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Grace Nicholson photograph collection

Creator:
Nicholson, Grace, -1948  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Names:
Maxwell, Thyra  Search this
Extent:
374 Photographic prints
38 Copy negatives
Culture:
Hupa  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Atsugewi (Hat Creek)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1905-1930
Summary:
This collection contains 374 photographic prints and 38 copy negatives made by Grace Nicholson, a collector and dealer of Native American and Asian arts and crafts in Pasadena, California. The majority of the photographs were made between 1910 and 1930 among various native communities in California, though there are smaller amounts of photographs in Arizona and New Mexico. Communities photographed include—Hupa, Yurok, Pomo, Karuk (Karok), Tolowa, Yokayo Pomo, Achomawi (Pit River), Atsugewi (Hat Creek), Hopi Pueblo, Kumeyaay (Digueno), Mojave (Mohave), Paiute, Taos Pueblo, Wintu, Acoma Pueblo, Maidu, Chukchansi Yokuts, Yokuts.
Scope and Contents:
The Grace Nicholson photograph collection contains 374 black and white photographic prints (38 copy negatives) made by Grace Nicholson between 1905 and 1930 however many of the photographs are undated. The majority of the photographs were shot within various native communities in California, including Hupa, Yurok, Pomo, Karuk (Karok), Tolowa, Yokayo Pomo, Achomawi (Pit River), Atsugewi (Hat Creek), Maidu, Chukchansi Yokuts, Yokuts, Kumeyaay (Digueno), Wintu. There are smaller amounts of photographs from Arizona and New Mexico which include photographs within Hopi Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, Mojave (Mohave) and Paiute communities.

A large number of these photographs include portraits of Native men and women posed with baskets, either made by themselves or other community members. There are also posed portraits of families in front of their homes and going about their daily activities. Nicholson was often close with the families she photographed and took care to include their names with the images, though there are many photographs where the sitters are still unidentified. Some photographs of certain dances and ceremonies have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.

The majority of the prints are silver gelatin (DOP) and the copy negatives (acetate) were made by the Museum of the American Indian sometime in the 1960s as part of a large photograph conservation project. There were also a number of photographic prints found within the Grace Nicholson manuscript materials (NMAI.AC.001) that were transferred to the photo archives in the early 2000s.
Prints from Grace Nicholson: P05451-P05497, P05505, P08339-P08368, P08469-P08479, P09400-P09453, P09463-P09464, P09836-P09838. Prints from Thyra Maxwell: P18316-P18317, P18932-P19107, P20830-P20836, P20999-P21075. Prints pulled from the MAI records (NMAI.AC.001): P28169, P28170, P28443-P28445. Copy Negatives: N35814-N35844, N36250, N41439, N41551-N41556.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Grace Nicholson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 31, 1877. She moved to California following her parents and grandparents death, in 1901 and was soon purchasing Native American baskets and other artifacts in association with Carrol S. Hartman, an old family friend from the East. Traveling north through California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and south and east through Arizona and New Mexico, she collected, not only for herself, but also for such institutions as the Smithsonian, the Field Columbian Museum of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania Department of Archeology and later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Nicholson kept extensive diaries and notes on her buying trips through Native American territory, especially of the Karok, Klamath, and Pomo Indians. Her subjects included Native American legends, folklore, vocabulary, tribal festivals, basket making, the art trade, and living conditions. Native American artists with whom Nicholson established long-term business and personal connections included Pomo basket weaver Mary Benson (1878-1930) and her husband William Benson (1862-1937), as well as Elizabeth Hickox (1875-1947) of the Karuk tribe. By August of 1902 she was establishing a shop and studio at 41-143 Raymond Ave., Pasadena and she regularly paid higher prices than competitive buyers, thereby obtaining the finest pieces.

In 1909 Grace Nicholson was awarded a silver medal for her ethnological collection exhibited at the Alaska-Yukon- Pacific Exposition in Seattle. In 1924, Nicholson designed and opened a new building for her collections nicknamed the "Treasure House" where she also handled the work of a number of the outstanding artists among them, Joseph H. Sharp and Grace Carpenter Hudson. Throughout her collecting career, Nicholson maintained a correspondence with George Heye selling and donating collections to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation from 1916 until her death in 1948.

Following Nicholson's death, her Native American Indian art collection was left to her assistants Thyra Maxwell and Estelle Bynum who became the executors of her estate. Her 12,000-item Asian art collection was auctioned by the Curtis Gallery in November 1950 and purchased by Los Angeles businessman Edker Pope. In 1968, Maxwell donated Nicholson's papers and photographs to The Huntington Library and sold Nicholson's collection of baskets made by the Bensons, as well as a large collection of correspondence and myths from William Benson, to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, of New York City (now the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution).
Related Materials:
The majority of Grace Nicholson's papers and photographs can be found at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California; Grace Nicholson Photograph Collection (photCL 56), Grace Nicholson Papers and Addenda (mssNicholson papers and addenda).

Additional Nicholson material can be found at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley; Photographic negatives and prints of Calif. Indian baskets and other ethnographic items handled by Grace Nicholson from about 1912-1925 (Accession 2880), Grace Nicholson's ledger of Indian baskets from about 1912-1925 in Pasadena, California (Accession 2881).
Separated Materials:
Correspondence between Grace Nicholsan and George Heye as well as Pomo myths recorded from William Benson can be found in the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation records (NMAI.AC.001) in Boxes 262, 262A, 263. Baskets made by Mary and William Benson, as well also additional collections donated and sold by Nicholson to the Museum, can be found in NMAI's ethnographic collection.
Provenance:
The majority of the photographic prints were donated by Thyra Maxwell in 1968 and 1969. The rest of the photographs accompanied collections purchased by the Museum of the American Indian or presented to the Museum from Grace Nicholson in 1923.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu). Photographs with cultural sensitivity are restricted.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace Nicholson photograph collection, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.039
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-039

John Peabody Harrington photographs from California

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Former owner:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Names:
Bautista, Bob, c.1843-1923  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Heye, Thea  Search this
Extent:
17 Negatives (photographic)
16 Photographic prints
2 Copy negatives
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Tachi Yokuts  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Santa Barbara -- California -- archeology
Ventura County (Calif.)
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
Date:
1923
Summary:
Negatives and photographic prints taken by John Peabody Harrington in Santa Barbara and Ventura County, California in 1923. John Peabody Harrington (1884-1961) was an ethnologist and linguist who specialized in the Native peoples of California and served with the U.S. Bureau of American Ethnology from 1915 to 1955. Beyond his efforts to document innumerable Native languages, Harrington also collected objects for the Bureau of Ethnology and on his own. Photographs in this collection accompanied the objects he sold to or collected for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Scope and Contents:
The John Peabody Harrington photographs from California include negatives and photographic prints taken in 1923 by Harrington while in the field. All of the negatives were taken at the Ventura County fair in the fall of 1923. These photographs depict a group of Chumash men building a grass lodge, organized by J.P. Harrington, as well as Bob Bautista, a Tachi Yokuts man, demonstrating traditional boat and house building. George Gustav Heye is pictured in several shots while the Chumash grass lodge is being built. Prints [P11568-P11572] were made from the aforementioned negatives. There is also one copy negative made from one of the subsequent prints.

The remainder of the photographic prints in this collection were taken during the Burton Mound expedition, funded by Thea Heye and led by John Peabody Harrington in 1923. Photographs taken by Harrington show workers excavating the mound as well images of the mound itself. There are four additional photographs from Burton Mound that were not taken by Harrington. These include an image Of J.P Harrington, D.B. Rogers and George W. Bayley standing with excavated materials. Some of these photographs have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Arrangement:
Physically arranged by catalog number. Negatives: N08762-N08766, N08964-N08975, N35868, N36678. Prints: P06039, P05564-P05566, P09497-P09502, P11568-P11572, P28107.
Biographical / Historical:
John Peabody Harrington (1884-1961) was an ethnologist and linguist employed by the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) for forty years, from 1915 to 1955. He came to the Smithsonian after training at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley. He became interested in Native American languages upon meeting historically renowned anthropologist A. L. Kroeber. J. P. Harrington was reportedly fluent in nine international languages and eighteen Native American languages.

In 1923, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation provided funding for J.P. Harrington to lead an expedition in Santa Barbara, California to excavate the Burton Mound.

Additional information on John Peabody Harrington can be found on the National Anthropological Archives' website, home to his collection.
Related Materials:
Archaeological materials excavated from Burton Mound can be found in NMAI's archaeological collection. For more information on these object please contact NMAICollections@si.edu.
Provenance:
The negatives were acquired from John Peabody Harrington by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation shortly after they were taken in 1923. It is likely that prints [P11568-P11572] were made from the negatives some time in the 1930s. Prints from Burton Mound [P09497-P09502] were cataloged by the MAI in 1929 though the additional Burton Mound prints arrived with the collection in 1923. The provenance of P06039 and P28107 is unknown.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

Some images restriced: Cultural Sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Mounds -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); John Peabody Harrington photographs from California, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.040
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington photographs from California
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-040
Online Media:

Huntington -- Oheka

Landscape designer:
Farrand, Beatrix, 1872-1959  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Former owner:
Kahn, Otto Hermann, 1867-1934  Search this
Melius, Gary  Search this
Eastern Military Academy  Search this
Provenance:
Blue, Frances  Search this
Nurserymen:
Lewis & Valentine Company  Search this
Architect:
Delano & Aldrich  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Oheka (Huntington, New York)
United States of America -- New York -- Suffolk County -- Huntington
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
Oheka was the grandest estate of its time in Cold Spring Harbor on Long Island's North Shore, styled after French farmhouses but with 126 rooms. The house was designed by architects William Adams Delano and Chester Holmes Aldrich in circa 1921. In 1917 the Olmsted Brothers planned the grounds of the 443-acre estate, which included the entrance drive bordered by red cedars, the golf course, and extensive bridle paths. It took two years to move the earth and build up a rise on which the house was sited. A distinctive parterre in front of the house was comprised of eight reflecting pools to show the changing sky and surrounding mountains, with grass borders. In 1919 Adele Wolff Kahn commissioned Beatrix Farrand to design more intimate spaces, including a Dutch garden, an octagonal garden, a rose garden and a water garden. The formal Dutch garden enclosed by vine-covered brick walls displayed tulips and flowering trees in the spring, in parterre beds separated by brick walks laid out in a herringbone pattern. The octagonal fragrance garden featured yellow and purple pansies followed in summer by lavender, nepeta and pink carnations. Farrand's designs were formal and highly detailed to the extent that each week's blooms could be anticipated.
Garden features included greenhouses, an orangery, a croquet lawn, stables, pools and tennis courts. Courtyards at the house featured single mature trees supplied by the Long Island nursery, Lewis & Valentine. The estate was too costly to maintain and the gardens were destroyed in 1948. A partial restoration and conversion to a hotel in the 1980s reinstalled the Olmsted Brothers landscape designs but not Farrand's.
Persons associated with the garden include Otto H. Kahn and Adele Wolff Kahn (former owners, 1914-circa 1934); Eastern military Academy (former owner), Gary Melius (former owner), Olmsted Brothers (landscape architects, circa 1917); Beatrix Farrand (landscape designer, 1919-1928); Lewis & Valentine (nurserymen, circa 1928); William Adams Delano & Chester Holmes Aldrich (architects).
Related Materials:
Oheka related holdings consist of 2 folders (29 35mm slides and 3 photo prints)
Other archival materials related to Oheka are located at the Environmental Design Archives at the University of California at Berkeley, Huntington Historical Society in Huntington, New York, the Nassau County Reference Library
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 06499, Otto H. Kahn.
See others in:
J. Horace McFarland collection, 1900-1962.

Lewis & Valentine Company records, 1916-1971.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- New York -- Huntington  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NY170
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New York
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref26808

Jay DeFeo papers, circa 1940s-1970s

Creator:
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Subject:
Hedrick, Wally  Search this
Berman, Wallace  Search this
Peterson, Margaret  Search this
McClure, Michael  Search this
Remington, Deborah  Search this
Sinton, Nell  Search this
Lobdell, Frank  Search this
Terrill, Ruth  Search this
Berman, Shirley  Search this
Blum, Irving  Search this
Conner, Bruce  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women photographers  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Expressionism (Art)  Search this
Symbolism  Search this
Beat generation  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Photography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7417
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209575
AAA_collcode_defejay
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Photography
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209575
Online Media:

William C. Sturtevant papers

Topic:
Handbook of North American Indians
Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Six Nations  Search this
Extent:
220 Linear feet (The total extent of the collection is 191.41 linear feet (consisting of 473 document boxes and 2 record boxes) plus 254 sound recordings, 94 computer disks, 42 card file boxes, 85 oversize folders, 9 rolled items, 18 binder boxes, and 3 oversize boxes. Of the total extent, 4.79 linear feet (14 boxes) are restricted.)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Date:
1952-2007
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and other professional activities. The collection is comprised of books, sound recordings, research and field notes, realia, artifacts, clippings, microfilm, negatives, slides, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, memorandums, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, and bibliographies.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and his involvement in various professional activities. The collection is comprised of research and field notes, sound recordings, realia, clippings, negatives, slides, prints, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, memorandums, conference papers and meeting notes, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, bibliographies, student files such as class notes and papers from Sturtevant's years as an anthropology student, teaching materials including lecture notes and exams, daily planners, passports, military records, artwork including prints and lithographs, maps, and computer files.

The materials in this collection document Sturtevant's career as a preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, university professor, his role as General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, and his contributions to the field of Anthropology. From his early work with the Seminole Indians of Florida to his forays into Burma, and his decades-long study of how Native Americans have been depicted in artistic and popular culture, Sturtevant's diverse intellectual interests are represented in his research files. A copious note taker, Sturtevant captured his observations and opinions of everything from meetings with colleagues to museum exhibits. Sturtevant's commitment to the anthropological profession can be found in the notes and programs of the many conferences, symposiums, and lecture series he attended and at which he presented. He also held numerous leadership positions in various professional associations and sat on the board of directors/trustees for several cultural organizations including Survival International and the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation. Sturtevant was respected for his vast knowledge of indigenous peoples and he received a voluminous amount of correspondence from colleagues who often included copies of their papers and grant proposals. He kept many of these works, which, it appears he used as reference material. Sturtevant's own work is reflected in his writings; he published over 200 scholarly papers, articles, and books.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 14 series: 1. Correspondence, 1951-2008; 2. Research Files, 1851, 1860s, 1880s, 1890, 1939-2006; 3. Writings, 1952-2006; 4. Professional Activities, 1952-2006; 5. Smithsonian, 1954-2008; 6. Handbook of North American Indians, 1971-2007; 7. Biographical Files, 1933-2007; 8. Student Files, 1944-1985; 9. Subject Files, 1902-2002; 10. Photographs, 1927-2004; 11. Artwork, 1699-1998; 12. Maps, 1949-1975; 13. Sound Recordings, 1950-2000; 14. Computer Files, 1987-2006.
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007), preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, and university professor, was best known for his contributions to Seminole ethnology, as curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and for his work as the general editor of the Handbook of North American Indians.

Sturtevant's passion for studying Native peoples began at a young age. In third grade "after a class on American Indians, he asked his father what kind of people study Indians, and his father replied, 'Anthropologists.' Sturtevant decided then that he would make anthropology his career" (Merrill 11). After graduating with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949, Sturtevant went on to Yale University to complete his graduate work in anthropology. When it came time to decide on what area of North America he should focus his research, one of his faculty members at Yale, Irving Rouse, "suggested he consider the Seminoles of south Florida. By the end of his first fieldwork season, Sturtevant was convinced that the dearth of ethnographic information about these Seminoles and their status as one of the least acculturated of all North American Indian societies justified ethnographic research among them and offered the possibility of making an important contribution to North American ethnology" (Merrill 13). Sturtevant spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 conducting preliminary fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole and in 1952 he took up temporary residence at Big Cypress Reservation to undertake research for his dissertation, "The Mikasuki Seminole: Medical Beliefs and Practices." This work focused on Seminole medicine, but also included Sturtevant's analysis of Seminole worldview, religion, history, inter-ethnic relations, material culture, economy, kinship, language, and social organization.

In 1954, while he was finishing his dissertation, Sturtevant made the transition from student of anthropology to professional anthropologist. He was hired as an instructor in Yale's Anthropology Department and began his career in museum work as an assistant curator of anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. After receiving his PhD from Yale in 1955, Sturtevant moved on to the Smithsonian Institution, where he accepted a position as a research anthropologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). This position afforded Sturtevant the chance to continue to explore his many research interests in ways that a full time professorship or museum curatorship could not. Over the next ten years he studied the Catawba in South Carolina; the Seneca and Cayuga nations of the Iroquois League in New York, Oklahoma, and Ontario; continued his work with the Seminole; visited European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture; and spent a year in Burma. In 1963, Sturtevant and his wife, Theda Maw, the daughter of a prominent Burmese family, took their three young children to Burma so that they could visit with Maw's family. Sturtevant took this as an opportunity to branch out from his Native American research and spent the year visiting neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examining archival materials, studying the Burmese language, learning about Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, and taking photographs. He also collected 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian.

When Sturtevant returned from Burma, he found the BAE had been dissolved. In 1965, he was transferred from the now-defunct BAE to the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), where he became curator of North American Ethnology, a position he held for the next forty-two years. During his tenure at NMNH Sturtevant oversaw all the North American ethnology collections, planned exhibitions, served on committees, and sponsored interns and fellows. One of Sturtevant's primary duties at NMNH was serving as the General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, "a major multi-volume reference work summarizing anthropological, linguistic, and historical knowledge about native peoples north of Mexico" (Jackson). Each volume was designed to represent a geographic or topical area of Americanist study. As General Editor, Sturtevant selected volume editors, chapter authors, oversaw office staff, and proofread manuscripts over the course of production.

Besides focusing on the Handbook, much of Sturtevant's time was taken up by responsibilities he held outside the Institution. Sturtevant was extremely involved in professional anthropological associations and held many leadership positions. Fresh out of graduate school, he began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1957. He later became a member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society, served as book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist from 1962-1968, was a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums and was both vice president and president of the committee once it became the Council for Museum Anthropology, was on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives, served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation from 1976-1982 and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986, and sat on the Board of Directors of Survival International from 1982-1988. He was President of the American Society for Ethnohistory, the American Ethnological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropological Society of Washington. Sturtevant also taught classes at Johns Hopkins University as an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology, served as a consultant on exhibits at other museums, and reviewed manuscripts for scholarly publications.

Sturtevant remained active in the profession throughout his later years. After divorcing Theda Maw in 1986, he married Sally McLendon, a fellow anthropologist, in 1990 and they undertook several research projects together. Sturtevant was recognized for his dedication and contributions to the field of anthropology in 1996 when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Brown University, and in 2002 when his colleagues published a festschrift in his honor, Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant.

Sturtevant died on March 2, 2007 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, MD after suffering from emphysema.

Sources Consulted

Estrada, Louie. 2007. William C. Sturtevant; Expert on Indians. Washington Post, March 17. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/16/AR2007031602273.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Jackson, Jason Baird. 2007. William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007). http://museumanthropology.blogspot.com/2007/03/william-c-sturtevant-1926-2007.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Merrill, William L. 2002. William Curtis Sturtevant, Anthropologist. In Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant. William L. Merrill and Ives Goddard, eds. Pp. 11-36. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1926 -- Born July 26 in Morristown, NJ

1944 -- Entered the University of California at Berkeley as a second-semester freshman

1944 -- Attended summer school at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City where he took courses on Mexican archaeology and South American ethnology

1945 -- Drafted into the United States Navy

1946 -- Received an honorable discharge from the Navy with the rank of pharmacist's mate third class and returned to UC Berkeley

1947 -- Attended the University of New Mexico's summer field school in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

1949 -- January: Received his Bachelor's degree with honors in anthropology from UC Berkeley

1949 -- Began graduate studies at Yale University

1950-1951 -- Spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 in Florida conducting fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole

1951 -- Conducted his first research study of the Iroquois, a classification of Seneca musical instruments, their construction and use, with Harold Conklin

1952 -- May: Moved to Big Cypress Reservation in Florida to conduct research for his dissertation. He focused on Seminole medicine, but also collected physical anthropological data such as blood-type frequencies, handedness, and color blindness

1952 -- July 26: Married Theda Maw

1954 -- Hired by Yale University as an instructor in the Department of Anthropology and as an assistant curator of anthropology in the Yale Peabody Museum

1955 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1956 -- Joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) as a research anthropologist

1957 -- Began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1957 -- Traveled to Rock Hill, South Carolina to collect linguistic data from Sam Blue, the last member of the Catawba tribe to have maintained some proficiency in the Catawba language. While there, he made a small collection of Catawba pottery for the United States National Museum

1957-1958 -- Spent seven weeks continuing his research among the New York Seneca

1959 -- Returned to Florida to study Seminole ethnobotany. He also collected ethnographic materials, especially objects made for the tourist market, which he deposited in the United States National Museum

1959-1960 -- Member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society

1960 -- July and August: Visited 17 European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture

1961-1962 -- Spent the summers of these years conducting ethnographic fieldwork among the Seneca-Cayuga in Oklahoma

1962 -- October: Visited the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada to conduct fieldwork among the Seneca and Cayuga there

1962-1968 -- Book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist

1963 -- October: Spent the year in Burma; visited neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examined photographs in several archives, studied the Burmese language, and read extensively about the country's history and culture. Assembled notes on Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, took hundreds of photographs, and made a collection of 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian

1964 -- Visited Inle Lake in the Southern Shan States southeast of Mandalay, where he examined local approaches to artificial island agriculture

1964-1981 -- Became a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums, which became the Council for Museum Anthropology in 1974. Sturtevant was the Council's first vice president, serving two terms between 1974 and 1978, and was its president from 1978 to 1981

1965 -- Became curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History after the dissolution of the BAE

1965-1966 -- President of the American Society for Ethnohistory

1966 -- Named the editor of the Handbook of North American Indians

1967-1968 -- Fulbright scholar and lecturer at Oxford University's Institute of Social Anthropology

1969 -- Began serving on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives

1974-1989 -- Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

1976-1982 -- Served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986

1977 -- President of the American Ethnological Society

1980-1981 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1981 -- Spent part of the spring semester at the University of California Berkeley as a Regents Lecturer

1982-1988 -- Board of Directors of Survival International

1986 -- Divorced Theda Maw

1986-1987 -- Smithsonian Fellow at Oxford University's Worcester College

1990 -- Married Sally McLendon

1992 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1996 -- Awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters at Brown University

2007 -- Died March 2 in Rockville, MD
Related Materials:
Other materials relating to William C. Sturtevant at the National Anthropological Archives are included in the following collections:

Manuscript 4504

Manuscript 4595

Manuscript 4806

Manuscript 4821

Manuscript 4972

Manuscript 7045

Photo Lot 59

Photo Lot 79-51

Photo Lot 80-3

Photo Lot 81R

Photo Lot 86-68 (6)

Photo Lot 86-68 (7)

American Society for Ethnohistory records

Committee on Anthropological Research in Museum Records

Handbook of North American Indians records

Records of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History

Gordon Davis Gibson Papers, Sound Recordings

SPC Se Powhatan Confederacy Mattapony BAE No # 01790700

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913800

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913900

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04914000

Negative MNH 1530

Negative MNH 1530 B

Sturtevant is listed as a correspondent in the following NAA collections:

Administrative file, 1949-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

John Lawrence Angel Papers

James Henri Howard Papers

Donald Jayne Lehmer Papers

John Victor Murra Papers

Records of the Society for American Archaeology

Albert Clanton Spaulding Papers

Waldo Rudolph Wedel and Mildred Mott Wedel Papers

Copies of sound recordings made by William C. Sturtevant can be found at The California Language Archive at UC Berkeley in two collections, The William Sturtevant collection of Creek/Seminole sound recordings, which includes 31 minutes of Northern Muskogean linguistic field recordings from 1951, and The William Sturtevant collection of Mikasuki sound recordings, which includes 33 minutes of Mikasuki linguistic field recordings from 1951. Two sound tape reels of Seminole music Sturtevant recorded in Florida in 1951 can be found at Wesleyan University's World Music Archives. Folk songs on these recordings include "Scalping Sickness," "Bear Sickness with blowing," "Bear sickness without blowing," "Lullaby," "Feather Dance," "Snake Dance," and "Crazy Dance." Performers include Josie Billie, Lee Cypress, Harvey Jumper, Boy Jim, Charlie (Johnny?) Cypress, Little Tiger Tail, Billy Ossiola, and Charlie Billy Boy.
Separated Materials:
One video tape, "Seminole History and Tradition", was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Series 2.2, Tukabahchee Plate: Glass negative of spectrogram from FBI (Box 135), removed for storage with other glass plate negatives.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History.
Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
History  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-24
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-24
Online Media:

Secretary Adams/Secretary-Elect Ira Michael Heyman

Author:
Strauss, Richard  Search this
Subject:
Adams, Robert McCormick 1926-2018  Search this
Heyman, Ira Michael 5/30/1930-11/19/2011  Search this
Physical description:
Color: Black and White; Size: 10w x 8h; Type of Image: Person, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Person, candid
Date:
1994
Topic:
Secretaries  Search this
Management--Museums  Search this
Secretariats  Search this
Regents  Search this
Standard number:
94-5169-12
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_10188

A. Myra Keen with her Parents

Author:
Unknown  Search this
Subject:
Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra) 1905-  Search this
Stanford University  Search this
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1; Color: Black and white ; Size: 4w x 6h; Type of Image: Group, candid; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Group, candid
Date:
1914
Topic:
Women paleontologists  Search this
Mollusks  Search this
Specimens  Search this
Malacologists  Search this
Paleontologists  Search this
Standard number:
91-7751
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_11230

I. Michael Heyman

Author:
Unknown  Search this
Subject:
Heyman, Ira Michael 5/30/1930-11/19/2011  Search this
University of California, Berkeley  Search this
Board of Regents  Search this
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 ; Color: Black and White; Type of Image: Portrait ; Medium: Photographic print
Type:
Photographic print
Portraits
Date:
1994
Topic:
Secretaries  Search this
Management--Museums  Search this
Secretariats  Search this
Lawyers  Search this
Standard number:
SIA2012-1119 and 98-015
Restrictions & Rights:
Unknown
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_7099

Folk Music, The Bay Years, Vol. 1 [sound recording]

Liner notes:
Cogan, Mike  Search this
Physical description:
1 sound disc digital 4 3/4 in
Type:
Musical sound recordings
Place:
United States
California
Berkeley (Calif.)
Date:
2007
Topic:
Old-time music  Search this
Folksong revival  Search this
Folk songs  Search this
Local number:
Bay 304
Restrictions & Rights:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only
Data Source:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_321756

(In)versions by Julie Chen and David Turner

Title:
Inversions
Versions
Author:
Chen, Julie  Search this
Author:
Turner, David 1948-  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books DSI  Search this
Publisher:
Flying Fish Press  Search this
Physical description:
[28] pages color illustrations 23 x 27 cm
Type:
Specimens
Artists' books (books).)
Artists' books
Peep shows
Toy and movable books
Place:
California
Berkeley
Date:
2000
Topic:
Collage  Search this
Illustrated books  Search this
Toy and movable books  Search this
Artists' books  Search this
Call number:
N7433.4.C44 I58 2000X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_935604

Octopus written by Elizabeth McDevitt ; and illustrated by Julie Chen

Author:
McDevitt, Elizabeth book artist  Search this
Chen, Julie  Search this
Flying Fish Press  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books DSI  Search this
Binder:
Tilcock, Sandy  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume ([14] leaves) ill 27 x 35 cm
Type:
Poetry
Clamshell boxes
Collographs
Double-spine bindings
Letterpress prints
Movable books
Tunnel books
Artists' books (books).)
Artists' books
Book cloth (textile material)
Limited editions
Place:
U.S.A
California
Berkeley
Date:
1992
Topic:
Ocean--In art  Search this
Octopuses in art  Search this
Octopuses  Search this
Social isolation in art  Search this
Sea in art  Search this
Call number:
N7433.4.M33 O28 1992
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_936433

World without end by Julie Chen

Author:
Chen, Julie  Search this
Papermaker:
Cohen, Bonnie  Search this
Binder:
Jaquier, Diane  Search this
McLeskey, Bonnie  Search this
Author:
Turner, David 1948-  Search this
Flying Fish Press  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books DSI  Search this
Physical description:
[16] pages color illustrations 26 cm., in box 39 cm
Type:
Specimens
Flag books (Toy and movable books)
Artists' books (books).)
Artists' books
Place:
California
Berkeley
Date:
1999
Topic:
Flag books (Toy and movable books)  Search this
Found objects (Art)  Search this
Geography in art  Search this
Maps in art  Search this
Artists' books  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_936439

Souvenirs of great cities [rhymes, Dorothy A. Yule ; illustrations, Susan Hunt Yule]

Author:
Yule, Dorothy A  Search this
Author:
Yule, Susan Hunt  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books DSI  Search this
Publisher:
Left Coast Press (Berkeley, Calif.),.)  Search this
Physical description:
4 volumes color illustrations 7 x 84 cm, folded to 7 x 7 cm
Type:
Specimens
In art
Poetry
Accordion fold format (Binding)
Art
Artists' books (books).)
Artists' books (books)
Artists' books
Place:
London (England)
New York (N.Y.)
Paris (France)
San Francisco (Calif.)
California
Berkeley
San Francisco
England
London
France
Paris
New York (State)
New York
Date:
1995
Topic:
London (England) in art  Search this
Paris (France) in art  Search this
San Francisco (Calif.) in art  Search this
Toy and movable books  Search this
Artists' books  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_932741

Ode to a grand staircase (for four hands)

Author:
Chen, Julie  Search this
Author:
Satie, Erik 1866-1925 March of the grand staircase  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books DSI  Search this
Book designer:
Tetenbaum, Barbara  Search this
Publisher:
Flying Fish Press  Search this
Triangular Press  Search this
Subject:
Satie, Erik 1866-1925  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume ([29] pages) color illustrations 19 x 97 cm. folded to 19 x 17 cm
Type:
Fiction
Adaptations
Accordion fold format
Artists' books (books).)
Artists' books
Cloth boxes (containers)
Compound bindings
Die-cut leaves (gathered matter components)
Folded books
Magnetic catches
Numbered limited editions
Signed limited editions
Place:
California
Berkeley
Date:
2001
2000-2009
Topic:
Staircases  Search this
Artists' books  Search this
Call number:
N7433.4.C44 O34 2001X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_935549

Saburo Shimono Papers

Creator:
Shimono, Sab  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (19 boxes, 1 map-folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Theater programs
Photographs
Compact discs
Newspaper clippings
Videocassettes
Black-and-white photographs
Movie scripts
Television scripts
Correspondence
School yearbooks
School records
Date:
1948-2013
Summary:
Collection documents the career of Saburo "Sab" Shimono, an American actor of Japanese descent.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents Saburo Shimono, an American born actor of Japanese descent primarily through movie and theatre scripts for productions featuring Shimono.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into five series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1948-2013

Series 2: Scripts, 1962-2012

Series 3: Photographs, 1965-1986

Series 4: Posters, 1966-2010

Series 5: Audiovisual Materials, 1970-2009
Biographical:
Sab Shimono is an accomplished actor and voice performer with numerous television, film, and stage credits to his name and an important figure in Asian-American arts and culture. He was born on July 31, 1937, in Sacramento, California, to restaurant owners Masauchi Shimono and Edith Mary Otani Shimono. During World War II he and his family were incarcerated at the Sacramento Assembly Center, then at Tule Lake Segregation Center, California and Camp Amanche (also known as the Granada War Relocation Center) in Colorado. After graduating from Sacramento High School (where he was student body president) in 1956, Shimono went on to the University of California, Berkeley, where he studied acting under Henrietta Davis. His first professional theatre role was a summer stock production of Flower Drum Song where he played Wang Ta. In 1966 he debuted on Broadway as Ito in the original production of Mame starring Angela Lansbury and directed by Greg Saks. After working on a number of off-Broadway projects including multiple productions with La MaMa, Shimono returned to Broadway in 1976 as Manjiro in the original production of Stephen Sondheim's Pacific Overtures. In addition to the stage, he has appeared in numerous films including, Midway (1976), Gung Ho (1986), Presumed Innocent (1990), Hot Summer Winds (1991), Suture (1993), The Shadow (1994), Waterworld (1995), Paradise Road (1997), The Big Hit (1998), and Southland Tales (2006). He guest starred in many television shows, including 2 ½ Men, Friends, Seinfeld, M*A*S*H, Mad Men, and Hawaii, Five-0. He voiced the role of Uncle for five seasons on Fox's Jackie Chan Adventures, and was the voice of Chow Lo in Disney's Mulan. Shimono has worked extensively with a number of acclaimed Asian-American playwrights including Philip Kan Gotanda, Wakako Yamauchi, and Ken Narasaki. He has appeared in several plays or movies that reference the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans, including Alan Parker's Come See the Paradise(1990), Michael Uno's movie version of the Philip Kan Gotanda play The Wash (1988), and independent shorts Day of Independence (2003) and Half Kenneth (2009). Shimono also starred in a short film for the National Museum of American History's exhibition, A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution, which ran from 1987 to 2004. He has been honored on numerous occasions with awards for outstanding performance from the LA Weekly and Dramalogue, and received the 1975 Clio Award for Best Actor. Shimono has also been active in the push for LGBT equality, working extensively with a number of organizations dedicated to LGBT rights, particularly within the Asian-American Pacific Islander communities. He lives and works with his husband, Steve Alden Nelson, in Los Angeles, California.

Source

Densho Encyclopedia
Separated Materials:
Materials about Saburo Shimono's US Army service (1960-1964) and wood hand tools (1940s) from Tule Lake Camp, California and Camp Amanche (Granada War Relocation Center) in Colorado are held in the Division of Armed Forces History (now Division of POlitical and Military History). See accession 2016.3049.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Saburo Shimono, May 2016.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Social Security numbers are present and have been rendered unreadable and redacted. Researchers may use the photocopies in the collection. The remainder of the collection has no restrictions.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Actors  Search this
Topic:
Japanese Americans  Search this
High school students -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Theater programs
Photographs -- Color prints -- 20th century
Compact discs
Newspaper clippings
Videocassettes -- 20th century
Black-and-white photographs
Movie scripts
Television scripts
Correspondence
School yearbooks
School records
Citation:
Saburo Shimono Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1379
See more items in:
Saburo Shimono Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1379

Nell (Eleanor) and Stanley Sinton papers, [circa 1920]-1993

Creator:
Sinton, Nell, 1910-1997  Search this
Sinton, Stanley H.  Search this
Sinton, Nell, 1910-1997  Search this
Subject:
DeFeo, Jay  Search this
Hedrick, Wally  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10238
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213329
AAA_collcode_sintnell
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_213329

Nell (Eleanor) and Stanley Sinton papers

Creator:
Sinton, Nell, 1910-1997  Search this
Sinton, Stanley H., d. 1954  Search this
Names:
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Hedrick, Wally, 1928-2003  Search this
Extent:
7.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[circa 1920]-1993
Scope and Contents:
The Nell (Eleanor) and Stanley Sinton papers measure 7.9 linear feet and date from circa 1920-1993. Included are biographical material; personal and professional correspondence; a bound copy of "Nell Sinton, An Adventurous Spirit: The Life of A California Artist," (oral history, University of California, Berkeley, 1993); an album, "Happy School Days," (c. 1920s); writings; financial material; teaching material, including lecture, workshop and seminar outlines, lesson plans, writings, and notes; personal photographs and a family photo album and color slides and transparencies of Sinton's work; scrapbooks containing printed articles; works of art consisting of a portfolio of drawings, sketches, gouaches, and mixed media paintings; and an appraisal of the Sinton Art Collection; printed material consisting of exhibition catalogs and announcements for Sinton and other artists. Motion picture films include footage by Coni Beeson of Sinton at work with Delia Moon, and "Scroll: The Social Development of an American Female" (1976). A small portion of the material including letters from Jay DeFeo and Wally Hedrick (DeFeo's former husband) to Eleanor (Nell) and Stanley Sinton concerning her finances, personal and professional life (including Christmas cards and invitations to parties); and exhibition announcements can be found on microfilm reel 858.
Biographical / Historical:
Nell (Eleanor) Sinton (1910-1997) was a painter, collector and educator in San Francisco, Calif.
Related Materials:
Also in the Archives lent for microfilming on reel 860 are correspondence, some relating to the San Francisco Hall of Justice mural and the controversy surrounding the choice of John Garth as artist; a scrapbook containing correspondence, drawings, and printed material; and exhibition catalogs, announcements, and printed material
Provenance:
In 1974 Sinton donated papers on reel 858 and lent for microfilming papers on reel 860. She donated motion picture film and 0.4 feet of additional papers between 1974 and 1978. Additions were received in 1999 from the daughters of Nell Sinton, Joan Dodd and Margot Biestman.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.sintnell
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sintnell

Paint container

Culture/People:
Chachilla (Cayapas)  Search this
Collector:
Samuel A. Barrett (Samuel Alfred Barrett/S.A. Barrett), Non-Indian, 1879-1965  Search this
Expedition sponsor:
Marie A. Heye (Marie Antoinette Lawrence Heye), Non-Indian, 1845-1915  Search this
Object Name:
Paint container
Media/Materials:
Nut/nuts
Techniques:
Cut
Object Type:
Art and Printing tools
Place:
Río Cayapas; Esmeraldas Province; Ecuador
Catalog Number:
2/3626
Barcode:
023626.000
See related items:
Chachilla (Cayapas)
Art and Printing tools
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6bca2e3e5-b707-495f-947a-3316cbd31929
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_25084
Online Media:

Paintbrush

Culture/People:
Chachilla (Cayapas)  Search this
Collector:
Samuel A. Barrett (Samuel Alfred Barrett/S.A. Barrett), Non-Indian, 1879-1965  Search this
Expedition sponsor:
Marie A. Heye (Marie Antoinette Lawrence Heye), Non-Indian, 1845-1915  Search this
Object Name:
Paintbrush
Media/Materials:
Coconut shell, tree pitch/gum
Techniques:
Cut
Object Type:
Art and Printing tools
Place:
Río Cayapas; Esmeraldas Province; Ecuador
Catalog Number:
2/3977
Barcode:
023977.000
See related items:
Chachilla (Cayapas)
Art and Printing tools
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws63d341b78-1548-4bf8-89a2-38f3d61fa39a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_25604
Online Media:

Painting tool

Culture/People:
Chachilla (Cayapas)  Search this
Collector:
Samuel A. Barrett (Samuel Alfred Barrett/S.A. Barrett), Non-Indian, 1879-1965  Search this
Expedition sponsor:
Marie A. Heye (Marie Antoinette Lawrence Heye), Non-Indian, 1845-1915  Search this
Object Name:
Painting tool
Media/Materials:
Wood, tree pitch/gum
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Art and Printing tools
Place:
Río Cayapas; Esmeraldas Province; Ecuador
Catalog Number:
2/3976
Barcode:
023976.000
See related items:
Chachilla (Cayapas)
Art and Printing tools
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6344fe3c0-2565-4fc0-9189-33d05e7d63b5
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_25603
Online Media:

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