 letter)

McGill University, Montreal, 1967 (1 letter)

McGlynn Associates, Inc., 1956 (1 letter)

McGrath, Raymond (Office of Public Works, Dublin, Ireland), 1937-1969 (9 letters)

McGraw-Hill Publications, 1967 (1 letter)

McGuinness, William J. (Pratt Institute), 1951 (1 letter)

McIntyre, A. McVoy, 1950-1951 (2 letters)

McLaughlin, Peter, 1959 (1 letter)

McMillan, Louis and Peggy (Architects' Collaborative), 1945-1946 (2 letters)

McVitty, John D., 1946 (1 letter)

John O. Meadows Associates, Ltd., 1984-1985 (2 letters)

Medical Economics, 1960 (1 letter)

Meier, Richard Alan, undated and 1957-1967 (5 letters)

Meldrum, Andrew, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Meller, Herbert, 1969-1970 (4 letters)

Mellon, Mary, 1938 (1 letter)

Meng, John J. (Hunter College), 1963 (1 letter)

Menken, Julian (Julian Menken and Associates), 1964 (1 letter)

Merit Studios, Inc., 1965 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Merle, André (André Merle Associates, Architectural Engineers), 1946 (1 letter)

Merrill and Holmbren, Architects, 1954 (1 letter): concerns Campbell Building Company

Merrill, Ruth P., 1950-1964 (2 letters)

Metropolitan Milwaukee War Memorial, Inc., 1945 (4 letters): 1 to Walter Gropius

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1944-1975 (8 letters)

Metropolitan Structures, Inc., 1974 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Metropolitan Washington Board of Trade, 1969 (2 letters)

Meunier, John, 1957 (1 letter)

México, Consulado Honorario de, 1938 (2 letters)

Meyer-Bohe, Walter, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Michaëlis, Lorenz S. (Swiss doctor), undated (1 letter)

Michaelis-Lenolt, Ilse, 1937 (1 letter)

Michaud, Marcel (Stylclair), 1950-1951 (3 letters)

Michel, John (General American Transportation Corporation), 1947-1948 (2 letters)

Michelson, Val (architect), 1970 (1 letter)

Michigan, University of, Ann Arbor, 1957-1963 (19 letters)

Middelhauve, Dr. F. G., 1963 (1 letter)

Mies Van der Rohe, Ludwig, 1945 (1 letter): from Breuer introducing Sanford L. and Helen Berger, architects

Mihályfy, Károlyné, 1966 (1 letter)

Millar, L. R., 1935 (1 letter)

Millard, Charles W., 1957 (1 letter)

Miller Company, 1945-1947 (2 letters)

Miller, Flora W. (Mrs. G. MacCulloch Miller), undated (1 letter)

Miller, H. Wisner, 1968-1969 (2 letters)

Herman Miller Furniture Company, 1951-1954 (4 letters): from Breuer

Miller, Rev. John (St. Charles Seminary), 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Miller, Richard J., 1955 (1 letter)

Miller, Steve, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Milliken, W. H. (Binney & Smith Company), 1951 (1 letter)

Mills, Mrs. Edward E., 1954 (1 letter): from William W. Landsberg

Mills, Willis N. (Sherwood, Mills and Smith, Architects), 1960-1969 (2 letters)

Ministre d'état Chargé des Affaires Culturelles, 1963 (1 letter): from Breuer

Minnesota Society of Architects, 1958 (1 letter)

Minnesota, State of, Board of Registration, 1954 (2 letters)

Minnesota, University of, 1953 (1 letter)

Miró, Joan, 1959-1963 (2 letters): 1 from Breuer

Mitchell and Ritchey, 1947 (2 letters)

Mitchell, Mary, 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Miya & Company, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Modern Industry, 1947 (1 letter)

Modern Master Tapestries, Inc., 1974-1975 (4 letters): from Breuer's office

Moffett, Toby, 1974 (1 letter)

Moholy, Lucia, 1957-1958 (5 letters)

Moholy-Nagy, László ("Lakci") and Sibyl, 1934-1955 (40 letters): includes a 1946 exhibition catalog for a Walter Gropius exhibition at the School of Design, Chicago; see also Hug, Hattula Moholy-Nagy

Moldcast Products, Inc., 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Molitor, Joseph W. (photographer), 1955-1975 (5 letters): 4 from Breuer

Molnár, Farkas (Hungarian architect), undated and 1933-1940 (25 letters)

Mongan, Agnes, 1938 (1 letter)

Montague, Harvey, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Montgomery, Elizabeth (Mrs. Wilmot), 1950 (1 letter)

Moore, Henry, 1946-1962 (13 letters): 6 from Breuer

Moore, Joe A., 1945 (2 letters)

Moore, Paul S. (architect), 1966-1967 (3 letters)

Morassutti, Mangiarotti, 1961 (1 letter)

Moretti, Bruno, 1936 (1 letter)

Morgan, Alice, 1939 (1 letter)

Morgan, Sherley W. (Princeton University), 1952 (3 letters)

Móricz, Miklós, 1947 (1 letter)

Morrell, Mrs. Ben, 1965 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Sydney Morrell & Company, Inc., 1973-1976 (4 letters)

Morris, Walter (Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc.), 1950 (1 letter)

Morrow, Margot, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Mory, Bob, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Moschette, Angela, 1950 (1 letter)

Motherwell, Robert, 1968 (1 letter)

Muguruza Otaño, José María (architect), 1935-1967 (3 letters)

Mulford, Edwin H., 1966 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Müller-Rehm, Klaus (architect), 1951 (1 letter)

Mundipharma GmbH, Frankfurt, 1975-1976 (4 letters)

Eduard Munz & Company, 1954-1959 (3 letters)

Murray, J. A. (University of Toronto School of Architecture), 1947-1956 (3 letters)

Murrow, Mrs. Edward R., 1961 (1 letter)

Musée des Arts Décoratifs, 1969 (2 letters)

Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro, 1954 (1 letter)

Museu de Arte Moderna do São Paulo, 1956 (1 letter concerning IV Bienal de S. Paulo)

Museum of Contemporary Crafts, 1967 (7 letters)

Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1941-1976 (49 letters)

Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, 1967 (3 letters)

Museum of the City of New York, 1959 (2 letters)

Muskat, Irving E., 1968 (2 letters)

Mutsu, Masako, 1964-1965 (2 letters): from Breuer

Myers, John S. and Shirlee, 1955-1959 (4 letters)

Myers, Ralph E., 1958 (2 letters)

Myers, Robert L., 1950 (1 letter)

Nadeau, Eleanor Saxe, 1950 (1 letter)

Nader, Fouzieh, 1972 (2 letters)

Nagare, Masayuki, 1963-1965 (6 letters): 5 letters from Breuer

Nagel, Chester (architect), 1968 (1 letter)

Nagy Iván, Dr. Vitéz (Ministry Secretary), undated (1 letter)

Najibullah, Yousof, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Napier, Frieda (Mrs. Ian Napier), undated and 1937 (7 letters)

Nathan, Carl H. (Suncraft), 1945 (1 letter)

National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council, undated (1 letter)

National Citizens for Johnson and Humphrey, 1964 (1 letter)

National Committee of Arts, Letters and Sciences for John F. Kennedy for President, 1960 (2 letters)

National Concrete Masonry Association, 1958-1959 (7 letters)

National Council of American Soviet Friendship, Inc., Architects' Committee, 1944-1945 (13 letters)

National Council of American Soviet Friendship, Inc., Building Industry Committee, 1946 (6 letters)

National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, 1946-1959 (5 letters): request recommendations for Jean Bodman Fletcher, I. M. Pei, and Richard G. Stein

National Council of Churches, 1955 (1 letter)

National Council on Schoolhouse Construction, 1951 (1 letter)

National Institute of Arts and Letters, 1965-1968 (47 letters): 1967 letter from Breuer includes typescripts concerning Josef Albers and Constantino Nivola; 1968 encloses a letter from Philip Johnson; see American Academy of Arts and Letters National Society of Interior Designers, Inc., 1958 (1 letter) National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association, 1955 (1 letter from Murray S. Emslie)

National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1975 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Nedberg, Björn, 1951 (1 letter)

Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Fundatie, 1957-1958 (2 letters)

Neighbour, Keith, 1955 (1 letter)

Neiman Marcus, Dallas, Texas, 1961 (1 letter)

Nelson, George (architect), undated and 1958 (2 letters)

Nemeny, George (architect), 1945 (2 letters): from Breuer

Nervi, Mario (son of Pier Luigi Nervi), 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Nervi, Pier Luigi, undated and 1960-1978 (5 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Neski, Joe and Barbara, 1957 (1 letter)

Neski, Julian (architect), 1967-1970 (2 letters)

Neufert, Ernst, 1946 (1 letter)

Neumann, J. B., 1950 (1 card): sent jointly with Elsa Schmid

Neumann, Lena, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Neumann, Vera (Scarves by Vera), 1970 (1 letter)

Nevendorff, Peter (construction supervisor for Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's Museum of the 20th Century), 1967 (1 office message)

Newark Museum, 1954-1955 (5 letters)

New Canaan Advertiser, 1974 (1 letter)

New Canaan Committee for Shakespearean Festival, undated (1 invitation): from Francis A. Sunderland to meet Sir Cedric and Lady Hardwicke

New Canaan Community Nursery School, Inc., 1955 (1 letter)

New Canaan Country School, 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer

New Haven Festival of Arts, Inc., 1959 (4 letters)

New Hungarian Quarterly, 1967 (1 letter)

Newman, Robert B. (Bolt Beranek and Newman), 1951 (1 letter)

Newport, Charles W. (R. S. Noonan, Inc.), 1945 (2 letters)

Newsome, Carroll V. (Prentice-Hall, Inc.), 1962 (1 letter)

Newsweek, 1955 (1 letter)

New York Association of Consulting Engineers, Inc., 1970 (1 letter)

New York Division of Housing and Community Renewal, 1964 (1 letter)

New Yorker, 1967-1975 (3 letters)

New York Institute of Technology AIA Chapter, 1976 (1 letter)

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, 1951-1963 (6 letters)

New York Public Library, 1966 (1 letter)

New York State Council on Architecture, 1975 (1 letter)

New York World's Fair 1964-1965, 1964 (1 invitation): for cocktails at Pavilion of Spain

Nicholson, Christopher (architect), 1946 (2 letters)

Nicholson's Sports Apparel, 1945 (1 letter)

Nivola, Constantine, 1966 (1 letter): from Breuer

Noever, Peter (Svoboda and Company), 1958-1968 (4 letters)

Noirot, Genevieve, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Nolen, James A., 1970 (1 letter)

Nolen-Swinburne and Associates, 1970 (1 letter): from Herbert Beckhard concerning Department of Housing and Urban Development

Nordmann, Christian, 1934 (1 letter)

North Dakota Agriculture College, AIA, 1959 (1 letter)

North Dakota State College, 1960 (2 letters)

Northey, Ned H., 1956 (1 letter)

Norton, Clifford, undated (1 letter)

Norton, Noël E. ("Peter"; Lady Clifford Norton), undated and 1933-1965 (36 letters)

Norweb, Emery May (Mrs. R. Henry Norweb), 1970 (1 letter)

Noyes, Eliot Fette (architect), undated and 1946-1974 (13 letters)

N.V. Ingenieurs - Bureau Voor Bouwnijverheid, 1960 (2 letters)

Ochs, Fritz, 1950 (1 letter)

O'Connor, Vincent A. G., 1963 (5 letters)

Oehler, Erma L. (Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc., Advertising), 1947 (3 letters)

Oestreicher, W. L., 1947 (1 letter)

Ohye, Hiroshi, 1954 (1 letter): of introduction from Hyoe Ouchi

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1950 (1 letter)

Oklahoma, University of, School of Architecture, 1966 (2 letters)

Okudaira, Kozo, 1954-1955 (6 letters)

Olgyay, Aladár (Hungarian architect; twin brother Viktor Olgyay) and Elizabeth, undated and 1939-1960 (12 letters)

Olivetti, Adriano, 1956 (1 letter)

Olivetti, Dino, 1963 (1 letter)

Olivetti, Roberto, 1970 (1 letter)

Olsen, Don and Helen, 1947 (1 letter)

Olsen, Ralph, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Omega Marble, 1965 (1 letter)

O'Neill, John C. R., and Marvin H. Segner (consulting engineers), undated (1 letter)

On Site, 1975 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Oppenheim, Dennis, 1968 (1 letter)

Ordre des Architectes, Paris, 1964 (1 letter from Robert F. Gatje)

Originators, The, 1977 (1 letter)

Ortega, Alvaro (Colombian architect, student of Breuer), 1960-1972 (3 letters): 1972 letter from Leonard Currie concerns a recommendation for Ortega

Osborn, Elodie and Robert, undated and 1946-1971 (18 letters)

Osborne, Stafford, 1963 (1 memorandum): from James S. Plaut

Otto, Marguerite, 1946 (1 letter)

Oud, J. J. P. (architect), undated (1 calling card)

Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation, 1959 (2 letters)

Owurowa, Saji, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Oxford University Press, Inc., 1954 (1 letter)

Pabst, Robert E. (Mabaco Marine), 1956 (1 letter)

Pach Brothers, 1965 (1 letter): from Breuer

Pack, Isabelle (Breuer's secretary), 1958 (3 letters)

Pack, Nancy (Mrs. Howard Meade Pack), undated and 1953 (2 letters)

Paine Furniture Company, 1946 (1 letter)

Pajor, Zoltán, 1938-1947 (7 letters)

Palestrant, Stephen, 1963 (1 letter)

Palmer Physical Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, 1945 (1 letter)

Papachristou, Tician and Judy, undated and 1967-1974 (6 letters)

Papadaki, Stamo, 1945-1951 (14 letters): see Commission on Community Interrelations (CCI) of the American-Jewish Congress; Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM), Chapter for Relief and Post-War Planning

Papadakis, Stanis (architect), 1935-1936 (2 letters)

Papock, Herbert (Wylie F. L. Tuttle Company), 1970 (1 letter)

Papp, Leslie G., 1957 (1 letter)

Paquin, G., 1938 (1 letter)

Parkin, John B., 1950 (1 letter)

Parkinson (Cobb), Eliza, undated (2 letters)

Parkinson, Elizabeth, 1969 (1 letter)

Parsons School of Design, 1956 (1 letter)

Passonneau, Joseph R. (Washington University, St. Louis), 1956-1958 (3 letters)

Paterson State Teachers College, undated and 1954 (7 letters)

Payer, Ernst, undated (1 letter)

Pázmándi, Margó (Hungarian architect), 1974 (1 letter)

Pearman, Charles, 1964 (2 letters)

I. M. Pei & Associates, undated and 1959 (6 letters): 1959 letter is letter of recommendation by Breuer for Pei

Pella Rolscreen Company, 1966 (1 letter)

Pennsylvania State University, 1958 (5 letters)

Pennsylvania, University of, 1958-1959 (2 letters)

Pepper, Eleanor (and Alta Grant Samuels), undated (1 letter)

Peressutti, Enrico (Banfi Belgiojoso Peressutti Rogers, architects), 1949-1959 (4 letters)

Perkins, G. Holmes (Harvard University), 1940-1947 (6 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA)

Perrin, Luis (architect), 1957 (1 letter)

Peter, J. A., 1945 (1 letter)

Peter, John, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Peterson, Cynthia, undated (1 letter)

Peterson, G. H., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Philco Corporation, 1950 (1 letter)

Phoenix Art Museum, 1965 (1 letter): concerns a Josef Albers exhibition

Pichler, Albrecht, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Picker, Fred, 1974 (4 letters): from Breuer's office

John B. Pierce Foundation, 1945 (1 letter)

Pignot, Gilbert (architect), 1971 (1 letter)

Pilchik, Ely E. (Congregation B'nai Jeshurun), 1962 (1 letter)

Pilzer, Leopold (Thonet Brothers, Inc.), 1943-1954 (9 letters): see also Project File for UNESCO

Pinkus, Dr. Felix, 1933-1934 (3 letters)

Pinter, Anthony S. (Study Abroad, Inc.), 1950-1951 (2 letters)

Pinter, Margit, 1946 (1 letter)

Pintori, Giovanni (Pubblicità Olivetti), 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Pisenti, Oreste, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, 1947 (1 letter): from Breuer

Plaut, James S. (Institute of Contemporary Art) and Mary, 1947-1963 (5 letters)

Polak, Jean and André, 1969-1970 (3 letters)

Polányi, Cecil, 1935 (1 letter)

Polieri, Jacques, 1957-1958 (2 letters)

Pomerance, Ralph, 1968 (1 letter)

Centre Georges Pompidou (P. Hussen), 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer

Ponti, Gio (architect), 1963-1967 (2 letters)

Poon, Sze-chiu, 1958 (3 letters): includes a photograph of Poon

Pope and Evans (consulting engineers), 1956 (1 letter)

Porter, Bernice, 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Porter, Lucy (Mrs. A. Kingsley Porter), 1950 (1 letter)

Porter, Tom, 1974-1976 (3 letters): from Breuer

Portland Cement Association, 1959 (1 letter): from Breuer

Pospischil, Ernest, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Posse, Ricardo Muratorio, 1956 (1 letter)

Postman, Art, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Potter, Arnold and Selma, undated (1 letter)

Potts, Del G. (Fred H. Towery Equipment Company), 1947 (1 letter)

Pouget, Cl. (Cie. IBM, France), 1961-1970 (2 letters)

Pradelle, T. and D., undated (1 letter)

Praeger, Frederick A. (Frederick A. Praeger, Inc.), 1959-1969 (19 letters): includes a 1959 transcript of Praeger's conversation with Breuer concerning the publication of a book on Breuer's life work

Pratt Institute, 1953-1969 (11 letters)

Présentè, G. M., 1954 (1 letter): see Project File for UNESCO

Prestressed Concrete Institute, 1970 (1 letter)

Price, Thomas M., 1946 (1 letter)

Prichard, Theodore J. (University of Idaho), 1946-1950 (3 letters)

Princeton University, 1954-1959 (12 letters)

Princeton University, Graduate Council, 1954 (1 letter)

Princeton University School of Architecture, 1955-1963 (3 letters)

Pritchard, J. C. ("Jack"; producer of Isokon furniture) and Molly, 1944-1977 (56 letters)

Producers' Council, Inc., 1958-1967 (6 letters)

Progressive Architecture, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Pullman Company, 1945-1946 (2 letters)

Pusztai, György, 1963 (2 letters)

Quale, Marcia, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Quigley, T. T. (Wallace and Tiernan Company), 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Quinn, Robert H. (Attorney General of Massachusetts), 1970 (1 letter)

Raab, Martin D. (MIT School of Architecture), 1954 (2 letters)

Raabe, Sally (Harvard University, School of Design), 1947-1960 (4 letters): from Breuer

Rachlin, Abraham H. (Union Building Company), 1944 (2 letters)

Radcliffe Club of Long Island, 1954 (1 letter)

Radich, Stephen J. (Stephen Radich Gallery), 1967 (1 letter)

Rado, Ladislav L. ("Laco"; architect), 1943-1945 (6 letters)

Radwany, Emery L. and Helen, 1951-1954 (2 letters)

Rafferty, James B. (RCA Communications, Inc.), 1954 (1 letter)

Raffo, Nestor, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Rakatansky, Ira (architect), 1954-1959 (7 letters)

Ram Press, Inc., 1954 (1 letter): from Robert F. Gatje

Rand, Ann, 1951 (1 letter)

Randinsky, Nina, 1963 (1 letter)

Rapson, Ralph (University of Minnesota, School of Architecture), 1954-1959 (5 letters)

Rather, Lillian Townsend (Mrs. James Rather), 1966 (1 letter)

Rauschenback, Esther, 1951 (1 letter)

Read, Sir Herbert, 1955 (3 letters)

Réalitiés, 1964 (1 letter)

Rebay, Baroness, 1936 (1 letter)

Rédèr, J. M., 1956 (1 letter)

Reed & Barton, Silversmiths, 1963-1964 (7 letters)

Reed, Joe, 1958 (1 letter): from Breuer concerning the first tubular steel chair

Reese, Ilse Meissner, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Reidy, Affonso Eduardo, 1963 (1 letter)

Reilly, Ambassador (of Great Britain) and Lady, 1965 (1 invitation): to reception for the Fourth Biennale de Paris

Reinwald, Karl, 1969 (1 letter)

Rendy, Lili, undated (1 letter)

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1950 (1 letter)

Renz, Wilhelm (Wilhelm Renz K G, Moebelfabrik), 1966 (1 letter)

Republic, The, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Residence Lighting Forum (Illuminating Engineering Society), 1953 (1 letter)

Rettaliata, John (Illinois Institute of Technology), 1955 (1 letter)

Rév, Lajos, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer

Reynolds Metals Company, undated and 1946-1956 (9 letters)

Rhode Island Chapter of AIA, 1959 (1 letter)

Rhode Island School of Design, 1956-1959 (4 letters)

Richards, Jim M. and Peggy, undated and 1936-1939 (5 letters)

Richards, Steve, 1966 (1 letter)

Richlan, Frank, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Richman, Robert (Institute of Contemporary Art), 1952 (2 letters): from Breuer

Richmond, C. R., 1941 (1 letter)

Richmond Radiator Company (A. A. Marks), 1944 (2 letters): from Breuer

Rietkerk, William, 1956 (1 letter)

John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, 1956 (1 letter)

Ritchey, Dahlen K. (Deeter Ritchey Sippel, Architects), 1968 (1 letter)

Rivers, Shavaun, 1950 (1 letter)

Roberts, Russell (opera singer who bought Breuer's first New Canaan house), 1951-1955 (7 letters): 6 letters from Breuer

Robinson, Frank S., 1969 (2 letters)

Robinson, Mrs. Preston, 1946-1960 (2 letters)

Roche, Mme. Yolande, 1966-1967 (4 letters)

Rockefeller, Blanchette (Mrs. John D. Rockefeller III), 1962 (1 letter)

Rockefeller, John Davison, IV, 1967 (1 wedding announcement): for Rockefeller and Sharon Lee Percy

Rockefeller, Nelson A., undated and 1967 (2 printed invitations)

Rocourt, Evelyn, 1954-1955 (4 letters)

Rodgers, Paul C. (Burton-Rodgers, Inc.), 1946 (13 letters)

Roffman, Edward A. Roffman Associates, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer's office mentioning György Kepes

Rogers, Ernesto N. (Banfi Belgiojoso Peressutti Rogers, architects), undated and 1938-1950 (6 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Rombro, Louise, 1950 (1 letter)

Root, Ballantine, Harlan, Bushby & Palmer, 1952 (1 letter)

Rosenberg, E., 1956 (1 letter)

Rosenthal, Julius, 1950 (2 letters)

Rosenthal, Richard Laurence, 1969 (1 letter)

Ross, Janet (Vassar College), 1950 (1 letter)

Rossi, Irving, 1944 (2 letters)

Rossum, Cheryl (photographer), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Roth, Alfred (architect), 1933-1963 (9 letters)

Roth, Gordon (builder), 1946-1947 (3 letters)

Roth, Joan, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Rothschild, Sigmund, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer

Roux, Alina (Photograph Department, UNESCO), 1960 (2 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Rowe, James (Corcoran, Foley, Youngman & Rowe), 1970 (1 letter)

Royal Society of Arts, 1969 (4 letters)

Rudert, Anton, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer

Rudofsky, Bernard, 1946-1950 (2 letters)

Russell, Gordon, 1936-1947 (3 letters)

Russell, Véra, 1969 (1 letter)

Rutherford, Eric, 1964-1967 (6 letters)

Rutledge, Dick, 1951 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Saarinen, Eero, undated and 1946-1954 (5 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Eero Saarinen & Associates, 1955 (1 letter)

Sackler, Raymond R., 1972 (1 letter)

Ed Sacks Company, 1950 (1 letter)

Saidenberg, Eleanore (Mrs. Daniel Saidenberg), undated (1 letter)

Sailer, John, 1968 (1 letter)

St. Francis de Sales Church, 1965-1966 (2 letters)

St. James Press, Ltd., 1977 (2 letters)

St. John's Abbey, 1953-1978 (9 letters)

Sakakura, Junzo, 1968 (1 letter)

Sakakura, Miho, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Salzano, Baron de Ferraris (Italian Consulate General), 1956 (2 letters): from Breuer

Salzman, Stanley (architect), 1947-1971 (2 letters)

Sampson, Thérèse (Mrs. Richard Sampson), 1954 (1 letter)

Samuely, Felix J. (consulting engineer), 1954 (3 letters)

Sanchez, Sergio, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Sanders & Malsin, Architects, 1949 (1 letter)

Krausz J. Sándor és Jeno, 1933 (1 letter)

San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, 1961 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Sarabhai, Gera, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Sarah Lawrence College, 1961-1976 (4 letters): 3 from Breuer

Sarton, May, undated (1 letter)

Sato, Chikafusa, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Satterlee, Nicholas, 1965 (1 letter)

Saturday Home Magazine, 1947 (1 letter)

Saxl, Erwin J. (Saxl Instrument Company), 1945 (1 letter)

Sayago, Manuel (Centro Profesional del Este), 1960 (2 letters)

Saybolt, Cleland & Alexander, Inc., 1945-1946 (2 letters)

Schaaf, Miv (Architectural Panel), 1958 (1 letter)

Scharff, Stephen L., 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Schawinsky, Xanti and Irene, undated and 1934-1964 (14 letters)

Schecter, Jack H. (architect), 1950 (1 letter)

Schendell, Hal, 1947 (2 letters): to Eliot Noyes

Schickel, William J., 1964 (1 letter)

Schillinger, Emilio F., 1964 (1 letter)

Schleifer, Fritz, 1934 (1 letter)

Schlemmer, Tut (Mrs. Oscar Schlemmer), 1960-1965 (3 letters)

Schlesinger, Alajos, undated (1 letter)

Schmalenbach, Werner (Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen), 1976 (2 letters)

Schmid, Elsa, 1950 (1 card): sent jointly with J. B. Neumann

Schmidt, Benno C. (J. H. Whitney & Company), 1970 (1 letter)

Schmidt-Gellerau, Karl, 1934 (3 letters)

Schmieg & Kotzian, 1945 (1 letter)

Architekturbüro Joachim Schmitz, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Schnall, Ben (photographer), undated (2 letters) vSchneck, Adolf G. (architect), 1947-1950 (2 letters)

Schneider-Manzell, Toni (Biennale Christlicher Kunst der Gegenwart Salzburg), 1964 (2 letters)

Robert Schoelkopf Gallery, undated (1 invitation): to meet Walker Evans

Schoendorff, Ellen G., 1937 (1 letter)

Schömer, Ervin (architect), 1974-1975 (6 letters)

Schorer, Mark, 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer

Schultz, Lili, 1964 (1 letter)

F. Schumacher & Company, 1954-1964 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Schuster, Mathias and Gerda (Schuster & Geiger), 1950-1964 (3 letters)

Schweighofer, Dr. Fritz, 1960 (1 letter)

Science Illustrated, 1955 (1 letter): from Breuer

Scitorszky, Hanna, 1966 (1 letter)

Scott, Stuart N. (Dewey, Gallantine, Bushby, Palmer & Wood), 1958 (1 letter)

Seagram-Distillers Corporation: see Kessler-Gallacher & Burton

Sears, Roebuck and Company (Arthur M. Wood), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer concerning luncheon for Alexander Calder

Segal, Georgette, 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Seghers, Pierre, 1963 (1 letter)

Segner, Marvin H., and John C. R. O'Neill (consulting engineers), undated (1 letter)

Segre, Mr., 1959 (2 letters): from Breuer

Seidel, Bert (architect), 1955 (2 letters)

Seidler, Harry (architect, Black Mountain College), 1946-1978 (24 letters)

Sekey, Sue, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Selinger, Hans, 1956 (1 letter)

Selwood, Christopher, 1958-1959 (2 letters): see also Gardner-Medwin, R. J.

Selye, Hans, 1967 (1 invitation): to George Washington Awards Dinner in honor of Breuer, Selye, and Watson Kirkconnell

Semrad, Peter H., 1957 (1 letter)

Senix Aerial (Don Preuss), 1947 (1 letter)

Sert, José Luis (architect) and Moncha, 1945-1970 (7 letters): see National Council of American Soviet Friendship, Inc., Architects' Committee; Project File for UNESCO

Setzer, H. O. (Spartan Tire & Recapping Company), 1947 (3 letters)

Sevely, Marvin, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Seyton, Mrs., 1954 (1 letter)

Shackleton, Edwin, 1951 (1 letter)

Shand, James (Art and Technics, Ltd.), 1950 (1 letter)

Shankland, Graeme, 1939 (1 letter)

Shannon, Edgar Finley (University of Virginia), 1967 (1 invitation): to Founder's Day Exercises

Sharon Forest Service Company, Inc., 1950 (5 letters)

Shattuck, George, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Shelton Roofing Company, Inc., 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Shepley, Anna L., undated (2 letters)

Shinoda, Toko, 1964 (2 letters)

Shokokusha Publishing Company, 1961-1964 (10 letters)

Shook, Ken, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Shuster, George N. (University of Notre Dame), 1962 (1 letter)

Sichel, Miss Cuy, 1964 (1 letter): from Breuer concerning Eric Rutherford's artwork

Siepman, Charles, 1956 (1 letter)

Siesel, Harold J. (Harold J. Siesel Company, Advertising), 1947 (1 letter)

Simha, O. Robert (Fulbright scholar), 1958 (1 letter)

Simon, Eva, 1934 (1 letter)

Simon, Steph (Ateliers Jean Prouvé), 1953-1956 (7 letters)

Simonson, Lee, 1955 (1 letter)

Simpson, Robert (Chemical Bank), 1975 (1 letter)

Simpson, William (New York University), 1960 (1 letter): from Robert F. Gatje

Sindicato Nacional de la Construcción (Jorge Fernández de Cuevas, architect), 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer

Sive, André (architect), 1947 (1 letter)

Skidmore College, 1954 (1 letter)

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1959-1965 (3 letters)

Skouras, Odyssia A. and Federico Quadrani, 1964 (1 exhibition announcement): for Francesco Somaini

Slayton, William L. (Urban America, Inc.), 1967-1968 (2 letters)

Sloth, Finn (Milieu Company), 1966-1967 (5 letters)

Smith, Christina, 1963 (2 letters)

Smith, Elbert G. (University of Denver), 1946 (1 letter)

Smith, Hamilton and Caroline, 1954-1978 (34 letters): see Gatje Papachristou & Smith; Project File for UNESCO

Smith, Linus Burr, 1956 (1 letter)

Smithsonian Institution: 1981 (4 letters)

Snyder, J. Rowland, 1968 (1 letter)

Sobelsohn, Jacob (CPA), 1945-1946 (3 letters)

Sociedad de Art Moderno, México, 1944 (1 letter)

Società degli Ingegneri e degli Architetti in Torino, 1960 (3 letters)

Society of Student Architects (Polytechnic, London), 1955 (2 letters)

Somaini, Francesco, 1964 (exhibition announcement)

Somerville, City of, Massachusetts, 1950 (1 letter)

Charles W. Sommer & Bro., Inc. (importers), 1946 (2 letters)

Sonnenberg, Benjamin (and John L. Loeb), undated (1 invitation): to birthday for Armond Eiff [?]

Sorensen, Abel (Von der Lancken, Lundquist and Sorensen), 1954 (1 letter)

Soupault, Ré Philippe, 1946-1950 (2 letters)

Southern California, University of, 1947-1958 (2 letters)

Sovik, Mathre and Madson, Architects, 1966 (1 letter)

Speert, Harry A., 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Spencer, William A. (New York University), 1960 (2 letters): from Robert F. Gatje

Speyer, Darthea (American Legation), 1950 (1 letter)

Spilman, Raymond, 1955 (1 letter)

Spinelli, Pat, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Spring, Bernard Polmer, 1945 (1 letter)

Stadler-Stölzl, G., 1967 (1 letter)

Staehelin, William R. and Marina, 1959-1977 (11 letters)

Staempfli, George, 1965-1966 (2 letters)

Stanpat Company, 1954 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Starkey, Mrs. Robert James, 1960 (1 letter): from Breuer

Starr, Polly (Mrs. Donald Starr), 1937-1938 (2 letters)

Stattelman, Richard, 1966 (1 letter)

Stein, Richard G. (architect), undated and 1951 (2 letters)

Steinberg, Saul, 1951-1965 (2 letters): from Breuer

Stendig, Charles (Contract Furniture), 1963-1967 (5 letters)

Stern, Alfred (U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of International Trade Fairs), 1957-1958 (4 letters)

Stern, Andor, 1950 (1 letter)

Stern, Max, 1963 (2 letters)

Sternberg, Charles (International Rescue Committee), 1956 (1 letter): of introduction for ádám Krivátsky-Szüts

Stevens, Edmund, 1960 (2 letters)

Stillman, Edgar and Kate [?] ("B + J"), 1953-1965 (2 letters)

Stillman, Jean, 1965 (1 letter)

Stillman, Kathy, 1965 (1 letter)

Stillman, Rufus C. ("Ruf") and Leslie, undated and 1951-1975 (60 letters): 1954 letter from Breuer's office encloses Stillman's outline for a book

Stockton, Sue, undated and 1964 (2 letters)

Stoddard, Whitney S. (Society of Alumni of Williams College), 1951 (1 letter)

Stoller, Ezra (photographer) and Helen, undated and 1945-1967 (8 letters)

Stonorov, Oskar (architect) and Elizabeth, 1944-1946 (4 letters)

Storch, Samuel (Astorloid Manufacturing Company/Astor-Ramel Manufacturing Company), 1945 (6 letters)

Storrow, Helen (Mrs. James Jackson Storrow), undated (4 letters)

Strenger, József, 1963 (2 letters)

Strettell, Marguerita (Rita), undated (1 letter)

Strohbach, Susi, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Strudwick Board of Trade, 1945 (1 letter)

Strunk, Granville B. (Santa Ana City Schools), 1946 (1 letter)

Stubbins, Hugh A. (architect), 1950-1977 (6 letters)

Stylos, Architectural Students Association at Delft, 1954 (1 letter)

Sugár, Stephen, 1947-1951 (2 letters): from Breuer

Sunderland, Mrs. Francis A., 1954 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Suter-Moser, Claude, 1956: see Project File for UNESCO

Sutnar, Ladislav, 1951-1965 (2 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Suzuki, Shizuo, 1975 (1 letter including résumé)

Swan, Robert Andrew, 1960-1963 (2 letters)

Swanson & Brey, Architects, 1961 (1 letter)

Swanson, Dean, 1963 (1 letter): to Charles H. Sawyer

Sweeney, James J., 1938 (2 letters): from Breuer

George J. Switzer Company, 1954-1956 (4 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Syracuse University Library, 1968 (1 letter)

Syracuse University, School of Architecture, 1959 (8 letters)

Syska and Hennessy, Inc., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Szabó, Albert, 1947-1950 (2 letters)

Szabó, Eva Mary (master weaver), 1966 (1 letter)

Szabó, G. (African Hide Trading Corporation), 1964 (1 letter)

Szak, László, 1957 (2 letters)

Szegedy-Maszák, Aladár (minister of Hungary), 1947 (1 letter)

Székely, Sándor, 1957-1959 (5 letters)

Székely, Tamás István (Wohnbedarf furniture store), 1956-1965 (10 letters): see Project File for UNESCO

Szüle, Peter János, 1975 (2 letters)

Tadashi, Iijima, 1963 (1 letter)

Tange, Kenzo and Toshike, 1960-1968 (3 letters)

Tanier, George (George Tanier, Inc.), 1961 (2 letters)

Tapia, Raúl, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Tate, Allen and Helen, 1966-1967 (2 letters)

Tate, Isabella (Bella), 1963 (1 letter)

Taylor, Harold, 1951-1968 (3 letters)

Tech Reps, Inc., 1966 (1 letter)

Teller, Mrs. Walter M., 1945 (1 letter)

Terminal Radio Corporation, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Tesla, S., 1961 (1 letter)

Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1962-1963 (2 letters)

Theband, Polly, 1964-1965 (3 letters)

Thebond [?], Sacha, 1959 (1 letter)

Thole, Henry G. (Seaboard Surety Company), 1947 (1 letter)

J. Walter Thompson Company, 1956 (1 letter)

Thompson, Marion Gordon (Mrs. A. W. Thompson), 1950 (1 letter): see Project File for UNESCO

Thompson, Rolland, 1955-1969 (3 letters)

Thonet Brothers, Inc., 1966-1968 (3 letters): see also Pilzer, Leopold

Thost, Eberhard, undated and 1934-1937 (4 letters)

Throop, Mortimer, 1959 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Thun, Ole, 1976 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Thurman, Marie Christophe de Menil, undated (1 letter)

Thürmer, Ludwig and Marie Luise, 1965-1970 (8 letters)

Tibby, Jack, 1954-1956 (4 letters)

Tice & Lynch, Inc., 1953 (1 letter)

Tieger, Robert M.., 1946 (1 letter)

Tildy, Mrs. Zoltán, 1947 (1 invitation): to her honorary dinner

Tillinger, Jerry D. (Ferendino, Grafton, Spillis, Candela), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer

Time magazine, 1954-1960 (6 letters): see also Jones, Cranston

Tischler, Julie [?], 1934 (1 letter)

Tizzone [?], Joe, 1967 (1 letter)

Todd, Charles I. (Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company), 1958 (1 letter)

Tolnay, Károly ("Carl"), 1959 (1 letter)

Tompkins, Gilbert Calyer, undated and 1941-1968 (7 letters)

Torin Corporation, 1974-1975 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Torok, László (engineer), 1933 (1 letter)

Toronto, University of, Architectural Society of, 1958-1960 (7 letters)

Touche, A., 1963 (1 letter): from Breuer

Tourneroche, R. (Comptoir Artisanal du Maroc), 1956 (2 letters)

Towers, Mrs. Henry, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Townsend-Chatterton Company, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer

Tragseil, Karl (Austrian architect), 1950 (1 letter)

Tralau, Walter (Gerhard Marcks/Wera Mayer-Waldeck/Walter Tralau), 1953 (1 letter): includes a printed statement about Walter Gropius

Treseder, Frank C., 1946 (2 letters)

W. F. Tubbs Company, 1944 (1 letter): from Breuer

Tuchman, Barbara (Mrs. Lester Tuchman), 1970 (1 letter)

Turner, Howard (Turner Construction Company), 1968 (1 letter)

Mark Twain Journal (Cyril Clemens), 1969 (1 letter)

Tyroler, József ("José"), 1938-1940 (2 letters)

Uda, William, 1951 (1 letter)

Ugarte, Federico A. (architect), 1963 (1 letter)

Undicesima Triennale di Milano, 1957 (5 letters)

UNESCO Centrum Nederland, 1954 (1 letter)

UNESCO, Paris, 1958-1961 (4 letters)

Union Carbide Building, 1963 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Union pour le Recouvrement des Cotisations de Sécurité Sociale et d'Allocations Familiales (URSSAF), 1953 (1 letter): from Breuer

United Nations, New York, 1966 (2 letters)

United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office concerning Grand Coulee Dam

United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization, 1938-1959 (4 letters from Breuer)

United States Department of State, 1946-1974 (4 letters)

United States Embassy, London, 1960-1961 (2 letters): from Breuer concerning Jo Yorke and Jane Susannah Yorke

United States General Services Administration (GSA), 1963-1977 (3 letters)

United States Government Printing Office, 1947 (2 letters): from Breuer

United States Information Agency, 1957-1964 (7 letters)

United States National Commission for UNESCO, 1951 (information for a conference)

United States Plywood Corporation, 1946 (1 letter)

United States Postmaster General, 1955 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

United States Selective Service, 1942 (notice of classification)

United States Social Security Administration, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Untermeyer, Louis, 1964 (1 letter)

Urbahn, Max O. (architect), 1965-1975 (2 letters)

Ustinov, Nadie, undated (1 letter)

Vachon, Judy and David, undated and 1964 (2 letters)

Valentin, Kurt (Buchholz Gallery), 1944 (1 letter)

Valle, Tommaso and Gilberto, undated (1 letter)

Van Altena, Edward, 1951 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Van den Broek, Professor J. H. (architect), undated (1 letter)

van der Straeten, Jean (CBR Cimenteries Bruxelles), 1970 (1 letter)

Van der Wal, Dr. G., undated and 1961-1966 (6 letters)

Van Doren, Mark, 1963 (2 letters): see also Citizens Committee for a Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

van Eesteren, C. (architect), 1951 (1 letter)

van Leer, Oscar, 1970 (1 letter)

van Westen, J. H., 1960 (1 letter)

Varèse, Edgard (composer), 1956 (1 letter)

Vargha, László I., 1967 (2 letters)

Vecchione, Robert, 1964-1970 (2 letters)

Véghelyi, Péter (Acta Paediatrica, Hungarian Science Academy), 1963-1972 (5 letters)

Ventris, Dora (and Michael), undated (1 letter)

Vergun, Alexei, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Verlag Girsberger, 1956 (1 letter): from Breuer

Viasz, Andor Safed ("Bendj"), 1962 (1 letter)

Vidal, Yves, 1956-1971 (7 letters)

Vincent, Mr., 1963 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Violich, Francis, 1955 (1 letter)

Virág, Csaba (Hungarian architect), 1965-1974 (3 letters)

Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1960 (2 letters)

Virginia, University of, 1967-1970 (18 letters)

Vissière, A. (architect), undated (1 letter)

Visy, Béla, 1957 (1 letter)

Vitrum magazine (Centro Informazioni e Studi per le Applicazioni del Vetro nell'Edilizia e nell'Arredamento; C.I.S.A.V.), 1955 (1 letter)

Vogel, George S. (Temple Israel, Cortlandt), 1951 (1 letter)

Voigt, James D. (Voigt and Fourré, Architects), 1958 (4 letters)

Volante, Julio C., 1955-1963 (2 letters)

von Debschitz, Irene, 1935 (1 letter)

von Erffa, H., 1951-1968 (2 letters)

von Meyerburg, Henrietta [?], undated (1 letter)

von Moltke, Wilhelm Viggo, 1946-1958 (4 letters)

von Segesser, Beat and Francisca, 1968-1975 (1 letter, plus 4 from Breuer)

Wachsmann, Konrad (architect/designer, General Panel Corporation), 1945-1965 (8 letters): see National Council of American Soviet Friendship, Inc., Architects' Committee

Wadsworth, Suzanne G., 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Wagner, Martin (Harvard University), 1946 (2 letters)

Senator Wagner Memorial Dinner, 1965 (1 invitation): from mayor of New York

Walker and Company, 1966-1967 (2 letters): includes a typescript about Breuer; see also Heyer, Paul O.

Walker Art Center, Center Arts Council, 1959-1962 (12 letters)

Walker, H. E. L. (Universal Moulded Products Company, Ltd.), 1943 (1 letter)

Walker, Ralph (AIA), 1951 (1 letter): from Walter Gropius

Walker, Vicki, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Ward, Ernest and Priscilla (Sprague Electric Company), 1946 (2 letters)

Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Watson, Arthur K. (U.S. Embassy, Paris), 1970-1972 (2 letters)

Watson, Thomas, 1970 (1 letter)

Wattjes, Professor J. G., 1935 (1 letter)

Webb & Knapp (Canada), Ltd., 1963 (3 letters)

Weidler, Charlotte (Bauhaus Ausstellung), 1968 (1 letter)

Weidlinger, Paul, 1946: see Project File for UNESCO

Weidlinger Associates, 1983-1984 (2 letters)

Weiner, Paul L., 1950-1966 (2 letters)

Weinstein, Jerry, 1945 (1 letter)

William H. Weintraub & Company, Inc., 1943-1947 (3 letters)

Weiz [?], Tiberio, 1939 (1 letter)

Weizenblatt, Sprinza, 1946-1963 (20 letters)

Wenzler, William P. (architect), 1965-1968 (4 letters)

Weren, Edward C., 1946 (1 letter)

Werner, Ingrid, 1963 (3 letters)

Wertz, Mr. (Der Finanzminister des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen), 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer

West China Development Corporation, 1947 (1 letter)

West Coast Stained Shingle Company, 1950 (1 letter): from Breuer

Westcott and Mapes, Inc. (architects and engineers), 1970 (1 letter)

Western Arts Association, 1959 (4 letters)

Western Reserve University, 1958 (5 letters)

Westport Public Library, 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

Wetter, Barbara, 1980 (1 letter): concerns traveling exhibition

Wheaton, William L. (Pomona College), 1960 (1 letter)

White, George (architect of the Capitol), 1975 (1 letter): from Breuer

White House (Letitia Baldridge), 1963 (1 letter): mentions Jacqueline Kennedy

White, J. G. (Peerless Flooring Company), 1955 (1 letter)

Whitney, Charles E. (Publications, Inc.), 1954-1956 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Whitney Museum of American Art, 1968-1976 (19 letters): 1 from Jean Lipman; 14 from Breuer and a typescript about Alexander Calder

Who's Who in America, 1947 (2 letters)

Wieland, Albert, 1963 (1 letter)

Wiener, Paul Lester and Ingebord, 1944-1955 (3 letters)

Wiesenfeld, David, 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Wieser, U. P. (Wohnbedarf furniture store), 1959-1960 (3 letters)

Wigglesworth, Isabella C., 1946 (1 letter)

Wilcox & Company, 1972 (1 letter)

Wilder, Hugo, 1946 (1 letter): from E. S. Ferguson

Wiley, Chuck, 1950 (1 letter)

Wilhelm, Günter, 1949 (1 letter)

Wilinski, Erich, 1935 (2 letters)

Willard, Marian G. ("Viva Villa"; East River Gallery), undated and 1935-1965 (25 letters)

Williams, Amancio (architect), 1955 (1 letter)

Williams, Daniel, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer's office

Williams, Peter C., 1956 (1 letter)

Williams, Preston, 1958 (2 letters)

Wilson, Dr. and Mrs. Julius Lane, 1965 (1 letter)

Wilson, June P. (Mrs. Kenneth Wilson), 1968 (1 letter)

Wilson, Marjorie (Mrs. Will Wilson), 1956 (1 letter)

Winde, McCormick & Chapin, 1945 (1 letter)

Wingler, Hans, undated and 1966-1980 (23 letters): 14 from Breuer; see also Bauhaus Archiv E.V.

Winkler, Robert, 1955 (1 letter)

Winsten, Steve, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Winston, E., 1950 (1 letter)

Winter, Edward, 1950-1951 (3 letters)

Wisconsin Chapter of AIA, 1960 (1 letter)

Wisconsin, University of, 1960 (2 letters)

Wisdom Encyclopedia, 1966 (1 letter)

Wogner, Charles, 1951 (2 letters)

Wohlstetter, Albert (Atlas Aircraft Products Corporation), 1944-1946 (7 letters)

Wohlstetter, Marjorie, 1946 (1 letter)

Wolf, Albin, 1933 (5 letters)

Wolf, Ferenc, 1963-1965 (4 letters)

Wolfe, James F. (Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Inc.), 1960 (2 letters)

Wolff, Robert Jay, 1956-1975 (3 letters): 1 from Breuer

Wolfson, Sidney, 1954-1955 (2 letters): from Breuer's office; 1975 letter is from Nicholas P. Appy, executor of Sidney Wolfson's will

Wollowick, David P., 1947 (1 letter)

Wong, Andy, 1968 (1 letter): from Breuer

Wong, Tommy (UCLA), 1974 (1 letter)

Worcester Art Museum, 1954 (1 letter)

Working, Jane, undated and 1961 (5 letters)

Wright, Irving S. and Lois, 1963-1968 (2 letters)

Wright, Russell (pottery), 1950-1951 (2 letters): from Breuer's office

Wu, King-lui, 1945-1950 (7 letters): 6 from Breuer

Wunderlich, Carlos Asensio, 1946 (1 letter): from Breuer

Wundrich-Meissen, 1934 (1 letter)

Wurster, William W. (architect) and Catherine, 1946-1960 (6 letters): see American Society of Planners and Architects (ASPA)

X Functie, 1953-1957 (3 letters)

Yale University, 1945-1976 (4 letters)

Yamawaki, Iwao, 1954 (2 letters)

Yasko, Karel, 1968 (1 letter)

Yorke, F. R. S. (Francis Reginald Stevens Yorke; architect), 1944-1962 (31 letters)

Yorke, Thelma and Kay, 1938-1939 (2 letters)

Yoshimura, Junzo (architect), undated (1 letter): to Yoshimura from Pella Rolscreen Company

Yoshioka, Yasugoro, undated (1 letter)

Young, Edward L., 1966 (1 letter)

Young, Hamilton, 1938 (1 letter)

Yu, Jane, 1964-1965 (3 letters)

Yurchenco, Basil ("Chenk"; Goldwater & Yurchenco Associates), 1947-1950 (3 letters)

Zahedi, H. E. Ardeshir (ambassador of Iran), 1974-1975 (4 letters): from Breuer

Zanuso, Marco (architect; Olivetti), 1957 (1 letter): from Breuer

Zechlin, Hans Josef, 1950 (1 letter)

Ziegler, Barbara, 1947 (1 letter)

Ziegler, Frank, 1974 (1 letter): from Breuer

Ziegler, Richard, undated (1 letter)

Zwick, Virgil J., 1959 (1 letter)
Collection Restrictions:
The microfilm for this collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Marcel Breuer papers, 1920-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.breumarc, Series 2
See more items in:
Marcel Breuer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94269a410-353a-4450-a036-6d5688d6cf20
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-breumarc-ref54

Gregory Battcock papers

Creator:
Battcock, Gregory, 1937-  Search this
Names:
Bronx Museum of the Arts  Search this
International Association of Art Critics  Search this
Trylon & perisphere  Search this
William Paterson College of New Jersey -- Faculty  Search this
Battcock, Elizabeth  Search this
Beker, Gisela  Search this
Brown, Cee  Search this
Burton, Scott  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976 -- Photographs  Search this
Carsman, Jon, 1944-  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Dalí, Salvador, 1904-  Search this
Dreva, Jerry, 1945-1997  Search this
Frank, Peter, 1950-  Search this
George, John  Search this
Glusberg, Jorge  Search this
Goldstein, Al  Search this
Halbert, Jacques  Search this
Hess, Emil, 1889-1945  Search this
Levine, Les, 1935-  Search this
Livingston, Braniff  Search this
McGeehan, Robert, 1933-  Search this
Morley, Malcolm, 1931-  Search this
Nakagawa, Naoto, 1944-  Search this
Neri, Julio  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-2006  Search this
Partch, Harry, 1901-1974  Search this
Peña, Rolando, 1942-  Search this
Picard, Lil  Search this
Pocock, Philip  Search this
Schult, Ha, 1939-  Search this
Van Baron, Judith  Search this
Varble, Stephen  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Wechter, Vivienne Thaul  Search this
Whyte, Ron  Search this
Extent:
10.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Photographs
Interviews
Date:
1952-circa 1980
Summary:
The papers of New York art critic, writer, educator, and painter, Gregory Battcock, measure 10.6 linear feet and date from 1952 to circa 1980. The collection includes biographical material, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, artists' files, personal business records, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographic materials, and artifacts that detail his involvement in both the mainstream and fringe art scenes of the 1970s.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York art critic, writer, educator, and painter, Gregory Battcock, measure 10.6 linear feet and date from 1952 to circa 1980. The collection includes biographical material, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, artists' files, personal business records, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographic materials, and artifacts that detail his involvement in both the mainstream and fringe art scenes of the 1970s.

Biographical materials contain address lists, six appointment books, a diploma and certificate, family history, identification documents, interviews, resumes, obituaries, a William Paterson College of New Jersey teaching file, and membership files for The Bronx Museum, International Association of Art Critics, and other organizations. Correspondence is with Battcock's mother, Elizabeth; friends and colleagues Peter Frank, John George, Al Goldstein, Braniff Livingston, Robert McGeehan, Julio Neri, Judith Van Baron, Ron Whyte, and others regarding social events, reprint permissions, book projects, travel arrangements, real estate, and freelance work.

Writings and notes include personal journal entries, drafts for articles and essays, manuscripts for published and unpublished works including "The Story of Film" and Breaking the Sound Barrier: A Critical Anthology of the New Music, his dissertation titled "Constructivism and Minimal Art: Some Critical, Theoretical and Aesthetic Correlations," book proposals, lectures, limericks, restaurant reviews, notes and writings by Jorge Glusberg and Vivienne Thaul Wechter.

Files for artists contain mostly printed material on Gisela Beker, Cee Brown, Jon Carsman, Christo, Jerry Dreva, Jacques Halbert, Emil Hess, Les Levine, Naoto Nakagawa, Nam Jun Paik, Harry Partch, Lil Picard, Philip Pocock, HA Schult, Andy Warhol, and others. The file for Salvador Dalí contains one video recording. Battcock's personal business records include contracts and payments for his writing, real estate papers, business agreements, papers regarding his father's estate, a loan agreement for Andy Warhol's "Self Portrait," and files detailing the theft of two painting by Malcom Morley from Battcock's residence.

Found in printed materials are clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, flyers, post cards, magazines, press releases, issues of Trylon & Perisphere and Gay magazines, and other material that features Battcock's writings. Additional clippings of Battcock's writings that appeared in the New York Free Press, New York Review of Sex and Politics, Domus, The Soho Weekly News, New York Arts Journal, Gay, and other publications are contained in ten scrapbooks.

Photographs are of Battcock, colleagues and friends, works of art from his personal collection, travel, and artists Alexander Calder, Andy Warhol, Nam Jun Paik, Julio Neri, Rolando Peña, Stephen Varble, and Scott Burton. Several keys with a detached keychain labeled 'studio' are in artifacts.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 9 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1958-1980 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1960s-circa 1980 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 12)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1966-1980 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 4-6)

Series 4: Artists' Files, 1960s-1980 (0.6 linear feet; Box 6)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1966-1980 (0.5 linear feet; Box 6-7)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1952-1980 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 7-8, 12-13)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1959-1980 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 8-9, 12)

Series 8: Photographic Materials, 1960s-1980 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 9-11)

Series 9: Artifacts, circa 1970s (0.1 linear feet; Box 11)
Biographical / Historical:
Gregory Battcock (1937-1980) was an art critic, writer, educator, and painter from New York, N.Y. He attended Michigan State University, the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome, and Hunter College for his undergraduate and graduate studies before receiving his Ph.D. from New York University in 1978. His dissertation was titled "Constructivism and Minimal Art: Some Aesthetic, Theoretical and Critical Correlations."

Battcock was a prolific writer and wrote numerous articles as a correspondent for Art & Artists and Domus magazines. His column, "The Last Estate," appeared in Gay magazine as well as other publications. In 1977, Battcock co-founded the short-lived magazine, Trylon & Perisphere, with his close friend, playwright Ron Whyte. Even though only three issues were printed, the magazine exhibited Battcock's predilection for art society gossip, and provocative imagery and prose. E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc. published several of Battcock's books including Why Art: Casual Notes on the Aesthetics of the Immediate Past, Breaking the Sound Barrier: A Critical Anthology of the New Music, and Idea Art: A Critical Anthology. In addition to his writing career, Battcock taught fine art at William Paterson College of New Jersey, was art critic for New York Free Press from 1967 to 1970, Editor-in-Chief of Arts Magazine from 1973 to 1975, and appeared in the Andy Warhol films The Illiac Passion, Horse, and Batman Dracula.

Battcock was murdered in Puerto Rico on December 25, 1980. At the time of his death he was working on "The Story of Film," which remains unpublished, and The Art of Performance: A Critical Anthology, which was published posthumously in 1984.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an audio interview recorded on December 11, 1969 with Gregory Battcock for the University Roundtable radio series. The recording forms part of the WFUV radio interviews relating to art, 1969-1973 collection.
Provenance:
The Gregory Battcock papers were donated in 1992 by Nancy Mahl, an artist who occupied a studio in Jersey City, N.J. that had formerly been leased by a moving and storage company, and who came upon Battcock's papers in the building. The papers had been shipped to the Jersey City building without the knowledge of Ron Whyte (executor of Battcock's estate) and the Rev. Paul William Bradley, who had arranged to have Battcock's papers stored after his death. Additional papers were donated 2003 by Rev. Paul W. Bradley, who inherited the papers after the death of his partner Ron Whyte.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Constructivism (Art)  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art thefts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Photographs
Interviews
Citation:
Gregory Battcock Papers, 1952-circa 1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.battgreg
See more items in:
Gregory Battcock papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9173ed1ab-2aac-4e20-85fe-1a96e7acf785
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-battgreg
Online Media:

William Horace Littlefield papers

Creator:
Littlefield, William Horace, 1902-1969  Search this
Names:
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts (Provincetown, Mass.)  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Busa, Peter, 1914-1985  Search this
Draper, Muriel, b. 1886  Search this
Grimaldi, Vincent  Search this
Hayter, Stanley William, 1901-1988  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Kirstein, Lincoln, 1907-  Search this
MacLeish, Archibald, 1892-1982  Search this
Mayor, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1901-1980  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Sachs, Paul J. (Paul Joseph), 1878-1965  Search this
Wheeler, Monroe, 1899-  Search this
Extent:
6.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1920-1969
Scope and Contents:
Biographical information, correspondence, photographs, writings, works of art, scrapbooks, artists' and organization files, and inventories documenting William Littlefield's career and a painter, writer, and art collector.
Biographical material includes resumes and awards. Correspondence is with family, friends, galleries, and others, including letters from Littlefirld written while studying in Paris and other European cities. Correspondents include Jean Paul Slusser, Vincent Grimaldi, Stanley William Hayter, Monroe Wheeler, Paul Sachs, Mary Rockwell, Lincoln Kirstein, Duncan Phillips, Muriel Draper, A. Hyatt Mayor, Peter Busa, Archibald MacLeish, among others. Photographs are of Littlefield, his work, friends, and works of art by others. Writings include poetry, articles, essays, notes, a draft for "The Son," a ballet by Littlefield, 1934, and a transcript of a speech by Hans Hofmann given at the Riverside Museum, New York City, Feb. 16, 1941. Works of art include sketches by Littlefield and Stanley Hayter.
Scrapbooks and artists' files contain printed material, correspondence and photographs pertaining to Frank and Isabel Moser, and Mary Peixotto, Herman Heilborn and Alexis Arapoff and others. Organization files include the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts, the New School for Social Research, and The Club, of which he was a member. Inventories include works of art by Littlfield and in his estate.
Biographical / Historical:
William Horace Littlefield (1902-1969) was a painter, writer, and art collector in New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Donated 1971 by Nancy Stiner, an antique dealer who bought the papers, in 1992, by Fred J. Stone who purchased the estate, in 2007 by Peggy Stone, Fred Stone's daughter, and in 2011 by Arthur Hughes, who purchased the additional material from Nancy Stiner.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.littwill
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94717618d-e843-4ade-8991-d17771a69041
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-littwill

Harold Weston papers

Creator:
Weston, Harold, 1894-1972  Search this
Names:
Adirondack Trail Improvement Society  Search this
Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (UNITED STATES OF AMERICA). Americans-in-Britain Outpost  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors  Search this
Food for Freedom, Inc.  Search this
Harvard Lampoon (Organization)  Search this
Harvard University -- Students  Search this
International Association of Art. United States Committee  Search this
Montross Gallery  Search this
National Council on the Arts and Government  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
New York State Council on the Arts  Search this
Phillips Collection  Search this
Studio House (Phillips Memorial Gallery)  Search this
Carmichael, Leonard, 1898-1973  Search this
Dows, Olin, 1904-1981  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Rosenfeld, Paul, 1890-1946  Search this
Sizer, Theodore, 1892-1967  Search this
Weston, Faith  Search this
Extent:
24.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Christmas cards
Notes
Etchings
Speeches
Articles
Postcards
Poems
Woodcuts
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Copper plates
Place:
Adirondack Mountain Reserve (N.Y.)
Date:
1894-1978
bulk 1912-1972
Summary:
The papers of modernist painter and activist Harold Weston (1894-1972) date from 1894 to 1978 and measure 24.3 linear feet. The papers focus on Weston's painting career and his involvement with humanitarian and artistic causes. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, personal business records, association and organization records, commission and project files, materials relating to Weston's book Freedom in the Wilds, writings, artwork, printed materials, two scrapbooks, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of modernist painter and activist Harold Weston (1894-1972) date from 1894 to 1978 and measure 24.3 linear feet. The papers focus on Weston's painting career and his involvement with humanitarian and artistic causes. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, personal business records, association and organization records, commission and project files, materials relating to Weston's book Freedom in the Wilds, writings, artwork, printed materials, two scrapbooks, and photographs. The papers document his involvement with the Committee to Defend America, Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, Food for Freedom, the International Association of the Plastic Arts, National Countil on the Arts and Government, National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council for the Arts, Reconstruction Service Committee, and the YMCA in Baghdad.

Biographical materials include biographical sketches and resumes, including a short biography written by Faith Weston in 1969. There are records from his school years at Exeter Academy and Harvard University that include yearbooks, report cards, scholarship information, Harvard Lampoon materials, and a diploma from Harvard. Also found are materials relating to Faith Weston, membership cards, memorials information, passports and travel papers, and wedding wishes.

Correspondence from Harold Weston dates from his school years up until his death in 1972. In letters to his family, Weston discusses his education; his travel and activities in the Middle East during World War I; the Adirondacks; convalescense in France in the mid-1920s; his immediate family life; and exhibitions. Also found are holiday cards designed and printed by Weston. The majority of correspondence is with his father S. Burns Weston, mother Mary, sister Esther, brother Carl, Faith Weston and the Borton family, children Barbara, Bruce, and Haroldine, and others. Also found are letters between Weston and friend Theodore Sizer and Duncan Phillips of the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C.

Personal business and financial records relating to Weston's exhibitions include delivery receipts, agreements, hand-drawn gallery plans for exhibitions, lists of exhibitions, framing invoices, legal information, pricelists, records of sales, and lists of works of art. Galleries with which Weston held exhibitions, sold, or lent works of art include Boyer Galleries, Corcoran Gallery, the Gallery in Paoli, Montross Gallery, the Phillips Collection, and Studio House Galleries.

Records relating to Harold Weston's memberships and involvement with professional associations and service organizations are from the Adirondack Trail Improvement Society, the Committee to Defend America, Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, Food for Freedom, International Association of the Plastic Arts/International Arts Association, National Countil on the Arts and Government, National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, Reconstruction Service Committee, and the Young Men's Christian Association, Baghdad. The files include correspondence, financial records, meetings and membership information, notes, organizational history, photographs, printed materials, programs and activities records, speeches, and writings.

Files that document Weston's Building the United Nations and the Treasury Relief Project sponsored "Procurement Building Murals" are found within the Commissions and Project files series. The files include correspondence, financial information, legal documents, photographs of the works of art and research photos, and printed materials. Correspondence of note includes letters written by Lewis Mumford, Duncan Phillips, Eleanor Roosevelt on behalf of Weston's Building of the United Nations and letters from Leonard Carmichael, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Letters from Olin Dows of the Treasury Relief Art Project are within correspondence relating to the "Procurement Building Murals." Also found are preliminary sketches of the murals.

The Freedom in the Wilds series contains materials relating to the book which combined Weston's autobiography with a history of the Adirondack Mountain Reserve. Additional writings and notes are by Harold Weston and others, and include articles, poetry, notes, speech notes and speeches, and lists. Harold Weston's articles include "Persian Caravan Sketches" published in 1921 discussing his travels throughout the Middle East. Other articles are written by Duncan Phillips, Paul Rosenfeld, Barbara Weston, and Faith Weston. Also found are postcards annoted with notes by Harold Weston about his travels.

Artwork inlcudes sketches, etchings, copperplates, and woodcuts. There are copperplates entitled "Shroud" and of the series Building the United Nations for the Harvard Alumni bulletin in 1957; an untitled etching by Weston; sketches including those from Baghdad and watercolor sketches; a woodcut of the 1924 Weston holiday card; and scattered unsigned sketches probably not by Weston.

Printed materials include calendars with notations; clippings; exhibition catalogs and announcements for Weston's exhibitions dating from 1922-1976 and for others; gallery tags or labels for paintings shown in exhibitions; reproductions of illustrations for the Harvard Lampoon and full issues from 1911-1916; materials relating to the Harvard production of Henry IV, for which Weston designed the sets; reproductions of works of art by Weston and by others; school seals; and various art related publications.

There are two scrapbooks compiled by Faith Weston about her husband. The first contains materials relating to Weston's activity with the International Association of the Plastic Arts Conference of 1963, including a letter and photograph of President John F. Kennedy. The second scrapbook dates from 1977 and consists of general clippings relating to Weston's career, dating from 1917 to 1952 with additional materials added by Faith in 1977.

Photographs are of Weston, family members, exhibitions and installations, and works of art by Weston and others. There are also numerous photographs of Weston's travel through the Adirondacks, the Middle East, Europe, and India. Also found are glass plate negatives of works of art painted in France between 1926-1930; scattered glass plate negatives of Baghdad and the Middle East; glass plates belonging to S. Burns Weston of the Adirondacks, circa 1900; and approximately 100 lantern slides of the various Middle Eastern cities and ruins - probably used by Weston to illustrate his talks given in the 1920s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1896-1974 (Box 1, 38; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1894-1975 (Box 1-3, 38; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business and Financial records, 1912-1977 (Box 4; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Associations and Organizations records, 1916-1972 (Box 4-10, 37-38; 6.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Commissions and Project files, 1935-1965 (Box 10-12, 38, OV 39; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 6: -- Freedom in the Wilds -- records, late 1960s-1976 (Box 12-13; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Writings and Notes, 1912-1975 (Box 13-14; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Artwork and Artifacts, circa 1917-1967 (Box 14, 21; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, circa 1900-1978 (Box 15-18, 38; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 10: Scrapbooks, circa 1963-1977 (Box 17-18; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1900-1975 (Box 18-20, 22-36, 38; 4.8 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Modernist painter and federal Treasury Relief Art Project artist Harold Weston (1894-1972) worked primarily in New York City and St. Huberts, New York in the Adirondacks. Weston was president of the U.S. Commission of the International Association of Art/Plastic Arts and the Federation of Modern Painters and Scultors. He was also chairman of the National Council on the Arts and Government and active with various political and humanitarian causes.

Harold Weston was born in 1894 in Merion, Pennsylvania into a privileged family. He attended school in Europe as a teenager, where he began to draw and sketch. In 1910, Harold contracted Polio which left him with a weak leg. After graduating from Exeter Academy, Harold entered Harvard University with the class of 1916 and was active in the Delta Upsilon Club and the Harvard Lampoon, for which he illustrated.

Despite his leg, Weston was determined to serve in some form during World War I. He traveled to Baghdad and volunteered with the YMCA. Here he started the Baghdad Art Club and organized exhibitions of soldier art. He remained in the Middle East until 1919 and served as the official painter for the British Army. The colors and the landscape of the region also inspired later works of art.

Upon returning to the United States, Weston built a one-room cabin in the Adirondack Mountains, where he lived and painted. He had his first one-man exhibtition at the Montross Gallery in 1922. In 1923, he married Faith Borton who moved with him to the Adirondacks. His wife inspired his series of "landscape nudes" which treated the body with different techniques that would typically be used in landscape painting. After suffering from a kidney infection in 1925, Weston and his wife moved to Ceres, France to recover. Weston continued to paint and started a family with Faith while in France. In 1930, the family moved back to the United States and lived in Greenwich Village, New York.

From 1936-1938, Harold Weston worked with the federal Treasury Relief Art Project and painted murals in the Procurement Building in Washington, D.C. The murals represent the growth of public buildings during the Great Depression. He took on a second major project to document the contruction of the United Nations in a series of six paintings. Later, the Smithsonian Instution received the paintings as gifts through an independent committee.

In addition to painting, Harold Weston devoted himself to public service by becoming involved in humanitarian causes, artist professional organizations, and federal government support of the arts. Weston served as president or chairman of three different organizations including the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, the International Association of Art/International Association of the Plastic Art, and the National Council on the Arts and Government. Before the start of World War II, Harold Weston was named the Chairman of Essex County Committee to Defend America, which argued for financial support of the allied forces in World War II. After the start of the war, he helped form the Food for Freedom movement which urged American aid for European and Asian refugees. Similarly, Weston served as Executive Secretary for the Reconstruction Service Committee which was established to assist the rebuilding of Europe.

Later in life, Weston wrote a book Freedom in the Wilds, which combined his own autobiography with a history of the Adirondack Mountain Reserve. Harold Weston died on April 10th, 1972 in New York City.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel N69-76) including biographic notes, exhibition material, clippings, a presentation album, and commemorative stamps. Some, but not all, of these papers were included in later donations. Materials not donated remain with the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.

Syracuse University also holds circa 14 linear feet of Harold Weston's papers.
Provenance:
Harold Weston lent the Archives of American Art materials for microfilming in 1969. Faith Borton Weston, Harold Weston's widow, donated the papers in several increments between 1972-1980 and lent materials for microfilming in 1977.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painting, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Christmas cards
Notes
Etchings
Speeches
Articles
Postcards
Poems
Woodcuts
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Glass negatives
Lantern slides
Copper plates
Citation:
Harold Weston papers, 1894-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.westharo
See more items in:
Harold Weston papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw912c19da0-1e91-45ea-b15f-b3d423b2a075
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-westharo
Online Media:

Eric Gugler papers

Creator:
Gugler, Eric, 1889-1974  Search this
Names:
Cornell, Katharine, 1893-1974  Search this
Gugler, Frida  Search this
Manship, Paul, 1885-1966  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Extent:
34.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Watercolors
Glass plate negatives
Paintings
Photographs
Blueprints
Date:
1889-1977
Summary:
The papers of architect and painter Eric Gugler measure 34.4 linear feet and date from 1889-1977. Found within the papers are biographical materials, including papers relating to the Gugler family, personal and business correspondence, writings, project files for commercial and residential commissions, personal business records, photographic materials, including 180 glass plate slides, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of architect and painter Eric Gugler measure 34.4 linear feet and date from 1889-1977. Found within the papers are biographical materials, including papers relating to the Gugler family, personal and business correspondence, writings, project files for commercial and residential commissions, personal business records, photographic materials, including 180 glass plate slides, and artwork.

Biographical materials include certificates, official documents, curriculum vitae, and histories of the Gugler family. Correspondence consists of professional letters regarding prospective and active projects, and personal correspondence from friends and family, including Eleanor Roosevelt, Katherine Cornell, and Paul Manship. Writings include book proposal drafts, essays, notes, speeches, and writings by others.

Project files consist of correspondence, architectural sketches, blueprints, and photographic and printed materials related to Gugler's work on commercial, residential, governmental, and memorial commissions. Renderings of specific design objects, sculptures, and Gugler's collaborative work on preservation efforts are also included.

Personal business records include correspondence related to Gugler's firm, including office leases, prospective client lists, and service fees. Printed material consists of clippings, exhibition material, postcards, and other miscellaneous items.

Photographic materials are of Eric Gugler and members of the Gugler family. Artwork includes sketches, watercolors, paintings, photographs of artwork, and artwork by Frida Gugler.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series. Glass plate slides are housed separately and closed to researchers, but listed where they fall intellectually within the collection.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1898-1975 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, OV 33)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1906-1974 (4 linear feet; Boxes 1-5, 20, OV 33)

Series 3: Writings, 1932-1973 (16 folders; Box 5)

Series 4: Project Files, 1889-1977 (28.2 linear feet; Boxes 5-18, 20-24, 70-72, OV 25-31, OV 33-49, RD 50-51, 53-69)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1928-1972 (0.3 linear feet; Box 18)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1923-1977 (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 19, 24)

Series 7: Photographic Materials, 1890-1966 (9 folders; Box 19)

Series 8: Artwork, 1895-1970 (0.4 linear feet; Box 19, OV 32)
Biographical / Historical:
Architect and painter Eric Gugler (1889-1974) lived and worked in New York City, New York. Known for his work on monuments and memorials, Gugler was selected by President Roosevelt to head the redesign and building of the White House's West Wing in 1934.

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to lithographer Julius Gugler and his wife, Bertha Bremer, Gugler attended Columbia University and received a three year scholarship to continue his studies at the American Academy in Rome. In 1919, he opened his architectural firm on Park Avenue in New York City and began accepting residential and commercial commissions. In addition to designing buildings and houses for clients, Gugler also completed smaller design objects for ceiling details, sculptures, murals, and decorative structures. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, his firm won commissions to complete World War I Memorials in New York and Chicago, Illinois, and also received a major commission to design the Educational Building in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Around this time, Gugler married Broadway actress and dancer Anne Tonetti and designed a second residence in the artist's community of Sneden's Landing, New York.

Gugler's interest and willingness to work on large scale memorials and institutional buildings aided in his appointment to a number of prominent commissions in the 1930s to the 1950s. These include the design of the White House's West Wing and the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial in Italy, new construction and renovations to the Forman School (Conn.) and Wabash College (Ind.), and the building of residential houses for Katherine Cornell, Barry Faukner, and Paul Manship. In the 1960s, he was selected to head memorial designs for the Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Theodore Roosevelt Memorials in Washington, D.C., and also spent considerable time and energy developing the "Hall of Our History" project. Gugler remained active designing and working on projects until his death in 1974.
Related Materials:
The White House Historical Association's Office of the Curator holds additional Eric Gugler Papers related to the expansion and redesign of the West Wing in 1934.
Provenance:
The papers were donated in 1977 by Gugler's wife, Anne Tonetti Gugler. Additional materials were donated between 1979 and 1980 by Gugler's business associate, Ferdinand Eiseman.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Architects as artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Architecture -- Designs and plans  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Architects -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Watercolors
Glass plate negatives
Paintings
Photographs
Blueprints
Citation:
Eric Gugler papers, 1889-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gugleric
See more items in:
Eric Gugler papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a729ea25-2ca9-4693-95a4-2f15b5651aab
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gugleric
Online Media:

Rockwell Kent papers

Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists League of America  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Citizens' Committee for Government Arts Projects  Search this
Farmers Union of the New York Milk Shed  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Federal Writers' Project  Search this
International Workers Order  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
National Farmers' Union (U.S.)  Search this
National Maritime Union of America  Search this
United American Artists  Search this
United Office and Professional Workers of America  Search this
United Scenic Artists  Search this
Boyesen, Bayard  Search this
Chamberlain, J. E.  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland), 1880-1964  Search this
Daniel, Charles, 1878-1971  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
DuBois, W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Fitzgerald, James, 1899-1971  Search this
Freuchen, Peter, 1886-1957  Search this
Gellert, Hugo, 1892-1985  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hays, Lee, 1914-1981  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Jones, Dan Burne  Search this
Keller, Charles, 1914-2006  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Nearing, Helen  Search this
Nearing, Scott, 1883-1983  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Rasmussen, Knud, 1879-1933  Search this
Reeves, Ruth, 1892-1966  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945  Search this
Ruggles, Carl, 1876-1971  Search this
Seeger, Pete, 1919-2014  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur, 1879-1962  Search this
Untermeyer, Louis, 1885-1977  Search this
Wildenstein, Felix, 1883-1952  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl, 1891-  Search this
Extent:
88 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
circa 1840-1993
bulk 1935-1961
Summary:
The Rockwell Kent papers measure 88.0 linear feet and date from circa 1840 to 1993 with the bulk of the collection dating from 1935 to 1961. The collection provides comprehensive coverage of Kent's career as a painter, illustrator, designer, writer, lecturer, traveler, political activist, and dairy farmer.
Scope and Content Note:
The Rockwell Kent papers measure 88 linear feet and date from circa 1840 to 1993 with the bulk of the collection dating from 1935 to 1961. The collection provides comprehensive coverage of Kent's career as a painter, illustrator, designer, writer, lecturer, traveler, political activist, and dairy farmer.

Circumstances surrounding the acquisition of the papers are highlighted in an article by Garnett McCoy ("The Rockwell Kent Papers," in the Archives of American Art Journal, 12, no. 1 [January 1972]: 1-9), recommended reading for researchers interested in the collection. The collection is remarkably complete, for in the mid 1920s Kent began keeping carbon copies of all outgoing letters, eventually employing a secretary (who became his third wife and continued her office duties for the remainder of Kent's life).

Series 1: Alphabetical Files contain Kent's personal and professional correspondence, along with business records of the dairy farm and associated enterprises; also included are printed matter on a wide variety of topics and promotional literature relating to organizations and causes of interest to him. Voluminous correspondence with his three wives, five children, and other relatives, as well as with literally hundreds of friends, both lifelong and of brief duration, illuminates Kent's private life and contributes to understanding of his complex character. Among the many correspondents of note are: his art teachers William Merritt Chase, Robert Henri, and Kenneth Hayes Miller; fellow artists Tom Cleland, Arthur B. Davies, James Fitzgerald, Hugo Gellert, Harry Gottleib, Marsden Hartley, Charles Keller, and Ruth Reeves; collectors Duncan Phillips and Dan Burne Jones; critics J. E. Chamberlain and Walter Pach; and dealers Charles Daniel, Felix Wildenstein, and Macbeth Galleries. Kent corresponded with such diverse people as Arctic explorers Peter Freuchen, Knud Rasmussen, and Vilhjalmar Steffanson; composer Carl Ruggles and songwriters Lee Hays and Pete Seeger; civil rights pioneers Paul Robeson and Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois; writers Bayard Boyesen, Scott and Helen Nearing, and Louis Untermeyer; and art historian and print curator Carl Zigrosser.

Kent's interest and involvement in the labor movement are reflected in correspondence with officials and members of a wide variety and large number of unions and related organizations, among them: the Farmers' Educational and Cooperative Union of America, Farmers' Union of the New York Milk Shed, International Workers Order, National Maritime Union, and United Office and Professional Workers of America. Of special interest is his participation, often in leadership roles, in various attempts to organize artists. Files on the American Artists' Congress, Artists League of America, The Artists Union, United American Artists, and United Scenic Artists contain particularly valuable material on the movement.

A supporter of New Deal efforts to aid artists, Kent was actively interested in the various programs and often was critical of their limitations; he advocated continuing federal aid to artists after the Depression abated. The Kent papers include correspondence with the Federal Arts Project, Federal Fine Arts Project, Federal Writers Project, and the War Department, as well as correspondence with the Citizens' Committee for Government Art Projects and President Franklin D. Roosevelt on the subject.

Kent's professional correspondence documents exhibitions, sales, consignments, and reproduction of prints and paintings. He kept meticulous records of his advertising commissions and illustration work. Detailed correspondence with publishers and printers indicates Kent's involvement in the technical aspects of production and provides a good overview of the publishing industry during the mid-twentieth century.

Business records of Asgaard Farm include records of the dairy and transfer of ownership to its employees, tax and employee information, and documents concerning several related business ventures such as distributor ships for grain, feed, and farm implements.

Series 2: Writings consists of notes, drafts, and completed manuscripts by Rockwell Kent, mainly articles, statements, speeches, poems, introductions, and reviews. The Kent Collection given to Friendship House, Moscow, in 1960, was augmented later by a set of his publications and the illustrated manuscripts of many of his monographs. Also included are a small number of manuscripts by other authors.

Series 3: Artwork consists mainly of drawings and sketches by Kent; also included are works on paper by other artists, many of whom are unidentified, and by children.

Series 4: Printed Matter consists of clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, brochures, broadsides, programs, and newsletters. These include items by and about Kent and his family, as well as articles written and/or illustrated by him, and reviews of his books. There is also material on a variety of subjects and causes of interest to him. Additional printed matter is included among the alphabetical files, mainly as attachments to correspondence.

Series 5: Miscellaneous includes biographical material, legal documents, and memorabilia. Artifacts received with papers include textile samples, a silk scarf, dinnerware, ice bucket, and rubber stamp, all featuring designs by Rockwell Kent. Also with this series are a variety of documents including a phrenological analysis of an ancestor, lists of supplies for expeditions, a hand-drawn map of an unidentified place, and technical notes regarding art materials and techniques.

Series 6: Photographs includes photographs of Kent, his family and friends, travel, and art number that over one thousand. Also included here are several albums of family and travel photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into six series. Series 1 is arranged alphabetically. The arrangement of the remaining series is explained in each series description. Note that sealed materials that became available in 2000 were microfilmed separately on reels 5740-5741, but have integrated into this finding aid.

Missing Title

Series 1: Alphabetical Files, circa 1900-1971, undated (Reels 5153-5249, 5256, 5740-5741)

Series 2: Writings, 1906-1978, undated (Reels 5249-5252, 5741)

Series 3: Art Work, 1910-1972, undated (Reels 5252, 5741)

Series 4: Printed Matter, 1905-1993, undated (Reels 5252-5254)

Series 5: Miscellaneous, 1859-1969, undated (Reels 5254, 5741)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1840-1970, undated (Reels 5254-5255, 5741)
Biographical Note:
Rockwell Kent (1882-1971), an energetic and multitalented man, pursued many interests and careers during his very long and active life. At various times he was an architect, draftsman, carpenter, unskilled laborer, painter, illustrator, printmaker, commercial artist, designer, traveler/explorer, writer, professional lecturer, dairy farmer, and political activist.

While studying architecture at Columbia University, Kent enrolled in William Merritt Chase's summer school at Shinnecock Hills, Long Island. He then redirected his career ambitions toward painting and continued to study with Chase in New York. Kent spent a summer working and living with Abbott H. Thayer in Dublin, New Hampshire, and attended the New York School of Art, where Robert Henri and Kenneth Hayes Miller were his teachers.

Critically and financially, Kent was a successful artist. He was very well known for his illustration work--particularly limited editions of the classics, bookplates, and Christmas cards. He was a prolific printmaker, and his prints and paintings were acquired by many major museums and private collectors. During the post-World War II era, Kent's political sympathies resulted in the loss of commissions, and his adherence to artistic conservatism and outspoken opposition to modern art led to disfavor within art circles. After many years of declining reputation in this country and unsuccessful attempts to find a home for the Kent Collection, Kent gave his unsold paintings--the majority of his oeuvre--to the Soviet Union, where he continued to be immensely popular.

An avid traveler, Kent was especially fascinated by remote, Arctic lands and often stayed for extended periods of time to paint, write, and become acquainted with the local inhabitants. Between 1918 and 1935, he wrote and illustrated several popular books about his experiences in Alaska, Tierra del Fuego, and Greenland. In the 1930s and 1940s, Kent was much in demand as a lecturer, making several nationwide tours under the management of a professional lecture bureau; he spoke mainly about his travels, but among his standard lectures were some on "art for the people."

In 1927, Kent purchased Asgaard Farm at AuSable Forks, New York, in the Adirondacks, where he lived for the remainder of his life, operating a modern dairy farm on a modest scale for many years.

As a young man, Kent met Rufus Weeks, became committed to social justice, and joined the Socialist Party. Throughout his life, he supported left-wing causes and was a member or officer of many organizations promoting world peace and harmonious relations with the Soviet Union, civil rights, civil liberties, antifascism, and organized labor. Kent was frequently featured as a celebrity sponsor or speaker at fund-raising events for these causes. In 1948, he ran unsuccessfully as the American Labor Party's candidate for Congress. Kent's unpopular political views eventually led to the dissolution of his dairy business, resulted in a summons to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee, and prompted the U.S. State Department to deny him a passport, an action that subsequently was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Kent wrote two autobiographies, This Is My Own (1940) and It's Me, O Lord (1955). In 1969, he was the subject of an oral history interview conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art.

Missing Title

1882 -- born, Tarrytown, New York

1887 -- death of Rockwell Kent, Sr.

1894-1896 -- attended Cheshire Academy

1895 -- toured Europe with Aunt Jo

1896 -- attended Horace Mann School, New York City

1900-1902 -- studied architecture at Columbia University

1900-1902 -- attended William Merritt Chase's summer school, Shinnecock Hills, Long Island

1903 -- studied with William Merritt Chase, New York City

1904 -- first sale of a painting

1904 -- met Rufus Weeks and attended first Socialist meeting

1905 -- lived and worked with Abbott H. Thayer, Dublin, New Hampshire

1905 -- first painting trip to Monhegan Island, Maine

1907 -- first one-man show, Claussen Galleries, New York City

1908 -- marriage to Kathleen Whiting

1908 -- studied with Robert Henri

1908 -- joined Socialist Party

1909 -- birth of Rockwell, III

1910 -- ran Monhegan Summer School of Art

1910 -- first trip to Newfoundland

1910 -- helped to organize first Independent Exhibition

1911 -- birth of Kathleen

1912 -- moved to Winona, Minnesota

1913 -- birth of Clara

1914 -- settled in Newfoundland

1915 -- deported from Newfoundland

1915 -- birth of Barbara

1917 -- served as full-time organizer and administrator of Independent Exhibition

1918-1919 -- in Alaska with son Rocky

1919 -- purchased Egypt Farm, Arlington, Vermont

1919 -- incorporated self

1920 -- publication of Wilderness

1920 -- birth of Gordon

1922 -- traveled to Tierra del Fuego

1924 -- publication of Voyaging

1925 -- trip to France

1925 -- divorced from Kathleen

1926 -- marriage to Frances Lee

1926 -- traveled to Ireland

1927 -- purchased Asgaard Farm, AuSable, New York

1927 -- editor of Creative Art

1927 -- helped organize National Gallery of Contemporary Art, Washington, D.C.

1929 -- sailed to Greenland on Direction

1930 -- publication of N by E

1932-1933 -- returned to Greenland

1934-1935 -- final trip to Greenland

1935 -- publication of Salamina

1936 -- trip to Puerto Rico

1937 -- trip to Brazil

1937-1938 -- Post Office Department mural commission and controversy over Eskimo-language message interpreted as encouraging Puerto Rican independence

1939 -- divorced from Frances

1939 -- General Electric Co. mural commission for New York World's Fair

1940 -- publication of This Is My Own

1940 -- marriage to Shirley Johnstone (Sally)

1942 -- solo exhibition, Know and Defend America, at Wildenstein Galleries, New York City

1946 -- elected to Executive Committee of American Labor Party

1948 -- congressional candidate, American Labor Party

1948 -- transferred ownership of dairy to remaining employees after boycott resulting from support of Wallace for president

1949 -- attended World Congress for Peace, Paris

1950-1958 -- denied U.S. passport; lawsuit, appeals, and Supreme Court decision reinstating right to travel

1953 -- testified before House Un-American Activities Committee

1955 -- publication of It's Me, O Lord

1958 -- one-man show at Hermitage Museum, Leningrad

1959 -- publication of Of Men and Mountains

1960 -- gift of Kent Collection to Friendship House, Moscow

1960 -- exhibition at Pushkin Museum, Moscow

1963 -- publication of Greenland Journal

1966 -- elected to Academy of Arts of the USSR

1967 -- awarded Lenin Peace Prize, Moscow

1969 -- oral history interview, Archives of American Art

1969 -- home at Asgaard destroyed by fire; papers survived with some water and smoke damage

1969 -- first installment of Rockwell Kent Papers donated to Archives of American Art

1971 -- died, Plattsburgh, New York

1971 -- gift of additional Rockwell Kent Papers to Archives of American Art

1979 -- gift of textile samples to the Archives of American Art

1996 -- gift of additional Rockwell Kent Papers to Archives of American Art

2000 -- death of Sally [Shirley Johnstone] Kent Gorton

2000 -- previously sealed correspondence of wives Frances and Sally (Series 1) opened to researchers

2001 -- gift of additional Rockwell Kent papers to the Archives of American Art from the Estate of Sally Kent [Shirley Johnstone] Gorton
Provenance:
In 1969, Rockwell Kent donated his papers to the Archives of American Art; textile samples were received in 1979, and his widow gave additional papers in 1971 and 1996. Letters to Rockwell Kent from wives Frances and Sally, sealed during Sally Kent Gorton's lifetime, became available for research after her death in 2000, and further material was donated to the Archives of American Art in 2001 by the Estate of Sally Kent [Shirley Johnstone] Gorton.
Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not microfilmed or digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Designers -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Politics and culture  Search this
Authors -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States -- Political aspects  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Illustration of books  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Art and war  Search this
Commercial art  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Function:
Labor unions
Genre/Form:
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kentrock
See more items in:
Rockwell Kent papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97edd9940-eb61-4562-9583-def2da778b6a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kentrock
Online Media:

Memorial Art Gallery exhibition catalogs

Creator:
University of Rochester. Memorial Art Gallery  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1913-1962
Summary:
The exhibition catalogs of the Memorial Art Gallery measure 1.0 linear feet and date from 1913 to 1962. The catalogs are for exhibitions held at the Memorial Art Gallery, 1913-1962, including the Inaugural Exhibition. Incomplete runs of annual exhibitions of the Rochester International Salon of Photography, 1929-1958, the Rochester Camera Club, 1943-1950, the Rochester Finger Lakes Exhibitions, 1938-1958, and the National Ceramic Exhibition, 1938-1952, are also included, as is the publication MEMORIAL ART GALLERY IN ROCHESTER, published in 1924 to commemorate the enlargement of the Gallery. In addition, there are several catalogs with no apparent connection to the Memorial Art Gallery. The Gallery regularly exhibited the Rochester Art Club, and featured many modernist painters in its exhibitions.
Scope and Contents:
The exhibition catalogs of the Memorial Art Gallery measure 1.0 linear feet and date from 1913 to 1962. The catalogs are for exhibitions held at the Memorial Art Gallery, 1913-1962, including the Inaugural Exhibition. Incomplete runs of annual exhibitions of the Rochester International Salon of Photography, 1929-1958, the Rochester Camera Club, 1943-1950, the Rochester Finger Lakes Exhibitions, 1938-1958, and the National Ceramic Exhibition, 1938-1952, are also included, as is the publication MEMORIAL ART GALLERY IN ROCHESTER, published in 1924 to commemorate the enlargement of the Gallery. In addition, there are several catalogs with no apparent connection to the Memorial Art Gallery. The Gallery regularly exhibited the Rochester Art Club, and featured many modernist painters in its exhibitions.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.

Series 1: Memorial Art Gallery Exhibition Catalogs, 1913-1962 (1.0 linear feet; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
The Memorial Art Gallery was founded in 1913 by Emily Sibley Watson as a memorial to her son, architect James Averell. The Gallery was given in trust to the University of Rochester.
Provenance:
Donated by the University of Rochester, Memorial Art Gallery, 1987.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Prints -- 20th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- New York (State)
Citation:
Memorial art Gallery Exhibition Catalogs, 1913-1962. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.univroch
See more items in:
Memorial Art Gallery exhibition catalogs
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90732aefe-33db-453f-8660-49abd70db858
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-univroch

Ala Story papers

Creator:
Story, Ala  Search this
Names:
American Academy of Arts and Letters  Search this
American British Art Center  Search this
University of California, Santa Barbara  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Clark, Kenneth, 1903-  Search this
Craske, John  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Rene, 1901-1968  Search this
Gibson, Charles Dana, 1867-1944  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Longden, Alfred A. (Alfred Appleby), d. 1954  Search this
Sterner, Harold  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Wilson, Mary F.  Search this
Extent:
2.5 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 4 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1941-1970
Scope and Contents:
Primarily research material for exhibitions organized by Story at the American British Art Center and at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
REELS 601-602: Correspondence, photographs, catalogs and business records for five exhibitions at the University of California, Santa Barbara, including: William Merritt Chase (1964-1965), Surrealism - A State of Mind (1966), Five Centuries of Prints (1967), Max Weber (1968), and Trends in 20th Century Art (1970).
REEL 2086: Papers, 1943, relating to Charles Dana Gibson exhibition at the American British Art Center, NYC, including sketches by Gibson, letters from him, price lists, a catalog of the exhibit, and miscellany.
REEL 3977: Biographical notes, photographs of drawings and paintings and exhibition announcements used by Story for exhibitions on William Merritt Chase, Harold Sterner and John Craske while at the American British Art Center; three letters from Robert Henri to Mrs. William Kennedy Thompson and one letter from William Merritt Chase to Della F. Shull; photographs of Henri and Chase; receipts and checks regarding Chase; and records of the American British Art Center, including 6 sales books, two guestbooks, a petty cash book, exhibition catalogs, and photocopies of exhibition catalogs and clippings.
ADDITION: 16 items including correspondence, 1941-1951, and a printed ceremonial program, 1952, of The American Academy of Arts and Letters and the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Correspondents include Alfred Barr, R.A. Beaes, M. Buller, Sir Kenneth Clark, Rene d'Harnoncourt, Alfred A. Longden, H. F. Perkins, and Mary F. Wilson.
Biographical / Historical:
Curator, museum director; New York, N.Y. and Santa Barbara, Calif. Born 1907. Died 1972.
Provenance:
Donated by Margaret Mallory, 1970-1984.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm.
Topic:
Women museum curators  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Prints -- Exhibitions -- United States  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Curators -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.storala
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90f8bca6e-217a-44d4-a365-236c0d38ded6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-storala

Jack Levine papers

Creator:
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
Names:
American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Arms, John Taylor, 1887-1953  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Bloom, Hyman, 1913-  Search this
Bocour, Leonard, 1910-1993  Search this
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
Close, Chuck, 1940-  Search this
Coen, Eleanor, 1916-  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Rene, 1901-1968  Search this
Dobkin, Alexander, 1908-  Search this
Fleischman, Lawrence A. (Lawrence Arthur), 1925-1997  Search this
Friedan, Betty  Search this
Gikow, Ruth, 1915-1982  Search this
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Halpert, Edith Gregor, 1900-1970  Search this
Hirsch, Joseph, 1910-1981  Search this
Lasansky, Mauricio, 1914-  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Lee, Gypsy Rose, 1914-1970  Search this
Levine, David, 1926-2009  Search this
Paul VI, Pope, 1897-1978  Search this
Peterdi, Gabor  Search this
Probst, Joachim  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Homer, b. 1880  Search this
Simon, Sidney, 1917-  Search this
Sorini, Emiliano  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Terkel, Studs, 1912-2008  Search this
Tooker, George, 1920-2011  Search this
Updike, John  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Yevtushenko, Yevgeny Aleksandrovich, 1933-  Search this
Extent:
3.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Student drawings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Date:
1923-1999
Summary:
The papers of New York social realist painter and printmaker Jack Levine date from 1923-1999, and measure 3.2 linear feet. Levine's career is documented through biographical material, scattered letters, notes and a speech, writings, student drawings, three scrapbooks, printed material and nearly one linear foot of photographs of Levine, his family, and his colleagues.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York social realist painter and printmaker Jack Levine date from 1923-1999, and measure 3.2 linear feet. Levine's career is documented through biographical material, scattered letters, notes and a speech, writings, student drawings, three scrapbooks, printed material and nearly one linear foot of photographs of Levine, his family, and his colleagues.

Found within the papers are two driver's licenses and several biographical accounts, and scattered letters from colleagues including one each from John Taylor Arms, Hyman Bloom, Leonard Bocour, René d'Harnoncourt, Lloyd Goodrich, Jacob Lawrence, and Homer Saint-Gaudens discussing various art-related events. There is only one carbon copy of a letter written by Levine. The correspondence includes oversized photographs of the members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Additional photographs of the members are found in the Photograph series.

Notes and writings are primarily typescripts about Jack Levine written by others. There is also a transcript of one speech, "Jack Levine Speaks Regarding the Donation of 108 of his Drawings to the Archives" delivered by Levine at the Fogg Art Museum.

Artwork consists entirely of Levine's student drawings including anatomical studies, neighborhood genre scenes, copies of Old Masters, and a series of images of symphony musicians. Some of the drawings display themes that are reflected in his later paintings.

Three scrapbooks contain clippings that document Levine's career and reflect his political interests. Additional printed material consists of a comprehensive collection of clippings and exhibition announcements and catalogs. There is also an announcement for a lecture by Levine, press releases, calendars of events, reproductions of artwork, programs, brochures including one for Facing East, a portfolio of Levine's prints, and three books.

Photographs include numerous photographs of Levine throughout his artistic career, including images of his wife, painter Ruth Gikow, their daughter Susanna, and colleagues including Hyman Bloom, Leonard Bocour, Alexander Dobkin, Joachim Probst, and Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko. Especially notable is a series of photographs of Levine printmaking with Emiliano Sorini and Ruth Gikow.

There are photographs of Levine serving on art juries and panels with Eleanor Coen, Joseph Hirsch, Gabor Peterdi, Studs Terkel, and Max Weber, and attending events with Lawrence Fleischman, Betty Friedan, Edith Halpert, Mauricio Lasansky, Gypsy Rose Lee, Pope Paul VI, and Raphael Soyer. A small album contains photographs of Levine and various buildings in Boston. There are also photographs of miscellaneous exhibition installations including Levine's retrospective at the Jewish Museum, and of artwork by Levine and others.

Group photographs of the members of the American Academy of Arts and Letters are found here, and include Will Barnet, Paul Cadmus, Chuck Close, David Levine, George Tooker, and John Updike. Additional group photographs of the members that were originally enclosed with letters are found in the correspondence series.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1953-1955 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Letters, 1946-1996 (Boxes 1, 5; 12 folders)

Series 3: Notes and Writings, 1961-1974 (Box 1; 6 folders)

Series 4: Artwork, 1923-1931 (Boxes 1, 5, OV 6; 11 folders)

Series 5: Scrapbooks, 1936-1962 (Boxes 1, 5; 16 folders)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1938-1999 (Boxes 1-3, 5, OV 6; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1940-1998 (Boxes 3-5, OV 6; 52 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Levine (1915-2010) was born in Boston, Massachusetts and worked as painter and printmaker primarily in New York City. Levine was one of the leading painters and advocates of the Social Realism School of the late 1930s.

Jack Levine was the youngest of the eight children of Lithuanian Jewish parents, Mary Grinker and Samuel Levine. After the family moved from the South End of Boston to Roxbury in 1923, Levine began to study drawing under Harold Zimmerman at the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. By 1929, Levine was studying painting under Denman Ross of the Fogg Art Museum.

From 1935-1940, Levine received U.S. government support from the federal Works Progress Administration. His first exhibition of paintings in New York City was at the Museum of Modern Art. In 1937, he painted The Feast of Pure Reason, a satire of Boston political power. Together with Ben Shahn, Levine became a leading exponent of the Social Realism School of the late 1930s. His first one-man show was held at the Downtown Gallery in New York City in 1938.

After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Levine was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1945, and a grant from the American Academy of Arts and Letters the following year. Also in 1946, Levine married painter Ruth Gikow and moved to New York City. Between 1950 and 1951, he was a Fulbright Fellow working in Rome where he was inspired by Old Master paintings. In the 1960s Levine's interest in printmaking intensified and he was instructed in creating intaglio prints by Emiliano Sorini, and was introduced to Abe Lublin who was associated with the New York Graphic Society.

Levine taught at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the American Art School in New York, and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the Fogg Art Museum. He was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters from 1956 on.

The D.C. Moore Gallery in New York City currently represents the Estate of Jack Levine.
Provenance:
Jack Levine donated his papers to the Archives in 1962, 1978, and 1999.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and limited to the Washington, D.C. Reference Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Social realism  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Jewish artists  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Student drawings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Citation:
Jack Levine papers, 1923-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.levijack
See more items in:
Jack Levine papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ee98ce56-1333-40b7-8878-654a12f9024b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-levijack
Online Media:

Hobart Nichols papers

Creator:
Nichols, Hobart, 1869-1962  Search this
Names:
Century Association (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Huntington, Archer M., 1870-1955  Search this
Root, Elihu, 1845-1937  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((on 2 partial microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca. 1895]-1958
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, printed material and photographs.
REEL D359: Correspondence, 1946-1958, with galleries, art associations and clubs including the Century Association, the National Academy of Design; also, one letter from Archer M. Huntington and 2 from Elihu Root; photographs of Nichols and his work; clippings; and exhibition announcements and catalogs.
REEL 64: Photographs, including 42 photographs of paintings by Nichols, 1 photograph of him, and 1 of the 1948 exhibition "Painting in the United States" held at the Carnegie Institute.
Biographical / Historical:
Landscape painter and illustrator; Bronxville, New York. Born in Washington, D.C. Studied at the Academie Julian. President of the National Academy of Design, 1939-1949, President Emeritus, from 1949; Vice-President and Director, Tiffany Foundation, New York; Assistant to Director of Fine Arts, United States Commission, Paris Exposition 1900.
Provenance:
Material donated by Leonora Nichols, Hobart Nichols' daughter, 1968.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Landscape painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State)  Search this
Landscape painting -- 20th century -- New York (State)  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.nichhoba
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91b222d64-ad92-4cdf-8e16-bf73db8701e8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nichhoba

Joseph Floch papers

Creator:
Floch, Joseph, 1895-1977  Search this
Names:
American Academy of Arts and Letters  Search this
Audubon Artists  Search this
Carnegie Institute  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts  Search this
Extent:
11.3 Linear feet
0.2 Linear feet (Addition)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Date:
[circa 1869-1981]
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, printed material, sketchbooks, photographs, diaries, address books, business records, and exhibition materials.
An autobiography, biographical and genealogical information; Mimi Floch's memoir of her husband, 1980; circa 3,000 letters, some illustrated; a book of poems and writings; a diary, 1909-1974; appointment and address books; 2 transcripts of interviews; an untranscribed interview; writings and notes; an illustrated inventory of his works; business records; exhibition files; 45 sketchbooks of figure, landscape and still life studies, and sketches for his paintings; works of art by Floch and others; 2 scrapbooks of letters, telegrams, and clippings; exhibition catalogs; books; clippings and miscellaneous printed material; and circa 1,200 photographs, slides, and negatives of Floch his family, friends, exhibitions, and works of art.
Award certificates from the National Academy of Design and Columbia University; 2 appointment certificates to the faculty of the New School for Social Research; a list of his awards and appointments; 27 letters, from the National Academy of Design, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, National Institute of Arts and Letters, Carnegie Institute, Audubon Artists, and museums in the U.S., Europe, and Israel.
REEL N69-66: Photographs of paintings by Floch.
REEL 88: Exhibition catalogs, announcements, and published articles on Floch.
ADDITION: Exhibition catalogs and clippings concerning Floch, circa 1942-1978.
Biographical / Historical:
Joseph Floch (1895-1977) was a painter from New York, N.Y., Vienna, Austria, and Paris, France.
Related Materials:
Joseph Floch papers also at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
Donated 1966-1983 by Joseph Floch; his wife, Mimi Hermine Floch; and their daughter, Jenny Floch Efland. Material on reel N69/51 was originally lent by Joseph, but donated in 1983 by Jenny. Additional printed material donated 1986 by Susi Friedmann, whose mother's cousin was married to Floch.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- Austria -- Vienna  Search this
Painters -- France -- Paris  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Austria  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- France  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.flocjose
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95b56cce1-3f70-494b-9ec3-5275903ecf09
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-flocjose

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