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Elizabeth B. Delaney

Collection Collector:
Whitehead, Henry Preston, 1917-2002  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet (Box 177, 178, OV 176)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1874- 1973
Arrangement:
This series is divided into six subseries. 4.1 Grand Oder of Odd Fellow of Kentucky 4.2 Order Eastern Star Kentucky 4.3 State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs of Kentucky 4.4 National Association of Colored Women 4.5 Printed Material 4.6 Photographs
Biographical / Historical:
Elizabeth Berry Delaney (b. September 13, 1882 – d. February 17 1964) a funeral home owner and operator and organization leader and clubwoman. Delaney married John W. Delaney on April 28, 1898. Their only child John W. Delaney Jr. was born in 1912. Delaney acquired a mortician's license in 1919 to help run her husband's funeral home business in Covington, Kentucky. After her husbands death Elizabeth became the sole owner of the funeral home and continued it's operation for nearly 40 years. Once her son joined the business the home was renamed E. B. Delaney and Son Funeral Home. The funeral expanded a second home in Cincinnati. Elizabeth was one of the first women to serve on the Board of Directors of the National Negro Business League and was an active member of the National Association of the Black Funeral Home Directors. Elizabeth was an active member in the State and Local Federation of Colored Women. In 1926 Delaney was elected the 11th president of the Federation of Colored Women club of Kentucky. Delaney was instrumental in establishing several chapters of the Order of Eastern Star and other civic organizations throughout northern Kentucky.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
The Henry P. Whitehead collection is the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Collection Citation:
Henry P. Whitehead collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Michael A. Watkins.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-042, Series 4
See more items in:
Henry P. Whitehead collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b167a938-6679-43ff-a9f7-3257c8d3daa1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-042-ref225

Duke Ellington Collection

Creator:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Names:
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Washingtonians, The.  Search this
Ellington, Mercer Kennedy, 1919-1996 (musician)  Search this
Strayhorn, Billy (William Thomas), 1915-1967  Search this
Collector:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Musical History  Search this
Extent:
400 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Music
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 20th century
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- 20th century
Washington (D.C.) -- 20th century
Date:
1903 - 1989
Summary:
The collection documents Duke Ellington's career primarily through orchestrations (scores and parts), music manuscripts, lead sheets, transcriptions, and sheet music. It also includes concert posters, concert programs, television, radio, motion picture and musical theater scripts, business records, correspondence, awards, as well as audiotapes, audiodiscs, photographs, tour itineraries, newspaper clippings, magazines, caricatures, paintings, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
Dating approximately from the time Duke Ellington permanently moved to New York City in 1923 to the time the material was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1988, the bulk of the material in the Duke Ellington Collection is dated from 1934-1974 and comprises sound recordings, original music manuscripts and published sheet music, hand-written notes, correspondence, business records, photographs, scrapbooks, news clippings, concert programs, posters, pamphlets, books and other ephemera. These materials document Ellington's contributions as composer, musician, orchestra leader, and an ambassador of American music and culture abroad. In addition, the materials paint a picture of the life of a big band maintained for fifty years and open a unique window through which to view an evolving American society.

The approximate four hundred cubic feet of archival materials have been processed and organized into sixteen series arranged by type of material. Several of the series have been divided into subseries allowing additional organization to describe the content of the material. For example, Series 6, Sound Recordings, is divided into four subseries: Radio and Television Interviews, Concert Performances, Studio Dates and Non-Ellington Recordings. Each series has its own scope and content note describing the material and arrangement (for example; Series 10, Magazines and Newspaper Articles, is organized into two groups, foreign and domestic, and arranged chronologically within each group). A container list provides folder titles and box numbers.

The bulk of the material is located in Series 1, Music Manuscripts, and consists of compositions and arrangements by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and other composers. Series 6, Sound Recordings also provides a record of the performance of many of these compositions. The materials in Series 2, Performances and Programs, Series 3, Business Records, Series 8, Scrapbooks, Series 9, Newspaper Clippings, Series 11, Publicity and Series 12, Posters provide documentation of specific performances by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Ellington was a spontaneous and prolific composer as evidenced by music, lyrical thoughts, and themes for extended works and plays captured on letterhead stationery in Series 3, Business Records, in the margin notes of individual books and pamphlets in Series 14, Religious Materials and Series 15, Books, and in the hand-written notes in Series 5, Personal Correspondence and Notes.

During its fifty-year lifespan, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra were billed under various names including The Washingtonians, The Harlem Footwarmers and The Jungle Band. The soloists were informally called "the band", and Series 3 includes salary statements, IOU's, receipts and ephemera relating to individual band members. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains the soloists' parts and includes "band books" of several soloists (for example; Harry Carney and Johnny Hodges) and numerous music manuscripts of Billy Strayhorn. The changing role of Strayhorn from arranger hired in 1938 to Ellington's main collaborator and composer of many well-known titles for Duke Ellington and His Orchestra including "Take The A' Train" and "Satin Doll" can be traced in these music manuscripts. Series 7, Photographs and Series 2, Performances and Programs contain many images of the band members and Strayhorn. This Collection also documents the business history of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 3, Business Records contains correspondence on letterhead stationery and Series 11, Publicity contains promotional material from the various booking agencies, professional companies, and public relations firms that managed the Orchestra.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection provide insight into public and institutional attitudes towards African Americans in mid-twentieth-century America. The business records in Series 3 beginning in 1938 and published sheet music in Series 1 depict Duke Ellington's progression from an African-American musician who needed "legitimization" by a white publisher, Irving Mills, to a businessmen who established his own companies including Tempo Music and Duke Ellington, Incorporated to control his copyright and financial affairs. Programs from the segregated Cotton Club in Series 2, Performances And Programs and contracts with no-segregation clauses in Series 3: Business Records further illustrate racial policies and practices in this time period. The public shift in perception of Duke Ellington from a leader of an exotic "Jungle Band" in the 1930s to a recipient of the Congressional Medal Of Freedom in 1970 is evidenced in Series 2, Performances And Programs, Series 12, Posters, Series 7, Photographs and Series 13, Awards. Reviews and articles reflecting Ellington's evolving status are also documented in Series 8, Newspaper Clippings, Series 9, Scrapbooks, Series 10, Newspaper and Magazine Articles.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection reflect rapid technological changes in American society from 1923-1982. Sound recordings in Series 6 range from 78 phonograph records of three minutes duration manufactured for play on Victrolas in monaural sound to long-playing (LP) phonograph records produced for stereo record players. Television scripts in Series 4, programs in Series 2 and music manuscripts (for example, Drum Is A Woman) in Series 1 demonstrate how the development of television as a means of mass communication spread the Orchestra's sound to a wider audience. The availability of commercial air travel enabled the Ellington Orchestra to extend their international performances from Europe to other continents including tours to Asia, Africa, South America and Australia and archival material from these tours is included in every series.

Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts and Series 6, Audio Recordings contain scripts and radio performances promoting the sale of United States War bonds during World War II, and Series 7, Photographs includes many images of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra's performances for military personnel revealing the impact of historic events on Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 2: Programs and Performances, Series 9, Newspaper clippings and Series 8, Scrapbooks document the 1963 Far East tour aborted as a result of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

The Duke Ellington Collection contains works by numerous twentieth-century music, literature, and art luminaries. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains original music manuscripts of William Grant Still, Eubie Blake, Mary Lou Williams, and others. Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts contains a play by Langston Hughes, and Series 12, Posters contains many original artworks.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Music Manuscripts, circa 1930-1981, undated

Series 2: Performances and Programs, 1933-1973, undated

Series 3: Business Records, 1938-1988

Series 4: Scripts and Transcripts, 1937-1970

Series 5: Personal Correspondence and Notes, 1941-1974, undated

Series 6: Sound Recordings, 1927-1974

Series 7: Photographs, 1924-1972, undated

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1931-1973

Series 9: Newspaper Clippings, 1939-1973, undated

Series 10: Magazine Articles and Newspaper Clippings, 1940-1974

Series 11: Publicity, 1935-1988

Series 12: Posters and Oversize Graphics, 1933-1989, undated

Series 13: Awards, 1939-1982

Series 14: Religious Material, 1928-1974

Series 15: Books, 1903-1980

Series 16: Miscellaneous, 1940-1974
Biographical / Historical:
A native of Washington, DC, Edward Kennedy Ellington was born on April 29, 1899. Edward was raised in a middle-class home in the Northwest section of Washington described by his sister Ruth--younger by sixteen years--as a "house full of love." Ellington himself wrote that his father J.E. (James Edward) raised his family "as though he were a millionaire" but Edward was especially devoted to his mother, Daisy Kennedy Ellington. In 1969, thirty-four years after his mother's death, Ellington accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom with these words, "There is nowhere else I would rather be tonight but in my mother's arms." Both his parents played the piano and Ellington began piano lessons at the age of seven, but like many boys he was easily distracted by baseball.

In his early teens, Ellington sneaked into Washington clubs and performance halls where he was exposed to ragtime musicians, including James P. Johnson, and where he met people from all walks of life. He returned in earnest to his piano studies, and at age fourteen wrote his first composition, "Soda Fountain Rag" also known as "Poodle Dog Rag." Ellington was earning income from playing music at seventeen years of age, and around this time he earned the sobriquet "Duke" for his sartorial splendor and regal air. On July 2, 1918, he married a high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson; their only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, was born on March 11, 1919. Duke Ellington spent the first twenty-four years of his life in Washington's culturally thriving Negro community. In this vibrant atmosphere he was inspired to be a composer and learned to take pride in his African-American heritage.

Ellington moved to New York City in 1923 to join and eventually lead a small group of transplanted Washington musicians called "The Washingtonians," which included future Ellington band members, Sonny Greer, Otto Hardwicke and "Bubber" Miley. Between 1923 and 1927, the group played at the Club Kentucky on Broadway and the ensemble increased from a quintet to a ten-piece orchestra. With stride pianist Willie "The Lion" Smith as his unofficial guide, Ellington soon became part of New York's music scene; Smith proved to be a long-lasting influence on Duke's composing and arranging direction. At the Club Kentucky, Ellington came under the tutelage of another legendary stride pianist, "Fats" Waller. Waller, a protege of Johnson and Smith, played solos during the band's breaks and also tutored Ellington who began to show progress in his compositions. In November 1924, Duke made his publishing and recording debut with "Choo Choo (I Got To Hurry Home)" released on the Blu-Disc label. In 1925, he contributed two songs to Chocolate Kiddies, an all-black revue which introduced European audiences to black American styles and performers. By this time Ellington's family, Edna and Mercer, had joined him in New York City. The couple separated in the late 1920's, but they never divorced or reconciled.

Ellington's achievements as a composer and bandleader began to attract national attention while he worked at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, from 1927 to 1932. The orchestra developed a distinctive sound that displayed the non-traditional voicings of Ellington's arrangements and featured the unique talents of the individual soloists. Ellington integrated his soloists' exotic-sounding trombone growls and wah-wahs, their high-squealed trumpets, their sultry saxophone blues licks and Harlem's street rhythms into his arrangements. In the promotional material of the Cotton Club, the band was often billed as "Duke Ellington and His Jungle Band." With the success of compositions like "Mood Indigo," and an increasing number of recordings and national radio broadcasts from the Cotton Club, the band's reputation soared.

The ten years from 1932 to 1942 are considered by some major critics to represent the "golden age" for the Ellington Orchestra, but it represents just one of their creative peaks. These years did bring an influx of extraordinary new talent to the band including Jimmy Blanton on double bass, Ben Webster on tenor saxophone, and Ray Nance on trumpet, violin and vocals. During this ten year span Ellington composed several of his best known short works, including "Concerto For Cootie," "Ko-Ko," "Cotton Tail," "In A Sentimental Mood," and Jump For Joy, his first full-length musical stage revue.

Most notably, 1938 marked the arrival of Billy Strayhorn. While a teenager in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Strayhorn had already written "Lush Life," "Something To Live For" and a musical, Fantastic Rhythm. Ellington was initially impressed with Strayhorn's lyrics but realized long before Billy's composition "Take the A' Train" became the band's theme song in 1942 that Strayhorn's talents were not limited to penning clever lyrics. By 1942, "Swee' Pea" had become arranger, composer, second pianist, collaborator, and as Duke described him, "my right arm, my left arm, all the eyes in the back of my head, my brain waves in his head, and his in mine." Many Ellington/Strayhorn songs have entered the jazz canon, and their extended works are still being discovered and studied today. Strayhorn remained with the Ellington Organization until his death on May 30, 1967.

Ellington had often hinted of a work in progress depicting the struggle of blacks in America. The original script, Boola, debuted in Carnegie Hall in November of 1943, retitled Black, Brown and Beige. The performance met with mixed reviews, and although Ellington often returned to Carnegie Hall the piece was never recorded in a studio, and after 1944 was never performed in entirety again by the Ellington Orchestra. Nonetheless, it is now considered a milestone in jazz composition.

After World War II the mood and musical tastes of the country shifted and hard times befell big bands, but Ellington kept his band together. The band was not always financially self-sufficient and during the lean times Ellington used his songwriting royalties to meet the soloists' salaries. One could assign to Ellington the altruistic motive of loyalty to his sidemen, but another motivation may have been his compositional style which was rooted in hearing his music in the formative stage come alive in rehearsal. "The band was his instrument," Billy Strayhorn said, and no Ellington composition was complete until he heard the orchestra play it. Then he could fine tune his compositions, omit and augment passages, or weave a soloist's contribution into the structure of the tune.

In 1956, the American public rediscovered Duke and the band at the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island. The searing performances of tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves on "Diminuendo and Crescendo In Blue," his premiere soloist, alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges on "Jeep's Blues", and the crowd's ecstatic reaction have become jazz legend. Later that year Duke landed on the cover of Time magazine. Although Ellington had previously written music for film and television (including the short film, Black and Tan Fantasy in 1929) it wasn't until 1959 that Otto Preminger asked him to score music for his mainstream film, Anatomy of a Murder, starring Jimmy Stewart. Paris Blues in 1961, featuring box-office stars Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier in roles as American jazz musicians in Paris, followed.

Ellington's first performance overseas was in England in 1933, but the 1960s brought extensive overseas tours including diplomatic tours sponsored by the State Department. Ellington and Strayhorn composed exquisite extended works reflecting the sights and sounds of their travels, including the Far East Suite, 1966. They wrote homages to their classical influences; in 1963, they adapted Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite and celebrated Shakespeare's works with the suite Such Sweet Thunder in 1957. With Ella Fitzgerald, they continued the Norman Granz Songbook Series. Ellington also began to flex his considerable pianist skills and recorded albums with John Coltrane (1963), Coleman Hawkins (1963), Frank Sinatra, and Money Jungle (1963) with Charles Mingus and Max Roach. The First Sacred Concert debuted in San Francisco's Grace Cathedral in 1965. In his final years, Ellington's thoughts turned to spiritual themes and he added a Second (1968) and Third (1973) Concert of Sacred Music to his compositions.

In his lifetime, Duke received numerous awards and honors including the highest honor bestowed on an American civilian, the Congressional Medal Of Freedom. In 1965, Ellington was recommended for a Pulitzer Prize to honor his forty years of contribution to music but the recommendation was rejected by the board. Most likely he was disappointed, but his response at the age of sixty-six was, "Fate is being kind to me. Fate doesn't want me to be famous too young."

Ellington never rested on his laurels or stopped composing. Whenever he was asked to name his favorite compositions his characteristic reply was "the next five coming up," but to please his loyal fans Ellington always featured some of his standards in every performance. Even on his deathbed, he was composing the opera buffo called Queenie Pie.

Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at seventy-five years of age. His funeral was held in New York's Cathedral of St. John The Divine; he was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. His long-time companion Beatrice "Evie" Ellis was buried beside him after her death in 1976. He was survived by his only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, who not only took up the baton to lead the Duke Ellington Orchestra but assumed the task of caring for his father's papers and his legacy to the nation. Mercer Ellington died in Copenhagan, Denmark on February 8, 1996, at the age of seventy-six. Ruth Ellington Boatwright died in New York on March 6, 2004, at the age of eighty-eight. Both Mercer and Ruth were responsible for shepherding the documents and artifacts that celebrate Duke Ellington's genius and creative life to their current home in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

William H. Quealy Collection of Duke Ellington Recordings (AC0296)

Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington (AC0328)

Duke Ellington Oral History Project (AC0368)

Duke Ellington Collection of Ephemera and realated Audiovisual Materials (AC0386)

Annual International Conference of the Duke Ellington Study Group Proceedings (AC0385)

Robert Udkoff Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0388)

Frank Driggs Collection of Duke Ellington Photographic Prints (AC0389)

New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society Collection (AC390)

Earl Okin Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0391)

William Russo Transcription and Arrangement of Duke Ellington's First Concert of Sacred Music (AC0406)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0415)

Music manuscripts in the Ruth Ellington Collection complement the music manuscripts found in the Duke Ellington Collection.

Carter Harman Collection of Interviews with Duke Ellington (AC0422)

Betty McGettigan Collection of Duke Ellington Memorabilia (AC0494)

Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0502)

Edward and Gaye Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0704)

Andrew Homzy Collection of Duke Ellington Stock Music Arrangements (AC0740)

John Gensel Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0763)

Al Celley Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC1240)

Materials at Other Organizations

Institute of Jazz Studies
Separated Materials:
Artifacts related to this collection are in the Division of Culture and the Arts (now Division of Cultural and Community Life) and include trophies, plaques, and medals. See accessions: 1989.0369; 1991.0808; 1993.0032; and 1999.0148.

"
Provenance:
The collection was purchased through an appropriation of Congress in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the original and master audiovisual materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright restrictions. Consult the Archives Center at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Paul Ellington, executor, is represented by:

Richard J.J. Scarola, Scarola Ellis LLP, 888 Seventh Avenue, 45th Floor, New York, New York 10106. Telephone (212) 757-0007 x 235; Fax (212) 757-0469; email: rjjs@selaw.com; www.selaw.com; www.ourlawfirm.com.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Big bands  Search this
Pianists  Search this
Bandsmen -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
African American entertainers -- 20th century  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Citation:
Duke Ellington Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0301
See more items in:
Duke Ellington Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep850a376a1-6b6d-48bc-9076-cffef76fea2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0301
Online Media:

Frank Christol photographs

Photographer:
Christol, Frank  Search this
Extent:
215 Photographic prints (dupe prints (2 v.), black & white, 8 x 10 in. )
215 Negatives (photographic) (dupe negs, black & white, 4 x 5 in. )
215 Photographic prints (silver gelatin (2 v.), black & white, 8 x 10 in. or smaller)
Container:
Volume 1
Volume 2
Culture:
Bamileke (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Cameroon
Africa
Date:
1920s
Summary:
Photographs taken by French Missionary Frank Christol during his stay in the Cameroon Grassfields, during the 1920s.

The photographs document the peoples of the Cameroon Grassfields, particularly the Bamileke. Activities depicted include dancing and playing musical instruments. Objects include figures, masks, textiles and vessels. There are images of chiefs' palaces and architectural details such as carved doors and house posts. Portraits, often with people in groups with objects, document dress, hairstyles, jewelry and scarification. People portrayed include carvers with their work and chiefs in their palaces.
Arrangement note:
Images indexed by negative number.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Photographic prints
Identifier:
EEPA.1989-004
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo74e573905-34c1-4cbe-a7e8-1c03cb042157
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1989-004

Look & Listen: Yumi Kurosawa, koto, with Sonia Coman-Ernstoff

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-06-24T20:00:13.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_D0FaIZCmE7E

Underdogs and Antiheroes: Japanese Prints from the Moskowitz Collection | Trailer

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2022-11-15T21:45:31.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_J6EynuZnHow

The Shamisen in Japanese Art and Music

Creator:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-06-17T23:52:51.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, Asian  Search this
See more by:
FreerSackler
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
YouTube Channel:
FreerSackler
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_hzTh6ydYSOI

Pickett N1010-ES Trig Duplex Slide Rule

Maker:
Pickett Industries  Search this
Physical Description:
aluminum (overall material)
nylon (cursor material)
leather (case material)
Measurements:
overall: 2.8 cm x 33 cm x 7 cm; 1 3/32 in x 13 in x 2 3/4 in
Object Name:
slide rule
Place made:
United States: California, Santa Barbara
Date made:
ca 1962
Subject:
Rule, Calculating  Search this
Mathematics  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Janis S. Popowicz
ID Number:
1977.1113.01
Catalog number:
336446
Accession number:
1977.1113
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Trigonometry
Slide Rules
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746aa-aee5-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1214521

Box for writing instruments (suzuribako)

Medium:
Lacquer, gold, silver, and pigments, wood, silver water dropper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 4.9 x 22.9 x 25.1 cm (1 15/16 x 9 x 9 7/8 in)
Type:
Container
Origin:
Japan
Date:
19th century
Period:
Edo period or Meiji era
Topic:
Edo period (1615 - 1868)  Search this
Meiji era (1868 - 1912)  Search this
writing  Search this
maple tree  Search this
Japan  Search this
Japanese Art  Search this
Credit Line:
Purchase — Charles Lang Freer Endowment
Accession Number:
F1944.24a-h
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Related Online Resources:
Google Cultural Institute
See more items in:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Collection
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ye39b5c7719-e3c0-49e9-af4c-f32ec4369359
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fsg_F1944.24a-h
Online Media:

G. Gage Skinner collection

Photographer:
Skinner, G. Gage  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Linear feet
265 Slides (photographs)
1 Sound cassette
Culture:
Ika (Ica/Arhuaco)  Search this
Kogi (Kagaba)  Search this
Mapuche  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Sound cassettes
Audiocassettes
Place:
Santa Marta Range (Colombia)
Chile
Colombia
Date:
1964-1966
1972
Summary:
This collection consists of 265 photographic slides and 1 audio cassette recording made by former Peace Corps volunteer G. Gage Skinner while living and traveling in Chile and Colombia in the 1960s-1970s. Images include portraits, landscapes, ceremonies, and daily village life. Audio recording includes songs, chants, and musical instruments.
Scope and Contents:
The G. Gage Skinner collection consists of 265 photographic slides and 1 audio cassette recording made by former Peace Corps volunteer G. Gage Skinner while living and traveling in Chile and Colombia in the 1960s-1970s. Series 1: Chile, 1964-1966, includes images of individual portraits, landscapes, ceremonies, and daily village life of the Mapuche peoples of what is now the Araucanía Region of Chile. Also part of Series 1 is an audio recording of songs, chants, and musical instruments from a 1965 Nguillatún fertility ceremony near Lumaco, Chile. Series 2: Colombia, 1972, includes images of landscapes and daily village life of the Ika (Ica/Arhuaco) and Kogi (Kagaba) peoples of the area near Donachui in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountain range of Colombia. Images include a particular focus on Ika (Ica/Arhuaco) dwellings and architecture, weaving, trade goods, and agriculture.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in two series. Series 1: Chile, 1964-1966 and Series 2: Colombia, 1972.
Biographical / Historical:
G. Gage Skinner is a former Peace Corps volunteer, having served in Chile, 1964-1966, and later in Colombia, 1969-1972. A student of cultural anthropology and a graduate of San Diego State University, Skinner has taught at the college level, and has published on a wide range of topics, including beekeeping, the fur trade, and the history of the American West.
Related Materials:
The Peace Corps Community Archives at American University in Washington, DC maintains a collection of manuscript materials donated by G. Gage Skinner documenting his Peace Corps service in Chile and Colombia. These materials include diaries, biographical information, training materials, and publications. In addition to material culture objects in the NMAI Object Collections donated by Skinner, there are also a large number of objects documenting Mapuche culture which he donated to the San Diego Museum of Man's ethnographic collections.
Separated Materials:
G. Gage Skinner also donated a number of material culture objects to the NMAI Object Collections, documenting the Mapuche, Ika (Ica/Arhuaco), and Kamsá (Sebondoy) peoples of Chile and Colombia. The object numbers are 27/0087 - 27/0089 and 27/0102 - 27/0108.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by G. Gage Skinner in 2017 and 2018.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Peace Corps (U.S.)  Search this
Indians of South America -- Chile  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Audiocassettes
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); G. Gage Skinner collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.116
See more items in:
G. Gage Skinner collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47fd8ff0c-b133-438a-9a96-0bf38fd0b978
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-116
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1995
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1995 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Cape Verdean Connection

Series 3: The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation

Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women

Series 5: Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1995 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1995 Festival featured American Indian women's musical traditions, the heritage of the Czech Republic and Czech Americans, music of Russian and Russian American groups, and the cultural life of the Cape Verdean community. These programs testified to the vitality of the human spirit, and to how people, ideas, and forms of cultural expression increasingly cross boundaries of geography, politics, language, race, and gender. Special events included evening concerts devoted to African immigrant communities in the Washington, D.C. area and a memorial concert for Festival founding director, Ralph Rinzler.

Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women presented the musical culture of American Indian women. The program examined how these women express their identity through the use of a variety of musical forms - from traditional songs of home to contemporary songs of Indian life, from the appropriation of men's music to the fusion of root music with country, folk, blues, and gospel.

The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation provided a broad survey of the ways national, regional, ethnic, and local traditions have been defined in a complex state located at the crossroads of Central Europe. The "Velvet Revolution" of 1989 and the separation of the Czech and Slovak Republics in 1993 have prompted further examinations of cultural identity, the relationship between the state and popular expression, creativity and tradition. Czech Americans, too, have looked at these changes and the reestablishment of relationships to their ancestral homeland.

A third program, Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds, explored the musical culture of Old Believers and Molokans, Russian religious communities created in the 17th and 18th centuries. The program united immigrant communities long established in the United States with those from Russia, and brought together people who, although separated by generations and different social environments, have nonetheless faced parallel issues with regard to cultural persistence and adaptation.

All these programs involved complex institutional arrangements, local-level research and documentation, and strong commitment to and pride in Festival representation. The Cape Verdean Connection program well demonstrated these processes. Cape Verde is an independent island nation and former Portuguese colony located off the west coast of Africa. Cape Verdean Americans, now numbering about 400,000, most born and raised here, historically settled in New England during the 18th century, playing instrumental roles in the whaling and cranberry industries. Cape Verdeans had an important story to tell about their role in American life, their immigrant and continuing transnational cultural experience, their multiracial heritage, and their enduring sense of community - a story with much to tell others as well. Cape Verdeans provided the impetus for the Festival program, carried out most of the research in concert with Smithsonian scholars, led the effort to raise funds from governments, foundations, corporations, and individuals through benefit dances, auctions, and other community events, and, as is fitting, joined with the Smithsonian to share their experiences with the American public.

The 1995 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and several special events.

The 1995 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordngs; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Betty Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Amy Horowitz, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Curators, Folklorists, Educational and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, John W. Franklin, Charlene James-Duguid, Program Managers; Felicia Erickson, Arlene L. Reiniger, Mary Van Meter, Program Specialists; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Kenneth M. Bilby, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corrine Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Yook Jung Park, Kate Rinzler, Research Associates & Collaborators

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Michael Asch, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Roger Kennedy, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d0f338f7-ff86-4399-82c5-39d8a73d9b35
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1995

Leo H. Baekeland Papers

Creator:
Baekeland, L. H. (Leo Hendrik), 1863-1944  Search this
Names:
Bakelite Corporation  Search this
Nepera Chemical Co.  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (49 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Professional papers
Clippings
Laboratory notes
Personal correspondence
Photographs
Notebooks
Diaries
Date:
1976
1863 - 1968
Summary:
The papers document Leo H. Baekeland, a Belgian born chemist who invented Velox photographic paper (1893) and Bakelite (1907), an inexpensive, nonflammable, versatile plastic. The papers include student notebooks; private laboratory notebooks and journals; commercial laboratory notes; diaries; patents; technical papers; biographies; newspaper clippings; maps; graphs; blueprints; account books; batch books; formula books; order books; photographs; and correspondence regarding Baekeland, 1887-1943.
Scope and Contents:
Baekeland documented his life prolifically through diaries, laboratory notebooks, photographs, and correspondence. These constitute the bulk of the collection. The Bakelite company history is also incompletely documented in this collection through Baekeland's correspondence, the commercial laboratory notebooks, and some company ledgers.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Reference Materials, 1863-1868 and undated

Subseries 1.1: Biographical, 1880-1965

Subseries 1.2:Company History, 1910-1961

Subseries 1.3: Related Interests, 1863-1968 and undated

Series 2: Published and Unpublished Writings (by Leo H. Baekeland), 1884-1945

Series 3: Correspondence, 1888-1963 Subseries 3.1: Personal Correspondence, 1916-1943

Subseries 3.2: Charitable Donations, 1916-1938

Subseries 3.3: Family Correspondence, 1888-1963

Subseries 3.4: Clubs and Associations, 1916-1943

Series 4: Diaries, 1907-1943

Series 5: Reading and Lecture Notes, 1878-1886

Series 6, Laboratory Notebooks, 1893-1915

Series 7: Commercial Laboratory Notebooks, 1910-1920

Series 8: Bakelite Company, 1887-1945

Series 9, Patents, 1894-1940

Series 10: Bakelite Corporation Ledgers, 1910-1924; 1935; 1939

Series 11: Photographs, 1889-1950 and undated

Subseries 11.1: Photographs, 1889-1950 and undated

Subseries 11.2: Film Negatives, 1900-1941 and undated

Subseries 11.3: Photoprints, 1894-1941

Subseries 11.4: Stereographs, 1888-1902 and undated

Subseries 11.5: Film and Glass Plate Negatives, 1899-1900 and undated

Series 12: Audio Materials, 1976
Biographical / Historical:
Leo Hendrik Baekeland was an industrial chemist famous for his invention of Bakelite, the first moldable synthetic polymer, and for his invention of Velox photographic paper. Baekeland's career as an inventor and innovator was punctuated by an urge to improve existing technologies and a willingness to experiment both meticulously and daringly. Born in Ghent, Belgium in 1863, Baekeland was a distinguished chemistry student and became a young professor at the University of Ghent. He had a long standing interest in photography and sought to further photographic technology with his expertise in chemistry. In 1887 he obtained his first patent for a dry plate which contained its own developer and could be developed in a tray of water. With the support of a business partner/faculty associate, Jules Guequier, he formed a company named Baekeland et Cie to produce the plate, but the venture failed due to lack of capital.

On August 8, 1889, he married Celine Swarts, daughter of his academic mentor Theodore Swarts, Dean of the Faculty of Sciences at the University of Ghent. After his wedding he travelled to different countries using a traveling scholarship he had been awarded two years previously. His travels ended in the United States where he was offered a job researching chemical problems associated with manufacturing bromide papers and films with A. and H.T. Anthony and Company, a photographic supply producer. Leo and Celine Baekeland had three children: George, Nina and Jenny (1890-1895).

He left Anthony and Company in 1891 to be a consulting chemist. During that time he invented a photographic print paper using silver chloride which could be developed in artificial light instead of sunlight and thus offered more flexibility and consistency to photographers. In 1893, with financial support from Leonard Jacobi, a scrap metal dealer from San Francisco, he formed the Nepera Chemical Company in Yonkers, New York, to manufacture "gaslight" paper under the trade name Velox. The paper became quite popular and the company expanded its operations after its first three years. Finally, George Eastman bought the company for a reported $750,000 which afforded Baekeland the time to conduct his own research in a laboratory he set up on his estate, "Snug Rock," in Yonkers.

Baekeland worked on problems of electrolysis of salt and the production of synthetic resins. He was hired as a consultant to work with Clinton P. Townsend to perfect Townsend's patented electrolytic cell. Baekeland's work there contributed to the success of the Hooke Electrochemical Company which began in operations in Niagara Falls in 1905.

Simultaneously, in 1902 Baekeland began researching reactions of phenol and formaldehyde, and by 1907 was able to control the reactions and produce a moldable plastic (oxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride) which he named Bakelite. Although the process was not perfected for another couple of years, Baekeland applied for a patent for Bakelite right away. He announced his discovery to the scientific community in 1909, and in 1910 formed the General Bakelite Company. Bakelite was a thermosetting resin that, unlike Celluloid became permanently solid when heated. It was virtually impervious to heat, acids, or caustic substances. It could be molded into a wide variety of shapes and was an excellent electric insulator that came to replace hard rubber and amber for electrical and industrial applications. It was also suitable for a wide variety of consumer products such as billiard balls, jewelry, pot handles, telephones, toasters, electric plugs, and airplane instrument knobs. Two companies challenged Bakelite with significant competition, Condensite Corporation of America and Redmanol Chemical Products Company. Bakelite finally merged with these two companies in 1922 to become the Bakelite Corporation. Union Carbide finally bought the corporation in 1939.

Baekeland sustained his interest in photography by taking numerous photographs throughout his lifetime. He also devoted much of his spare time to professional societies and received various honorary degrees and awards such as the Perkin Medal. He had several hobbies such as boating, wine and beer making, and, exotic plants. He also traveled extensively throughout the world, which is documented in his diaries and photographs.

Baekeland spent his final years mostly in his Coconut Grove, Florida home where he became increasingly eccentric until his mind failed him and he was institutionalized. He died in 1943 at the age of eighty.

Scope and Content: Baekeland documented his life prolifically through diaries, laboratory notebooks, photographs, and correspondence. These constitute the bulk of the collection. The Bakelite company history is also incompletely documented in this collection through Baekeland's correspondence, the commercial laboratory notebooks, and some company ledgers.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Albany Billiard Ball Company Records (AC0011)

Celluloid Corporation Records (AC0009)

J. Harry DuBois Collection on the History of Plastics (AC0008)

Materials at Other Organizations

The Hagley Museum and Library, Manuscripts and Archives Department in Delaware also several related collections including: the Directors of Industrial Research Records, 1929 -982; the Du Pont Viscoloid Company, Survey of the Plastics Field, 1932; The Society of the Plastics Industry, 1937-1987; the Roy J. Plunkett Collection, 1910-1994 (inventor of Teflon); and the Gordon M. Kline Collection, 1903.
Separated Materials:
The National Museum of American History, Division Medicine and Science has several artifacts associated with Baekeland including the original "Bakalizer" the apparatus in which Bakelite was first made. See accession numbers: 1977.0368; 1979.1179; 1981.0976; 1982.0034; 1983.0524; 1984.0138.
Provenance:
The bulk of the collection was donated to the National Museum of American History's Division of Physical Sciences in November, 1981, by Celine Karraker, Leo H. Baekeland's granddaughter.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Phenolic resins  Search this
Travel -- Photographs  Search this
Chemists -- 1880-1970  Search this
Inventors -- 1880-1970  Search this
Plastics -- 1880-1970  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Professional papers -- 1880-1970
Clippings -- 1880-1970
Laboratory notes
Personal correspondence -- 1880-1970
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Glass -- 19th-20th century
Notebooks -- 1880-1970
Diaries -- 1880-1970
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 19th-20th century
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Nitrate -- 19th-20th century
Citation:
Leo Baekeland Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0005
See more items in:
Leo H. Baekeland Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep846e88df6-033d-4805-99e2-b308002a75f4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0005
Online Media:

Ramon Ayala

Artist:
Jeff Wilson, born Aug 1975  Search this
Sitter:
Ramon Ayala, born 8 Dec 1945  Search this
Medium:
Inkjet print
Dimensions:
Image: 45.7 x 37.1 cm (18 x 14 5/8")
Sheet: 50.8 x 40.6 cm (20 x 16")
Mat: 71.1 x 55.9 cm (28 x 22")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
2004 (printed 2011)
Topic:
Exterior\Landscape\Rural  Search this
Nature & Environment\Plant\Tree  Search this
Music\Musical instrument\Accordion  Search this
Ramon Ayala: Male  Search this
Ramon Ayala: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician  Search this
Ramon Ayala: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Bill and Sally Wittliff
Object number:
C/NPG.2011.29
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Jeff Wilson
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm486da5a09-a720-4897-b202-011822c15695
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_C_NPG.2011.29

Esperanza Spalding

Artist:
Sandrine Lee, born 1972  Search this
Sitter:
Esperanza Spalding, born 1984  Search this
Medium:
Digitally exposed chromogenic print
Dimensions:
Image: 40.5 x 61 cm (15 15/16 x 24")
Sheet: 50.7 x 71.2 cm (19 15/16 x 28 1/16")
Mat: 66 x 81.3 cm (26 x 32")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\Connecticut
Date:
2010 (printed 2012)
Topic:
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Chair  Search this
Music\Musical instrument\Violin  Search this
Equipment\Drafting & Writing Implements\Writing implement\Pencil  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Bench  Search this
Music\Sheet music  Search this
Music\Musical instrument\Cello  Search this
Interior\Train station  Search this
Esperanza Spalding: Female  Search this
Esperanza Spalding: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician  Search this
Esperanza Spalding: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Esperanza Spalding: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Jazz  Search this
Esperanza Spalding: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Sandrine Lee
Object number:
C/NPG.2012.42
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4f238680a-347f-4d05-9f04-be717317dfdf
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_C_NPG.2012.42

Ray Charles

Artist:
Michel Salou, active mid 20th century  Search this
Sitter:
Ray Charles, 23 Sep 1930 - 10 Jun 2004  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 17.9 x 23.9 cm (7 1/16 x 9 7/16")
Mat: 55.9 x 40.6 cm (22 x 16")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
France\Île-de-France\Ville de Paris, Départment de
Date:
c. 1961
Topic:
Music\Musical instrument\Piano  Search this
Equipment\Sound Devices\Microphone  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Bench  Search this
Interior\Performing Arts  Search this
Ray Charles: Male  Search this
Ray Charles: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Ray Charles: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer  Search this
Ray Charles: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Pianist  Search this
Ray Charles: Society and Social Change\Person with disability\Blind  Search this
Ray Charles: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2000.23
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4c70ba916-2e63-4a0c-b61b-2b937595a3fe
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2000.23

Ballad Singer

Alternate Title:
Pete Seeger
Artist:
Burr Singer  Search this
Sitter:
Pete Seeger, 3 May 1919 - 27 Jan 2014  Search this
Medium:
Lithograph on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 31.1 x 23.5cm (12 1/4 x 9 1/4")
Type:
Print
Date:
1944
Topic:
Music\Musical instrument\Banjo  Search this
Pete Seeger: Male  Search this
Pete Seeger: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician  Search this
Pete Seeger: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Songwriter  Search this
Pete Seeger: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist  Search this
Pete Seeger: Education and Scholarship\Scholar\Folklorist  Search this
Pete Seeger: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Guitarist  Search this
Pete Seeger: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Folk  Search this
Pete Seeger: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Banjo  Search this
Pete Seeger: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2001.65
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm46157b8ab-f2b4-4e5c-bcb4-ee8c29b19d4f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2001.65

Louis Armstrong

Artist:
Anton Bruehl, 1900 - 10 Aug 1982  Search this
Sitter:
Louis Armstrong, 4 Aug 1901 - 6 Jul 1971  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 24.8 x 19.4cm (9 3/4 x 7 5/8")
Sheet: 25.7 x 20.2cm (10 1/8 x 7 15/16")
Mount: 27.9 x 22.8cm (11 x 9")
Mat: 55.9 x 40.6cm (22 x 16")
Frame: 59.7 x 43.8 x 3.8cm (23 1/2 x 17 1/4 x 1 1/2")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\New York\Kings\New York
Date:
1935
Topic:
Music\Musical instrument\Trumpet  Search this
Interior\Studio\Photography  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Male  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Comedian  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Jazz  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Jazz  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Horn player\Trumpeter  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2001.77
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Estate of Anton Bruehl
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4db40dacc-a1b6-4016-a3ed-88eb80bf1e72
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2001.77

Fats Domino

Artist:
Red Grooms, born 7 Jun 1937  Search this
Sitter:
Antoine Domino, Jr., 26 Feb 1928 - 24 Oct 2017  Search this
Medium:
Color lithograph on paper
Dimensions:
Vitrine: 43.8 x 51.8 x 44.1cm (17 1/4 x 20 3/8 x 17 3/8")
Type:
Print
Date:
1984
Topic:
Music\Musical instrument\Piano  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Equipment\Sound Devices\Microphone  Search this
Interior\Performing Arts\Theatrical\Stage  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Stool  Search this
Music\Sheet music  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Neckwear\Tie\Necktie  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Watch\Wrist watch  Search this
Music\Phonograph\Record  Search this
Antoine Domino, Jr.: Male  Search this
Antoine Domino, Jr.: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Pianist  Search this
Antoine Domino, Jr.: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Rhythm and Blues  Search this
Antoine Domino, Jr.: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2003.78
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© 1984 Red Grooms / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm48b1a1d16-4ae6-4beb-9979-40eba67df049
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2003.78

The Bronze Venus

Alternate Title:
Lena Horne
Artist:
Morgan Lithography Company, active c. 1917 - 1945  Search this
Sitter:
Lena Calhoun Horne, 30 Jun 1917 - 9 May 2010  Search this
Medium:
Color halftone lithographic movie poster on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 204.1 × 103.4cm (80 3/8 × 40 11/16")
Paper mount: 207.8 × 108.6cm (81 13/16 × 42 3/4")
Type:
Print
Date:
1943
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry  Search this
Music\Musical instrument\Trumpet  Search this
Music\Musical instrument\Trombone  Search this
Poster  Search this
Human Figures  Search this
Poster\Movie  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Female  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist\Civil rights activist  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Popular  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Television  Search this
Lena Calhoun Horne: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2005.139
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Morgan Lithography Company
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4cd69972a-8b0a-4dd6-8122-fd4e2dd7b6af
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2005.139

Dizzy Gillespie

Artist:
Avi Farin, born 22 Jun 1943  Search this
Sitter:
Dizzy Gillespie, 21 Oct 1917 - 6 Jan 1993  Search this
Medium:
Color photolithograph with halftone
Dimensions:
Sheet: 95.7 × 61.1 cm (37 11/16 × 24 1/16")
Type:
Print
Date:
1979
Topic:
Music\Musical instrument\Trumpet  Search this
Poster  Search this
Dizzy Gillespie: Male  Search this
Dizzy Gillespie: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Jazz  Search this
Dizzy Gillespie: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Horn player\Trumpeter  Search this
Dizzy Gillespie: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Jack Rennert
Object number:
NPG.2007.167
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© 1979 Avi Farin, A Contemporary Poster Classic
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
20th Century Americans: 1960-2000
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 342
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm428a63eb6-2fa2-4add-95bb-dba8e031404f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2007.167

Louis Armstrong

Artist:
Woodward's Studio, c. 1920 - 1930  Search this
Sitter:
Louis Armstrong, 4 Aug 1901 - 6 Jul 1971  Search this
Medium:
Halftone on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 25.5 x 20 cm (10 1/16 x 7 7/8")
Type:
Print
Date:
c. 1928
Topic:
Music\Musical instrument\Trumpet  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Neckwear\Tie\Bowtie  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Male  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Comedian  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Jazz  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Jazz  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Horn player\Trumpeter  Search this
Louis Armstrong: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2009.54
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm40506ad45-b513-4a34-a642-f03fb33ff4a2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2009.54

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