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MS 1802 Ethnological Studies of the Hoh and Quileute Indians, the Sole Survivors of the Chimakuan Linguistic Family

Creator:
Reagan, Albert B., 1871-1936  Search this
Extent:
212 Pages
2 Maps
3 Items (musical score pages )
Culture:
Quileute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Maps
Drawings
Musical scores
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes text and drawings, 2 sketch maps, 21 native drawings, 3 pages musical scores.
Contents: 1 [Introduction], page 1; and Ethnohistory and History, 22 pages. 2. Traditions and Myths..., pages 1-89. 3. Songs..., pages 52-56. 4. Games..., pages 45-51. 5. The Quileute Children's Pastime, pages [1]-4. 6. Native coloring Material..., pages 43-44. [text and drawings] 7. ...Methods of Hunting and Trapping [text and drawings] [10] 8. Native Medicines, 1 page. 9. ...Dances..., pages 57-65. 10. Shamanistic Performances, pages [1]-10. 11. Shakerism, pages [1]-18. 12. The Potlatch, pages [1]-8. 13. Marriage Ceremonies, pages [1]-2. 14. Birth Ceremonies, 1 page. 15. Puberty Customs, 1 page. 16. Mortuary Customs, pages [1]-4. page. 17. Miscellaneous Notes, pages [1]-15, [16]. 18. The Retarding Influence of the Chinook Jargon, 1 page. The Thunder Bird. (Copied from a grave slab at Quileute) [Illustration] 1 page. 212 pages total. Quileute Indian Village and Vicinity [sketch map, 20" x 28"] 1 page. James Island or Ah-Kah-Lot. [sketch map, 20" x 28"] 1 page. [Drawings by native artists; all or part by students at the Indian School, Lapush, Washington.] 21 pages. Music to Songs used at the Quileute Shaker Meetings, pages 6, 7, 11. 238 pages total.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1802
Topic:
Folklore -- Quileute  Search this
Games -- Quileute  Search this
Color and dyes -- Quileute  Search this
Hunting -- Quileute  Search this
Medicine -- Quileute  Search this
Dance -- Quileute  Search this
Potlatch -- Quileute  Search this
Marriage -- Quileute  Search this
Birth customs -- Quileute  Search this
Puberty customs -- Quileute  Search this
Mortuary customs -- Quileute  Search this
Thunderbird -- Quileute  Search this
Music -- Quileute  Search this
Shakerism -- Quileute  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
James Island -- map  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Maps
Musical scores
Citation:
Manuscript 1802, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1802
See more items in:
MS 1802 Ethnological Studies of the Hoh and Quileute Indians, the Sole Survivors of the Chimakuan Linguistic Family
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1802
Online Media:

Frederica de Laguna Papers

Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Aberle, David F. (David Friend), 1918-2004  Search this
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Baird, Melissa  Search this
Balzer, Marjorie  Search this
Bersch, Gretchen  Search this
Birket-Smith, Kaj  Search this
Black, Lydia  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Chowning, Ann  Search this
Clark, J. Desmond (John Desmond), 1916-2002  Search this
Codere, Helen F., 1917-2009  Search this
Collins, Henry B. (Henry Bascom), 1899-1987  Search this
Colton, Harold Sellers, 1881-1970  Search this
Conklin, Harold C., 1926-2016  Search this
Corbett, John M.  Search this
Darnell, Regna  Search this
Dauenhauer, Nora  Search this
Dauenhauer, Richard  Search this
Davenport, William  Search this
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Drucker, Philip, 1911-1982  Search this
Du Bois, Cora Alice, 1903-1991  Search this
Duff, Wilson, 1925-  Search this
Fair, Susan  Search this
Fitzhugh, William W., 1943-  Search this
Foster, George McClelland, 1913-  Search this
Garfield, Viola Edmundson, 1899-1983  Search this
Giddings, James Louis  Search this
Gjessing, Gutorm, 1906  Search this
Grinev, Andrei V.  Search this
Hanable, William S.  Search this
Hara, Hiroko, 1934-  Search this
Haury, Emil W. (Emil Walter), 1904-1992  Search this
Heizer, Robert F. (Robert Fleming), 1915-1979  Search this
Helm, June, 1924-  Search this
Herskovits, Melville J. (Melville Jean), 1895-1963  Search this
Holtved, Erik  Search this
Jenness, Diamond, 1886-1969  Search this
Kahn, Mimi  Search this
Kan, Sergei  Search this
Krauss, Michael E., 1934-  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Larsen, Helge, 1905-1984  Search this
Leer, Jeff  Search this
Lindgren, E. J. (Ethel John), 1904-1988  Search this
Lomax, Alan, 1915-2002  Search this
Low, Jean  Search this
Mathiassen, Therkel, 1892-1967  Search this
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Olson, Wallace  Search this
Rainey, Froelich G. (Froelich Gladstone), 1907-1992  Search this
Riddell, Francis A. (Francis Allen), 1921-2002  Search this
Ritchie, William A. (William Augustus), 1903-1995  Search this
Schneider, William  Search this
Schumacher, Paul J. F.  Search this
Shinkwin, Anne D.  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Spiro, Melford E., 1920-2014  Search this
Underhill, Ruth, 1883-1984  Search this
VanStone, James W.  Search this
Weiner, Annette B., 1933-  Search this
Weitzner, Bella, 1891?-1988  Search this
White, Leslie A., 1900-1975  Search this
Woodbury, Natalie Ferris Sampson  Search this
Woodbury, Richard B. (Richard Benjamin), 1917-2009  Search this
Workman, Karen Wood  Search this
Workman, William B.  Search this
Names:
American Anthropological Association  Search this
Bryn Mawr College  Search this
Photographer:
Smith, Harlan Ingersoll, 1872-1940  Search this
Extent:
2 Map drawers
38 Linear feet (71 document boxes, 1 half document box, 2 manuscript folders, 4 card file boxes, 1 flat box, and 1 oversize box)
Culture:
Yakutat  Search this
Tutchone Indians  Search this
Tsimshian  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Tanana  Search this
Kawchodinne (Hare)  Search this
Ahtna (Ahtena)  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Northern Athapaskan  Search this
Chugach  Search this
Kalaallit (Greenland Eskimo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Eyak  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Degexit'an (Ingalik)  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Map drawers
Manuscripts
Maps
Field notes
Correspondence
Photographs
Sound recordings
Place:
Alaska -- Archaeology
Aishihik (Yukon)
Angoon (Alaska)
Alaska -- Ethnology
Chistochina (Alaska)
Greenland
Copper River (Alaska)
Klukshu (Yukon)
Hoonah (Alaska)
Kodiak Island (Alaska)
Klukwan (Alaska)
Saint Lawrence River Valley
New Brunswick -- Archaeology
Yukon Island (Alaska)
Date:
1890-2004
bulk 1923-2004
Summary:
These papers reflect the professional and personal life of Frederica de Laguna. The collection contains correspondence, field notes, writings, newspaper clippings, writings by others, subject files, sound recordings, photographs, and maps. A significant portion of the collection consists of de Laguna's correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, and students, as well as her informants from the field. Her correspondence covers a wide range of subjects such as family, health, preparations for field work, her publications and projects, the Northwest Coast, her opinions on the state of anthropology, and politics. The field notes in the collection mainly represent de Laguna and her assistants' work in the Northern Tlingit region of Alaska from 1949 to 1954. In addition, the collection contains materials related to her work in the St. Lawrence River Valley in Ontario in 1947 and Catherine McClellan's field journal for her research in Aishihik, Yukon Territory in 1968. Most of the audio reels in the collection are field recordings made by de Laguna, McClellan, and Marie-Françoise Guédon of vocabulary and songs and speeches at potlatches and other ceremonies from 1952 to 1969. Tlingit and several Athabaskan languages including Atna, Tutochone, Upper Tanana, and Tanacross are represented in the recordings. Also in the collection are copies of John R. Swanton's Tlingit recordings and Hiroko Hara Sue's recordings among the Hare Indians. Additional materials related to de Laguna's research on the Northwest Coast include her notes on clans and tribes in Series VI: Subject Files and her notes on Tlingit vocabulary and Yakutat names specimens in Series X: Card Files. Drafts and notes for Voyage to Greenland, Travels Among the Dena, and The Tlingit Indians can be found in the collection as well as her drawings for her dissertation and materials related to her work for the Handbook of North American Indians and other publications. There is little material related to Under Mount Saint Elias except for correspondence, photocopies and negatives of plates, and grant applications for the monograph. Of special interest among de Laguna's writings is a photocopy of her historical fiction novel, The Thousand March. Other materials of special interest are copies of her talks, including her AAA presidential address, and the dissertation of Regna Darnell, a former student of de Laguna's. In addition, materials on the history of anthropology are in the collection, most of which can found with her teaching materials. Although the bulk of the collection documents de Laguna's professional years, the collection also contains newspaper articles and letters regarding her exceptional performance as a student at Bryn Mawr College and her undergraduate and graduate report cards. Only a few photographs of de Laguna can be found in the collection along with photographs of her 1929 and 1979 trips to Greenland.
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the professional and personal life of Frederica de Laguna. The collection contains correspondence, field notes, writings, newspaper clippings, writings by others, subject files, sound recordings, photographs, and maps.

A significant portion of the collection consists of de Laguna's correspondence with family, friends, colleagues, and students, as well as her informants from the field. Her correspondence covers a wide range of subjects such as family, health, preparations for field work, her publications and projects, the Northwest Coast, her opinions on the state of anthropology, and politics. Among her notable correspondents are Kaj Birket-Smith, J. Desmond Clark, Henry Collins, George Foster, Viola Garfield, Marie-Françoise Guédon, Diamond Jenness, Michael Krauss, Therkel Mathiassen, Catharine McClellan, and Wallace Olson. She also corresponded with several eminent anthropologists including Franz Boas, William Fitzhugh, J. Louis Giddings, Emil Haury, June Helm, Melville Herskovitz, Alfred Kroeber, Helge Larsen, Alan Lomax, Margaret Mead, Froelich Rainey, Leslie Spier, Ruth Underhill, James VanStone, Annette Weiner, and Leslie White.

The field notes in the collection mainly represent de Laguna and her assistants' work in the Northern Tlingit region of Alaska from 1949 to 1954. In addition, the collection contains materials related to her work in the St. Lawrence River Valley in Ontario in 1947 and Catharine McClellan's field journal for her research in Aishihik, Yukon Territory in 1968. Most of the audio reels in the collection are field recordings made by de Laguna, McClellan, and Marie-Françoise Guédon of vocabulary and songs and speeches at potlatches and other ceremonies from 1952 to 1969. Tlingit and several Athapaskan languages including Atna, Tutochone, Upper Tanana, and Tanacross are represented in the recordings. Also in the collection are copies of John R. Swanton's Tlingit recordings and Hiroko Hara's recordings among the Hare Indians. Additional materials related to de Laguna's research on the Northwest Coast include her notes on clans and tribes in Series VI: Subject Files and her notes on Tlingit vocabulary and Yakutat names specimens in Series 10: Card Files.

Drafts and notes for Voyage to Greenland, Travels Among the Dena, and The Tlingit Indians can be found in the collection as well as her drawings for her dissertation and materials related to her work for the Handbook of North American Indians and other publications. There is little material related to Under Mount Saint Elias except for correspondence, photocopies and negatives of plates, and grant applications for the monograph. Of special interest among de Laguna's writings is a photocopy of her historical fiction novel, The Thousand March.

Other materials of special interest are copies of her talks, including her AAA presidential address, and the dissertation of Regna Darnell, a former student of de Laguna's. In addition, materials on the history of anthropology are in the collection, most of which can found with her teaching materials. The collection also contains copies of photographs from the Harriman Alaska Expedition of 1899. Although the bulk of the collection documents de Laguna's professional years, the collection also contains newspaper articles and letters regarding her exceptional performance as a student at Bryn Mawr College and her undergraduate and graduate report cards. Only a few photographs of de Laguna can be found in the collection along with photographs of her 1929 and 1979 trips to Greenland.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 12 series: (1) Correspondence, 1923-2004; (2) Field Research, 1947-1968; (3) Writings, 1926-2001; (4) Teaching, 1922-1988; (5) Professional Activities, 1939-2001; (6) Subject Files, 1890-2002; (7) Writings by Others, 1962-2000; (8) Personal, 1923-2000; (9) Photographs, 1929-1986; (10) Card Files; (11) Maps, 1928-1973; (12) Sound Recordings, 1904-1973
Biographical / Historical:
Frederica Annis Lopez de Leo de Laguna was a pioneering archaeologist and ethnographer of northwestern North America. Known as Freddy by her friends, she was one of the last students of Franz Boas. She served as first vice-president of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) from 1949 to 1950 and as president of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) from 1966-1967. She also founded the anthropology department at Bryn Mawr College where she taught from 1938 to 1972. In 1975, she and Margaret Mead, a former classmate, were the first women to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Born on October 3, 1906 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, de Laguna was the daughter of Theodore Lopez de Leo de Laguna and Grace Mead Andrus, both philosophy professors at Bryn Mawr College. Often sick as a child, de Laguna was home-schooled by her parents until she was 9. She excelled as a student at Bryn Mawr College, graduating summa cum laude with a degree in politics and economics in 1927. She was awarded the college's prestigious European fellowship, which upon the suggestion of her parents, she deferred for a year to study anthropology at Columbia University under Boas. Her parents had recently attended a lecture given by Boas and felt that anthropology would unite her interests in the social sciences and her love for the outdoors.

After a year studying at Columbia with Boas, Gladys Reichard, and Ruth Benedict, de Laguna was still uncertain whether anthropology was the field for her. Nevertheless, she followed Boas's advice to spend her year abroad studying the connection between Eskimo and Paleolithic art, which would later became the topic of her dissertation. In the summer of 1928, she gained fieldwork experience under George Grant MacCurdy visiting prehistoric sites in England, France, and Spain. In Paris, she attended lectures on prehistoric art by Abbe Breuil and received guidance from Paul Rivet and Marcelin Boule. Engaged to an Englishman she had met at Columbia University, de Laguna decided to also enroll at the London School of Economics in case she needed to earn her degree there. She took a seminar with Bronislaw Malinowski, an experience she found unpleasant and disappointing.

It was de Laguna's visit to the National Museum in Copenhagen to examine the archaeological collections from Central Eskimo that became the turning point in her life. During her visit, she met Therkel Mathiassen who invited her to be his assistant on what would be the first scientific archaeological excavation in Greenland. She sailed off with him in June 1929, intending to return early in August. Instead, she decided to stay until October to finish the excavation with Mathiassen, now convinced that her future lay in anthropology. When she returned from Greenland she broke off her engagement with her fiancé, deciding that she would not able to both fully pursue a career in anthropology and be the sort of wife she felt he deserved. Her experiences in Greenland became the subject of her 1977 memoir, Voyage to Greenland: A Personal Initiation into Anthropology.

The following year, Kaj Birket-Smith, whom de Laguna had also met in Copenhagen, agreed to let her accompany him as his research assistant on his summer expedition to Prince William Sound and Cook Inlet. When Birket-Smith fell ill and was unable to go, de Laguna was determined to continue on with the trip. She convinced the University of Pennsylvania Museum to fund her trip to Alaska to survey potential excavation sites and took as her assistant her 20 year old brother, Wallace, who became a geologist. A close family, de Laguna's brother and mother would later accompany her on other research trips.

In 1931, the University of Pennsylvania Museum hired de Laguna to catalogue Eskimo collections. They again financed her work in Cook Inlet that year as well as the following year. In 1933, she earned her PhD from Columbia and led an archaeological and ethnological expedition of the Prince William Sound with Birket-Smith. They coauthored "The Eyak Indians of the Copper River Delta, Alaska," published in 1938. In 1935, de Laguna led an archaeological and geological reconnaissance of middle and lower Yukon Valley, traveling down the Tanana River. Several decades later, the 1935 trip contributed to two of her books: Travels Among the Dena, published in 1994, and Tales From the Dena, published in 1997.

In 1935 and 1936, de Laguna worked briefly as an Associate Soil Conservationist, surveying economic and social conditions on the Pima Indian Reservation in Arizona. She later returned to Arizona during the summers to conduct research and in 1941, led a summer archaeological field school under the sponsorship of Bryn Mawr College and the Museum of Northern Arizona.

By this time, de Laguna had already published several academic articles and was also the author of three fiction books. Published in 1930, The Thousand March: Adventures of an American Boy with the Garibaldi was her historical fiction book for juveniles. She also wrote two detective novels: The Arrow Points to Murder (1937) and Fog on the Mountain (1938). The Arrow Points to Murder is set in a museum based on her experiences at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the American Museum of National History. Fog on the Mountain is set in Cook Inlet and draws upon de Laguna's experiences in Alaska. Both detective novels helped to finance her research.

De Laguna began her long career at Bryn Mawr College in 1938 when she was hired as a lecturer in the sociology department to teach the first ever anthropology course at the college. By 1950, she was chairman of the joint department of Sociology and Anthropology, and in 1967, the chairman of the newly independent Anthropology Department. She was also a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania (1947-1949; 1972-1976) and at the University of California, Berkeley (1959-1960; 1972-1973.)

During World War II, de Laguna took a leave of absence from Bryn Mawr College to serve in the naval reserve from 1942 to 1945. As a member of WAVES (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service), she taught naval history and codes and ciphers to women midshipmen at Smith College. She took great pride in her naval service and in her later years joined the local chapter of WAVES National, an organization for former and current members of WAVES.

In 1950, de Laguna returned to Alaska to work in the Northern Tlingit region. Her ethnological and archaeological study of the Tlingit Indians brought her back several more times throughout the 1950s and led to the publication of Under Mount Saint Elias in 1972. Her comprehensive three-volume monograph is still considered the authoritative work on the Yakutat Tlingit. In 1954, de Laguna turned her focus to the Atna Indians of Copper River, returning to the area in 1958, 1960, and 1968.

De Laguna retired from Bryn Mawr College in 1972 under the college's mandatory retirement policy. Although she suffered from many ailments in her later years including macular degeneration, she remained professionally active. Five decades after her first visit to Greenland, de Laguna returned to Upernavik in 1979 to conduct ethnographic investigations. In 1985, she finished editing George Thornton Emmons' unpublished manuscript The Tlingit Indians. A project she had begun in 1955, the book was finally published in 1991. In 1986, she served as a volunteer consultant archaeologist and ethnologist for the U. S. Forest Service in Alaska. In 1994, she took part in "More than Words . . ." Laura Bliss Spann's documentary on the last Eyak speaker, Maggie Smith Jones. By 2001, de Laguna was legally blind. Nevertheless, she continued working on several projects and established the Frederica de Laguna Northern Books Press to reprint out-of-print literature and publish new scholarly works on Arctic cultures.

Over her lifetime, de Laguna received several honors including her election into the National Academy Sciences in 1976, the Distinguished Service Award from AAA in 1986, and the Lucy Wharton Drexel Medal from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999. De Laguna's work, however, was respected by not only her colleagues but also by the people she studied. In 1996, the people of Yakutat honored de Laguna with a potlatch. Her return to Yakutat was filmed by Laura Bliss Spann in her documentary Reunion at Mt St. Elias: The Return of Frederica de Laguna to Yakutat.

At the age of 98, Frederica de Laguna passed away on October 6, 2004.

Sources Consulted

Darnell, Regna. "Frederica de Laguna (1906-2004)." American Anthropologist 107.3 (2005): 554-556.

de Laguna, Frederica. Voyage to Greenland: A Personal Initiation into Anthropology. New York: W.W. Norton Co, 1977.

McClellan, Catharine. "Frederica de Laguna and the Pleasures of Anthropology." American Ethnologist 16.4 (1989): 766-785.

Olson, Wallace M. "Obituary: Frederica de Laguna (1906-2004)." Arctic 58.1 (2005): 89-90.
Related Materials:
Although this collection contains a great deal of correspondence associated with her service as president of AAA, most of her presidential records can be found in American Anthropological Association Records 1917-1972. Also at the National Anthropological Archives are her transcripts of songs sung by Yakutat Tlingit recorded in 1952 and 1954 located in MS 7056 and her notes and drawings of Dorset culture materials in the National Museum of Canada located in MS 7265. The Human Studies Film Archive has a video oral history of de Laguna conducted by Norman Markel (SC-89.10.4).

Related collections can also be found in other repositories. The University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania holds materials related to work that de Laguna carried out for the museum from the 1930s to the 1960s. Materials relating to her fieldwork in Angoon and Yakutat can be found in the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in the papers of Francis A. Riddell, a field assistant to de Laguna in the early 1950s. Original photographs taken in the field in Alaska were deposited in the Alaska State Library, Juneau. Both the Archive of Folk Culture at the Library of Congress and the American Philosophical Library have copies of her field recordings and notes. The American Museum of Natural History has materials related to her work editing George T. Emmons' manuscript. De Laguna's papers can also be found at the Bryn Mawr College Archives.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Frederica de Laguna.
Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Anthropology -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Maps
Field notes
Correspondence
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1998-89
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1998-89
Online Media:

Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers

Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Extent:
28 Linear feet (65 document boxes, 1 box of oversize materials, 1 box of ephemera, 1 shoebox of index cards, 1 map drawer)
Culture:
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Native American  Search this
American Indian -- Education  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota
Date:
1914, 1932-1949, 1952-2003 (bulk dates, 1945-2003).
Summary:
The Beatrice Medicine papers, 1913-2003 (bulk 1945-2003), document the professional life of Dr. Beatrice "Bea" Medicine (1923-2005), a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, anthropologist, scholar, educator, and Native rights activist. The collection also contains material collected by or given to Medicine to further her research and activism interests. Medicine, whose Lakota name was Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman," focused her research on a variety of topics affecting the Native American community: 1) mental health, 2) women's issues, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs of Native Americans, and 6) Children and identity issues. The collection represents Medicine's work as an educator for universities and colleges in the United States and in Canada, for which she taught Native American Studies courses. Additionally, because of the large amount of research material and Medicine's correspondence with elected U.S. officials and Native American leaders, and records from Medicine's involvement in Native American organizations, the collection serves to represent issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, and reflects what Native American leaders and organizations did to navigate and mitigate those issues. Collection materials include correspondence; committee, conference, and teaching material; ephemera; manuscripts and poetry; maps; notes; periodicals; photographs; training material; and transcripts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Beatrice Medicine reflect Medicine's interests as an academic and an activist, and contain correspondence, committee, conference, and teaching material, ephemera, manuscripts and poetry, maps, notes, periodicals, photographs, and training material (see series scope notes for further details on contents). The majority of the material is printed matter that Medicine collected, with less of her own work included. Taken together, the collection reflects issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, as well as the network of Native American leaders and organizations that navigated these issues. Student papers, letters of recommendation, evaluations, and documents containing personally identifiable information are restricted.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into 24 series:

Series 1: Native American Culture and History, 1954-1962, 1967-1975, 1978-1989, 1991-1997, 1999-2002

Series 2: Appropriations, Economics, and Labor, 1955, circa 1970-1980, 1988, 1993, circa 1995-2000

Series 3: Archaeology, 1935-1950, 1952-1973, 1987-1995

Series 4: Native American Artists, Authors, Crafts, Film, and Poets, 1951-1969, 1972-2002

Series 5: Census, Demographic, and Poll Data, 1974, 1984-1986

Series 6: Civil Rights, 1972, 1980, 1983-1997

Series 7: Committee Material: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes, and Memos, 1985-1995

Series 8: Conference Material, 1955-1962, 1965, 1968-1974, 1976-2002

Series 9: Correspondence, 1952, 1959, 1962, 1966-2000

Series 10: Education: Native American Institutions and Teaching Material, 1948-2002

Series 11: Ephemera: Campaign, Pow-Wow, and Other Event Buttons, and Calendars, 1973, 1976, circa 1980-2000

Series 12: Health: Alcohol and Drug Addiction and Recovery, Disabilities, Healthcare, Mental Health, Nutrition, and Wellness, 1955, 1965, 1969-1999, 2004

Series 13: Historic Preservation, 1942, 1956, 1960-1969, 1979, circa 1985-1998

Series 14: Invitations, 1966-1979, 1982, 1991-2002

Series 15: Linguistics: Native American Languages, 1961, 1963, 1975, 1978-1981, 1987-1995

Series 16: Manuscripts, 1964-2003

Series 17: Maps, 1982-1991

Series 18: Museum Material: Native American Museums, Exhibit Preparation, and the National Museum of the American Indian, 1949, 1962, circa 1976-1998

Series 19: Oversized Material, 1962, circa 1965-1996, 1999

Series 20: Published material: Journals, Magazines, Monographs, and Newsletters, 1914, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1952-2003

Series 21: Reports, 1947-1949, 1956-1998

Series 22: Training Material, 1968, 1988-2000

Series 23: Women and Gender, 1962, 1965, circa 1970-1997

Series 24: Restricted Material, 1972, 1978, 1987-1999
Biographical / Historical:
A member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, Beatrice "Bea" Medicine—also known by her Lakota name Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman"—was born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota on August 1, 1923.

As a young adult, she studied at the South Dakota State University on the Laverne Noyes Scholarship, where she attained her B.A. in Anthropology in 1945. Between 1945 and 1951, Medicine worked a variety of teaching positions, including for three American Indian institutions (see Chronology for Medicine's complete work history). In 1951, Medicine went back to school and worked as a research assistant until she earned her master's degree in Sociology and Anthropology from Michigan State University in 1954. For the remainder of her life, Medicine served as faculty, visiting professor, and scholar-in-residence at thirty-one universities and colleges in the United States and Canada, teaching cultural and educational anthropology courses, as well as Native American Studies. As an educator, Medicine carried out her research on a variety of issues affecting Native American and First Nation communities, including: 1) mental health issues, 2) women's issues—professionalization, sterilization, socialization, and aging, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use and abuse, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs, and 6) socialization of children and identity needs. Medicine's research in American Indian women's and children's issues, as well as her research in gender identity among the LGBT community was among the first to document the narratives of the members of these groups.

In 1974, Medicine testified alongside her cousin, Vine Deloria, Jr., as an expert witness in the Wounded Knee trial (United States v. Banks and Means). Following this, Medicine returned to school to pursue her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology, which she completed in 1983 at the University of Wisconsin. With her experience as a researcher, educator, activist, and Lakota woman, medicine sought to create more opportunities for multicultural and bilingual education for minority students, especially those of Native American descent. Such education, she believed, provided students a means to preserve and legitimize their own cultural identity, debase negative stereotyes, and be recognized as individuals who are capable of academic and economic achievement.

Medicine was an active member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and pursued her educational agenda further through the establishment of the Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions (CAPMI) (1987-1995), which brought anthropologists out of retirement to teach at minority institutions. (See Chronology for a complete list of organizations and committees in which Medicine was involved.) The program was short-lived but provided a space for minority students to confront a field that historically misrepresented them, reclaim their narratives and languages, and instigate positive change as potential future anthropologists.

Medicine officially retired on August 1, 1989, but continued to be active in AAA and was honored many times for her contributions to the field of anthropology. Some of her recognitions include the Distinguished Service Award from AAA (1991) and the Bronislaw Malinowski Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology (1996). One of Medicine's highest honors, however, was serving as the Sacred Pipe Woman at the 1977 Sun Dance. Medicine continued her research into retirement, and went on to publish her first book in 2001, Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings. Medicine died in Bismarck, North Dakota on December 19, 2005. Medicine's final work, Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux was published posthumously in 2006. In honor of her life's work and dedication to education, the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) created the Bea Medicine Award, a scholarship travel grant for students to attend the Annual Meeting of the SfAA.

Chronology: Beatrice Medicine

1923 August 1 -- Beatrice Medicine (also known by her Lakota name, Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman") is born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota.

1941-1945 -- Receives scholarship: Laverne Noyes Scholarship, South Dakota State University

1945 -- Receives Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology, South Dakota State University.

1945-1946 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Haskell Indian Institute (B.I.A.)

1947-1948 -- Health Education Lecturer, Michigan Tuberculosis Association

1948-1949 -- Teacher, Santo Domingo Pueblo, United Pueblos Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico

1949-1950 -- Teacher, Navajo Adult Beginner's Program, Albuquerque Indian School

1950-1951 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Flandreau Indian School

1950-1954 -- Fellowship: Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs Fellowships

1951-1954 -- Research Assistant, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University

1953-1954 -- Fellowship: John Hay Whitney Foundation Fellowship

1954 -- Receives Master of Arts, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University. Fellowship: American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship

1954- -- Charter Member, American Indian Women's Service League

1955-1958 -- Teaching and Research Assistant, University of Washington

1956 -- Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1960 -- Mentioned as "Who's Who Among American Indians"

circa 1960 -- Alpha Kappa Delta, Sociology Hononary Phi Upsilon Omicron, Home Economic Honorary

1960-1963 -- Lecturer, Anthropology, University of British Columbia

1960-1964 -- Board of Directors, Native Urban Indian Centers in Vancouver, British Columbia and Calgary, Alberta

1963-1964 -- Lecturer/Sociology and Teacher/Counselor, Mount Royal College, Indian Affairs Branch Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Research Grant

1965 -- Lecturer, Social Science, Michigan State University

1966 -- Psychiatric Social Worker, Provincial Guidance Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

1966-1967 -- Receives grant: Career Development Grant, National Institute of Mental Health

1966- -- Member, National Congress of American Indians (Education Issues)

1967 -- Receives grant: Ethnological Research Grant, National Museum of Canada

1967-1968 -- Lecturer, Sociology and Anthropology, University of Montana

1968 -- Teacher, "Cultural Enrichment Program," Standing Rock Indian Reservation, South Dakota Cited in "The Role of Racial Minorities in the United States," Seattle, Washington

1968 March -- Speaker: "The Pow-Wow as a Social Factor in the Northern Plains Ceremonialism," Montana Academy of Sciences

1968 May -- Speaker: "Patterns and Periphery of Plains Indian Pow-Wows," Central States Anthropological Society

1968 June -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," Canadian Sociology and Anthropological Association, Calgary, Alberta

1968 August -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German Speaker: "The Dynamics of a Dakota Indian Giveaway," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German

1968-1969 -- Director, American Indian Research, Oral History Project and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of South Dakota

1968-1970 -- Consultant, Text Book Evaluation Committee, American Indians United

1969 -- Assistant Professor, Teacher Corps, University of Nebraska

1969 September -- Speaker: "The Red Man Yesterday," Governor's Interstate Indian Council, Wichita, Kansas

1969 December -- Speaker: "The Native American in Modern Society," Northwestern State College

1969-1970 -- Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University Speaker: "The Indian in Institutions of Higher Learning," Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1969-1975 -- Member, Editorial Board, American Indian Historical Society

1970 -- Mentioned for second time as "Who's Who Among American Indians" Steering Committee Member, Indian Ecumenical Convocation of North America Member, Planning Committee Indian Alcoholism and Drug Use

1970 August -- Speaker: "The Role of the White Indian Expert," 2nd Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1970 October -- Speaker: "The Ethnographic Study of Indian Women," Annual Convention, American Ethnohistorical Soceity

1970 November -- Speaker: "The Anthropologists as the Indian's Image Maker," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "The Anthropologist and Ethnic Studies Programs," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1970-1971 -- Associate Professor, Anthropology, San Francisco State University Member, Mayor's Committee on the Status of Women, San Francisco, California

1971 -- Member, Native American Scholars Board, Steering and Selection, American Indian Historical Society

1971 May -- Speaker: "Ethnic Studies and Native Americans," National Education Association

1971-1973 -- Pre-Doctoral Lecturer, Anthropology, University of Washington Consultant, American Indian Heritage Program

1972 -- Honored in "Potlatch" ceremony by Makah Tribal people at the National Indian Education Conference for contributions to Indian education Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Travel Grant, Americanist Annual Meeting, Rome, Italy Curriculum Advisor, Lakota Higher Education Center, Prine Ridge, South Dakota

1972 March -- Speaker: "Warrior Women Societies," Northwest Anthropological Conference

1972 April -- Chairperson and Speaker: "Racism and Ethnic Relations," Society for Applied Anthropology

1972 June -- Chairperson, Native American Studies Symposium, International Congress of Americanists, Mexico

1972 August -- Speaker: "Warrior Women of the Plains," International Congress of Americanists, Rome, Italy

1972 November -- Speaker: "Native Americans in the Modern World," Southwest Minnesota State College

1973 -- Expert Witness, Yvonne Wanro Trial, Spokane, Washington Member, Organization of American States, First Congress of Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico Speaker: "Self-Direction in Sioux Education," American Anthropological Association Speaker: "North American Native Women: The Aspirations and Their Associations," presented as a Delegate to the Inter-American Commission on Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico

1973-1974 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Native American Studies Program, Dartmouth College

1973-1976 -- Member, Committee on Minorities in Anthropology, American Anthropological Association

1973- -- Consultant, Human Services Department, Sinte Gleska Community College

1974 -- Expert Witness, Wounded Knee Trial, Lincoln, Nebraska Speaker: "Indian Women's Roles: Traditional and Contemporary," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1974-1975 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Colorado College

1975-1976 -- Visiting Associate Professor, Anthropology, Stanford University

1975-1977 -- Member, Steering Committee, Council of Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association

1976 -- Visiting Professor, Educational Anthropology, University of New Brunswick Expert Witness, Topsky Eagle Feathers Trial, Pocatello, Idaho Panelist, White House Conference on Ethnic Studies, Washington, D.C.

1977 -- Expert Witness, Greybull Grandchildren Custody Case, Portland, Oregon American Indian representative to the World Conference on Indigenous People, Geneva, Switzerland Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1977 August 18 -- Medicine serves as Sacred Pipe Woman at the Sun Dance, Green Grass, South Dakota

1977-1980 -- Education Consultant, National Congress of American Indians, Washington, D.C.

1978 -- Cited in the Directory of Significant 20th Century American Minority Women, Gaylord Professional Publications Biographical Sketch in "Moving Forward" of the Bookmark Reading Program, Third Edition

1978 August -- Speaker: "Issues in the Professionalization of Native American Women," Annual Meeting, American Psychological Association

1978-1982 -- Advanced Opportunity Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 -- Visiting Professor, Department of Education Policy Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 August -- Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters, Northern Michigan University Speaker: "The Dakota Indian Memorial Feast: Reservation and Urban Manifestations," International Congress of Americanists, Lima, Peru

1980 -- Member, Nominations Committee, American Anthropological Association Biographical Sketch in "Native American Indian Personalities, Historical and Contemporary," Dansville, New York: The Instructor Publications, Inc.

1981 -- Visiting Professor, Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Washington-Seattle Speaker: "Linguistically Marginated: The Transformation of Dominated Speech Varieties," American Anthropological Association

1982 -- School of Social and Behavioral Science Academic Planning, California State University Speaker: "Policy Decisions: Federal Regulations and American Indian Identity Issues," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1982-1983 -- Anthropology Department Curriculum Committee, California State University

1982-1985 -- Associate Professor of Anthropology, Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Indian Studies, California State University Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Studies Program, California State University

1982- -- President, Assembly of California Indian Women

1983 -- Receives Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology, University of Wisconsin Expert Witness, Fortunate Eagle Trial, Reno, Nevada Award: Outstanding Woman of Color, National Institute of Women of Color, Washingtonton, D.C. (for anthropological contributions) Award: Outstanding Minority Researcher, American Educational Research Association Publishes book with Patricia Albers: The Hidden Half: Indian Women of the Northern Plains Honor: Significant Academic Book (The Hidden Half), Choice, Association of Colleges and Research Libraries, American Library Association

1983-1984 -- Student Affirmative Action Coordinating Council, California State University

1983-1986 -- Member, Executive Board, Southwest Anthropological Association Member, Governing Board, Common Cause

1984 -- Member, Advisory Board of National Research for Handicapped Native Americans, North Arizona University Scholarly Publications Award Selection Committee, California State University Award: Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University Speaker: Field Work Methods: "Ties That Bond," Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "Career Patterns of American Indian Women," Council of Education and Anthropology, Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1984 November -- Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University

1984-1985 -- Participant, Chancellor's Office Grant to "Cross-Cultural Perspectives in the Social Sciences," California State University

1985 November -- Speaker: Conference on "The Native American: His Arts, His Culture, and His History," West Virginia State College

1985-1986 -- Board of Directors, Naechi Institute on Alcohol and Drug Education

1985-1988 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology and Director, Native Centre, University of Calgary

1985-1989 -- Member, Malinowski Awards Committee, Society for Applied Anthropology

1987 -- Honor: Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, University of Michigan

1987-1995 -- Member, Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association

1988 August 1 -- Medicine officially retires.

1989 -- Volunteer (Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association), Standing Rock College Honor (twice): Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, Wayne State University.

1990 -- Honor: "Outstanding Contributions for the promotion of sex equity in Education," Illinois State Board of Education Honor: Outstanding Lakota Woman, Standing Rock College

1991 -- Honor: Distinguished Service Award, American Anthropological Association. Medicine was the first American Indian to receive this award.

1991 -- Visiting Professor, Saskatchewan Indian Federal College Visiting Professor, Colorado College Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Humboldt State University

1992 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Women's Studies, University of Toronto

1993 -- Visiting Professor, Rural Sociology, South Dakota State University Award: Distinguished Native American Alumna Award, South Dakota State University

1993-1994 December -- Research Co-ordinator, Women's Perspectives, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

1994- -- Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta

1995 -- Scholar in Residence, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul Visiting Scholar, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia Award: Ohana Award, Multi-Cultural Counseling Excellence, American Association of Counselors

1996 -- Award: Bronislaw Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology. Buckman Professor, Department of Human Ecology, University of Minnesota

circa 1997- -- Associate Professor of Anthropology Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, California State University

2001 -- Publishes book: Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings.

2005 -- Award: George and Louise Spindler Award, Council on Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association.

2005 December 19 -- Medicine dies during emergency surgery in Bismarck, North Dakota.

2006 -- Book: Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux is published posthumously.

2008 -- The Society for Applied Anthropology creates the Bea Medicine Award.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Beatrice Medicine between 1997 and 2003, and by Ted Garner in 2006.
Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Alcohol  Search this
Gender imagery  Search this
Discrimination  Search this
Linguistics -- Research -- United States  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Lakota Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.1997-05
See more items in:
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1997-05

Homer Garner Barnett Papers

Creator:
Barnett, H. G. (Homer Garner), 1906-1985  Search this
Names:
University of California, Berkeley. Far Eastern Language and Area Training Program  Search this
Extent:
7.5 Linear feet
Culture:
Palauans  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Ponape  Search this
Yurok Indians  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Yapese (Micronesian people)  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Yakama Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Hawaii
Irian Jaya (Dutch New Guinea)
Date:
1934-1973
Summary:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers, 1934-1973, consist of papers, photographs, slides, maps, and periodicals primarily documenting his ethnological work among American Indians, Palauans, and the people of Netherlands New Guinea (Irian Jaya).
Scope and Contents:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers, 1934-1973, contain papers, photographs, slides, maps, periodicals, field notes and copies of studies done by others. Dr. Barnett, an ethnologist, anthropologist, author and teacher spent his early professional years, 1934-1943, studying Northwest Coast Indians. After the second World War, her focused on Micronesia, especially Palau, and later Netherlands New Guinea, now known as West Irian. It was during this time that he observed at close hand and became an expert in cultural change.

Between 1947 and 1970, years of drastic change for natives of Oceania, Dr. Barnett made three long stays and many shorter ones in the islands. He used his research in writing, teaching, and consulting.

His early study of Yurok, Hupa, Karok, Nuqually, Oakville and Skopomish Indians is contained in research notebooks, field notebooks and photographs. There is an interesting section on Indian Shakerism (not related to the Shaker Movement of the East). One notebook records his experience while conducting a class at Berkeley in 1943 on inter-cultural exchange of information. The later field notebooks record his observations while on Palau and New Guinea. There are also approximately 900 slides that he used in class lectures.

Dr. Barnett amassed a large collection of scholarly papers and periodicals dealing with the South Pacific area, especially during the years 1952-1960. There are a few publications in Japanese reflecting the interests of the prior trustees of Palau. There are significant numbers of scientific papers in Dutch on natives of New Guinea. He also preserved interesting examples of literature in Palauan, pidgin English and Papuan.

There is no personal correspondence other than that pertaining to setting up a study of displaced communities in the South Pacific. This study was funded over a 5-year period by the National Science Foundation. The resulting papers are on deposit at the University of Oregon.

Dr. Barnett spent 2 years (1944-1946) as Senior Fellow in ethnogeography at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). There are no papers in this collection dating from those years, but the BAE Correspondence files contain letters to and from Barnett during this period.
Arrangement note:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers are arranged in the following series: (1) Material relating to the "Displaced Communities" Study, 1963-1970; (2) Writings, 1938-1959; (3) Field notebooks, 1934-circa 1955; (4) Dissertation notebooks, undated; (5) Linguistic material, 1941-1965; (6) Scholarly serials and periodicals, 1950-1971; (7) Processed and printed items, 1942-1974; (8) Photographs, 1895-1955; (9) Micronesian Monthly/Reporter, 1951-1963; (10) Quarterly Bulletin of the South Pacific Commission, 1953-1963; (11) Photographic slides, 1947-1953; (12) Maps, 1887-1959
Biographical/Historical note:
Homer G. Barnett trained at the University of California at Berkeley and practiced as an ethnologist and archeologist. He specialized in culture change and applied anthropology.

Barnett's earliest field work was among American Indians of Oregon, Washington, and northwestern California--particularly the Yurok, Hupa, Yakima, and several small groups of the Oregon coast. Some of his research concerned diverse ethnological matters but much of it focused primarily on the Indian Shaker religion and the potlatch, the latter being the subject of his doctoral dissertation.

In 1939, while he was on the faculty of the University of New Mexico, Barnett served as field director of the Jemez Archeological Field School and was in charge of a project in the Santa Fe National Forest in New Mexico. Later in the same year, he joined the faculty of the University of Oregon and has been chiefly identified with that institution since then. In the summer of 1943, however, he participated in a World War II Far Eastern Language and Area Training Program of the University of California at Berkeley. There he helped train voluteer service men in techniques of eliciting cultural information from native informants.

In the following year, he joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology and became a researcher associated with the Ethnogeographic Board, the World War II agency formed to provide scientific information about human and natural resources of the world. He served as the executive secretary of the Board's Pacific Survey Project and, later, undertook a War Document Survey concerning the Pacific to determine and advise on the disposition of documents that had been accumulated by the government.

Returning to the University of Oregon after the war, Barnett continued to work with Pacific cultures. He carried out field work in the Palau Islands under the sponsorship of the National Research Council, served as staff anthropologist for the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and was a consultant for the government of Netherlands New Guinea. In the 1960s, he directed a program of research among communities of the Pacific displaced because of natural disasters and atomic bomb tests.
Related Materials:
In 1939, Dr. Barnett was the director of an archeological excavation in the Santa Fe National Forest in New Mexico. The report of this dig is NAA MS 4070. Another paper Barnett wrote, Yakima Indians in 1942 is NAA MS 4867.
Provenance:
Dr. Homer G. Barnett donated this collection to the National Anthropological Archives in 1975.
Restrictions:
The Homer Garner Barnett papers are open for research.

Access to the Homer Garner Barnett papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Religion  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Potlatch  Search this
Shakers (American Indian)  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Citation:
Homer Garner Barnett Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1975-17
See more items in:
Homer Garner Barnett Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1975-17

1954-5 [Yakutat]

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1954
Scope and Contents:
1. Mary Thomas

Song Fest-Yakutat

2. Minnie

Maggy Harry

Reel 5, Side 1 (full)

B.A. Jack's Song for 1931 ANB Convention in Yakutat

Mary Thomas 4/25/54

Song Fest No II 4/25/54

B. Kitty Martin's Song to tł'UknaXAdi-yAtx'I & gIneX-qwan-yAtx'i

Helen Bremner for Mary Thomas

C. Kardeetoo's Song about diyaguna'Et

Nick Milton & Mary Thomas, for Louise Peterson

D. Killerwhale Drum Song (second verse has wrong words)

Nick Milton & Olaf Abraham --Olaf speaks.

Helen Bremner Translates

E. Raven & Snipes

F. Raven & Mussels

Not transcribed --G. Max Italio's Song to tł'UknaXAdi-yAtx'I

Couldn't transcribe

H. Mrs. Chester Johnson's Song to cAnuqedi-yAtx'I & teqwedi-yAtx'i

Mrs. C J 4/29/54

Mrs. Chester Johnson's Song to tewedi-yAtx'I, yAnyedi-yAtx'I, and cAnkuqedi-yAtx'i

Mrs. C J 4/29/54

Side 2 (full)

A. Incorrect version of the slave, gucdutin's Song --2 verses

B. Correct version of the above. Minnie Johnson 4/7/54

C. Blind Dave Dick's Song to teqwedi-yAtx'i

Minnie Johnson & Mrs. Chester Johnson 4/29/54

D. Maggy Harry's Father's Song --Maggy Harry 5/27/54

Not transcribed E. First verse of Thunderbanket Song --cAnkuqedi

Mrs. Chester Johnson (and Jenny White) 6/10/54

F. Two out of three verses of another Thunder Blanket Song. Mrs. C Johnson (& Jenny White) 6/10/54

G & H: Two shaman's songs with Tsimshian Words, belonging to Mrs. Chester Johnson's father's mother's father --(tłIngit 'ani 'Adi q'U yek) --qałaXetł & łtuneX'

Mrs. Chester Johnson 6/10/54 Old tune with new words by Mrs. Chester Johnson to F de Laguna, to tcicqedi-yAtx'I (just composed)

Mrs. Chester Johnson 6/10/54

The last is the Killerwhale Drum Song, a potlatch song belonging to the Tequedi clan of Yakutats who have the Brown Grizzly and Killer Whale as their totemic emblems --It was traditionally sung by the Tequedi when they were hosts at a potlatch, often the serious mourning songs were over and just before they distributed gifts to their guests. One of the latter would be invited to beat the big wooden box drum, painted with the killer whale crest, while the Tequedi man sang and the Teqca a Tequedi woman danced. The drummer would be given an extra gift for his services. They say invaluable because the owners have paid so much to their guests everytime they have sung it. For this recording the singers were Nick Milton, Olaf Abraham (who spoke after the song), Mary Thomas, Louise Peterson, and Helen Bremner
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2025

1954-7 Yakutat

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
May 23, 1954
Scope and Contents:
Side 1. Bird Songs

Mrs. C. Johnson

and songs B + C

Side 2. Maggy Harry and Mrs. B.A. Jack, etc. Songs A to K.

Reel 7, Side 1 (not complete)

Bird Songs --5/23/54 --evening

5/24/54 --evening --last at slow speed

5/27/54 --morning --last at slow speed

B. wUckitan song for Murrelet Staff

Mrs. Chester Johnson and Jenny White 6/10/54

C. Song Composed by q'awus'a for his young sweetheart

Mrs. Chester Johnson 6/10/54

Side 2

A. Marching Song --kwack'qwan crossing the glacier, used in walking to hosts potlatch house

Maggy Harry (& Jenny Jack) 5/27/54

B. Copper River words --Resting Song

Maggy Harry (& Jenny Jack)

C. Song Composed by Man who shot his Brother --Copper R words

Maggy Harry

D. Jimmy Jackson's Song, 1904, when his wife left him

Maggy Harry

E. Haida Love Song, purchased from qackwe in 1900 by BA Jack & tcAna-ic. Maggy Harry --Jenny Jack beating drum

F. Kwack'qwan "National Song"

Owel's Cry --for before battle, or facing death

Owl's yek Song, belonging to danAX-ic & ceq', Tsimshian words

Maggy Harry

G. Composed by Jimmy Jackson to sAnáX-tła when her husband left her.

To kagwantan-yAtx'i

Jenny Jack

H. Kwack' Mourning Song for those drowned --composed in djIłqat by kagwase' (about 1860?)

Maggy Harry (& Jenny Jack)

I. Gun Dance Song, captured from Aleuts by cada

Maggy & Jenny Jack 5/27/54 --untranscribable

J. Funny Song about Raven threatening to break Daylight

Minnie Johnson 5/31/54

K. Raven Looking for his Nose --Minnie Johnson 5/31/54 untranscribable

The last two are abbreviated versions --go with the Raven patterns of beadwork on fishskin bag made by Minnie Johnson for F de L
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2039

1958-4 [Atna]

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 24
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
August 16-September 7, 1958
Scope and Contents:
Side 1 - (slow speed) Martha and Arthur Jackson - (2/3 of side 1)

(Fast speed) 8/16/58 - Gakona George's shaman's songs

A- Sarani sleep doctor song without drum

B- Thunder sleep doctor song, without drum

C- "He's different man" sleep doctor song with drum

D- Sleep Doctor Song

Side 2-

1- (A) Sarani yaggadi song with drum

2- Christian sleep doctor's song "kneel down, all"

8/27/58

3- Spider song, Martha's grandfather's[?] shaman song

4- Andy Brower's potlatch song to dead uncle

5 -wolf hunting song

6- Martha's grandfather's [?] potlatch song to his brother

7- Martha's grandfather's potlatch song to his brother "sun spoiled him"

8- Martha's own shaman song about "money" [?]

9/7/58

9 & 10- Martha sings ground squirrel hunting songs

11- Arthur sings dance song
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2123

1960-2 (Copy)

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
July 23, 1960
Scope and Contents:
Chistochina 7/23/1960

Alaska

Side 1, Songs 1-19

(1+2 are the same, 18 repeats 13)

Indians gave wrong identifications of some songs a s a joke!

Side 2, Songs 1 + 2, Seniors [?] potlatch songs
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2165
Online Media:

Tetlin #3 (Copy)

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 37
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
May 20, 1968 and November 29, 1963
Scope and Contents:
Copy of Jimmy Joe's Tape of Potlatch for Henry John who died May 20, 1968

Repeat of Tetlin #1

A. Potlatch for Henry John 5/20/68

B. Potlatch for Chief Luke, Chief Peter, and Roosevelt Titus, November 29, 1963

Cont. on copy #4 A
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2221

Tetlin #4 (Copy)

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 39
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Nov. 23, 1963
Scope and Contents:
continuation of de Laguna SR 37

A. Chief Luke's Potlatch contd November 23, 1963

B. Ends in middle of Jimmy Joe's Side
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2235

Tetlin copy '65 -1

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 41
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Sept. 19, 1965
Scope and Contents:
Copy of Cora David's tape of Potlatch, Tetlin 9/19/65. Ends with laughter after song 16.

1. Tubare xanedi gi [?]

2. Sorry song for Lucy Adam to sing for her son?

3. Sorry song

-no break-

4. Big Mark's sorry song for his son

oh

5. jerky song

no break

6. jerky song for dance

whi!

7. dance song (down-the-line)

(Alfred Adam said? It was from Dawson)

8. dance song

clapping

9. (familiar) dance song

"gulata"?

cries interrupted the song --it is resumed -- oh! oh! clap

10. hee! etc. dance song --(2 drums not quite in unison)

awi. Clapping

11. crow eating dance

-copy machine off & on-

12. Dance song

laughter

13. "hee heya"? dance song-

aw-elule wi! Laughter

14. dble beat song (Canadian) (laughter) --jump right, feet together

15. a second dble-beat song (always song with 14 - same dance

noise

16. "a sude" [?]

Steven Northway's song

Mixed up --laughter

End of tape
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2249

Tetlin Copy #1 [1966]

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 43
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Nov. 22, 1966
Scope and Contents:
Copy of (side 1) Jimmy Joe's Reel

Potlatch, November 26, 1966, given by Titus David for his father, chief David, who died in 1923

(Side 1 and start of side 2)

Songs are identified by Kitty David, song composer.

1. Chief David's own song. Made long ago. It is for the beginning of the potlatch, to bring luck. So the potlatch will be lucky and they will get their money (back) --what they lost. They stand in a circle (to sing it). That's the first song. Nothing first [before it].

They sing it to American Flag. Could be sung indoors or outdoors.

2. Emma Titus made that song when her husband died and her son made potlatch for his dad. She heard wolf howling.

No break with the next, which has a fast beat.

3. Andrew Charley David made that song for his dad, at the same time his dad die --1923 that potlatch.

4. Emma Titus sings [i.e. her composition] [Short song].

5. Chief Luke's song for his brother get show, and die. His name I forgot.

6. [no break with preceding]. Big Mark's song. "'adjuci ce'a"

7. David Teeka made that song for his dad, long time ago. He is Kitty David's uncle and Joe John's uncle.

8. Lily Northway made that song for his daughter (who died) = Eva Thomas. About 1959

9. Chief Luke's song again [cf. #5]

Talk on the tape

10. Patrick Joe for potlatch time, for his mom, Eva Joe [old lady who is still living]. Make her happy.

11. Alfred Adam --for his brother die. Mason Adam. A sorry song. He make sorry [about?] his brother's things.

12. David Teek'as song again [cf. #7 --wu, wu]

13. Indian dance song --Candian side, Yukon long ways.

14. Tukon Territory song, also

15. Scotty Creek song (hu he ha)

16. Yukon Dance Song (ha ha)

17. Another Yukon song (ali hiyi) --ends in cheers

18. Another Yukon song (cheers)

19. Another Yukon song.

20. Steven Northway made this dance song for Christmas time: "Christmas tree."

21.Steven Northway "Santa Claus song" (with double drum beat) (laughter)

22. (laughter) Scottie Creek song. Bill John for his mother died.

23. Yukon Dance Song. Crow eating. (hu, heya)

24. Swan coming back from Lower 48. "Swan fly over my house." Canadian song.

Side 2 of Jimmy Joe's Reel

25. Scotty girl he take. Shushana Joe's wife, Pauline. She made the song when she came.

26. huu huu Canadian song. 'u 'u 'u' for gANho
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2263

Tetlin Copy #2 [1966]

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 44
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Nov. 26, 1966
Scope and Contents:
continuation of reel 43

Side 2 of Jimmy Joe's Reel of Potlatch for Chief David, November 26, 1966

Potlatch for Chief David. (begins with 3rd song on side 2 of Jimmy Joe's tape)

1. . . . end of gAnho song (cf. 26 of Copy Tape 1)

2. Dawson, Yukon, Dance song . . . (áháliya). Clap, laugh.

3. hi ye ha --Yukokn Dawson song. (rapid drum beat, no break)

4. Yukon Song. Ye huh u (heard as iye ye on replay)

5. another Yukon song (ye du qa cu heard on replay)

6. another Yukon Song --rapid drum beat . . . ends with claps (qehediye)

7. Repeat of 3 1 GUnho song (heard as he hea hé on replay)

8. Sushama Joe's wife, Pauline, made this song & dance when she came to Tetlin party. (cf. #25 on Reel 1). Potlatch was for Old Joe died, was Jimmy Joe's uncle.

9. Yelps…The Canda dance song. [CC people said: all good song]

break

10. Copper Center sing this song. Kitty David thinks it's from Eagle. She heard it when she was small.

Break

11. He wants beer, he want water, he want whiskey.

[Andy Brown says they call for moccasins, blankets, etc.—things they want to get at the potlatch. He's hungry.]

12. Canadian song [a repeat]

13. Joe Demert of Northway made it going to a party in Yukon, according to Ida David.

14. Fast; a Yukon Dance song.

[Fanny Stanfield: That's the same song over and over again.]

15. Copper Center Singing.

16. Tlingit Song --Copper River singing. (no break)

17. Scottie Creek. Bill Johns' mom made it when her daughter's husband die. Tack Teeka die, Kitty David's uncle. [Andy Brown thinks it's Northway.]

18. Eagle Dance song.

(no break when heard on tape)

19. Snag people's song. No break

20. Yukon Dance song.

[Andy Brown heard this first in 1930, way down Chitina way]

21. Hey hey…Then they get started. Yukon People made this song for Kitty David's first brother. He fell, and a stick went into his mouth. He was about 2 years old --a long time ago. His name was Adam Tie.

[Andy Brow: Arthur Jackson went down Copper River in 1908 and dance to this song. He was young that time.]

22. Crow eating something --Canadian song. One man lies down and the rest pretend to eat him [Recognized by CC group as SARani k'yan.]

23. Snag people's dance song. He come to Tetlin to a party when Kitty's husband die. Ends with "Get a little drink".

24. Saltjacket people's song. A sorry song. Is repeated.

[Fanny Stanfield: somebody's daddy --they sing ani t'a' '.

Norther one sing "my people --sE dEnáyi."]

25. Another Saltjacket Sorry song.

26. Saltjacket Dance song. All clap hands.

[Andy Brown: Nenana].

27. Tanana Dance Song…ends yeah!

[Fanny Stanfield: They singing another - all different. Some one sleep.]

28. Medicine Man's song, Tanana. His people start to go to war. All come back. Stop War.

29. (snatch) --Not sure that this is really included

30. Ends with TcElali from Saltjacket.

[Andy Brown: 1918 -]
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2270

1968-1 Gulkana Potlatch/ Cantwell

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 46
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
June 6, 1968
Scope and Contents:
NAGRA 1 track A. Potlatch for Maggie Joe, Gulkana 6/16/68

B. Jenny Peters Cautwell

June 25, Continued in #2

1968 Reel 1 (on Nagra)

A: Songs recorded at Gulkana Potlatch for Maggie Joe, 6/16/1968

1. short snatch

2. long, ends in clapping

3. ends in clapping

4. short snatch

5. ends in "whee!"

6. song

7. "whoo, whoo" --talk [talk only]

8. song again

9. Beginning with drum alone; then men & women sing --"'ani"

10. Song --TubARA XAnégE.

11. All sing "wineya" --aughter --Mrs. Alfred Adam's sorry song

12. Song --For Chief David --Tetline

13. Women's voices sound above men's (cf. Jenny Peter's song, Cantwell, 6/24, & 6/25)

Big Mark made it Tx song

14. Song --phonograph song --Mrs. Banzonita Billy Henry.

15. Spirited song, clapping. deL asks if it's Tanacross Song.

Sophie Lincoln answers.

16. Spirited song

17. Spirited song, short. No break with next.

18. Song

19. Song; ends with clapping

20. Song. Then talk; no apparent break with next --First Song

21. Song

22. Song --Northway dancing song

23. Song (can hear child cry)

24. Song - clapping - - talk --coughing --doors open & close

de Laguna identifies the preceding songs.

Summary of Recordings 1968

All are Atna Singers Unless Otherwise Notes

Reel 1, A: Gulkana Potlatch for Maggie Joe. June 16, 1968

[As identified by Bill & Maggie Joe, 7/6/68, pp. 1-3]

1. Short snatch of Northway song.

2. Northern song, ends in clapping

3. Northway song, ends in clapping

4. Short song --not identified

5. TcElali [drinking song], from Up-the-Line

6. Dance song

7. Calls only

8. Up-the-Line song

9. Up-the-Line song

10. Andrew Isaac's Sorry Song for Johnny Frank [Johnson?], c. 1966

11. Lucy Adam's Sorry Song for her Son, Tetlin

12. Andrew David's or Walter David's Sorry Song for their father, Chief David, Tetlin

13. Big Mark's Sorry Song for his Son, Tanacross

14. Mrs. Baznita Billy's Sorry Song for her Son

15. Tanacross Song

16. Up-the-Line song, not completed

17. Kitty David's Tanana Boat Song, Tetlin, not completed.

18. Dance song

19. Up-the-Line Dance Song

20. Tradition first song by Potlatch Guests (Up-the-Line)

21. Buster Jim's Dance Song, Northway.

*22. Dance Song, "Something Follow Me"

*23. Down below song --call for supper[?]

24. Talk only

*numbering becomes uncertain
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2284

1968 #12

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 59
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
August 10 and July 31, 1968
Scope and Contents:
NAGRA

July 31, 1968

MJ, AJ, MS,and AB 8/19

Full

1. Johnny Goodlataw's Sleep Doctor's Song

2. Big Stickman's Sleep Doctor Song

3. Escaldita's Sleep Doctor Song

4. 4a Martha's famobro [?] Sleep Doctor Song

5. Ewain's Sleep Doctor Song

6. Martha's Own Song "Too Bad Old Man"

7. Martha's own song #2

8. Martha's autobiography - sleep doctor experience and song

9. Dance Song

Up the line song

10 - 11 - 12 -13 (11 over again) 14

14. M and Arthur mostly [?] Aug 10, 1968

15. AB leads off

16. AB leads

17. AB

18. Shateh [?]

19. Northway 1907

20. Juneau Song

21. "Wait A Minute"

22. Yakutat Song

23. Tlingit Song

24. A. Brown's song to his uncle- Potlatch in 1951 or 1950

25. Jim McKinley's song to same potlatch, made 1919 for his cousin
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2377

[1968] #15 - Jim McKinley/MJ

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 65
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
August 3 and 5, 1968
Scope and Contents:
Jim McKinley, Aug 3

Martha Jackson, Aug 5

#1-4 Aug 3

1. Not good - Jim's song for Agnes' mother

2. again

3. Song to Oscar Craig

4. speech at potlatch

#5-6 Aug 5

5. MJ sings sorry song of Old Ewan's father for his daughter

6-7-8. MJ sings grandpa's songs for his brother

ATNA
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2417

Notes on Brenwick's Pictures of Oscar Craig's Potlatch

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 85
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1958
Scope and Contents:
These notes were taken on the Pentron while the Brenwicks ran their soundless movie film of the potlatch

Side 1-A

Notes in Brenwick's Pictures of Oscar Craig's potlatch

8/8/68

3 3/4 in p.m.
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2558

Mentasta Potlatch II, 1969

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 91
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Sept. 13, 1969
Scope and Contents:
copy of a recording made by Marie-Francoise Guedon of a potlatch given at Mentansta by Kitty John for her sons and by other people. Reel 2
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2599

Tetlin Practice '69

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 92
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
Sept. 20, 1969
Scope and Contents:
Copy of Reel 1 - Side 1 Original recording made by Marie-Francoise Guedon 9/20/1969 Songs 1 -20 One track only on this tape

Joe John present but not singing Practice was so David could learn song to beat it. He announces song. 1. Kitty David's song for the new community hall. "Look at the clean new house." 2. Repeated – at lwer pitch – then decided that this was too low. David doesn't yet know the song – so isn't quite sure of his drumming In the course of practicing the song becomes simplified 3. Annie Joe make new song for Tetlin Committee Hall. (Announced by David Mark) This song was easily learned by all at the potlatch and sung "everywhere" – Heard song at Nway, - Learned by people from C. C., Mentasta, Tx. 4. Emma Titus speaks to tell David Mark what to say about her grandson who was hurt by a gun at Christmas time – song was composed by Emma Titus. "my grandchild" [words in English] "The good lord hearn my grandchild was hurt---Christmas time Jesus came." 5. "Annie Joe---" discussion---then drum and song Annie Joe's song for her grandchild coming—a little girl of 5 who was dancing in front of her mother. Composed because Annie was so happy when the child recovered from pneumonia. She had been in the hospital that August. "See the little girl dancing" David Mark identifies this song and the next. 6. Annie Joe's song for her son's boy. 7. This song was made by Tetlin girls for Tanacross. (Announced by David Mark) Laughter because the "girls" are Emma Titus, Jessie David, & Kitty David. Based on a reading by C. McC" at Burwash – 1968 8. "Tetlin village – 2 girls make song for Dance Shirt" "Aya, dance shirt!" by Jessie David. (aya! Is an insult "stupid" because he should have said "dance costume" D. Mark – but composer was Kitty David noise 9. song not identified (Is this for the Tanana R. boat by Kitty David – a dance to display costume 10. hesitation "This song from Joe John when he lose his son. (the composer was present but didn't sing) 11. "This song come out from Emma Titus when she lost her sister" (Ida David) – song – 12. "This song come out from Kitty David --- for her aunt" (aunt is unidentified) – song – drum, and stomping making funny percussion 13. Sorry song made for Herman Gene to sing for his song. Herman is married to Tabessa, Joe John's sister. The 20-yr old son went to dog race at Tok, got drunk. Went in the woods & Tetlin people said he froze to death; some whites said he had heart attack – March 1969 14. announcement too faint to hear sorry song faint singing at first 15. 'ani sitÉ – sorry song "This from Titus David when he lose his son?" 16. "ani sit'a aya" (very similar to 15) machine off & on

17. minto song – 1st version – i.e. the minto version before it was adapted for Tetlin Hill

18. Now are trying to fit Tetlin words - //original tape ends in middle of rehearsal
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2605

Side 2 of Practice for Tetlin Potlatch - 1

Collection Creator:
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Reel 93
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
September 20 & 24, 1969
Scope and Contents:
Copy of Side 2 of original recording by Marie-Francoise Guedon

Practice for Tetlin Potlatch (see De laguna SR 92)

#1, 2 Recorded by M- F.G. 9/20/69

#3 recorded by M- F.G. 9/24/69

7 ends in the middle

1. Annie Joe & Jessie David composing words for minto song (2nd version) --in honor of Tetlin Hill. --laugh happily

2. sing it again faster --laugh happily

------------------

[FdeL identifies]

Practice in Joe John's house sept. 24, 1969

3. no drum, only spoon on the table --song not identified

4. Potlatch song

Annie is singing it to teach it to the others

composed by Annie Joe

4a. repeated at slightly higher pitch --more faintly

------------------

David Mark announces for above

"Potlatch song

Sorry song for Steven John and Joe John" composed by Annie Joe

Try to record announcement louder

5. The same potlatch song is repeated

[Annie Joe composed this song for Steven John and Joe John who were firing [?] the potlatch]

They bring a drum --laughter

6. Dance song with drum

mike noises

7. Dance song --Kitty David's song for the new community hall
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna Papers
Frederica de Laguna Papers / Series 12: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref2613

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