Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
555 documents - page 1 of 28

Nancy Spero papers

Creator:
Spero, Nancy, 1926-2009  Search this
Names:
A.I.R. Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Galerie Lelong (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Mendieta, Ana, 1948-1985  Search this
Sosa, Irene  Search this
Extent:
26.4 Linear feet
19.12 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Documentary films
Motion pictures
Date:
1940s-2009
Summary:
The papers of painter, collage artist, and printmaker Nancy Spero measure 26.4 linear feet and 19.12 GB and are dated 1940s-2009. Biographical material, correspondence and other files documenting Spero's personal and professional relationships, interviews and writings, records of Spero's many exhibitions and projects, files highlighting the major subjects that galvanized her, business records, printed and photographic material, and digital and video recordings, offer detailed insight into the career of one of the earliest feminist artists.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, collage artist, and printmaker Nancy Spero measure 26.4 linear feet and 19.12 GB and are dated 1940s-2009. Biographical material, correspondence and other files documenting Spero's personal and professional relationships, interviews and writings, records of Spero's many exhibitions and projects, files highlighting the major subjects that galvanized her, business records, printed and photographic material, and digital and video recordings, offer detailed insight into the career of one of the earliest feminist artists.

Biographical material includes biographical notes and curricula vitae, as well as several video recordings of documentaries about Spero by Patsy Scala and Irene Sosa which feature original footage of Spero at work. Correspondence is personal and professional, and includes letters from artists including Judy Chicago and Ana Mendieta, writers and curators such as Deborah Frizzell and Susanne Altmann, regarding Spero exhibition catalogs, monographs, and articles, and personal news from family members such as Spero's sons, and correspondence related to other aspects of Spero's career.

Interviews of Spero include transcripts, published interviews, and video recordings. Writings include many of Spero's statements about her work, as well as notes, published versions of articles written by Spero, and video recordings of talks and panel discussions she participated in.

Exhibition files for over 75 shows document the extent to which Spero's work has been widely exhibited in her lifetime with numerous solo exhibitions, including major retrospectives in London, Paris, Barcelona, and Madrid, and dozens of group exhibitions in which she participated over the course of her career.

Gallery and museum files supplement the exhibition files by further documenting Spero's dealings with numerous galleries and museums, including Galerie Lelong, which represents Spero's estate, Barbara Gross Galerie, the first gallery in Germany to represent Spero, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Canada, and many others. The series also documents Spero's involvement with A.I.R. Gallery, the first independent women's art venue in the United States.

Professional files document other aspects of Spero's career including, but not limited to, awards she received, organizations she participated in or contributed to, publishing projects related to her work, and individual projects she executed such as an installation at the Harold Washington Library in Chicago and the Artemis, Acrobats, Divas & Dancers mosaic tiles she created for the Metropolitan Transit Authority for the 66th Street/Lincoln Center subway station. Also included here are files related to works of art such as Codex Artaud, and Notes in Time.

Subject files, contents of which were presumably used as source material for Spero, document subjects of interest to her, many of which were incorporated into her work and consists primarily of printed material. Broad subject categories include animal rights and conservation, feminism, war, and women. One set of folders documents "museum and political actions" undertaken by Spero and other activists during the 1960s-1970s to fight for equal representation of women in the arts and challenge the male-dominated hierarchy of the art world. Subject files include multiple news articles on torture, rape, and other atrocities committed particularly against women during wartime and by repressive and autocratic political regimes, and also include source material on the archetypal images of women that were fundamental to her interpretation of the female experience.

Printed material documents Spero's entire career from the late 1950s on. Announcements, exhibition catalogs, invitations, news clippings, and periodicals provide comprehensive coverage of her many exhibitions and other events. Printed material also documents the activities of a few other artists, primarily from the 2000s, and includes periodicals, primarily about art, and video recordings of documentaries about art and various other subjects.

Photographic material includes photographs of Nancy Spero from the 1940s on, photos of Spero with family and friends, and photographs of artwork including the heads of Spero's 2007 Maypole: Take No Prisoners which was the last major work completed before her death, originally realized for the Venice Biennale. Also found are a few installation shots and prints, slides, and digital images of Notes in Time at A.I.R. Gallery in 1979.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1950-2009 (Box 1, FC 30; 0.85 linear feet, ER01-ER04; 9.58 GB)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1946-2009 (Boxes 1-4, 27; 2.75 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1973-2007 (Boxes 4-5; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1950-2007 (Boxes 5-6; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, circa 1976-2009 (Boxes 6-9, 27, OV 28; 3.3 linear feet, ER09-ER10, ER14-ER17; 1.5 GB)

Series 6: Gallery and Museum Files, 1972-2009 (Boxes 9-14; 5.1 linear feet; ER05-ER08, ER12-ER13; 2.962 GB)

Series 7: Professional Files, circa 1967-2008 (Boxes 14-17, RD 29; 3.5 linear feet; ER15; 0.74 GB)

Series 8: Subject Files, 1950s-2009 (Boxes 17-19, 27, OV 28; 2.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Business Records, circa 1976-2008 (Boxes 19-20; 0.7 linear foot)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1949-2009 (Boxes 20-25, 27, OV 28; 5.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographic Material, 1940s-2009 (Boxes 25-27; 0.7 linear foot; ER18-ER19; 0.151 GB)
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Spero (1926-2009) was a figurative painter, printmaker, and collage artist based in New York City whose work was executed primarily on paper from the 1960s on, and often incorporated text. Spero was among the first feminist artists and a political activist whose convictions were expressed relentlessly in her work. Using archetypal representations of women to examine the range of female experience, Spero centered "woman as protagonist" whilst simultaneously examining the suffering women have long been subjected to through structural inequality, the systematic abuses of repressive political regimes, and the atrocities of war.

Born in Cleveland, Nancy Spero lived in Chicago from the time she was a very young child until completing her studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (BFA 1949) where she met her future husband, painter Leon Golub (1922-2004). Spero studied briefly in Paris and lived in New York City, returning to Chicago after her marriage in 1951. The couple and their two sons lived in Italy from 1956 to 1957. In 1959, after a few years in New York, the family moved to Paris where Spero developed an interest in existentialism and produced a series of black paintings. Spero and Golub returned to New York in 1964 with their three sons.

Nancy Spero was strongly affected by the war in Vietnam and the many social changes of the period. She became an activist and feminist, joined various organizations, and participated in a variety of demonstrations. Work such as the War series began to include political and sexual imagery, and Spero's work from here on was primarily executed on paper.

Spero was among the founding members of the women's cooperative A.I.R. Gallery established in 1972. In the 1970s archetypal representations of women in mythology, history, art, and literature became predominant in her work. Included in this vein are major series and installations, among them Torture of Women, Notes in Time on Women, The First Language, and her 66th Street/Lincoln Center subway station mosaic mural Artemis, Acrobats, Divas and Dancers.

Spero exhibited in the 1950 Salon des Independents and her first solo exhibition (in tandem with Leon Golub) was held at Indiana University in 1958. Thereafter, she showed sporadically until nearly 30 years later when her career flourished and she enjoyed international stature. Beginning in 1986, each year brought multiple solo exhibitions at galleries and museums in the United States and internationally. In addition, she continued to participate in group shows such as "Documenta" and the Venice Biennale. Her work is included in the permanent collections of museums throughout the world.

Awards and honors included the Skowhegan Medal for Works on Paper (1995), Hiroshima Art Prize shared with Leon Golub (1996), The Women's Caucus for Art award for Outstanding Achievement in Visual Arts (2003), and The Women's Caucus for Art Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement (2005). Spero was awarded honorary Doctorates of Fine Arts by The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1991) and Williams College (2001), and was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters (2006).

After several years of declining health, Nancy Spero died from heart failure in New York City, October 18, 2009.
Related Materials:
Also among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are an interview with Nancy Spero conducted 2008 Februay 6-July 24, by Judith Olch Richards, and the papers of Spero's husband, Leon Golub.
Provenance:
Following a gift of materials by Nancy Spero in 1979, the majority of the collection was donated by Spero's sons, Stephen Golub, Philip Golub, and Paul Golub, in 2013.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Documentary films
Motion pictures
Citation:
Nancy Spero papers, 1940s-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.spernanc
See more items in:
Nancy Spero papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ee586015-b282-427f-88a2-0768b0b0e79b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-spernanc
Online Media:

Adja Yunkers papers

Creator:
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Names:
Alice Simsar Gallery  Search this
Impressions Gallery of Photography  Search this
Smith Andersen Gallery  Search this
Bjornstjerna, Mikael  Search this
Grossman, Morton, 1926-  Search this
Haley, Donna  Search this
Olsen, Cheryl  Search this
Wood, Denis  Search this
Extent:
2.32 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 3 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1939-1983
Scope and Contents:
REEL N70-16: A typescript (42 p.) address delivered at the Corcoran Museum of Art, 1967, by Yunkers describing his student years in Russia, and later years in Germany, France, and Mexico, ca. 1917-1928, and relating political, social, and cultural events to the development of modern art. He describes Russia before and during the Revolution and Germany during the Weimar Republic. Also included are a resume; a critical bibliography of Yunkers work; typescripts of 2 articles; and clippings.
REEL D251: Printed material, 1941-1965, including newspaper clippings, magazine articles, reviews, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and press releases.
REEL 1023: "Prints in the Desert: New Mexico," 1950, a limited edition book of prints and poetry produced by a collaboration of artists under the leadership of Yunkers.
UNMICROFILMED: Biographical material, including naturalization papers and a passport; files of letters from Mikael Bjornstjerna (1977-1983), Cheryl Bowers (1978-1983), Morton and Chris Grossman (1979-1982), Donna Haley (1982-1983), Denis Wood (1978-1983), Yunker's daughters, including Nina (1979-1983); business and personal correspondence, 1960-1983; files on galleries handling Yunkers' work, including Smith Andersen Gallery (Palo Alto, Calif.), Alice Simsar Gallery (Ann Arbor, Mich.), and Impressions Gallery (Boston, Mass.) containing correspondence, price lists and receipts; a few sketches and a collage; 2 portfolios, "Creation" (1941) and "Ars: Tidskrift for Konst Litterature Och Veteskap" (1942) containing original prints and collages by Yunkers; 2 appointment books, 1980-1983; notes and writings; photographs of Yunkers, Yunkers at work, his family, friends, studio, and art work; photograph albums, including 2 of Yunkers' studios in Stockholm, Sweden, New Mexico, and New York City (1942-1980) and one of exhibition installations, undated; photographs by Denis Hare of the making of Octavio Paz's book BLANCO, illustrated by Yunkers, and slides of prints included in BLANCO; and printed material, including exhibition announcements, clippings and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Abstract painter and printmaker, collagist, and art instructor; New York, N.Y. Died 1983. Born in Riga, Latvia. Studied in Leningrad, Paris, Berlin, and London. He moved to the United States in 1947. Faculty member of the New School for Social Research, 1947-1956; Cooper Union, 1956-1967.
Related Materials:
Adja Yunker papers also at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
Materials on reels D251, N70-16, and 1023 donated by Adja Yunkers, 1966-1970, and transferred to NMAA-NPG Library vertical files after microfilming, except "Prints in the Desert: New Mexico" (REEL 1023). Unmicrofilmed material donated 1984 by Marina and Alexandra Yunkers, Yunkers' daughters.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm.
Unmicrofilmed: ACCESS RESTRICTED; written permission required.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Painting, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Prints, Abstract -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' illustrated books  Search this
Prints -- 20th century  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.yunkadja
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ddbf2fbb-ff0e-4910-8bf2-70c282edc073
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-yunkadja

Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961

Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Subject:
Wildenstein, Felix  Search this
Phillips, Duncan  Search this
Hays, Lee  Search this
Untermeyer, Louis  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl  Search this
Robeson, Paul  Search this
DuBois, W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt)  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano)  Search this
Ruggles, Carl  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur  Search this
Nearing, Helen  Search this
Nearing, Scott  Search this
Pach, Walter  Search this
Rasmussen, Knud  Search this
Reeves, Ruth  Search this
Seeger, Pete  Search this
Daniel, Charles  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland)  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen)  Search this
Chamberlain, J. E.  Search this
Boyesen, Bayard  Search this
Chase, William Merritt  Search this
Freuchen, Peter  Search this
Gellert, Hugo  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry  Search this
Hartley, Marsden  Search this
Fitzgerald, James  Search this
Keller, Charles  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
Jones, Dan Burne  Search this
United American Artists  Search this
United Office and Professional Workers of America  Search this
United Scenic Artists  Search this
National Farmers' Union (U.S.)  Search this
National Maritime Union of America  Search this
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists League of America  Search this
Citizens' Committee for Government Arts Projects  Search this
Farmers Union of the New York Milk Shed  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Federal Writers' Project  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
International Workers Order  Search this
Type:
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Designers -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Politics and culture  Search this
Authors -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States -- Political aspects  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Illustration of books  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Art and war  Search this
Commercial art  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9557
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211757
AAA_collcode_kentrock
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211757
Online Media:

Art & Language sound recordings, 1975

Creator:
Art & Language (Group)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Art & Language sound recordings, 1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Conceptual art  Search this
Theme:
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15970
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)304975
AAA_collcode_artlang
Theme:
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_304975

Art & Language sound recordings

Creator:
Art & Language (Group)  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1975
Summary:
Twelve audio cassettes of six days of meetings, conducted in 1975, by members of the Art & Language group, concerning the future of the group. Participants include Sarah Charlesworth, Carol Condé, Michael Corris, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Andrew Menard, Mel Ramsden, and Paula Ramsden among others. Participants discuss Marxism, Capitalism, including class and gender structure in society and other political issues; Art & Language publication, "The Fox"; and the Structuralist and Formalist movements in art. Also mentioned are the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Council.
Scope and Contents:
The Art & Language sound recordings measure 0.5 linear feet and date to 1975.The collection is a series of meetings held by the group, Art & Language, in which they discuss the future of the group. Participants include Sarah Charlesworth, Carol Conde, Michael Corris, Christine Kozlov, Nigel Lendon, Andrew Menard, Mel Ramsden, and Paula Ramsden. Some of the topics of discussion include Marxism, Capitalism, Art & Language publication "The Fox," and the Structuaralist and Formalist movements in art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Art & Language (1967- 1975) was a group of artists based in England and New York, N.Y. that focused on Conceptual art.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Nigel Lendon, one of the participants, in 2011.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Conceptual art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Art & Language sound recordings, 1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.artlang
See more items in:
Art & Language sound recordings
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91369af2f-88f1-47a6-a81c-50f16d015dc2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-artlang

Oral history interview with Harold Rosenberg

Interviewee:
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Office of War Information. Washington, D.C.  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
Baumbach, Harold, 1903-  Search this
Blume, Peter, 1906-1992  Search this
Breton, André, 1896-1966  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Lundeberg, Helen, 1908-1999  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Matta, 1912-2002  Search this
Miró, Joan, 1893-  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Prestopino, Gregorio  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Extent:
244 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1970 December 17-1973 January 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Harold Rosenberg conducted 1970 December 17-1973 January 28, by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art over nine sessions.
Rosenberg speaks on a wide variety of topics including Marxism and Communism; art criticism; teaching and the philosopy of art; how his interest in art developed over the years; getting his writings published and starting a magazine; what intrigues him about the avant-garde; when and why he started painting; action painting; the inaccuracies in art history about Avant-gardism and Surrealism; working as a mural painter for the College Art Association; moving from the WPA's art project to the writer's project, and becoming an art editor; what happened to the works of art done under the WPA after it ended; and moving to the Hamptons.
He speaks in detail on the New York art scene during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s; The Club; writing about art; politics and art; Shakespeare and literature's influence on art and vice versa; the various economic aspects of art; how the Depression affected him and the people he knew; the projects he worked on in the WPA; and working for the OWI after the WPA disbanded.
He recalls Mark Rothko, Harold Baumbach, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Peter Blume, Helen Lundberg, André Breton, Arshile Gorky, Roberto Matta, Jackson Pollock, David Smith, Lee Krasner, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró, Jim Leshay, Stuart Davis, Bruce Inverarity, Barney Newman, Mark Tobey, Gregorio Prestopino, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Harold Rosenberg (1906-1978) was a writer and educator from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound tapes. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 10 hr., 4 min.
Interview transcript is not in chronological order; arrangement designated by the interviewer Paul Cummings.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Art and literature  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Avant-garde (Aesthetics) -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rosenb70
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw973c587b6-e4b1-453e-9790-0420db435320
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rosenb70
Online Media:

John Button papers

Creator:
Button, John, 1929-1982  Search this
Names:
Ansen, Alan  Search this
Burton, Scott, 1939-1989  Search this
Cohan, Zara  Search this
Davis, Bette, 1908-1989  Search this
Fabian, Gerald Langston  Search this
Fondren, Hal  Search this
Freilicher, Jane, 1924-2014  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997 -- Photographs  Search this
LeSueur, Joe  Search this
O'Hara, Frank, 1926-1966  Search this
Orlovsky, Peter, 1933-2010  Search this
Porter, Fairfield  Search this
Porter, Katherine Anne, 1890-1980  Search this
Schuyler, James  Search this
Weaver, Helen, 1932-2021  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1964-2004
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, writings, photographs, and printed material regarding painter John Button.
Correspondence includes two letters from Fairfield Porter,1974, three letters from Button to Zara Cohan, 1964, and copies of personal and professional letters from Button to businesses, organizations, and friends regarding his artwork, political beliefs, and personal issues, and photocopies of a postcard and six letters from Fairfield Porter. Writings include a typescript poem by Frank O'Hara, a poem by Helen Weaver, a copy of a poem attributed to James Schuyler about Button, and copies of two poems by Katherine Porter.
Photographs are of Button, Allen Ginsberg, Alan Ansen, Peter Orlovsky, Bette Davis, Gerald. L. Fabian, Maxine Groffsky, Harry Matthews, Scott Burton, James Schuyler, Jane Freilicher, Hal Fondren, Joe LeSueur, Frank O'Hara, and three photographs of the mural created by John Button and Mario Dubsky at the Gay Activist Alliacne Firehouse, 99 Wooster Street, New York, 1971-1974. Printed material consists of exhibition catalogs, announcements, reviews, publications by Button and others, among them a book of poems, "If I Dream I Have You, I Have You," written by Richard Howard and illustrated by Button, 1997.
Biographical / Historical:
John Button (1930-1982) was a painter in San Francisco, Calif. and New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Donated 2010 by Alvin Novak, longtime friend of Button's, and by John Button via Jaap van Liere, executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.buttjohn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99f743d2e-d927-46b8-b172-a92fc3b913c9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-buttjohn

Hugo Gellert papers

Creator:
Gellert, Hugo, 1892-1985  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Art of Today Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artist's Committee of Action (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Coordination Committee (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Council  Search this
Artists for Victory, Inc.  Search this
Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome  Search this
Hungarian Word, Inc.  Search this
National Society of Mural Painters (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Derkovits, Gyula, 1894-1934  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Fast, Howard, 1914-2003  Search this
Fiene, Ernest, 1894-  Search this
Gellert, Ernest  Search this
Gellert, Lawrence, 1898-1979  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Lie, Jonas, 1880-1940  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Reisman, Philip, 1904-  Search this
Sequenzia, Sofia  Search this
Extent:
6.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1916-1986
Summary:
The papers of graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert measure 6.9 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1986. They document his career as an artist and organizer for the radical political left through an interview, legal papers, financial records, family papers, artifacts, correspondence, writings, organizational records, extensive printed materials (many of them illustrated by Gellert), photographs, and artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert measure 6.9 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1986. They document his career as an artist and organizer for the radical left through an oral interview conducted by Sofia Sequenzia, legal papers, financial records, family papers, artifacts, correspondence, writings, organizational records, clippings, exhibition catalogs, various printed materials illustrated by Gellert, pamphlets, periodicals, mass mailings, photographs, and artwork.

Biographical Material includes an audio interview with Gellert; official documents related to memberships, property, and legal matters; financial documents that include bills, receipts, and contracts related to professional activities; papers of Gellert's brothers, Lawrence and Ernest; and artifacts. Correspondence is with other artists, writers, publishers, activists, friends, and family, including Ernest Fiene, Rockwell Kent, Harry Gottlieb, William Gropper, Philip Evergood, Howard Fast, and Jonas Lie. Writings include essays, book projects, notes, and notebooks written by Gellert; and stories and articles by other authors, including typescripts of early twentieth-century Hungarian short stories collected by Gellert.

Organizational Records are related to political and art organizations in which Gellert was an active organizer, officer, and in some cases, a founder. Because of his central role in many of these organizations, records often contain unique documentation of their activities. Records are found for the American Artists Congress, the Art of Today Gallery, the Artists Committee of Action, the Artists Coordination Committee, the Artists Council, Artists for Victory, Inc., the Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome, Hungarian Word, Inc., the National Society of Mural Painters, and other organizations.

Printed materials include a variety of political publications and periodicals with illustrations by Gellert, including New Masses, Art Front, Magyar Szo, and American Dialog; clippings related to his career, exhibition catalogs, political pamphlets, Hungarian literature, and mass mailings received from political organizations. Photographs contain a few personal photographs but are mostly news and publicity photographs, many of which depict prominent Communists and other newsmakers. Artwork includes sketches, drawings, designs, prints, and production elements for Gellert's artwork, as well as prints and drawings by Philip Reisman, Gyula Derkovits, and Anton Refregier.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1917-1982 (Box 1 and OV 9; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1920-1986 (Boxes 1-2, 8; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1916-1970 (Boxes 2 and 8; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Organizational Records, circa 1920-1977 (Boxes 3, 8, and OV 9; 1 linear foot)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1920-1986 (Boxes 4-6, 8, and OV 9; 3 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1920-1959 (Boxes 6-7; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1927-1981 (Box 7, OV 10; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Graphic artist, muralist, and activist Hugo Gellert was born Hugo Grünbaum in Budapest, Hungary in 1892, the oldest of six children. His family immigrated to New York City in 1906, eventually changing their family name to Gellert.

Gellert attended art school at Cooper Union and the National Academy of Design. As a student, he designed posters for movies and theater, and also worked for Tiffany Studios. A number of student art prizes with cash awards enabled him to travel to Europe in the summer of 1914, where he witnessed the outbreak of World War I, an experience which helped shape his political beliefs. Aesthetically, he was also influenced by a folk revival among Hungarian artists at the time of his trip, and was more impressed, he later said, with the street advertising in Paris than he was with the cubism he saw in the Louvre.

Returning to the United States, Gellert became involved in the Hungarian-American workers' movement, and contributed drawings to its newspaper, Elöre (Forward). He remained involved in Hungarian-American art and activism throughout his life, including membership in the anti-fascist group, the Anti-Horthy League. When members of the fascist Horthy government unveiled a statue of a Hungarian hero in New York in 1928, Gellert hired a pilot and dropped leaflets on the group, a stunt for which he was arrested. In the 1950s, Gellert served as director of Hungarian Word, Inc., a Hungarian-language publisher in New York.

Gellert's political commitment and art remained deeply intertwined throughout his life, as he continually sought to integrate his commitment to Communism, his hatred of fascism, and his dedication to civil liberties. Throughout the 1910s and 1920s, he contributed artwork to several magazines of the radical left, including Masses and its successors Liberator and New Masses, both of which featured Gellert's artwork on their inaugural issue. Through Masses, he came to know other radicals such as Mike Gold, John Reed, Louise Bryant, Max Eastman, Floyd Dell, Anton Refregier, William Gropper, Harry Gottlieb, Bob Minor, and Art Young, and with them he followed the events of the Bolshevik revolution in Russia with sympathy and growing political fervor.

His brother, Ernest Gellert, also a socialist and activist, was drafted into the military but refused to serve. He died of a gunshot wound under suspicious circumstances while imprisoned at Fort Hancock, New Jersey, as a conscientious objector. Traumatized by this event, Gellert fled to Mexico to avoid conscription. In 1920 to 1922, he taught art at the Stelton School in New Jersey, a radical, utopian community school. He participated in the cultural scene of Greenwich Village, working on set designs, publications, and graphic art for political productions. He founded the first John Reed Club in 1929 with a group of Communist artists and writers including Anton Refregier, Louis Lozowick, and William Gropper. Initially, the group held classes and exhibitions, and provided services for strikes and other working-class activism. Later, John Reed Clubs formed around the country and became a formal arm of the United States Communist Party (CPUSA).

In the late 1920s, Gellert became a member of the National Society of Mural Painters (which, partly due to Gellert's activism in the group, became the Mural Artists' Guild local 829 of the United Scenic Artists Union of the AFL-CIO in 1937. Other members included Rockwell Kent, Anton Refregier, Arshile Gorky, and Marion Greenwood). In 1928, he created a mural for the Worker's Cafeteria in Union Square, NY. Later murals include the Center Theater in Rockefeller Center, the National Maritime Union Headquarters, the Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union Building, NYC, the interior of the Communications Building at the 1939 World's Fair, and the Seward Park Housing Project in 1961.

In 1932, Gellert was invited to participate in a mural exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, and submitted a political mural about the robber barons of contemporary American politics and industry called Us Fellas Gotta Stick Together - Al Capone. The museum attempted to censor the mural, along with the murals of William Gropper and Ben Shahn. Other artists threatened to boycott the exhibition over the censorship and were successful in restoring them to the show.

The cooperation of artists in this controversy foreshadowed a larger protest in 1934, organized by Gellert, Saul Belman, Stuart Davis, and Zoltan Hecht, when Diego Rivera's pro-labor mural was destroyed at Rockefeller Center. After the incident, the group formed the Artists' Committee of Action and continued to fight censorship and advocate for artists' interests and welfare. They also co-published the magazine Art Front with the Artists' Union, a labor organization. Gellert served for a time as editor of Art Front, and chairman of the Artists' Committee of Action.

Gellert was active in producing both art and strategic policy for the cultural arm of the CPUSA, and he worked to mobilize the non-communist left, often referred to as the Popular Front. In 1933 he illustrated Karl Marx's Capital in Lithographs, and in 1935, he wrote a Marxist, illustrated satire called Comrade Gulliver, An Illustrated Account of Travel into that Strange Country the United States of America. Other published graphic works include Aesop Said So (1936) and a portfolio of silkscreen prints entitled Century of the Common Man (1943).

Other artist groups he helped to found and/or run include the American Artist's Congress, a Communist organization founded with Max Weber, Margaret Bourke-White, Stuart Davis, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Harry Sternberg, and others, which held symposia and exhibitions between 1936 and 1942; the Artists' Coordination Committee, an umbrella group of national organizations which sought protections for federally-employed and unionized artists; Artists for Victory, Inc., which formed in 1942 to mobilize artists in support of the war effort; and the Artists' Council, formed after the war to advocate for artists' welfare and employment.

Gellert maintained his loyalty to the Communist party throughout the post-war period despite growing disillusionment in the Popular Front over the actions of Josef Stalin, and despite the intense anti-communist crusades in the late 1940s and 1950s. He was investigated by the House of Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and was nearly deported. He spent a number of years during this period in his wife's native Australia. Returning to the United States in the early 1950s, he threw his efforts into the defense of others who faced prison, deportation, and the blacklist following the HUAC hearings. He established The Committee to Defend V.J. Jerome in 1951 when Jerome, the cultural commissioner of CPUSA, was convicted under the Smith Act. The writer Dorothy Parker was the group's treasurer.

In 1954, Gellert established the Art of Today Gallery in New York City with Rockwell Kent and Charles White to provide an exhibition venue for blacklisted artists. Exhibitions included Maurice Becker, Henry Glintenkamp, Harry Gottlieb, Kay Harris, and Rockwell Kent. Gellert served as the gallery's secretary until it closed in 1957.

In the 1960s until his death in 1985, Gellert continued his activism through involvement in grassroots political organizations. Unlike many of his radical contemporaries, Gellert lived to see the revival of some of the ideas of the progressive era of the thirties in the countercultural years of the late 1960s and early 1970s. There were retrospectives of his work in Moscow in 1967 and in his native Budapest in 1968, and he appeared in Warren Beatty's film Reds in 1981.

Sources used for this essay include James Wechsler's 2003 dissertation "The Art and Activism of Hugo Gellert: Embracing the Spectre of Communism," his essay "From World War I to the Popular Front: The Art and Activism of Hugo Gellert," ( Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts number 24, Spring 2002), and Jeff Kisseloff's biographical essay for the 1986 Hugo Gellert exhibition at the Mary Ryan Gallery.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are an oral history with Hugo Gellert from 1984, a recording of a lecture Gellert gave at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1985, and additional records of Artists for Victory, Inc., 1942-1946.

The Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University holds additional papers of Hugo Gellert.
Provenance:
A portion of the papers were donated in 1970 by Hugo Gellert. Additional papers were donated by Gellert and his wife, Livia Cinquegrana, in 1983 and 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Artists' writings  Search this
Politics in art  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Graphic artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Hugo Gellert papers, 1916-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gellhugo
See more items in:
Hugo Gellert papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9eb96ed42-b751-47f6-a0ca-038014c8800e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gellhugo
Online Media:

Rockwell Kent papers

Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists League of America  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Citizens' Committee for Government Arts Projects  Search this
Farmers Union of the New York Milk Shed  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Federal Writers' Project  Search this
International Workers Order  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
National Farmers' Union (U.S.)  Search this
National Maritime Union of America  Search this
United American Artists  Search this
United Office and Professional Workers of America  Search this
United Scenic Artists  Search this
Boyesen, Bayard  Search this
Chamberlain, J. E.  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland), 1880-1964  Search this
Daniel, Charles, 1878-1971  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
DuBois, W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Fitzgerald, James, 1899-1971  Search this
Freuchen, Peter, 1886-1957  Search this
Gellert, Hugo, 1892-1985  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hays, Lee, 1914-1981  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Jones, Dan Burne  Search this
Keller, Charles, 1914-2006  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Nearing, Helen  Search this
Nearing, Scott, 1883-1983  Search this
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Rasmussen, Knud, 1879-1933  Search this
Reeves, Ruth, 1892-1966  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945  Search this
Ruggles, Carl, 1876-1971  Search this
Seeger, Pete, 1919-2014  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur, 1879-1962  Search this
Untermeyer, Louis, 1885-1977  Search this
Wildenstein, Felix, 1883-1952  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl, 1891-  Search this
Extent:
88 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
circa 1840-1993
bulk 1935-1961
Summary:
The Rockwell Kent papers measure 88.0 linear feet and date from circa 1840 to 1993 with the bulk of the collection dating from 1935 to 1961. The collection provides comprehensive coverage of Kent's career as a painter, illustrator, designer, writer, lecturer, traveler, political activist, and dairy farmer.
Scope and Content Note:
The Rockwell Kent papers measure 88 linear feet and date from circa 1840 to 1993 with the bulk of the collection dating from 1935 to 1961. The collection provides comprehensive coverage of Kent's career as a painter, illustrator, designer, writer, lecturer, traveler, political activist, and dairy farmer.

Circumstances surrounding the acquisition of the papers are highlighted in an article by Garnett McCoy ("The Rockwell Kent Papers," in the Archives of American Art Journal, 12, no. 1 [January 1972]: 1-9), recommended reading for researchers interested in the collection. The collection is remarkably complete, for in the mid 1920s Kent began keeping carbon copies of all outgoing letters, eventually employing a secretary (who became his third wife and continued her office duties for the remainder of Kent's life).

Series 1: Alphabetical Files contain Kent's personal and professional correspondence, along with business records of the dairy farm and associated enterprises; also included are printed matter on a wide variety of topics and promotional literature relating to organizations and causes of interest to him. Voluminous correspondence with his three wives, five children, and other relatives, as well as with literally hundreds of friends, both lifelong and of brief duration, illuminates Kent's private life and contributes to understanding of his complex character. Among the many correspondents of note are: his art teachers William Merritt Chase, Robert Henri, and Kenneth Hayes Miller; fellow artists Tom Cleland, Arthur B. Davies, James Fitzgerald, Hugo Gellert, Harry Gottleib, Marsden Hartley, Charles Keller, and Ruth Reeves; collectors Duncan Phillips and Dan Burne Jones; critics J. E. Chamberlain and Walter Pach; and dealers Charles Daniel, Felix Wildenstein, and Macbeth Galleries. Kent corresponded with such diverse people as Arctic explorers Peter Freuchen, Knud Rasmussen, and Vilhjalmar Steffanson; composer Carl Ruggles and songwriters Lee Hays and Pete Seeger; civil rights pioneers Paul Robeson and Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois; writers Bayard Boyesen, Scott and Helen Nearing, and Louis Untermeyer; and art historian and print curator Carl Zigrosser.

Kent's interest and involvement in the labor movement are reflected in correspondence with officials and members of a wide variety and large number of unions and related organizations, among them: the Farmers' Educational and Cooperative Union of America, Farmers' Union of the New York Milk Shed, International Workers Order, National Maritime Union, and United Office and Professional Workers of America. Of special interest is his participation, often in leadership roles, in various attempts to organize artists. Files on the American Artists' Congress, Artists League of America, The Artists Union, United American Artists, and United Scenic Artists contain particularly valuable material on the movement.

A supporter of New Deal efforts to aid artists, Kent was actively interested in the various programs and often was critical of their limitations; he advocated continuing federal aid to artists after the Depression abated. The Kent papers include correspondence with the Federal Arts Project, Federal Fine Arts Project, Federal Writers Project, and the War Department, as well as correspondence with the Citizens' Committee for Government Art Projects and President Franklin D. Roosevelt on the subject.

Kent's professional correspondence documents exhibitions, sales, consignments, and reproduction of prints and paintings. He kept meticulous records of his advertising commissions and illustration work. Detailed correspondence with publishers and printers indicates Kent's involvement in the technical aspects of production and provides a good overview of the publishing industry during the mid-twentieth century.

Business records of Asgaard Farm include records of the dairy and transfer of ownership to its employees, tax and employee information, and documents concerning several related business ventures such as distributor ships for grain, feed, and farm implements.

Series 2: Writings consists of notes, drafts, and completed manuscripts by Rockwell Kent, mainly articles, statements, speeches, poems, introductions, and reviews. The Kent Collection given to Friendship House, Moscow, in 1960, was augmented later by a set of his publications and the illustrated manuscripts of many of his monographs. Also included are a small number of manuscripts by other authors.

Series 3: Artwork consists mainly of drawings and sketches by Kent; also included are works on paper by other artists, many of whom are unidentified, and by children.

Series 4: Printed Matter consists of clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, brochures, broadsides, programs, and newsletters. These include items by and about Kent and his family, as well as articles written and/or illustrated by him, and reviews of his books. There is also material on a variety of subjects and causes of interest to him. Additional printed matter is included among the alphabetical files, mainly as attachments to correspondence.

Series 5: Miscellaneous includes biographical material, legal documents, and memorabilia. Artifacts received with papers include textile samples, a silk scarf, dinnerware, ice bucket, and rubber stamp, all featuring designs by Rockwell Kent. Also with this series are a variety of documents including a phrenological analysis of an ancestor, lists of supplies for expeditions, a hand-drawn map of an unidentified place, and technical notes regarding art materials and techniques.

Series 6: Photographs includes photographs of Kent, his family and friends, travel, and art number that over one thousand. Also included here are several albums of family and travel photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into six series. Series 1 is arranged alphabetically. The arrangement of the remaining series is explained in each series description. Note that sealed materials that became available in 2000 were microfilmed separately on reels 5740-5741, but have integrated into this finding aid.

Missing Title

Series 1: Alphabetical Files, circa 1900-1971, undated (Reels 5153-5249, 5256, 5740-5741)

Series 2: Writings, 1906-1978, undated (Reels 5249-5252, 5741)

Series 3: Art Work, 1910-1972, undated (Reels 5252, 5741)

Series 4: Printed Matter, 1905-1993, undated (Reels 5252-5254)

Series 5: Miscellaneous, 1859-1969, undated (Reels 5254, 5741)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1840-1970, undated (Reels 5254-5255, 5741)
Biographical Note:
Rockwell Kent (1882-1971), an energetic and multitalented man, pursued many interests and careers during his very long and active life. At various times he was an architect, draftsman, carpenter, unskilled laborer, painter, illustrator, printmaker, commercial artist, designer, traveler/explorer, writer, professional lecturer, dairy farmer, and political activist.

While studying architecture at Columbia University, Kent enrolled in William Merritt Chase's summer school at Shinnecock Hills, Long Island. He then redirected his career ambitions toward painting and continued to study with Chase in New York. Kent spent a summer working and living with Abbott H. Thayer in Dublin, New Hampshire, and attended the New York School of Art, where Robert Henri and Kenneth Hayes Miller were his teachers.

Critically and financially, Kent was a successful artist. He was very well known for his illustration work--particularly limited editions of the classics, bookplates, and Christmas cards. He was a prolific printmaker, and his prints and paintings were acquired by many major museums and private collectors. During the post-World War II era, Kent's political sympathies resulted in the loss of commissions, and his adherence to artistic conservatism and outspoken opposition to modern art led to disfavor within art circles. After many years of declining reputation in this country and unsuccessful attempts to find a home for the Kent Collection, Kent gave his unsold paintings--the majority of his oeuvre--to the Soviet Union, where he continued to be immensely popular.

An avid traveler, Kent was especially fascinated by remote, Arctic lands and often stayed for extended periods of time to paint, write, and become acquainted with the local inhabitants. Between 1918 and 1935, he wrote and illustrated several popular books about his experiences in Alaska, Tierra del Fuego, and Greenland. In the 1930s and 1940s, Kent was much in demand as a lecturer, making several nationwide tours under the management of a professional lecture bureau; he spoke mainly about his travels, but among his standard lectures were some on "art for the people."

In 1927, Kent purchased Asgaard Farm at AuSable Forks, New York, in the Adirondacks, where he lived for the remainder of his life, operating a modern dairy farm on a modest scale for many years.

As a young man, Kent met Rufus Weeks, became committed to social justice, and joined the Socialist Party. Throughout his life, he supported left-wing causes and was a member or officer of many organizations promoting world peace and harmonious relations with the Soviet Union, civil rights, civil liberties, antifascism, and organized labor. Kent was frequently featured as a celebrity sponsor or speaker at fund-raising events for these causes. In 1948, he ran unsuccessfully as the American Labor Party's candidate for Congress. Kent's unpopular political views eventually led to the dissolution of his dairy business, resulted in a summons to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee, and prompted the U.S. State Department to deny him a passport, an action that subsequently was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Kent wrote two autobiographies, This Is My Own (1940) and It's Me, O Lord (1955). In 1969, he was the subject of an oral history interview conducted by Paul Cummings for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
In 1969, Rockwell Kent donated his papers to the Archives of American Art; textile samples were received in 1979, and his widow gave additional papers in 1971 and 1996. Letters to Rockwell Kent from wives Frances and Sally, sealed during Sally Kent Gorton's lifetime, became available for research after her death in 2000, and further material was donated to the Archives of American Art in 2001 by the Estate of Sally Kent [Shirley Johnstone] Gorton.
Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not microfilmed or digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Designers -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Politics and culture  Search this
Authors -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States -- Political aspects  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Illustration of books  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Art and war  Search this
Commercial art  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Function:
Labor unions
Genre/Form:
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kentrock
See more items in:
Rockwell Kent papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97edd9940-eb61-4562-9583-def2da778b6a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kentrock
Online Media:

Anton Refregier papers

Creator:
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Names:
ACA Galleries  Search this
Bard College -- Faculty  Search this
Gosudarstvennyĭ Ėrmitazh (Russia)  Search this
National Council of American-Soviet Friendship (U.S.)  Search this
New York World's Fair (1939-1940 : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
United States. Works Progress Administration  Search this
Woodstock Artists Association (Woodstock, N.Y.)  Search this
World Peace Council  Search this
De Diego, Julio, 1900-  Search this
Dreyfuss, Henry, 1904-  Search this
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Fast, Howard, 1914-2003  Search this
Geddes, Norman Bel, 1893-1958  Search this
Greenwood, Marion, 1909-1970  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Morley, Eugene, 1909-1953  Search this
O'Higgins, Pablo, 1904-  Search this
Packard, Emmy Lou, 1914-1998  Search this
Randall, Byron, 1918-1999  Search this
Refregier, Lila  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Yavno, Max  Search this
Extent:
35.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Travel diaries
Greeting cards
Interviews
Cartoons (working drawings)
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Photographs
Diaries
Sketches
Place:
Chile
Soviet Union
Guatemala
Mexico
Date:
circa 1900-circa 1990
Summary:
The papers of Woodstock area painter, muralist, and designer, Anton Refregier (1905-1979) date from circa 1900 to circa 1990 and measure 35.9 linear feet. The collection records Refregier's early commercial work and murals for the Works Progress Adminstration (WPA) and documents his career through to the 1970s with records of commissions for many public and private buildings, exhibitions in the United States and abroad, teaching positions, essays and publications, and extensive travel, particularly to the Soviet Union and Mexico. The collection contains scattered biographical material, personal and business correspondence, notes and writings, 15 diaries and journals, mural and tapestry files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, 10 scrapbooks, artwork including sketches and cartoons for murals, and photographs of Refregier, his friends, family and travels.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Woodstock area painter, muralist, and designer, Anton Refregier (1905-1979) date from circa 1900 to circa 1990 and measure 35.9 linear feet. The collection records Refregier's early commercial work and murals for the Works Progress Adminstration (WPA) and documents his career through to the 1970s with records of commissions for many public and private buildings, exhibitions in the United States and abroad, teaching positions, essays and publications, and extensive travel, particularly to the Soviet Union and Mexico. The collection contains scattered biographical material, personal and business correspondence, notes and writings, diaries and journals, mural and tapestry files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork including sketches and cartoons for murals, and photographs of Refregier, his friends, family and travels.

Biographical material contains legal records such as Refregier's will and marriage and death records, passports, resume material and 2 interview transcripts.

Correspondence, both chronological and alphabetical, constitutes almost a third of the collection and documents all aspects of Refregier's career including his work for the WPA, private commissions, representation by ACA Galleries, his involvement with groups such as the Woodstock Artists Association and his teaching work for institutions such as Bard College. Also documented are his involvement with local political groups and international organizations such as the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship and the World Peace Council, and travels including visits to the Soviet Union. Notable correspondents include Henry Dreyfuss, Philip Evergood, Rockwell Kent, Emmy-Lou Packard, and Byron Randall. Correspondence also includes family letters written primarily by Refregier to Lila Refregier, in addition to greeting cards received by the Refregier family, many of which contain original arwork.

Writings are primarily by Refregier and include drafts of many essays and autobiographical writings, in addition to copies of published works including Natural Figure Drawing, An Artists Journey and Sketches of the Soviet Union.

The collection contains diaries and journals from 12 years in various formats including published and handmade day planners and typed and handwritten journal entries. They include sketches and primarily record travel and daily activities including specific projects such as the New York World's Fair mural (1938-1939).

Mural and Tapestry files document individual commissions bid on and/or completed by Refregier. The creation of the Rincon Annex Post Office mural and subsequent controversies over its subject matter are well-documented here, as are many of Refregier's commissions for banks, hospitals, hotels, shopping centers, and schools.

Exhibition files document at least 15 of Refregier's exhibitions, including his first one-man show at ACA Galleries (1942) and his exhibition of paintings at the Hermitage Museum (1967) in what was then Leningrad.

Personal business records contain addresses of contacts. Scattered records referencing market values for Refregier's work can be found throughout the series in records such as bills and receipts, financial notes and tax records.

Printed material provides extensive coverage of Refregier's entire career through announcements, invitations, catalogs, and news clippings. His interests in art, literature, music, theater and politics are also well-represented in these files.

The collection contains 10 scrapbooks, mostly in fragmented condition, which contain a mixture of photographs, sketches and other artwork, notes and fragments of writings, and printed material. The scrapbooks document a variety of subjects including Refregier's family life, travels to Guatemala and the Soviet Union, and the artist at work.

Artwork consists primarily of artwork by Refregier in the form of mural design sketches and cartoons in various media, including pencil, ink and pastel, in addition to 21 sketchbooks, many of which also contain journal entries and notes. Also found here are prints and reproductions of Refregier's "Peace card" block engravings for every year from 1950-1973, with the exception of 1970.

Photographs document all phases of Refregier's career and include family photographs dating from circa 1900, photos of Refregier in the studio including work for the WPA, Refregier and other artists and individuals at events and parties from the 1940s-1970s, travel snapshots probably taken in Chile, Guatemala, Mexico, and the Soviet Union, and photographs of artwork and installations. Individuals pictured include Julio de Diego, Marion Greenwood, Rockwell Kent, Pablo O'Higgins and David Siqueiros; also, a series of press photographs by Albert A. Freeman pictures Refregier with Howard Fast, Norman Bel Geddes, Marion Greenwood, John Kingsbury, Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Harry Stockwell. One photograph by Eliot Elisofon, 2 by Eugene Morley and 4 by Max Yavno can also be found here.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1925-1980 (Box 1; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1912-circa 1990s (Boxes 1-11, 36, OVs 38, 45; 10.2 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1930s-circa 1970s (Boxes 11-14, OV 45; 3.3 linear ft.)

Series 4: Diaries and Journals, 1923-1979 (Box 15; 0.6 linear ft.)

Series 5: Mural and Tapestry Files, circa 1930s-circa 1970s (Boxes 15-18, 36, OVs 38, 45, 46, RD 42; 3.65 linear ft.)

Series 6: Exhibition Files, 1942-1981 (Boxes 18-19; 0.6 linear ft.)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1920s-1980s (Boxes 19-20; 1.8 linear ft.)

Series 8: Printed Material, circa 1920s-1980s (Boxes 21-28, 36; 7.4 linear ft.)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1930s-1960s (Boxes 28, 37, BV 47; 1.1 linear ft.)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1930s-circa 1970s (Boxes 28-30, 36, OVs 40, 41, RDs 42-44; 3.5 linear ft.)

Series 11: Photographic Material, ca. 1900-1980s (Boxes 31-35, 39; 4.5 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Russian-born Woodstock painter Anton Refregier (1905-1979) immigrated to the United States in 1920. Refregier was well-known for his sometimes controversial social realist murals for the WPA.

After an apprenticeship to the sculptor, Vasilief, in Paris, Anton Refregier attended the Rhode Island School of Design from 1920-1925 and studied with Hans Hofmann in Germany in 1927. He had his first one-man show at ACA Galleries in New York City in 1942 and settled in Woodstock, New York, with his wife, Lila, and three children Anton, Jr., Brigit and Aleksandre, where he became a prominent member of the artist community.

Refregier completed several social realist murals for the federal Works Progress Adminstration (WPA) program, including one at the New York Worlds Fair in 1939 and the controversial Rincon Annex Post Office mural in San Francisco begun in 1941. He also completed interior design installations for businesses such as the nightclub, Cafe Society Uptown, and the restaurant, The Cookery, in New York City. In addition to being an easel and mural painter Refregier worked in tapestry, mosaic, ceramic, and collage, and completed many commissions for hotels, banks, hospitals, restaurants, synagogues, supermarkets and deparment stores throughout the country.

Refregier taught at various institutions including Stanford University, the University of Arkansas, and Bard College and his publications inlcude Natural Figure Drawing (1948), An Artist's Journey (1965), and Sketches of the Soviet Union (1978). He traveled regularly to the Soviet Union to explore and exchange ideas about art and culture and as a representative of the World Peace Council.

Anton Refregier died in Moscow in October 1979 while visiting the Soviet Union. His work can be found in many museums including the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum, the San Francisco Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview with Anton Refregier, 1964, Nov. 5 by Joseph Trovato; and Papers regarding Anton Refregier mural controversy, 1953.
Provenance:
Donated 1983 by Lila Refregier, widow of Anton Refregier, and in 1992 by Brigit R. Sutton, Refregier's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Authorization to quote or reproduce for purposes of publication requires written permission from Bridget R. Sutton via Bridget's son, Tim Sutton. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Tapestry  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Political clubs  Search this
Muralists -- New York -- Woodstock  Search this
Art -- Commissioning  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- Archival resources -- 20th century  Search this
Designers -- New York (State)  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Travel diaries
Greeting cards
Interviews
Cartoons (working drawings)
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Photographs
Diaries
Sketches
Citation:
Anton Refregier papers, circa 1900-circa 1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.refranto
See more items in:
Anton Refregier papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9545f99ed-0a65-4626-904d-8dda5c569fcf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-refranto

Lucy R. Lippard papers

Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Names:
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Alliance for Cultural Democracy  Search this
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Heresies Collective, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Printed Matter, Inc.  Search this
Studio International (Firm)  Search this
University of Colorado -- Faculty  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Henes, Donna  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
70.5 Linear feet
0.454 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1930s-2010
bulk 1960-1990
Summary:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

A small amount of biographical material comprises resumes and an address book.

Correspondence files document all aspects of Lippard's professional life including her relationships with artists such as Carl Andre, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ray Johnson, Sol LeWitt, and Henry Pearson; feminist artists including Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Donna Henes, and May Stevens; political and art-related activist groups such as Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Art Workers Coalition, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Printed Matter, and Women's Caucus for Art; galleries and museums including Addison Gallery of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and publishers including Art International and Art Forum. The series also traces the development of Lippard's involvement in activist causes including censorship and the rights of artists, Central America and the impact of U.S. policy on the region, and equality and reproductive rights for women, as well as her interest in conceptual and minimalist art. The series includes scattered artwork and photographs of artists.

Writings are primarily by Lippard and include correspondence, manuscript drafts, extensive notes, and publication records for some of her best-known books such as The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood (1966), Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973), Eva Hesse (1976), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), as well as essays for publications such as Art Forum and Studio International and contributions to exhibition catalogs. Also found are edited transcripts from conferences, symposia and interviews conducted by and of Lippard, some audio recordings of interviews and symposia, including an interview with Donald Judd, and notes and typescripts for lectures and speeches.

A small number of files document Lippard's teaching work during the 1970s and 1980s, primarily at the University of Colorado, Boulder where she taught several courses and seminars.

Exhibition files document Lippard's involvement with exhibitions she helped to organize or curate such as A Different War: Vietnam in Art (1989-1991) 557,087 and 955,000 (1969, 1970), 2,972, 453 (1971) c.7,500 (1973-1974) and those for which she wrote catalog contributions.

Printed material includes a collection of articles written by Lippard and a small amount of material concerning events, such as speaking engagements, in which Lippard was involved. Other printed material reflects Lippard's wide range of artistic, political and activist interests and documents exhibitions and performances and the activities of art-related and political groups. Material includes many exhibition catalogs, announcements, invitations, printed posters, news clippings, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets and other publications.

Artwork includes sixteen items by unidentified artists, including two by children. Photographs consist primarily of photographs of works of art in addition to a small number of photos of exhibition installations.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960s-circa 1980s (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950s-2006 (Boxes 1-28, 51, OVs 54-63; 28.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1930s-1990s (Boxes 28-41, 51-52, OVs 64-66; 13.24 linear feet, ER01; 0.454 GB)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1966-1993 (Boxes 41, 52; 0.76 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibitions, 1960s-1990s (Boxes 42-45, 52, OVs 67-68; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940s-2007 (Boxes 45-49, 52, OVs 69-77; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork and Ephemera, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53; 4 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1950s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53, OV 71; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1965-2010, (Boxes 78-94; 17.0 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
New York and New Mexico writer and art critic, Lucy R. Lippard, is the curator of numerous exhibitions and the author of over twenty-four books and other writings that trace the emergence of minimalist and conceptual art and document Lippard's commitment to feminism and political activism.

Born in New York City in 1937, Lippard earned a B.A. from Smith College in 1958 and an M.A. in 1962 from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. In the 1960s she began writing art criticism for the journals Art International and Artforum. In 1966 she curated the landmark exhibition Eccentric Abstraction at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City. Lippard then curated the first of four defining conceptual art exhibitions that became known as her "numbers" shows, each titled after the populations of the cities in which they took place, with catalogs in the form of a set of 10 x 15 cm index cards. Opening at the Seattle Art Museum in 1969, 557,087 was followed by 955,000 in Vancouver, Canada, a few months later. 2,972,453 was held at the Centro de Arte y Comunicacíon in Buenos Aires in 1971 and c.7500 opened in Valencia, California, in 1973-1974 before traveling to several other venues in the United States and Europe.

Lippard's first book, The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood was published in 1966, followed by Pop Art the same year, and a collection of her early essays, Changing, in 1971. Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973) and From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976) documented the emergence of conceptual art and the early years of feminist art respectively. In 1976 Lippard published her seminal book on the life and work of Eva Hesse.

Between 1977 and 1978 Lippard lived on a farm in Devon, England, and worked on a novel, The First Stone, about the role of politics in the lives of three generations of women. During her walks across the English countryside she became interested in landscape art and conceived of her book Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory which was subsequently published in 1983. Other books include Get the Message?: A Decade Of Art For Social Change (1984), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990). Lippard has also written regular columns on art and politics for the Village Voice, In These Times and Z Magazine, and has been a contributing editor of Art in America.

Lippard was radicalized during a trip to Argentina in 1968 when she was invited to be a juror at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. On her return to the United States she became heavily involved in anti-war activities and the Art Workers Coalition. She is a co-founder of several feminist and artist organizations including the feminist collective Heresies, which produced Heresies: A Feminist Journal on Art and Politics from 1977-1992, Ad Hoc Women Artists, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Women's Action Coalition, and Women's Art Registry. In 1976 she was a founder of Printed Matter, a New York nonprofit dedicated to producing artists' publications. She also worked closely with Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space devoted to the promotion of artists' books, installation art, and video and performance art, and served on the organization's International Committee.

Lippard has been a visiting professor at the School of Visual Arts, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the University of Queensland, Australia, and was Eminent Artist in Residence at the University of Wyoming Department of Art in 2015. She has received honorary doctorates in fine arts from Maine College of Art, the Massachusetts College of Art, Moore College of Art, San Francisco Art Institute, and others, and awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Smith College Medal, the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts, and the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Excellence.

Lippard has lived in New Mexico since 1992 and works as a freelance writer and speaker.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lucy Lippard conducted in 2011 March 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
Provenance:
Lucy R. Lippard donated her papers in several increments between 1972-1995, 2006, 2015 and 2021.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- Political activity  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9101c6a69-dde9-42ed-94cc-d03650c249ed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipplucy
Online Media:

Peter Howard Selz papers

Creator:
Selz, Peter Howard, 1919-2019  Search this
Names:
College Art Association of America  Search this
Institute of Design (Chicago, Ill.) (Faculty)  Search this
Marlborough Gallery  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pomona College (Claremont, Calif.)  Search this
San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (Calif.)  Search this
University of California, Berkeley. University Art Museum  Search this
Baykam, Bedri, 1957-  Search this
Beckmann, Max, 1884-1950  Search this
Benton, Fletcher, 1931-  Search this
Bergman, Ciel, 1938-  Search this
Bury, Pol, 1922-2005  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Chase-Riboud, Barbara  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Conner, Bruce, 1933-2008  Search this
Dubuffet, Jean, 1901-  Search this
Feininger, Lyonel, 1871-1956  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Graves, Morris, 1910-  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hadzi, Dimitri, 1921-2006  Search this
Lebrun, Rico, 1900-1964  Search this
Lindner, Richard, 1901-1978  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia, 1887-1986  Search this
Onslow-Ford, Gordon  Search this
Paris, Harold, 1925-1979  Search this
Petlin, Irving, 1934-  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Tinguely, Jean, 1925-  Search this
Extent:
31.5 Linear feet
0.696 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Place:
San Francisco Bay Area (Calif.)
Date:
1929-2014
bulk 1950-2005
Summary:
The papers of art historian and writer Peter Howard Selz measure 31.5 linear feet and 0.696 GB and date from 1929 to 2018, with the bulk of the materials from 1950 to 2005. The papers document Selz's long career via correspondence, writings, professional files, project files, membership and association records, artists' research files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed and digital materials, and nine scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian and writer Peter Howard Selz measure 31.5 linear feet and 0.696 GB and date from 1929 to 2018, with the bulk of the materials from 1950 to 2005. The papers document Selz's long career via correspondence, writings, professional files, project files, membership and association records, artists' research files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed and digital materials, and scrapbooks.

Correspondence is with colleagues, artists, museums, and galleries concerning a wide variety of topics, including exhibitions and publications. The bulk of the correspondence consists of alphabetical files (two linear feet) that includes correspondence with artists. Notable correspondents include Pol Bury, Alexander Calder, Gordon Onslow Ford, Alberto Giacometti, Morris Graves, Philip Guston, Dimitri Hadzi, Jacques Lipchitz, Georgia O'Keeffe, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Jean Tinguely, and others. Eight additional files of chronological correspondence is with curators, arts organizations, and publishers. Additional correspondence is found in the professional files, project files, membership files, artists' research files, and exhibition files.

The bulk of the writings series is comprised of files related to Selz's books and includes typescript drafts and galleys, printed and digital material, correspondence, and publishing contracts. Files are found for Art in Our Times, Art of Engagement, Beyond the Mainstream, and Theories of Modern Art. Other writings consist of drafts of articles, essays, notes, and lectures by Selz. Also included are writings by others, including materials related to Paul Karlstrom's biography of Selz.

Professional files document curatorial and teaching positions at the Chicago Institute of Design, Pomona College, University of California, Berkeley, and the Museum of Modern Art. The series includes contracts, recommendations, syllabi, and correspondence.

Project files document Selz's professional work on specific art projects, panels, and symposiums. There is extensive documentation of Selz's work as project director of Christo's Running Fence, as well as other environmental art work projects by Christo, the Berkeley Art Project, Disney Art Project, "Funk Art" symposium, and the "Art and Politics in the 20th Century" symposium. Project files contain a wide variety of materials, such as correspondence, printed material, financial records, reports, photographs, and other documents. There are 2 tape reels, 1 VHS, and 1 sound cassette.

Membership and association records document Selz's involvement with or membership in various art councils, trustee boards, such as the College Art Association, Art in Chicago Advisory Committee, Bay Area Rapid Transit (B.A.R.T.) Art Council, and the San Francisco Crafts and Folk Art Museum Advisory Board, among others. Materials include meeting minutes, bulletins, correspondence, and memoranda.

Artists' Research Files consist of a wide variety of research materials Selz compiled about artists for lectures, writings, projects, exhibitions, etc. Files vary and may include original and photocopied correspondence, photographic material, resumes, printed and digital material, and writings. There is also 1 sound cassette. Files are found for Bedri Baykam, Max Beckmann, Fletcher Benton, Ciel Bergman, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Bruce Conner, Jean Dubuffet, Lyonel Feininger, Leon Golub, Dimitri Hadzi, Rico Lebrun, Harold Paris, Irving Petlin, among many others.

Exhibition files include catalogs, reviews, clippings, writings, correspondence, and other material documenting exhibitions organized by Selz. Limited materials are found for the MOMA Art Nouveau exhibition. More extensive documentation is found for Seven Decades of Modern Art, 1895-1965, The Joint Show (1967), The American Presidency in Political Cartoons (1976), American Modern Art Between the Two World Wars (1979), German Realism in the Twenties: Artist As Social Critic (1980), Twelve Artists from the German Democratic Republic (1989), a Richard Lindner Retrospective (1996), Spaces of Nature (1999), Color and Fire: Defining Moments in Studio Ceramics, 1950-2000 (2000), and a Nathan Oliviera Retrospective (2002), among others. Some of the materials are in digital format.

Personal business records are related to the Mark Rothko estate and Kate Rothko's legal case against Marlborough Gallery, Inc. Also included in this series are Peter Selz's school transcripts, bequests, royalty statements, house designs, and other material.

Printed materials include clippings, prints of articles written by Peter Selz, exhibition announcements and invitations, and photocopies of artwork images.

There are nine disbound scrapbooks dating from the 1940s up through 2012 containing clippings, exhibition announcements, and photographs of art events, Selz, and artists. This series also includes materials from the 2018 addition that may have previously been compiled in binders.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 10 series. When possible the original order of Peter Selz was maintained. However, multiple accessions were merged and integrated.

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1942-2013 (2.3 linear feet; Box 1-3, Box 37)

Series 2: Writings, 1942- circa 2014 (8.3 linear feet; Box 3-10, OV 32, Box 37, 0.035 GB; ER01, ER12)

Series 3: Professional Files, 1949-2012 (1 linear feet; Box 11, Box 37)

Series 4: Project Files, 1962-2015 (2.8 linear feet; Box 12-14, OV 33, Box 37)

Series 5: Membership and Association Records, 1958-2014 (1.1 linear feet; Box 14-15, Box 37)

Series 6: Artists' Research Files, 1955-2014 (7.9 linear feet; Box 15-22, OV 34-35, 0.520 GB; ER02-ER08)

Series 7: Exhibition Files, 1959-2014 (5.2 linear feet; Box 23-27, Box 38, 0.093 GB; ER09-ER11)

Series 8: Personal Business Records, 1929-2014 (1.2 linear feet; Box 28-29, OV 36, Box 38)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1957-2014 (0.3 linear feet; Box 29, Box 38)

Series 10: Scrapbooks, 1947-2018 (1.4 linear feet, Box 29-31, Box 38)
Biographical / Historical:
Peter Howard Selz (1919-2019) was a pioneering historian of modern art, professor, and writer who taught at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1965-1988 and founded and directed the Berkeley Art Museum from 1965-1973.

Selz was born in 1919 in Munich, Germany to Eugene Selz and Edith Drey Selz. In 1936, the family fled Nazi Germany and immigrated to the United States. Selz attended Columbia University from 1937 to 1938 and became a naturalized citizen in 1942. During World War II, Selz served in the U.S. Army in the Office of Strategic Services. He married writer Thalia Cheronis in 1948 but they later divorced in 1965; he married several times afterwards.

After the war, Selz attended and taught at the University of Chicago where he received a Ph. D. in German Expressionism. He spent a year in Paris, 1949-1950, at the Sorbonne and École du Louvre on a Fulbright grant. He received a second Fulbright grant in 1953 to study at the Royal Museums of Art and History in Belgium. From 1953-1955, Selz also taught at the Chicago Institute of Design.

In 1955 Peter Selz accepted a position to chair the art history department at Pomona College in Claremont and relocated to California for a few years. He also became director of the college's art gallery.

In 1958 Selz moved to New York City to become curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art and was there through the transformative mid-1960s. While at MOMA, he organized several significant exhibitions of modern art, including the 1960 Jean Tinguely "Homage to New York," a sculpture that destroyed itself (and started a fire) in the sculpture garden of the museum; New Images of Man (1959), the Art Nouveau show (1960), and the Art of Assemblage (1961). He also launched important retrospectives, including the first Rodin retrospective in the United States and a comprehensive exhibition of Alberto Giacometti's work in 1965.

In 1965, Peter Selz returned to California to become the founding director of the Berkeley Art Museum at the University of California, Berkeley, a position he held until 1973. He organized exhibitions of Funk, film, and ceramicists like Peter Voulkos and Robert Arneson. Peter Selz later became project director for Christo's "Running Fence", the 24.5-mile long fabric fence over the Marin County hills in 1976. He also served concurrently as a professor of art history at UC until retiring in 1988.

Peter Selz was a member of the College Art Association's board of directors for two terms, 1958-1964 and 1966-1971. Selz is a prolific writer, and the author or co-author of numerous books, exhibition catalogs, and articles. Notable books include German Expressionist Painting (1957), Art in a Turbulent Era (1965), Art in Our Times (1981), and Sam Francis (1975).

In 1988 Peter Selz was named emeritus professor at University of California, Berkeley. In 1993 he was on the acquisitions committee of the Museums of Fine Arts, San Francisco. In 2012, Selz curated The Painted Word exhibition. Selz died in 2019 in Albany, California.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds oral history interviews of Peter Selz conducted by Paul J. Karlstrom on July 28, 1982, October 12, 1982, and November 3, 1999.
Provenance:
The Peter Howard Selz papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Peter Selz in multiple installments from 1976 through 2014. Additional papers were donated in 2018 by Gabrielle Selz, Peter Selz's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Art historians -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Topic:
Realism  Search this
Political cartoons  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Environment (Art)  Search this
Painting, Abstract  Search this
Ceramics  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- California  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art -- Germany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Peter Howard Selz papers, 1929-2018, bulk 1950-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.selzpete
See more items in:
Peter Howard Selz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ce9d9d14-7599-455d-828d-57077e76ef17
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-selzpete
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dore Ashton

Interviewee:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Sampson, George E., 1951-  Search this
Creator:
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Names:
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art -- Faculty  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Harvard University -- Students  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
New York Times Company  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Devree, Howard, 1891-1966  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Klüver, Billy, 1927-2004  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Orlovsky, Peter, 1933-2010  Search this
Paz, Octavio, 1914-  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne, 1903-  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Selz, Peter Howard, 1919-2019  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
67 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 November 21 - 2011 March 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dore Ashton conducted 2010 November 21 and 2011 March 9, by George W. Sampson, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, at Ashton's home, in New York, New York.
Ashton talks about growing up politically active; protesting the internment of the Japanese Americans during WWII; attending The New School and then Harvard University; briefly working as a gallery receptionist; writing her first reviews for Art Digest; Howard Devree hiring her as a writer for The New York Times; travels and living in Europe; writing feature pieces about individual artists for The New York Times; writing for Cahiers d'art; her relationships Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Philip Guston, Robert Motherwell, Billy Kluver, Robert Rauschenberg, Octavio Paz, and others; marriage to Adja Yunkers; teaching at Cooper Union; interest in Latin American Art; flirting; being a "dedicated reader of Nietzsche"; visits to the Cedar Tavern; being a peacenik; and other topics. She recalls Jeanne Reynal, Mario Pedrosa, Alger Hiss, Peter Selz, Peter Orlovsky, David Smith, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Dore Ashton (1928-2017) was an art historian in New York, New York. George W. Sampson (1951-) is an arts administrator in Charlottesville, Virginia.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 memory cards. Duration is 2 hr., 57 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ashton10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b7c38826-8734-452b-afbe-3303efd2db24
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ashton10
Online Media:

Ivan C. Karp Personal Papers

Collection Creator:
Karp, Ivan C., 1926-2012  Search this
O.K. Harris Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet (Boxes 76-79)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1961-2012
Scope and Contents:
The Ivan C. Karp papers consist mainly of journals that record travel and daily life. There are a large number of obituaries from print and internet sources along with other biographical information, published versions of brief interviews with Karp conducted for various purposes, writings, a few materials relating to business and academic activities, and some photographs.

The majority of this series consists of photocopies of Ivan C. Karp's journals from the period 1950-2012 (bulk 1991-2012). The earliest are travel journals written during trips to Italy, Spain, France, and more unusual destinations such as Bulgaria, Tunisia, Egypt, Poland, and Guatemala. The observant and thoughtul young Ivan Karp included salient details of travel and everyday life. Some entries are accompanied by drawings, and his interest in wordplay is evident. Later daily journals, written when Karp was an established art dealer, are more organized and less personal. Photographs, clippings, maps, and wine labels are occasionally included to illustrate statements or add interest. He wrote about scheduled activities, food and wine, sports, music, politics, and often commented on the weather. While daily journals record travel experiences at home and abroad, little mention is made of family or friends.

Writings by Karp include articles, introductions and essays for exhibition catalogs, and a chapter in a book about the business of art. Among the writings by others is I Married an Art Dealer by Marilynn Karp. Also found are an academic paper, "Reflections on American Super Realism and Photo Realism" by Michael Jucker, and a dissertation by Suzanne Pines, "Five Photo-Realists: Process and Perceptions" (Columbia University, 1979). Among the small number of photographs are several digitial copies of earlier images of Karp including him in uniform during World War II and several at his gallery.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Ivan C. Karp papers and OK Harris Works of Art gallery records, 1960-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.okharr, Series 8
See more items in:
Ivan C. Karp papers and OK Harris Works of Art gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9165e8892-b4ab-4df7-bd84-e4f1bc84e577
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-okharr-ref1716

Leo Castelli Gallery records

Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Names:
Amsterdam (Netherlands). Stedelijk Museum  Search this
Castelli Graphics (Firm)  Search this
Castelli-Sonnabend Tapes and Films, Inc.  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ileana Sonnabend (Gallery)  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Multiples, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Sidney Janis Gallery  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Artschwager, Richard, 1923-  Search this
Barry, Robert, 1936-  Search this
Bloom, Barbara, 1951-  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Chryssa, 1933-  Search this
Daphnis, Nassos, 1914-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Epstein, Ethel Steuer  Search this
Flavin, Dan, 1933-  Search this
Gorgoni, Gianfranco  Search this
Heller, Ben, 1925-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
Kiesler, Frederick  Search this
Klapheck, Konrad, 1935-  Search this
Koons, Jeff  Search this
Landsman, Stanley, 1930-  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Nauman, Bruce, 1941-  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Panza, Giuseppe  Search this
Parker, Raymond, 1922-  Search this
Power, Alan  Search this
Powers, John, 1916-  Search this
Powers, Kimiko  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Rosenquist, James, 1933-  Search this
Rowan, Carolyn  Search this
Rowan, Robert  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Scarpitta, Salvatore, 1919-2007  Search this
Scull, Ethel  Search this
Scull, Robert C.  Search this
Serra, Richard, 1938-  Search this
Starn, Doug  Search this
Starn, Mike  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Tremaine, Burton  Search this
Tremaine, Emily Hall, 1908-1987  Search this
Twombly, Cy, 1928-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Weiner, Lawrence  Search this
Extent:
215.9 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Date:
circa 1880-2000
bulk 1957-1999
Summary:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.
Scope and Content Note:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and audio and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.

The records document the gallery's daily business operations, exhibitions, spaces/buildings, collaborations and joint ventures with other galleries and museums, and its relationship with many artists, dealers, and clients. Artists particularly well-represented throughout the collection include Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Records pre-dating the gallery's establishment in 1957 are primarily newspaper and magazine clippings related to artists, personal photographs and photographs of works of art, and scattered personal business records of Leo Castelli.

General Correspondence is extensive at circa 25 linear feet and consists primarily of the gallery's and Leo Castelli's named and subject correspondence files concerning the gallery's daily operations, exhibitions, artwork installation and fabrication, appraisals, inquiries, loans, sales, consignments, personal and business relationships with artists, and other topics. The general correspondence is arranged either by name of correspondent or topic, and is with museums and galleries, collectors, business associates, artists, employees, and friends. Notes, scattered photographs and slides, and printed materials are often found as enclosures. Leo Castelli's personal correspondence is also found here and consists primarily of solicitations, requests for advice, notes of thanks, congratulations, and invitations.

Letters written by artists in the gallery's stable are somewhat limited. There are scattered letters from artists Christo, Chryssa, Nassos Daphnis, Hanne Darboven, Marisol, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Frederick Kiesler, Robert Morris, Hans Namuth, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Ray Parker, James Rosenquist, Edward Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Frank Stella, Cy Twombly, and Jack Tworkov. There are also letters about artists in this series filed under the artists' name.

Collectors and dealers represented within the correspondence include the De Menil family, Mrs. Henry Epstein, Ben Heller, Giuseppe Panza, Alan Power, John and Kimiko Powers, Robert and Carolyn Rowan, Robert and Ethel Scull, and Burton and Emily Tremaine. Museums and galleries for which there is considerable correspondence includes the Dwan Gallery, Ferus Gallery, the Jewish Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Sidney Janis Gallery, Stedelijk Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Ileana Sonnabend Galerie.

The materials arranged in General Correspondence were originally marked by the gallery as "correspondence" files upon accessioning, and, are thus arranged into their own series. However, in some cases, there appears to be little difference between the General Correspondence and the Administrative Files. Thus, researchers are encouraged to reference both series.

Administrative Files document a wide variety of the gallery's activities and business. Essentially, these are files that were arranged by the gallery according to subject or topic and cover almost all activities except specific exhibitions. These files include records and correspondence about buildings and space, advertising, appraisals, auctions, consignments, loans, miscellaneous business correspondence, index cards, business arrangements with artists, information about artists, interviews with artists (transcripts), history of the gallery, mailings, photograph requests, shipping, and other topics. Few items are in digital format. There are staff notebooks and files and Leo Castelli's notebooks and notes from the late 1950s through the early 1990s. Extensive outgoing chronological correspondence filed in this series dates from 1964-1977. Also found are transcripts of interviews with Leo Castelli, biographical material, some of it in digital format, and scattered photographs.

Researchers should note that the Administrative Files often overlap and complement the General Correspondence. However, they focus slightly more distinctly on gallery business activities and are arranged mostly by subject or topic, except for the chronological business correspondence. Researchers are encouraged to reference both series. For example, correspondence with and about Jasper Johns may be found in both series, but the administrative files most likely focus on a specific loan, consignment, or business activity or transaction.

Exhibition files provide a thorough history of the gallery's exhibitions, as well as the fabrication and installation of artwork for exhibitions. These files include correspondence, exhibition catalogs, guest books, lists of exhibitions by artist and by year, press releases, sketches and notes, and scattered financial records. Photographs document over 650 exhibitions at Leo Castelli Gallery, including The Ninth Street Show organized by Castelli in 1951, and over 200 exhibitions at other galleries.

Extensive artists' files comprise approximately 40% of the records and are a rich resource of printed and compiled information about the careers of over 120 artists and their relationship with Leo Castelli and the gallery. There are exhibition announcements and catalogs, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, posters, press releases, photographs, and a handful of books. Nearly half of the series is comprised of black and white photographs of artwork, presumably handled by the Leo Castelli Gallery.

Additional printed materials include exhibition announcements, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, press releases, and exhibition posters. Exhibition catalogs are filed with the exhibitions files. The general archives files provide a chronological history of the gallery and its exhibitions. There are also files concerning Leo Castelli and numerous art-related topics. Exhibition posters are found here as well.

Artwork is limited and includes a few works of art and signed posters. Artists represented here include photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra and Andy Warhol, as well as others.

The records of the subsidiary Castelli Graphics New York consist of correspondence and administrative files relating to general operations and the sale and loan of prints. Also found are exhibition files, sales records, and scattered financial records. The series provides a wealth of information about Castelli Graphics collaborations with Multiples Inc. in the 1970s.

Also found in the collection are records of Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films, a joint business venture between Leo Castelli Gallery and Sonnabend Gallery from 1974-1985. Records include correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, printed materials, sales and rental records, photographs, and financial records.

The importance and stature of Leo Castelli and the Leo Castelli Gallery to the arts community in New York City and beyond is documented by numerous awards and recognitions, such as framed and unframed certificates, plaques, statues, medals, and scattered photographs.

Nearly seven linear feet of photographs include professional black and white original prints, scattered color photographs, color transparencies, slides and negatives, and disassembled photo albums. The photographs primarily depict social and art events and functions; family and friends of Leo Castelli; and portraits of Leo Castelli and artists and of Leo Castelli with artists, including Richard Artschwager, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, and Andy Warhol. Photographs of exhibitions and exhibition installations are filed with the exhibition files.

Sound and video recordings include sound and video art, performances, interviews with artists and Leo Castelli, recordings from and of exhibitions, and television publicity recorded on sound cassettes, phonograph records (vinyl and lacquer), videocassettes (U-matic, VHS, Betamax), and videocartridges. Artists represented include Vito Acconci, Robert Barry, Barbara Bloom, Hannah Collins, Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Laura Grisi, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Doug and Mike Starn, and Lawrence Weiner, among others.

See Index for list of Exhibitions at the Leo Castelli Gallery and Castelli Graphics
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1948-1999, bulk 1957-1997 (24.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-23, 191, OVs 233-236)

Series 2: Administrative Files, 1941-1999, bulk 1970s-1990s (17.3 linear feet; Boxes 24-39, 192-193, OVs 237-238, 0.001 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1951-1999, bulk 1957-1998 (18.7 linear feet; Boxes 40-56, 192, 194-196, 308-309, OVs 239-241, 280)

Series 4: Artists Files, 1913-1999, bulk 1960s-1990s (80.8 linear feet; Boxes 57-133, 197-208, OVs 242-243)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1949-1998 (23.5 linear feet; Boxes 134-153, 209-211, OVs 244-274, 276, 300, RDs 301-306)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1960s-1990s (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 153, 212-213, OVs 275, 277-278, RD 307)

Series 7: Castelli Graphics, circa 1950-1999, bulk mid 1970s-early 1990s (16 linear feet; Boxes 154-169)

Series 8: Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films, 1969-1998 (5.6 linear feet; Boxes 170-174, 214, OVs 279-281)

Series 9: Awards and Recognition, 1962-1998 (6.9 linear feet; Boxes 175-176, 215-228, OVs 282)

Series 10: Photographs, circa 1880-1997, bulk 1960s-1990s (6.6 linear feet; Boxes 177-180, 229-231, OVs 283-299)

Series 11: Sound and Video Recordings, 1959-2000 (9.7 linear feet; Boxes 181-190, 232)
Historical Note:
Leo Castelli (1907-1999) was one of America's most noted contemporary art dealers and opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City in 1957. The gallery showcased cutting edge American contemporary art, including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Op Art, Color Field painting, Hard-edge painting, Lyrical Abstraction, Minimal Art, Conceptual Art, and Neo-expressionism, among other movements.

Leo Castelli was born as Leo Krauss on September 4, 1907 in Trieste, of Italian and Austro-Hungarian Jewish origin. He married art dealer Ileana Sonnabend in 1932 and the couple lived in Paris up until World War II. They had a daughter, Nina Castelli Sundell. In Paris, Castelli opened his first gallery in 1939. At that time, he was interested in the European Surrealists.

For years after Castelli moved to New York, he worked in his father-in-law's garment business. However, he organized his first American exhibition in 1951, the famous Ninth Street Show of 1951, a seminal event of Abstract Expressionism.

In 1957, he opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in his townhome on E. 77th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues in New York City. Castelli initially featured European Surrealism, but also curated exhibitions of American Abstract painters, including Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Cy Twombly, Friedel Dzubas, and Norman Bluhm.

In 1958, Castelli discovered Pop artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns and forged a life-long nurturing relationship with both artists. The gallery then began focusing more on Pop Art, Minimalism and Conceptual Art. Beginning in the early 1960s, Castelli's stable included Richard Artschwager, Lee Bontecou, Chryssa, John Chamberlain, Ronald Davis, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Larry Poons, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Leo and Ileana divorced in 1959, and Ileana returned to Europe. She later moved back to New York and opened a gallery close to Castelli's. The two remained close and together they established the joint venture of Castelli-Sonnabend Films and Tapes to accommodate artists interested in new media.

In the 1970s Leo Castelli opened a downtown SoHo branch of the Leo Castelli Gallery at 420 West Broadway. In the 1980s he opened a second larger downtown exhibition space on Greene Street also in SoHo.

Leo Castelli's second wife was Antoinette Castelli, with whom he also opened Castelli Graphics, an art gallery devoted to prints and photographs, mostly those by Castelli artists. The couple also had a son together, Jean-Christophe Castelli. In 1995 Leo Castelli married Italian art historian Barbara Bertozzi Castelli. She directs the Leo Castelli Gallery today, showing many of the same artists of the gallery's past.

Leo Castelli's unparalleled eye for quality, combined with his extraordinary skill for nurturing and promoting new art and artists, secured his position as one of the most respected and influential advocates of contemporary art for nearly five decades.
List of Exhibitions:
Below is a chronological listing of over 850 exhibitions and events held at the Leo Castelli Gallery from 1957 to 1999; included are exhibitions at 4 E 77 St (1957-1989), 65 Thompson (1989-1994), 108th St Warehouse (1968-1970), 142 Greene St (1980-1988), 420 W Broadway (1971-1999), and 578 Broadway (1988-1997). Castelli Graphics exhibitions from 1969-1996 and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films exhibitions from 1974-1984 are also included and are noted when known.

Note that this list is not comprehensive. In particular, Castelli Graphics exhibitions from the 1980s and early 1990s are incomplete. Sources used to compile this index include exhibition schedules and lists, installation photographs, announcements, clippings, and other printed materials from the Leo Castelli Gallery records, and the Leo Castelli Gallery website (www.castelligallery.com).

Exhibitions are listed in chronological order by title, if known, and gallery address.

1957 SeasonFeb. -- First Exhibition: de Kooning, Delaunay, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Leger, Mondrian, Picabia, Pollock, David Smith, van Doesburg; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-23, 1957 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 13, 1957 -- Viseux; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15 - May 4, 1957 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

May 6-25, 1957 -- New Work: Bluhm, Budd, Dzubas, Johns, Leslie, Louis, Marisol, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Savelli; 4 E 77 St

1957-1958 SeasonOct. 1-26, 1957 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 16, 1957 -- Horia Damian; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 14, 1957 -- Marisol; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 17, 1957 - Jan. 18, 1958 -- Collector's Annual; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 20 - Feb. 8, 1958 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 1, 1958 -- Friedel Dzubas; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-29, 1958 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1-26, 1958 -- Giuseppe Capogrossi; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 29 - May 31, 1958 -- Pioneers 1910-1950: de Kooning, Delaunay, Domela, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Kandinsky, Leger, Miro, Picabia, Pollock, Schwitters, Smith, van Doejburg; 4 E 77 St

1958-1959 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 25, 1958 -- Angelo Savelli; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 22, 1958 -- Group Exhibition: Bluhm, Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Marisol, Rauschenberg, Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 20, 1958 -- Esteban Vicente, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-24, 1959 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 14, 1959 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Extramurals; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 17 - Mar. 7, 1959 -- Al Newbill; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-28, 1959 -- Gabriel Kohn; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 18, 1959 -- Norman Bluhm, Jean Dubuffet, and Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 21 - May 9, 1959 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

May 12-30, 1959 -- Group Exhibition: Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Sander, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

1959-1960 SeasonOct. 6-17, 1959 -- Opening Exhibition of the New Gallery: Bluhm, Brach, Daphnis, Johns, Kohn, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 20 - Nov. 7, 1959 -- Work in Three Dimensions: Chamberlain, Follet, Giles, Johns, Klein, Kohn, Marisol, Nevelson, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10-28, 1959 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 1-26, 1959 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 5-23, 1960 -- William Giles; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 26 - Feb. 13, 1960 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 5, 1960 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 8-26, 1960 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 16, 1960 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 7, 1960 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 10-28, 1960 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

May 31 - June 25, 1960 -- Summary 1959-1960: Bluhm, Bontecou, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Kohn, Langlais, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1960-1961 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 15, 1960 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 5, 1960 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 9 - Dec. 3, 1960 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6, 1960 - Jan. 7, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg, 34 Illustrations for Dante's Inferno; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-28, 1961 -- Frederick Kiesler; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 25, 1961 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings and Sculpture; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 28 - Mar. 18, 1961 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 21 - Apr. 8, 1961 -- Bernard Langlais; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-29, 1961 -- Yves Klein, Le Monochrome; 4 E 77 St

May 2-20, 1961 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

May 23 - June [10], 1961 -- Sculpture and Relief: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Higgins, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

1961-1962 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 14, 1961 -- An Exhibition in Progress: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Langlais, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 17 - Nov. 4, 1961 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 7 - Dec. 5, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1961 - Jan. 10, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Langlais, [Lichtenstein], Scarpitta, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 6, 1962 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1962 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10 - Apr. 5, 1962 -- Robert Moskowitz; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 7-21, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1962 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 30, 1962 -- Drawings: Bontecou, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1962-1963 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Johns, Klapheck, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Tinguely, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 7, 1962 -- John Chamberlain and Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10 - Dec. 6, 1962 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1962 - Jan. 9, 1963 -- Gerald van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 12 - Feb. 7, 1963 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 9 - Mar. 7, 1963 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1963 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-25, 1963 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Kiesler, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 16, 1963 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 30, 1963 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov, van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

1963-1964 SeasonSept. 28 - Oct. 24, 1963 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 21, 1963 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23, 1963 - Jan. 2, 1964 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4 - Feb. 6, 1964 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 12, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 9, 1964 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-30, 1964 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

May 2 - June 3, 1964 -- Introducing Artschwager, Christo, Hay, Watts; 4 E 77 St

June 6-30, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1964-1965 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 22, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 19, 1964 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 28, 1964 -- Andy Warhol, Flower Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 9-27, 1965 -- John Chamberlain, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 30 - Feb. 24, 1965 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 27 - Mar. 24, 1965 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 27 - Apr. 14, 1965 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 13, 1965 -- James Rosenquist, F-111; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 9, 1965 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Oracle; 4 E 77 St

1965-1966 SeasonOct. 2-21, 1965 -- Group Exhibition: [Chamberlain], Johns, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Stella, [Warhol]; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 23 - Nov. 17, 1965 -- Robert Bart; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1965 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstrokes and Ceramics; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the Foundation for the Contemporary Performance Arts; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Group Exhibition; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 8 - Feb. 2, 1966 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 5 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Cy Twombly, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1966 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1966 -- Andy Warhol, Wallpaper and Clouds; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 30 - May 25, 1966 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 13, 1966 -- Christo, Storefront; 4 E 77 St

June 14-30, 1966 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1966-1967 SeasonOct. 8 - Nov. 8, 1966 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12 - Dec. 3, 1966 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6-10, 1966 -- Benefit Group Exhibition for Experiments in Art and Technology, Inc.; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Stanley Landsman; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-31, 1967 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 4-26, 1967 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-28, 1967 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1967 -- New Work: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 1967 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Revolvers; 4 E 77 St

1967-1968 SeasonOct. 7-26, 1967 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1967 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 23, 1967 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 30, 1967 - Jan. 23, 1968 -- Richard Artschwager, Sculptures and Reliefs; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 17, 1968 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 24 - Mar. 16, 1968 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 23 - Apr. 11, 1968 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1968 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 8, 1968 -- Jack Krueger; 4 E 77 St

1968-1969 SeasonSept. 14-28, 1968 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1968 -- Robert Rauschenberg, White Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-23, 1968 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1968 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 4-28, 1968 -- 9 at Leo Castelli: Anselmo, Bollinger, Hesse, Kaltenbach, Nauman, Saret, Serra, Sonnier, Zorio; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 4-25, 1969 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 1-22, 1969 -- John Chamberlain; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 3-22, 1969 -- David Diao, Richard Pettibone, and Peter Young; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris, A Continuous Project Altered Daily; 108th St Warehouse

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Carnal Clocks; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Jack Krueger; 108th St Warehouse

May 24 - June 14, 1969 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

May 24 - June 21, 1969 -- 4 Painters for Spring: Bower, Cibula, Kalina, Roth, Yrisarry; 108th St Warehouse

June 21 - July 31, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Young; 4 E 77 St

1969-1970 SeasonSept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 108th St Warehouse

Nov. - Dec., 1969 -- Joseph Kosuth; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 13, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Moonshot Series (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 6, 1969 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 11-13, 1969 -- Benefit Exhibition, Art for the Moratorium; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 16, 1969 - Jan. 10, 1970 -- Richard Serra; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 10-31, 1970 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 17-24, 1970 -- Rafael Ferrer; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Tatlin Monuments; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Robert Morris, Earthwork Projects (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 108th St Warehouse

May 16-30, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

June 11-27, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

June 30 - Aug. 28, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1970-1971 SeasonSept. 19-26, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for Referendum '70: Daphnis, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 26 - Oct. 24, 1970 -- Roy Lichtenstein, New Editions: Lithographs, Sculpture, Reliefs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 3-18, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Untitled (to Barnett Newman); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 19, 1970 - Jan. 9, 1971 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Schlossberg, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 16 - Feb. 6, 1971 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 13 - Mar. 6, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 13 - Apr. 9, 1971 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1971 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 8, 1971 -- Robert Barry; 4 E 77 St

May 8 - June 5, 1971 -- Douglas Huebler; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 12, 1971 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

June 26 - Sept. 24, 1971 -- Group Exhibition: Davis, Flavin, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1971-1972 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 9, 1971 -- Group Film Exhibition: Jonas, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 2-16, 1971 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Eighth Investigation, Proposition Three; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1971 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1971 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. [2], 1972 -- Group Film Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Richard Hamilton, Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15 - Feb. 5, 1972 -- Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Larry Stark (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12, 1972 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19, 1972 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19 - Mar. 16, 1972 -- Object Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 19 - Mar. 25, 1972 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 18, 1972 -- Keith Sonnier, Films and Videotapes; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 18 - Apr. 13, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Electric Chairs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 15, 1972 -- Michael Balog; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1972 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15-29, 1972 -- Robert Barry, Projections; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 15 - May 6, 1972 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 18 - May 6, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Hearing; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22 - May 13, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Projects; 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 13, 1972 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Frank Owen; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Donald Judd and Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 12, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tares (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 27 - June 17, 1972 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. 6, 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. [23], 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1972-1973 SeasonSept. 7-23, 1972 -- Furniture Designed by Artists: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 11-23, 1972 -- Larry Stark, Fifty States (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1972 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Barry, Bontecou, Daphnis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 24, 1972 -- Satirical/Political Cartoons, Benefit for American Peace Action Coalition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 7-21, 1972 -- New Works: Judd, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; Videotapes: Jonas, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 27-28, 1972 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Collection for Stockholm; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 11, 1972 -- Frank Stella, Race Track (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 15, 1972 -- Jasper Johns, From Robert Scull Collection (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Ninth Investigation, Proposition One; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Dan Flavin, an exposition of cool white and warm white circular fluorescent light; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 9-25, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Mao Prints [Castelli Graphics]; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 9, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 2-23, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, Early Works: Protoinvestigations; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2-24, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Made in Tampa [Castelli Graphics]; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 9-23, 1972 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs from the book "The New Avant-Garde"; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 16-30, 1972 -- Cirrus Editions: Anderson, Balog, Card Celmins, Cooper, Goode, Nauman, Price, Ruscha (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4-6, 1973 -- Joan Jonas, Performance; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Richard Serra, Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1973 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-17, 1973 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 3-24, 1973 -- Group Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1973 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 24 - Mar. 10, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Still Lifes; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 3-23, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Horsefeathers XIII (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-24, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Retrospective 1958-1972; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 14-16, 1973 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening "A First Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Monoprints; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman, Floating Room; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 24 - Apr. 14, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Dan Flavin, 40th Birthday Drawing Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Venetian Series; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Curved Series; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 19, 1973 -- Group Show, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1973 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

May 5-26, 1973 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 19 - June 6, 1973 -- Laura Grisi, Pebbles; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 7, 1973 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 16, 1973 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

June [3] - Sept. 15, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Waldman, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 8-22, 1973 -- Don Judd, Woodcuts, Silkscreens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 9, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bulls (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 22, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella; 420 W Broadway

1973-1974 SeasonSept. 10-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Black and White Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 22 - Oct. 16, 1973 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 29 - Oct. 20, 1973 -- Videotapes by Twelve Artists: Benglis, Chamberlain, Freed, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 29 - Nov. 16, 1973 -- Stockholm Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 10, 1973 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Committee to Save Venice: Cornell, Dine, Frankenthaler, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Louis, Noland, Oldenburg, Olitski, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-3, 1973 -- Group Film Exhibition: Chamberlain, Jonas, Ruscha, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-14, 1973 -- Group Show: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 10 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 15 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 7, 1973 -- Lewis Baltz, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1973 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- Group Show of New Prints: Balog, Petersen, Rauschenberg, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 15, 1973 - Jan. 19, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha, Retrospective Show, Graphics from the Collection of Donald Marron (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St (upstairs)

Jan. 12-26, 1974 -- [García] Uriburu (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1974 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-16, 1974 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 2-23, 1974 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 16 - Mar. 2, 1974 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Davis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 23 - Mar. 9, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Video Still Screens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 2-23, 1974 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Amplified Local Time: Radio Installation; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1974 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-20, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1974 -- Robert Morris, Voice; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 27 - May 11, 1974 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg; 4 E 77 St

May 4-25, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

May 18 - June 1, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Pages and Fuses (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 15, 1974 -- Lucia Wilcox; 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Ron Davis (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Group Video Exhibition: Acconci, Baldessari, Bell, Benglis, Campus, Gillette, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Oldenburg, Palestine, Serra, Smithson, Wegman (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Exhibition: Darboven, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Baltz, Bontecou, Daphnis, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Petersen, Pistoletto, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

1974-1975 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 4, 1974 -- Frank Stella, Eccentric Polygons (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 5, 1974 -- Jasper Johns, Recent Four Panel Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1974 -- Group Sculpture Show, In Three Dimensions: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5-19, 1974 -- Peter Mauss, Recent Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1974 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 19 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg, Selected Show of Prints from 1968-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2 - 30, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Artist's Studio Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12-30, 1974 -- James Rosenquist, Selected Show of Prints from 1965-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 16-30, 1974 -- Hanne Darboven, 24 Songs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21, 1974 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7-21, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Series; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7, 1974 - [Jan. 4], 1974 -- Michelangelo Pistoletto, New Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1974 - Jan. 4, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Editions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1974 - Jan. 11, 1975 -- Andy Warhol, Hand Colored Flowers (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 4-18, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, Cones/Cojones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11-25, 1975 -- Edward Ruscha, Domestic Tranquility, Four New Lithographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 2, 1975 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Sleds; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15-18, 1975 -- Peter Campus and Paul Kos, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 25 - Feb. 8, 1975 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Tenth Investigation, Proposition Four; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-15, 1975 -- Group Show: Huebler, Morris, Nauman, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8-22, 1975 -- Keith Sonnier, Air to Air; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 8, 1975 -- Nassos Daphnis, A Continuous Painting; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Merce Cunningham Portfolio: Cage, Johns, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Joan Jonas and Charlemagne Palestine, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-8, 1975 -- Frank Gillette and William Wegman, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Sculptures; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Larry Stark, Silkscreens on Canvas; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15 - [Apr. 5], 1975 -- Richard Landry, "1, 2, 3, 4" from Videotapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-5, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Dan Flavin, Flourescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Gray Series Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 3, 1975 -- James Klosty, Around and About Merce Cunningham, Photographs 1968-1972; 420 W Broadway

May 3-17, 1975 -- Richmond Jones, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 3-31, 1975 -- Frank Stella, Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

May 10-31, 1975 -- Ron Davis, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 10-31, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, Stripes; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 7, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 7 - Sept. 5, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Darboven, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 7 - Sept. 20, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition, Black and White: Kelly, Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

June 14-28, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

July 7-25, 1975 -- Group Exhibition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

1975-1976 SeasonSept. 13-27, 1975 -- Autumn Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1975 -- James Rosenquist, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-18, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-25, 1975 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 11-25, 1975 -- Frank Owen; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1975 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-15, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-22, 1975 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1975 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Lewis Baltz, The New Industrial Parks Near Irving, CA, 1974 (a portfolio of 51 photographs) (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 3-17, 1976 -- Ralph Gibson, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Robert Barry, Recent Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Alan Charlton; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 24 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus and Frank Gillette, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Feb. 10, 1976 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening, "A Second Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Jammers; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Keith Sonnier, Abaca Code; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 28 - Mar. 20, 1976 -- Joseph Cornell; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Dan Flavin, Colored Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 27 - Apr. 17, 1976 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1976 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-24, 1976 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 24 - May 15, 1976 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

May 1-22, 1976 -- Hanne Darboven, For Jean-Paul Sartre; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 5, 1976 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 22 - June 12, 1976 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

May 29 - June 12, 1976 -- Robert Adams, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 19 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Noland, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 26 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Darboven, Flavin, Morris, Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

1976-1977 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Portraits: Cohen, Eggleston, Gibson, Gossage, Kelly, Namuth, Sonneman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Daniel Buren, To Transgress; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 25 - Oct. 16, 1976 -- Cy Twombly, Watercolors; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Robert Morris, Black and White Felts; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Paul Kos, Tokyo Rose (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1976 -- Kenneth Noland; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-27, 1976 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Nov. 6 - Dec. 4, 1976 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 11-18, 1976 -- Poppy Johnson, Performance; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 11-22, 1976 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 8-29, 1977 -- Andy Warhol, Still Life Paintings and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 5-26, 1977 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-19, 1977 -- Robert Barry, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Hans Namuth and Georg Reisner, Photographs from the Spanish Civil War; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Beryl Korot, Text and Commentary (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg (Castelli Graphics); [4 E 77 St]

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1977 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28, 1977 -- Brazos River: Videotape by Viola Farber, Robert Rauschenberg, and David Tudor; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-16, 1977 -- Frank Gillette, Mecox (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 23 - May 21, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Spreads and Scales; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1977 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings - Castelli Uptown; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - June [18], 1977 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - Sept. 17, 1977 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1977-1978 SeasonSept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1977 -- James Rosenquist, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Architecture I: Abraham, Ambasz, Meier, Pichler, Rossi, Stirling, Venturi and Rauch; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 25 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- William Eggelston, Color Photographs, 1966-1977 (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 7-28, 1978 -- Numerals 1924-1977; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway (front office)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Robert Barry, A Wall Drawing; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1978 -- Keith Sonnier, Black Ground Series Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 1-29, 1978 -- Hanne Darboven, Card-Index, Filing Cabinet; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-29, 1978 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 6 - June 24, 1978 -- Joseph Cornell, Collages 1931-1972; 420 W Broadway

June 10-24, 1978 -- Alan Sonfist; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

July 5 - Sept. 23, 1978 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

1978-1979 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Jan Dibbets, Structure Panoramas 1977-78; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Douglas Huebler, Mediations; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 2-20, 1978 -- Film/Video 1976-78: Baldessari, Benglis, Campus, Downey, Freed, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Rappaport, Wegman, Wiener (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1979 -- Frank Stella, Indian Birds, Painted Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1979 -- Donald Judd, Survey of Work; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Morris, 6 Mirror Works; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Again and Again; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Hans Namuth, Todos Santos: Portraits (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1979 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Joseph Kosuth, Text/Context (New York); 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Keith Sonnier, Expanded Sel Series; 420 W Broadway

June 23 - Sept. 15, 1979 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Andre, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Owen, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

1979-1980 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1979 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 10, 1979 -- Dan Flavin, 1960's and 1970's Installations; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1979 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-19, 1980 -- Michele Zaza; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 5-26, 1980 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1980 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22-26, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Charles Gaines, Falling Leaves; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 19 - [Mar. 15], 1980 -- Leo Castelli: A New Space: Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Nassos Daphnis, Paintings From the 50's; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Robert Barry, Wall Piece; 420 W Broadway (back office)

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1980 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Apr. [5] - May 10, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, "Color Panels for a Large Wall," 1978, from the Central Trust Company, Cincinnati; 142 Greene St

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints 1978-1980 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Cletus Johnson, Theaters; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 17 - June 21, 1980 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 142 Greene St

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

1980-1981 SeasonSept. 13 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Nauman, Stella, Judd, Warhol, Kelly; 142 Greene St

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Edward Ruscha, New Paintings; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Peter Young, Homage to Agnes Martin; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 22, 1980 -- Architecture II Houses For Sale: Ambasz, Eisenman, Gregotti, Isozaki, Moore, Pelli, Price, Ungers; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Hans Namuth, Pollock Painting, 1950-1951 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1980 -- Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway (rear office)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 6, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, American Architecture Now (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 13, 1980 -- Benefit Exhibition for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1980 -- James Turrell; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13-20, 1980 -- Group Installation: Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 10 - Feb. 7, 1981 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings 1970-1980; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 17 - Feb. 21, 1981 -- James Rosenquist, Star Thief; 142 Greene St

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 28 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Slice; 142 Greene St

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 12 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Film screenings, "Railroad Turnbridge" and "Steelmill/Stahlwerk" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Douglas Huebler, Crocodile Tears; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1981 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1981 -- Michael Harvey, Film screenings, "Sub Rosa" and "Dead Letter" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 13, 1981 -- Joan Jonas, Upsidedown and Backwards (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 16-30, 1981 -- Artists' Benefit For the Trisha Brown Dance Company; 142 Greene St

May 16 - Sept. 4, 1981 -- Dan Flavin, Barred Corridors; 420 W Broadway

1981-1982 SeasonSept. 15 - Oct. 31, 1981 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Richard Serra (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Collaboration; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Charles Gaines, Landscape: Assorted Trees with Regressions; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 14 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17-21, 1981 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Visions and Images - American Photographers on Photography (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1981 -- Hermine Freed, Beads + Marbles [Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films]; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Nov. 28 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Eight Lithographs to Benefit the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 28 - Dec. 23, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Bruce Nauman, Violins, Violence, Silence; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Dollar Signs; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Reversals; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 9 - Feb. 13, 1982 -- Hans Namuth, Portraits; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Claude Viallat; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 20 - Mar. 27, 1982 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 20-27, 1982 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra, "Marilyn Monroe-Greta Garbo," 1981,-(A Sculpture for Gallery-Goers.); 142 Greene St

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3 - May 1, 1982 -- Frank Gillette; 142 Greene St

May 1-22, 1982 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - Oct. 23, 1982 -- Summer Group Show: Chia, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Schnabel, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1982 -- Castelli and His Artists 25 Years; 420 W Broadway

1982-1983 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 9, 1982 -- 25th Anniversary Exhibition of Leo Castelli, Castelli and His Artists 25 Years: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Johns, Johnson, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Schnabel, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Interior Design: The New Freedom; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Architectural Drawings and Models: Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Charrette Competition Entries; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1982 -- Group Show: Flavin, Nauman, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Oct. 30 - Nov. 20, 1982 -- Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

[Nov. 20 - Dec. 12, 1982] -- Salvatore Scarpitta, American Cycle: 1958-1982; 142 Greene St

Nov. 27 - Dec. 18, 1982 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 31, 1982 - Jan. 29, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 142 Greene St

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Margrete Sørensen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Robert Morris, Psychomachia; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1983 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 3-26, 1983 -- Diane Blell; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Longo; 142 Greene St

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Mapplethorpe; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Douglas Huebler; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Sandy Skoglund; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Morris, and Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 30 - June 3, 1983 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 11 - June 30, 1983 -- Michael Smith, Government Approved Home Fallout snack bar (Castelli Graphics); 43 West 61st St

June [11] - Aug. [4], 1983 -- Drawings/Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1983 -- Summer Show, Sculpture; 142 Greene St

1983-1984 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Photogravures (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Ken Price; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 1-[22], 1983 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1983 -- Architectural "Follies": Drawings and Models; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 29 - Nov. 5, 1983 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Handmade in America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 12-26, 1983 -- Marvin Torffield, Pandora's Tears; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3-17, 1983 -- 8 x 8 to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Greene St Mural; 142 Greene St

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 21 - Feb. 18, 1984 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Corten Wall Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 28 - Feb. 25, 1984 -- Jasper Johns, Paintings; 142 Greene St

Feb. 18 - Mar. 10, 1984 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-17, 1984 -- Artists Call Against US Intervention in Central America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 3-31, 1984 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Mar. 10-31, 1984 -- Castelli Graphics 15th Anniversary Exhibition: Graphics, Photographs, Drawings, and Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17 - Apr. 7, 1984 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1984 -- Lucio Pozzi; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-28, 1984 -- Dan Flavin; 142 Greene St

Apr. 14 - May 12, 1984 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1984 -- Eve Sonneman; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 19 - June 9, 1984 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 420 W Broadway

June 6, 1984 -- Michael Smith, Video: Go For It Mike (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

June 15 - July 27, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

June 23 - Sept. 8, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blell, Chia, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Salle, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1984-1985 SeasonSept. 15-29, 1984 -- Billy Apple, Survey: 1962-1974; 142 Greene St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 6, 1984 -- Hanne Darboven, Ansichten '82; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 6 - Nov. 3, 1984 -- Bruce Nauman; 142 Greene St

Oct. 13 - Nov. 10, 1984 -- Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19, [1984] -- Mitchell Kriegman, Video, "The Effect of Gravity on Dogs" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 8, 1984 -- Cunningham Dance Foundation Benefit Art Sale; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-26, 1985 -- Sandro Chia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 12 - Feb. 9, 1985 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 2-23, 1985 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 23, 1985 -- Nassos Daphnis; 142 Greene St

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Ralph Gibson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Warhol; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Wall Reliefs; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1985 -- Francesco Clemente; 142 Greene St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Charles Gaines; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1985 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dianne Blell; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

June 22 - July 27, 1985 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chia, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Serra, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

1985-1986 SeasonSept. 7-21, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Jiri Georg Dokoupil; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Keith Haring; 142 Greene St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Judy Tompkins; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 15 - Dec. 7, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Mario Merz; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Group Exhibition: Chia, Judd, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Sonnier, Warhol, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Robert Ryman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Laura Grisi; 142 Greene St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Robert Combas; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Dan Rodan; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1986 -- Richard Serra, Prints; 142 Greene St

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- Jean Kallina; 420 W Broadway (office)

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1986 -- Miquel Barceló; 142 Greene St

May 10 - June 14, 1986 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May 17 - June 14, 1986 -- Joseph Kosuth, Selected Works, 1965-1986; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Barceló, Dokoupil, Kosuth, Morris, Moskowitz, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blais, Blell, Brown, Chia, Combas, Gibson, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Ryman, Salle, Serra, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

1986-1987 SeasonSept. 19-27, 1986 -- The Law and Order Show; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1986 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen, Sculpture and Drawings, 1983-1986; 142 Greene St

Oct. 4-11, 1986 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Color Video Selections; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Oct. 4-25, 1986 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 18-25, 1986 -- Skowhegan: A Ten-Year Retrospective; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Lawrence Weiner; 142 Greene St

Nov. [1]-22, 1986 -- Robert Therrien, 1st Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Gluts; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 1: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 142 Greene St

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Barceló, Flavin, Grisi, Simonds; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 2nd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1987 -- Charles Gaines, Numbers + Trees; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 2: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Waldman, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - May 2, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Grisi, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 18 - May 2, 1987 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Dan Flavin, A New Work; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Ti Shan Hsu; 420 W Broadway

May [9]-30, 1987 -- Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella, Therrien; 142 Greene St

May 12 - June 27, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 3rd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 16 - June 6, 1987 -- Richard Artschwager, Bruce Nauman, and Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 4-13, 1987 -- Art Against Aids; 142 Greene St

June 20 - July 31, 1987 -- Andy Warhol; 142 Greene St

1987-1988 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1987 -- Richard Serra, Three Sculptures; 142 Greene St

Oct. 3-31, 1987 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1987 -- Peter Schuyff; 142 Greene St

Nov. 7-28, 1987 -- Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 5-22, 1987 -- Similia/Dissimilia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Mike Bidlo, Picasso's Women; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Cletus Johnson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5-12, 1988 -- School of Visual Arts Alumni Show, 1977-87; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1988 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1988 -- Chryssa, Cityscapes 1980-88; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1988 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 23 - May 14, 1988 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May [28] - June 18, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, His Peers and Persuasions, 1963-1988; 142 Greene St

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Frank O. Gehry, Furniture; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

1988-1989 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Joseph Kosuth; 578 Broadway

Sept. 17 - Oct. 22, 1988 -- The Last Show: Kelly, Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5 - Nov. 12, 1988 -- Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, and David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Robert Cumming (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Bruce Nauman and Richard Serra; 578 Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 22, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 8-30, 1988 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performing Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Circa 1989 -- Castelli Graphics 1969-1989 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Robert Barry; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- David Lynch; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- James Rosenquist, Joseph Kosuth, and Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- Dianne Blell; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1989 -- James Brown; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-29, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, To the Citizens of the Republic of France on the 200th Anniversary of their Revolution; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 8 - May 13, 1989 -- Walter De Maria; 65 Thompson

May 6-27, 1989 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 6-27, 1989 -- Charles Simonds, Wall Smears and Rocks; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 19 - July 1, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bronze Sculpture 1976-1989; 65 Thompson

May 20 - June 10, 1989 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

June 3-24, 1989 -- Summer Group Show: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins; 420 W Broadway (front room)

June 3-24, 1989 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

1989-1990 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Sept. 23 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Richard Serra, 8 Drawings: Weights and Measures; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 30, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Fall, 1989; 65 Thompson

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Group Drawing Show: Artschwager, Barry, Brown, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Drawings from Mali; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 1, 1989 - Feb. 24, 1990 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Winter, 1989; 65 Thompson

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Roni Horn, Thicket No. 1; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Hanne Darboven, Requiem For M. Oppenheimer; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- The 60's Revisited: New Concepts/New Materials; 578 Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Edward Ruscha, Selected Portfolios (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Nassos Daphnis, Thirty Years With Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Douglas Huebler; 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Petersen, Selected Works (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 65 Thompson

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Portraits: Recent Prints from Gemini G.E.L. (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bernar Venet, Drawings Scale: 1 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 1990 -- John Gutmann, Talking Picture; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Taking the Picture: Photography and Appropriation; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7 - May 12, 1990 -- Hiroshi Teshigahara, Echizen Ware; 65 Thompson

May 5-26, 1990 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Currents '70 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

May 5 - June 2, 1990 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

May 12 - July 28, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 65 Thompson

June 9 - Sept. 15, 1990 -- Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Stella, Vaisman, van Bruggen, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1990-1991 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- David Salle, Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Cletus Johnson; 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg, Works from Gemini G.E.L., 1988-1990 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Robert Watts; 578 Broadway

Dec. 8, 1990 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Frank Stella, New Work; 65 Thompson

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Chryssa; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lewis Baltz, Rule without Exception (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Hanne Darboven, Urzeit; 578 Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

[Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991] -- [Robert Cumming; 578 Broadway]

Mar. 9 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- James Brown, Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Bertrand Lavier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interior Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 11, 1991 -- Group Drawing Show: Janie Lee Master Drawings; 65 Thompson

May 11-25, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha, Prints; 578 Broadway

May 11 - June 1, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

[May 11 - June 1, 1991] -- [Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway (middle room)]

May 21 - [June 22], 1991 -- Robert Therrien; 65 Thompson

June 1-22, 1991 -- Charles Gaines; 578 Broadway

June 5-22, 1991 -- Group Drawings Exhibition; 578 Broadway

[July 16 - Nov. 9], 1991 -- Frank Stella; 65 Thompson

Summer 1991 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien, Vaisman, Warhol, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1991-1992 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Dianne Blell, Wild Lives, Photographic Portraits Documenting Africa's Vanishing Wildlife; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Group Exhibition: Johns, Kelly, Lavier, Lichtenstein, Starn Twins, Stella, Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 19 - Nov. 16, 1991 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 30, 1991 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Print Survey in Themes, 1952-1992; 578 Broadway

Nov. 23 - Dec. 14, 1991 -- Jean-Pierre Raynaud; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 14, 1991 - Feb. 1, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Large Scale Prints: Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Serra, Starn Twins; 578 Broadway

Jan. 4-25, 1992 -- Pruitt-Early; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 65 Thompson

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Leo Castelli XXXV Anniversary, Installation; 578 Broadway

Feb. 8-29, 1992 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Early Works; 578 Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Hans Namuth; 578 Broadway

[Apr. - July], 1992 -- Elyn Zimmerman, Portals and Passages; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Charles Simonds, Stugg. Thebb?The Singing Monkey, 1992; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier, Prints, Drawings and Multiples 1990-1992; 578 Broadway

May 2-23, 1992 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

May 9 - June 6, 1992 -- James Brown, Survey of Work 1986-1992; 578 Broadway

May 30 - June 13, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

June 6 - July 31, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Drawings, Prints, Multiples, Photographs; 578 Broadway

June 23 - July 31, 1992 -- The Guggenheim in Europe: Architectural Models and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Aug. 17 - Sept. 19, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition 1992, Part II: Artshwager, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1992-1993 SeasonSept. 19 - Oct. 24, 1992 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Minimalist Works; 578 Broadway

Sept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1992 -- Meyer Vaisman, Turkey; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 26 - Nov. 7, 1992 -- Group Architecture Exhibition, Angels and Franciscans: Innovative Architecture from Los Angeles and San Francisco; 65 Thompson

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1992 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 31 - Dec. 5, 1992 -- Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Post-Minimal Works; 578 Broadway

Nov. 14, 1992 - Jan. 9, 1993 -- Andrew Lord, Modelling: A Sculpture of 27 Pieces and Related Works; 65 Thompson

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Waterlilies; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 12, 1992 - Jan. 30, 1993 -- Group Sculpture Exhibit, Object Lessons; 578 Broadway

Jan. 9 - Feb. 6, 1993 -- Jasper Johns, 35 Years with Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 16-23, 1993 -- Benefit for Cunningham Dance Foundation; 65 Thompson

Jan. 30 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Richard Long; 65 Thompson

Feb. 6 - Mar. 6, 1993 -- Word Play: Darboven, Kosuth, Ruscha, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Blind Color: Calle, Charlton, Klein, Manzoni, Rauschenberg, Richter, Rinehardt; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Sophie Calle, Last Seen; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Frank Stella and James Rosenquist, New Prints; 65 Thompson

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist, Prints from "Welcome to the Water Planet" and "House of Fire"; 578 Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Keith Sonnier, Robert Morris, and Robert Rauschenberg, Soft Ware; 578 Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 22, 1993 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 29, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Graphic Works; 578 Broadway

May 15 - July 31, 1993 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Long, Lord, Morris, Rauschenberg, Sonnier, Stella; 65 Thompson

May 29 - Oct. 2, 1993 -- British and American Sculpture: Cragg, Deacon, Kapoor, Long, Kelly, Nauman, Serra, Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 5 - July 24, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Faces and Figures; 578 Broadway

1993-1994 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Sept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris, Blind Time Drawings; 578 Broadway

Sept. 25 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kosuth, Morris, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1993 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Thing-in-itself is found in its Truth through the loss of its immediacy; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 30 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Charles Simonds, Retrospective; 578 Broadway

Nov. 12 - Dec. 4, 1993 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 3, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Frank Stella, Moby Dick Deckle Edges (New Prints from Tyler Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 4, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Andrew Lord; 578 Broadway

Dec. 9, 1993 - Jan. 8, 1994 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 19, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Falls, Pratfalls, and Sleights of Hand; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Robert Morris; 578 Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Prints and Drawings; 578 Broadway

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 65 Thompson

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside the New York Art World; 578 Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Group Exhibition: Lord, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 7, 1994 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Spectroheliographs; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 14, 1994 -- Lee Bontecou, Edward Higgins, and Robert Moskowitz, Sculpture and Painting from the Early 1960's; 578 Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 18, 1994 -- Sandro Chia, New Paintings; 65 Thompson

May 17 - June 11, 1994 -- Hannah Collins, Signs of Life; 420 W Broadway

May 21 - June 25, 1994 -- Jasper Johns, The Prints of Jasper John 1960-1993; 578 Broadway

June 18 - Sept. 10, 1994 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

July 5 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition, Major Works: Artschwager, Judd, Flavin, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1994-1995 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Richard Meier, Sculpture; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 8 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- Dan Flavin, Selected Works 1969-1990; 578 Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 23, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes: 9 Color Relief Prints; PACT 95 International America's Cup Class Yacht; 578 Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1995 -- Lawrence Wiener, Stones + Stones + Stones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 14 - Feb. 11, 1995 -- Robert Morris, Malaprops; The Fallen and the Saved; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1995 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 18 - Mar. 18, 1995 -- Richard Artshwager, Robert Therrien, and Edward Ruscha; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1995 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 25 - Apr. 29, 1995 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tribute 21; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Hannah Collins; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Anamorphic Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 29 - May 20, 1995 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

May 6 - June 2, 1995 -- New Editions: Johns, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha; 578 Broadway

May 31 - June 30, 1995 -- Barbara Bloom, Pictures from the Floating World; 420 W Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Imaginary Places (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Collins, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

July 11 - Sept. 1, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

1995-1996 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Serra; 578 Broadway

Sept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Sayings, Puddinhead Wilson; 578 Broadway

Sept. 18 - Oct. 7, 1995 -- Hanne Darboven, South Korean Calendar; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 4, 1995 -- Nassos Daphnis, Energies in Outer Space; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 18, 1995 -- Joseph Kosuth, Editions The Past 10 Years; 578 Broadway

Nov. 11 - Dec. 16, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Free Standing Murals; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2, 1995 - Jan. 13, 1996 -- Frank Stella, Editions; 578 Broadway

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1996 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 30 - Feb. 10, 1996 -- Bailey House Auction; 578 Broadway

Feb. 10 - Mar. 9, 1996 -- Group Exhibition, New Works by Gallery Artists: Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Sonnier, Stella, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 17 - Mar. 16, 1996 -- Collage - Gallery Artists: Brown, Darboven, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 13, 1996 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 23 - Apr. 20, 1996 -- Photography: Calle, Collins, Kosuth, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 18, 1996 -- James Rosenquist, Horizon Home Sweet Home; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 24, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Eight New Prints; 578 Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Ralph Gibson, Infanta; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Group Drawing Exhibition, Works on Paper: Chryssa, Daphnis, Darboven, Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Sonnier, Therrien, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - July 26, 1996 -- Summer Group Show: Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Ruscha, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1996-1997 SeasonSept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, 25 Years of Artists Portraits; 578 Broadway

Sept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints; 578 Broadway

Sept. 28 - Oct. 26, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes in the Chinese Style; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Jasper Johns, Prints 1960-1996 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 2 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Bruce Nauman, Bronze Heads and End of the World; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11 - Feb. 8, 1997 -- Robert Morris, Horizons Cut Between Clio and Mnemosyne; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Robert Therrien, Drawings; 578 Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Andy Warhol, Prints; 578 Broadway

Feb. 15 - Mar. 15, 1997 -- Lawrence Weiner, Then Now + Then; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1997 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

Mar. 22 - Apr. 26, 1997 -- Keith Sonnier, Alternating Currents; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 29 - Apr. 5, 1997 -- The Printmaking Workshop Benefit Exhibition and Auction; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 17 - May 17, 1997 -- Columbia University MFA Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

May 3 - June 7, 1997 -- Edward Ruscha, Cityscapes and "O" Books; 420 W Broadway

July - Sept., 1997 -- Summer Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Serra; 420 W Broadway

1997-1998 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1997 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 1: Bontecou, Chryssa, Cornell, Johns, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 2: Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Serra, Stella, Therrien, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-31, 1998 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 3: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Grisi, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 7 - Mar. 14, 1998 -- Dan Flavin, Some Drawings and Installations of Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28 - Apr. 25, 1998 -- Hannah Collins, True Stories; 420 W Broadway

May 2 - June 6, 1998 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Black Hole Sun Burned; 420 W Broadway

June 24 - Aug. 29, 1998 -- Summer Show; 420 W Broadway

1998-1999 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 31, 1998 -- Robert Morris, The Rationed Years; 420 W Broadway

Nov. - Dec., 1998 -- Joseph Kosuth, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. - Feb. 1999 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Arcadian Survey; 420 W Broadway
Related Material:
Available in the Archives of America Art are three oral history interviews with Leo Castelli. Paul Cummings interviewed Castelli between May 14, 1969 and June 8, 1973; Barbara Rose in July, 1969; and Andrew Decker on May 22, 1997.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds items lent for microfilming (reel N68) including printed material. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Leo Castelli loaned printed material for microfilming in 1968. Leo Castelli's wife, Barbara Bortuzzo Castelli, and his children, Nina Castelli Sundell and Jean-Christophe Castelli, donated the Leo Castelli Gallery records to the Archives of American Art in 2007.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.leocast
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a74e5e8f-9538-4152-8f10-6561763eb241
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-leocast
Online Media:

William R. Hutton Papers

Creator:
Hutton, William R., 1826-1901  Search this
Extent:
30 Cubic feet (33 boxes, 21 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Letterpress copybooks
Blueprints
Diaries
Drawings
Cashbooks
Business records
Business letters
Notebooks
Topographic maps
Tax records
Technical drawings
Stock certificates
Technical literature
Photoengravings
Notes
Maps
Microfilms
Linen tracings
Letter books
Letters
Land titles
Legal documents
Sketches
Salted paper prints
Reports
Receipts
Plans (drawings)
Photostats
Photographic prints
Architectural drawings
Administrative records
Albumen prints
Albums
Annual reports
Booklets
Account books
Books
Family papers
Financial records
Cyanotypes
Correspondence
Deeds
Printed material
Contracts
Photograph albums
Specifications
Christmas cards
Menus
Place:
France
Maryland
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
Panama Canal (Panama)
New Jersey
New York (N.Y.)
Hudson River
Baltimore (Md.)
Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
New York
Washington Bridge
New Croton Aqueduct
Kanawha River Canal
Washington Aqueduct
Potomac River -- 19th century
Washington Memorial Bridge
Hudson River Tunnel
Date:
1830-1965
Summary:
The papers document the life and work of William R. Hutton, a civil engineer during the late 1800s to the early 1900s. Materials include diaries, notebooks, correspondence, letterpress copy book, printed materials, publications, specifications, photographs, drawings, and maps that document the construction of several architectural and engineering projects during this period. Most notable are the records containing information related to the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Hudson River Tunnel, the Washington Aqueduct, the Kanawha River Canal, and the Washington/Harlem River Bridge. There are also several records about railroads in the state of Maryland, the District of Columbia and elsewhere, including the Western Maryland Railroad, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Colorado Midlands Railway, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, the Northern Adirondack Railroad, and the Pittsfield and Williamstown Railroad. The records can be used to track the progression of these projects, and engineering innovation during the late 1800s to the early 1900s.
Scope and Contents:
These papers document William R. Hutton's professional career as a civil engineer and his personal affairs. Although the personal materials in the collection provide insight into a man and a family that have been largely forgotten by biographers, it is the professional materials that are perhaps the most interesting to researchers. They provide a compelling narrative of the push to the West that occurred in 19th century America and the internal improvements movement typified by the American System plan proposed by Henry Clay. Perhaps best remembered for the high tariffs that accompanied it, the American System plan was also concerned with the advancement of internal improvements, such as canals, that would unite the East and West in communication, travel, and trade. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal can be seen as one of the products of this movement (1) and was in fact initially heralded as the first great work of national improvement (2).

The papers in this collection that are related to the construction and maintenance of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal are an invaluable documentation of efforts during this turbulent time to unite the eastern and western United States. They provide details of the canal from its initial construction to its decline with the incline at Georgetown project. The canal also serves as an example, or perhaps a warning against, federal involvement in state improvement efforts as it was the first project to be directly funded and staffed by the federal government (3). The groundbreaking ceremony was attended by then President John Quincy Adams whose toast, "to the canal: perseverance," (4) became an ironic omen, as construction of the canal took over twenty-two years to be completed. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal materials can be used as a case study for the problems encountered during canal building (5). These problems are best typified in the collection by the papers relating to the Georgetown incline. This project was headed by Hutton and was plagued with construction problems, boating accidents, and obsolescence from the moment of its completion. Despite these issues, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal remains a structure of historical significance in America. As the third and last effort to construct an all-water route to the West (6), the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is an important artifact of 19th century attitudes and efforts towards commerce, trade, travel, and communication between the eastern and western United States. Other significant canals and water structures represented in the collection are the Kanawha Canal, the Washington Aqueduct, and a large collection of materials relating to the Kingston Water Supply (New York).

One of the most significant internal improvements made during this time was the railroad. The legal conflicts that arose between the canal companies and railroads is also represented in the materials relating to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. These materials specifically deal with the legal conflict's between the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The development and construction of the railroads is also represented in the materials documenting the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, the Northern Adirondack Railroad, the Western Maryland Railroad, the Mexican National Railroad, the Colorado Midlands Railroad, and the Columbia Railroad.

The collection also demonstrates the spirit of innovation and invention that was prevalent in the engineering field in the nineteenth century. Joseph Gies writes, "...one of the distinctive characteristics of the great nineteenth century engineering adventurers was their readiness to gamble on the translation of theory into practice" (7). In this quote, he is speaking of the civil engineer Dewitt Clinton Haskins and a project that truly encapsulates engineering invention in the nineteenth century, the Hudson River Tunnel. Responding to the increase in the population of the City of New York in the late nineteenth century from sixty thousand to three and a half million, the Hudson River Tunnel was originally devised as a way to alleviate traffic and to transport train passengers directly across the Hudson River (8). Beginning with records dating from 1881 to 1901, the Hutton papers can be used to document not only the advances in engineering during this time but also the costs of progress. Haskins' initial efforts to build the tunnel using submerged air pressurized caissons were marked by failure and in some cases fatalities. Workers on the tunnel often suffered from what came to be known as "caisson disease" or "the bends," caused by the immense forces of compression and decompression experienced while working in the tunnels (9). This problem was so prevalent that as construction progressed the rate of worker deaths caused by "the bends" rose to twenty-five percent (10). Materials in the collection document worker complaints and deaths resulting from this disease as well as providing a technical record of the construction of the tunnel. The highlight of the materials relating to the Hudson River Tunnel is an album that contains photographs of workers in the tunnel and a detailed daily report of the construction progress on the tunnel that was maintained by Hutton's assistant, Walton Aims. The first hand account in these reports provides insight not only into the construction of the tunnel, but also the problems encountered.

Another project featured in the Hutton collection that was devised in response to the population explosion in the City of New York in the nineteenth century is the Harlem River Bridge, or as it is now known, the Washington Bridge. Known as one of the longest steel arch bridges of its time, the Harlem River Bridge also represents that spirit of invention and innovation that was prevalent in the civil engineering field during the nineteenth century. The collection provides an invaluable resource for those wishing to track the construction of the bridge from early concept drawings and proposals to finalized plans. Also present are photographs of the construction and workers. Societal response to the bridge in the form of newspaper and magazine clippings help to create the narrative of the Washington Bridge, and these are supplemented by correspondence from the builders, suppliers, and planners.

This collection also includes diaries, 1866-1901; letterpress copybooks, 1858-1901; correspondence on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Hudson River Tunnel, Washington Bridge over the Harlem River, and Maryland and Colorado railroads, 1861-1901, and on Hutton's financial and real estate affairs, 1835-1921; construction photographs of the Harlem River, Cairo, Poughkeepsie, Niagara bridges and the Hudson River Tunnel, Washington Aqueduct, and Capitol Dome (in the form of albumen, cyanotype, salted paper print); data and drawings; rolled land profile drawings; canal notes, 1828-1892; Hudson River Tunnel construction reports, 1889-1891; publications, drawings, and maps of railroad routes; pamphlets and reprints on hydraulic works and water supply; road, railway, bridge, and hydraulic construction specifications, 1870-1900; drawings (linen, oil cloth, and heavy drawing paper), and blueprints; account books, 1891-1899; and plans, drawings, field notebooks, and publications on American and European construction projects, especially in Maryland, New York, and France; personal correspondence detailing his role as executor for the estates of Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Annie Theller, and the Countess H. De Moltke-Hvitfeldt and his relationships with his children, siblings, cousins, and colleagues, 1850-1942.

Materials are handwritten, typed, and printed.

Special note should be made that any materials dated after the year 1901 were added to the collection by another creator who is unidentified. It can be speculated that professional materials added after this date were contributed by his brother and colleague Nathanial Hutton or his son Frank Hutton. Personal materials contributed after this date may have been added by his wife, daughters, or other members of his extended family.

Series 1, Letterpress Copybooks, 1858-1901, consists of twenty seven letterpress copybooks containing correspondence between Hutton and other engineers, architects, and building suppliers. The letterpress copybooks in this series have been arranged chronologically. The books involve a process by which ink is transferred through direct contact with the original using moisture and pressure in a copy press. The majority of the correspondence is business- related. Some letterpress copybooks are devoted to specific projects such as the Washington/Harlem River Bridge, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The letterpress copybooks provide a record of correspondence written by Hutton, which makes it distinctive from the other correspondence in the collection. Most of the other correspondence has Hutton as recipient.

The letterpress copybooks also document Hutton's various residences throughout his life and provide a glimpse into the civil engineering profession at the time by demonstrating how engineers shared ideas and comments about projects. This can be supplemented with the printed materials in the collection as many of the authors also appear in the correspondence. Other topics covered in the letterpress copybooks include business reports (specifically the report of the president and directors of the Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad), records of people and companies involved in projects, pasted in engineering sketches, engineering specifications and notes, travel expenses and estimates, construction histories and progress, legal issues with family estates, tax information, Colorado Railroad, payment certificate schedules, St. Paul Railroad, personal correspondence, title guarantees, Hudson River Tunnel, financial matters, real estate matters, insurance information, sketches and drawings, supply lists, cost estimates, the Memorial Bridge, Coffin Valve Company, engineering expenses, engineering calculations, payroll notes for Kingston Water Supply, proposals, account information, Hutton Park, reservoirs, contract drafts, French Society of Civil Engineers, inspection results (specifically Piedmont Bridge), land descriptions, damage reports, Morse Bridge, Illinois Central Railroad, North Sea Canal, moveable dams, iron works, site histories, Potomac Lock and Dock Company, Kanawha River canal (lock quantities, specifications, payroll information), Pennsylvania Canal, and bills for services.

Series 2, Professional Correspondence, 1861-1901, consists of correspondence that relates to Hutton's architectural and engineering projects. This series is further subdivided into two subseries: Project Correspondence and General Correspondence. Subseries 1, Project Correspondence, 1876-1899, correspondence is divided by project and arranged alphabetically. Subseries 2, General Correspondence, 1861-1901, is arranged chronologically. Both series contain handwritten and typed letters. Some letters are on letterpress copybook pages and are most likely copies. Some materials are in French and Spanish. Special note should be made that this series does not contain all of the professional correspondence in the collection. Some correspondence has been separated according to project and placed in Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965, in order to make it easier for researchers to access materials related to those subjects.

Subseries 1, professional correspondence topics include comparisons between construction projects (specifically comparisons of the Kanawha River Canal to other canals), supply lists, location recommendations, sketches, construction plans and modifications, bills for supplies and works, leaks in the gates, cost estimates, Brooklyn Water Supply, use of lake storage (Ramapo Water Supply), water supply to states and counties, damages to water supply pipes, estimates of water quantities, responses to construction reports, legal issues related to projects, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and payment for services.

Subseries 2, general correspondence topics include employment opportunities, committee meetings and elections, land surveys, sketches, engineering plans and ideas, work on projects, dismissal from projects, notes on supplies, Washington Aqueduct, construction progress, land purchases, Civil War, Jones Falls, cost of water pumps, steam drills, lots divisions and prices, repairs, report of the engineering bureau, tidewater connection at Annapolis, bridge construction, construction costs, statement of vessels that entered and cleared Baltimore, technical questions from colleagues, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, supply costs, letters of introduction, requests for reference, changes to plans and designs, survey reports, St. Andrew's lot, Canal Coal Company, publication process, American Society of Civil Engineers and its members, responses to project inquiries, Graving Dock gross revenue, job offers, specifications, trade figures, contracts, water levels, appointment dates and times, moveable dams, proposals for membership, salaries, Piedmont Coal Lands, maps, land profiles, Washington Bridge, board payments, Nicaragua Canal, Grant Coal Company, statistics, engineering notes, Hartford Bridge, water pressures, coal deposits, Colorado Coal, pipe lines, reservoirs, boat costs for canals, floods, bridges, letters of resignation, engines, Ruxton Viaduct, Colorado and Midland Railroad, Morse Bridge, share values, railroad locations, membership invitations, call for submissions, structural tests, record of accounts for room and board, appointments, water rights (Putnam County), publications, blueprints, visitation programs, cotton compresses, street trenches, pressures in dams, level tests, Portland Transportation bureau, trade information, concrete steel, Chicago drainage canal, ship canals, Augusta Cotton and Compress Company, Sooysmith case, Consolidated Gas Company, masonry, book binding, Columbia Railway Company, jetties, land grades, Chesapeake and Delaware canal, water wheels, pneumatic lock, tunnel arches, rifton power, Hutton's health, elevators, Brooklyn Bridge Terminals, girder weights, legal issues and their results, rating table for the Potomac, land profiles, transmission lines, transformers, water turbines, and water power on the Potomac River.

Correspondents for this series include the following: Captain Montgomery C. Meigs, Captain T.W. Symons, William Bryan, Ernest Flagg, John Hurd, Jake Wolfe, J.C. Saunders, J.H. Dolph, Charles J. Allen, G.H. Mendell, Virgil S. Bogue, B.A. Mounnerlyn, Edward Burr, H.G. Prout, R. William, H. Dodge, C.R. Suter, M. Mink, W.R. King, John Lyons, Alex Brown and Sons, John G. Butler, D. Condon, Bernard Carter, R.P. McCormick, D.R. Magruder, Andrew Banks, Isaac Solomon, C.J. Mayer, C.W. Kern, John Herring, James S. Mackie, D.R. Magunde, D. Rittaguide, R.S. Stevens, J.L. Raudolph (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad), J.M. Lane, W.D. Stuart, W.G.P. Palmer (Committee Church of the Ascension), C. Crozet, General W. Hughes, V.R. Maus, J.M. Hood (Western Maryland Railroad Company), Ernest Pontzen, M. Haus, William F. Craighill, Harry Hutton, John W. Pearce, Reverend James A. Harrald, William Watson, A.L. Rives, Thomas Monro, A.F. Croswan (Commander United States Navy), H.R. Garden, William McAlpine, James Forrest, Wm. Bloomsfield, Daniel Ammen, Linel Wells, A. and Otto Sibeth, Alfred Noble, Clemens Hershel, Sidney Warner, E.H. de Rheville, Theodore Cooper, William Findlay Shunk, Lewis S. Wolfe, Rufus Mead, Theodore F. Taylor, John Bogart, J. Whaler, B. Williamson, Colonel F.V. Greene, Robert H. Sayre (Lehigh Valley Railroad Company), Charles W. Pussey, Louis Q. Rissel, V.C. Bogue, H.C. Eckenberger, Melville E.G. Leston, Edwin Parson, Rudolph Hering, R.S. Hale, F.M. Turner, Thosl Martindale, Justus C. Strawbridge, William M. Ayresm, R.L. Austin, A.M. Miller, P. Livingston Dunn, T.J. Cleaver, C.S. Dutton, H.A. Carson, William Bainbridge Jaudon, H.A. Presset, Thomas H. McCann, Russel Sturgis, H.G. Prout, Alexis H. French, John K. Cowen, F.W. Williams, J. Waldorf, B.H. Byrant, B.H. Jones, M.H. Rogers, J.W. Ogden, General W. Cashing, William Longhudge, A.J. Cameron, T.L. Patterson, J.J. Hagerman, H. Wigglesworth, Charles B. Rowland, E. Bantz, W.G. Lathrop, Clarence King, George Rowland, George A. Tibbals (Continental Iron Works), George N. Vanderbilt, Eugene C. Lewis, F.P. Burt, Colonel John C. Clarke, Lieutenant Thomas Turtle, W.S.M. Scott, E. Bates Dorsey, Bernard Carter, George M. Shriver (Baltimore and Ohio Railroad), Russel Sturgis, Macmillan Publishing, James Abernethy, B. Baker, J.G.W. Fynje, A. Mallet, Jean Hersuy, L.F. Vernon Horcourt, Robert Lilley, A.J. Johnson, F.M. Colby, Henry D. Loney, A.S. Cameron, James A. Harrald, William Watson, John B. Lervis, A.L. Rives, Edwin F. Bidell, Frank H. Stockett, E. McMahon, C.F. Elgin, Enrique Budge, G. Clayton Gardiner, Dwight Porter, William A. Chapman, T.E. Sickels, Theodore Cooper, C.J. Warner, Institution of Civil Engineers, Robert Gordon, United States Coast of Geodetic Survey Office, C.P. Pattun, J.N. Putnam, Sidney B. Warner, H.D. Fisher, Union Pacific Railway Company, Lewis S. Wolle, George E. Waring Junior, The American Exhibition, G.F. Swain, American Society of Civil Engineers, N.H. Whitten, U.S. Engineer Office, Government Works Committee, J.J. Hagerman, D. Jackson, Sterling Iron and Railway Company, E.P. Alexander, E. Williamson, Central Railway Company of New Jersey, William A. Underwood, F. Collingwood, James Dun (Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company), Henry F. Kilburn, Louis A. Bissell, Virgil G. Boque, H.C. Eckenberger, Melville Egleston, Charles Parson, George Swain, Continental Iron Works, Rudolph Hering, J.B. Gordon, Mayor's Office (Baltimore), Harry Robinson, Pennsylvania Railway Company, W.H. Gahagan, L. Luiggi, B.H. Bryant, T.J. Cleaver (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Company), H.A. Carson, H.A. Presset (Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey), John K. Cowen, Vernon H. Brown, J. Waldorf, B.H. Bryant, L.F. Root, P.W. White, Metropolitan Railroad Company, Charles F. Mayer (Consolidated Coal Company, Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad Company), J.M. Lane (Western Maryland Railroad), Dr. R.S. Stewart (Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad), Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad (John Lyons, John G. Butler, D. Candon, R.P. McCormick, Andrew Banks), Thomas F. Rowland, J.A. Bensel, Walton Aims, S.D. Coykendall, H.C. Rogers, John F. Ward, T.B. Jewell, H.A. Pressey, C.S. Armstrong, J. Nennett, V.G. Bague.

Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942, contains correspondence with immediate and extended family, specifically the heirs to the Benjamin H. Hutton and Joseph Hutton estates and Adele Gorman. Correspondence is primarily arranged chronologically, but some files have been divided based on subject or author (the Deer Park and Adele Gorman files), or by form (the Telegrams, and Cablegrams file). Special note is made of the posthumous correspondence file, which includes correspondence both relating to Hutton's death and correspondence that was written by family members after the years of his death. The series contains both hand written and typed letters. Some correspondence is in French. The correspondence demonstrates his relationship with his children specifically Elizabeth (Bessie) Hutton, and illuminates his role in his family. This series also provides details about nineteenth century upper class society and activities. Special note should be made that this folder does not contain all of the personal correspondence contained in the collection. Some correspondence has been separated according to recipient, or subject in order to make researching these recipients or subjects easier.

Series 3 correspondence topics include: estate payments, distribution of assets, funds transfers, estate lines, conflicts with tenants, sketches, lot maintenance, real estate sales, deeds, real estate sales negotiations, congratulations wishes on new babies, family illnesses, family affairs and travels, traveling directions, personal investments, invitations for social occasions, family debts, professional interests, professional and personal appointments, family issues, requests for money, sketches, advice to children (specifically Frank Hutton), life insurance, books, letters of introduction, legal issues, funeral expenses, charity donations, advertisements, minutes from professional organizations, army enlistment, deaths of friends and family, recipes, estimates of personal expenses, renovations, stock certificates (Great Northern Railway Company, New York), food, social activities, the weather, marriages, real estate and construction plans, and loan agreements.

Correspondents include the following: Frank Hutton, Thomas B. Brookes, J.L. Marcauley, C.M. Matthews, Edward J. Hancy, John M. Wilson, H.A. Carson, William H. Wiley (of John Wiley and Sons Scientific Publishers, New York), Georgina Hutton, Pierre and Jane Casson, George McNaughlin, Henrietta Hutton, Aaron Pennington Whitehead, J.B. Wheeler, B. Williamson, Robert De Forest, Elizabeth (Bessie) Hutton, Grace Beukard, J.C. Saunders, Mary Hutton, William J. Pennington, C.S. Hurd, Henry C. Cooper, Henry J. Segers, S.F. Miller, Annie Theller, Alfred Noble, Maria Burton, Joseph Hobson, E. Lennon, F. Hulberg, Charles Gordon Hutton, Edward C. Ebert, A. William Lewin, E.R. Dunn, William P. Craighill, Theodore Cooper, P.I. Chapelle, Anita McAlpine, Clarence King, Victoria Raymond, and Adele Gorman.

Series 4, Personal Materials, 1835-1946, contains documentation about Hutton's personal finances, role as executor of the Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Annie Theller, and Countess H. De Moltke-Hvitfeldt estates, Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary Hutton (daughter), Frank Hutton, John Caulfield (son-in-law), and B.F. and C.H. Hutton. The series has been divided into four subseries: Financial Records, 1876-1901, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, Other Huttons, 1876-1936, and Personal Material, 1878-1946. Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, contains correspondence relating to specific family estates and family members. This correspondence was separated from Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942, to make it easier for researchers to access all records relating to the family estates. This series includes hand written, typed, and printed materials. Some materials are in French. All material dated after 1901 has been added to the collection by other creators such as Hutton's wife and children.

Subseries 1, Financial Records, 1876-1901, includes account books, account records, correspondence related to bank accounts, bank statements, financial notes, bills and proofs of payment, rent receipts, tax bills (New York, Flatbush, Montgomery County), checks, money exchanges, receipts for tax payments, real estate receipts, stock and bond certificates, loan agreements, executor accounts, rebate calculation sheet, and tax and insurance payments.

Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921, includes property maps and information (rent, mortgage costs, deeds), correspondence, notes on estate distribution, estate assets, value of estate and estate payments, account records, loan agreements, receipts, proof of payments, checks, financial records, legal documents, insurance documents, tax bills, auction receipts, and wills relating to the estates of Benjamin H. Hutton, Joseph Hutton, Countess H. de Moltke-Hivtfeldt, Annie Theller, and William R. Hutton. Also included are correspondence, property maps and information, and deeds and mortgages on Hutton properties.

Subseries 2, the estate and real estate records correspondence topics include: Virginia state building codes, construction costs, construction notices, purchasing offers for property, real estate prices, receipts of payments, property lines, real estate purchases and sales, real estate sales negotiations, deeds insurance estimates and costs, loan costs, property estimates, renovation costs, mortgages, property damages and repairs, property tax payments, insurance rates and payments, rent payments, telephone installation, building permits, rental agreements, reports on property condition, contracts of sale, conflicts with tenants, changes of address, deeds, distribution of estate monies, details about the Countess' illness, estate arrangements, changes of address, problems arising out of estate distribution, payment of debts, will details, selling of mortgage shares, accounts, estate settlement, money cables and transfers, dealings with lawyers, rent on Hutton Park property, legal and accounting fees, power of attorney transfer, investments, property security, land appraisals, lists of assets, legacy taxes, mortgages transfers, property management, Flatbush property, property rent and values, and physicians bills.

Correspondents include the following: A.C. Weeks, Walter I. Green, John D. Probsh, A.G. Darwin, Thomas H. McCann, Allan Farguhar, Thomas Dawson, Potter and Crandall Real Estate and Insurance Brokers, George C. Tilyou, H.D. Olephant, F. Winston, Richard E. Calbraith, Frank P. Martin, Henry DeForest, Henry C. Cooper, Metropolitan Telephone and Telegraph Company, John Ecker, C.K. Avevill, Georgina Hutton, Edward J. Hancy, Robert Graham, W.M. Bennett, Willis E. Merriman, Nathan L. Miller, Harry Hutton, Marquise de Portes (Adele Gorman), Annie Theller, Samuel L. Theller, Mrs. R. Locke, Frank Z. Adams, John Palmer (Secretary of State, New York), J.T. Cammeyer, Frank P. Martin, Florence Theller, Francis H. Seger, Henry C. Cooper, D.W.G. Cammeyer, Campbell W. Adams, Jane Casson, Elizabeth Hutton, Rene de Portes, H.G. Atkins, Grace Beukard, Aaron Pennington Muikhead, J.E. Delapalme, T.H. Powers, Egerton L. Winthrop Junior, George B. Glover, William Jay and Robert W. Candler, B. Williamson, J.E. Knaff, Cornelius C. Vermeule, S.V. Hayden, Charles G. Landon[?], H.A. Hurlbert, F.A. Black, John L. Calwalder, the Health Department of New York, A.G. Darwin, William Laue, Frederick Frelinghuysen, Charles S. Brown, Henrietta Hutton, Edward Gelon.

Subseries 3, Other Huttons, 1874-1936, includes professional drawings and proposals, checks, insurance information, correspondence, tax information, medical information, tax bills, relating to Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary Hutton (daughter), Henry and Harry Hutton, Frank Hutton (son), John Caulfield (son-in-law), B.F. Hutton, and C.H. Hutton.

Subseries 4, Personal Materials, 1878-1946, contains handwritten property notes, school notes, sermons, travel documents, menus, Christmas cards, jewelry box, postal guide, typed religious materials and flyers.

Series 5, Diaries, 1866-1901, contains twenty nine diary books that document both Hutton's personal and professional life. These diaries provide not only a record of Hutton's life, but were also used by Hutton himself as a reference tool. When working on projects he would refer to notes and observations he made in his diary (as evidenced by notes made in his diaries). The first pages of the diaries often list his height, weight and clothing sizes as they varied from year to year. A researcher could probably use the cashbooks (see Series 7) and the diaries in conjunction as both detail the purchases made by Hutton. Many of the diaries also include a short record of accounts in the back. The diaries are arranged chronologically.

Topics found in the diaries include short form accounts of daily activities and appointments, records of the weather, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, construction progress on projects, steam pumps, sketches and calculations, extension of Washington railroads, cost of food, work supplies, travel costs, costs of goods and food, work deadlines, home renovations, visits to family, cash accounts, accounts of household duties, produce on Woodlands property, records of deaths, debts owed, account of clearing Woodlands property, church visits, Hancock and Tonoloway Aqueduct, canals, Drum Point Railroad, Montgomery C. Meigs, Washington Aqueduct, Annapolis Water Works, telegram costs, wages for Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, William Craighill, Morris Canal, Annapolis Railroad and Canal, professional duties (inspections), Kanawha River Canal, travel schedules, professional expenses, cash received from Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, John's Dam, cathedral construction (St. Patricks?), Piedmont Bridge, Cumberland, account of farm property belonging to Major Campbell Bruns, Cunard Pier, Marquise de Portes, rent costs, Baltimore Canal, Kingston Water Supply, Croton Orange Estate, Pierre Casson, Hudson River Tunnel, Washington/Harlem River Bridge, entertainment costs, Greenwood cemetery, train schedule, notes on illness, real estate sales, Hutton Park, Benjamin H. Hutton estate and heirs, estimates, accounts of correspondence received and sent, Central Railroad, rent on Orange properties, addresses, contracts and building supplies for projects, personal finances, Joseph Hutton property on Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, amounts paid and received, medical appointments, Ramapo Water Company, drawing progress of maps and diagrams, Harbor Board (New York), property repairs, inspection and test reports, reservoirs, lists of birthdays, Boston Tunnel, family financial issues, tax payments, and prayers.

Series 6, Notebooks, 1860-1900, document the engineering and architectural projects worked on by Hutton. The series has been divided into three subseries: Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899; Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886; and Subseries 3, Notes, 1863-1900. Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899, contains sixteen field notebooks used by Hutton. Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886, contains seven notebooks. Subseries three, Notes, 1863-1900, contains four documents.

Some notebooks correspond to specific projects such as the Kanawha River Canal (lockgate and Phoenix Waterline), Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, Buffalo Reservoir, Potomac Lock and Dock Company, Northern Adirondack Railroad account, Washington Aqueduct, Little Rock Bridge, Wilson-Adam Dock, Croten Brick Works, Hutton Park, Centennial Iron Works, Cumberland Canal, Williamsport Aqueduct, Catoctin Aqueduct, Alexandria Canal, Miller's Saw Mill, Seneca Dam, Union Tunnel, Cumberland Waterworks, Victoria Bridge, Welland Canal, North Sea Canal, Ramapo Water Company, Annapolis Water Company, Antietam Aqueduct, Interoceanic Canal, San Quentin Canal, Suez Canal, Amsterdam Canal, Harlem Bulkhead, Morris Canal, Blue Lake Canal, and Nicaragua Canal.

These notebooks should be used in conjunction with the other materials in the collection related to professional projects, as they often provide more detailed accounts of the construction and land surveys. Some of the notebooks contain entries from several different sources. The notebooks were probably shared among the engineers working on these projects. The notebooks also contain looseleaf ephemera such as hand written calculations, newspaper clippings, and blueprints. Languages found in this series are English and French.

Notebook topics include construction projects, supply needs, costs for labor, sketches (Woodland Mills, landscapes, dams, railway cars, Noland Tunnel), costs of crops, survey measurements, cost of livestock, aqueducts, inspections, canal bridges, seed prices, dams, measurements, coffer dam, canal maintenance, worker salaries, calculations, towpath sketches and measurements, shipping rates, worker accidents, water and coal used, geometrical sketches (Washington Aqueduct), locks, damage reports, interactions with other engineers (William Reading), coal shipments on the canal, travel expenses, land survey notes, drafts for correspondence, William Craighill, Victoria docks, lists of personal supplies used, construction time estimates, surveying expenses, telegram costs, sand pump, canal from Sherling to Tuxedo Bay, analysis of several artificial lakes and reservoirs, distances of reservoirs to main pipes, calculations for the Austin Wheel, engine construction, bridges, gauging water depth, results and observations of tests and performance, problems with construction, to-do lists, cost of land surrounding towpaths, Fawcett's Lock, Tarman's Lock, comparison of costs in transporting coal by water and by rail, inspection notes, iron work, drainages, leaks, cost of supplies, watergates, harbor ferries, railroad station distances, flood protection, Panama Canal via the Nicaraguan route, cost of jetties, water levels, pressure of steam, boilers, steam and water cycle, water depth, cement, Great Falls, Virginia, waterflow, soundings, time of floats, flow of currents, rain fall measurements, tunnel measurements, cost of trenching San Francisco water supply, record of livestock, cost of food, rates of sawing woods and mills, preliminary railroad line measurements, profile of final line, and railroad line profiles.

Series 7, Cash Books, 1856-1899, contains seven cashbooks which list prices for personal items purchased by Hutton. Topics include groceries, church dues, clothes, hygiene products, cigars, some short journal entries about his work (Williamstown), concerts, dinners, family addresses, cakes, meals, cars, stamps, office supplies (pencils and papers), valentines, glasses, gloves, fabric, medicine, needles, diapers, tobacco, shoes (adult and childrens), travel expenses, telegrams, candles, newspapers, liquor, coal oil, jewelry, allowances given to family members, bank deposits, monies paid and received, taxes, subscriptions, tailoring costs, deposits and payments into estate trusts, and notes about payments to Benjamin H. Hutton heirs. The cashbooks also contain some personal loose leaf ephemera such as prayers, sketches, and engineering notes collected by Hutton.

Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965, contains documents about engineering and architectural projects throughout Hutton's career, including information about the professional organizations and the legal issues in which he was involved. This series has been divided into eight subseries based on project, document form, and document subject. Some materials are in French and Italian.

Series 8, Professional Projects, also includes correspondence related to specific projects, primarily the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, the Hudson River Tunnel, the Washington/Harlem River Bridge, and the Georgetown Incline.

Topics include construction and repair to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, engineering and use of Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, worker contracts, supply and labor purchases, design plans and proposals, construction and repair costs, supply notes and costs of supplies, water pressure and power, shipping materials and routes (specifically the shipping of coal), inspections and their findings, condition of canal dam and locks, water supply, drainage, sketches, board proceedings, business meetings, deeds, cost comparisons to other shipping methods, hiring processes, wages, cost estimates, Hutton's consulting fees, measurements and calculations, funding issues, worker conflicts, negotiations with municipal governments, payment schedules, bills for services, air pressure in Hudson River Tunnel, permission for construction, specifications, mortality rate among workers on the Hudson River Tunnel, construction reports, outlet incline, proposals for construction, letters of introduction, railroad versus water for trade, controversy with Tiersey, construction contracts, construction schedules, construction issues, construction progress, construction damage, basis for estimates, supply requests, internal politics, changes to construction plans, contract and price adjustments, issues with suppliers, construction delays, work permits, bills, worker issues, engineering notes, construction excavations, expenses, construction instructions, Union Bridge Company, lighting installations, construction processes, hiring practices, electrical conductors, water proofing, hydraulics, cement, concrete, payment of contributors, processes of approval for construction, meeting dates of the Harlem River Bridge Commission, and contract restrictions.

Correspondents include the following: W.W.M. Kaig, Henry Dodge, E. Mulvany, John Shay, James Clarke, H.D. Whitcomb, Horace Benton, J. Rellan, J.R. Maus, W.E. Merrill, A.P. Gorman, J.H. Staats, Vernon H. Brown, Charles H. Fisher (New York Central and Hudson River Railway Company), B. Baker, John Fowler, Benjamin and John Dos Passos, Charles B. Colby, Charles B. Brush, S. Pearson, Stanford White, Horace E. Golding, R.H. Smith, Daniel Lord, A. Fteley, Herbert Hinds, J.R. Bartlett, D.M. Hirsch, M.H. Bartholomew, Thomas O. Driscoll, W.E. Porter, Thomas F. Rowland, George Edward Harding, R.H. Dames, William Watson, James B. Eads, J.D. Bright, H. Aston, Charles Suley, A.M. Maynard, W.R. Henton, G. Geddes, H.P. Gilbut, Malcolm W. Niver (Secretary of the Harlem River Bridge Commission), J.D. Patterson, George Devin (Assistant Engineer Washington/ Harlem River Bridge), J.B. Wheeler, John Bogart, Charles Burns, J. McClellon, Rob Bassee, B. Williamson, Theodore Cooper, Lewis Cass Ledyard, R.M. Hunt, John Cooper, Henry Wilson, A.A. Caille, Myles Tierney, W. Pentzen, L.B. Cantfield, George Q. Grumstaid Junior, M.J. Funton, George Pierce, W.O. Fayerweather, Noah S. Belthen, Herbert Steward, W.M. Habirsham. Subseries 1, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1965, consists of plans, blueprints, land profiles, drawings, boat rates, contract forms, order forms, descriptions of the canal, design information, engineering data, sketches, cost estimates, land titles, microfilm, business papers, supply bills, patent bills, news clippings, reports, specifications, stockholder's reports, receipts, water leases, printed materials, and correspondence.

The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal project was started in 1828 and completed twenty two years later in 1850. The canal's main objective was to connect Georgetown to the coal banks above Cumberland, Maryland, providing a short and cheap trade route between the eastern and western United States. It was also hoped that the canal would provide greater communication and travel between these two regions. Plagued by natural disasters, and construction setbacks, the canal was never completed in time to be useful and became obsolete shortly after its completion. Canal trade was eventually put out of business by the increase of railroads. Although it was an important development in engineering at its inception, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal is no longer in use and has become what locals affectionately refer to as "the old ditch." The canal was designated a National Historical Park in 1971 and consists of 184.5 miles of hiking and biking trails.

Subseries 2, Hudson River Tunnel, 1887-1901, consists of agreements for construction, certificates, contracts, and cost estimates, construction reports, engineering notebooks, engineering notes, sketches, land profiles, maps, progress profiles, plans, proposals, printed material, statements of expenses, and correspondence.

The Hudson River Tunnel project was started in 1874, and the final tubes were opened in 1910 after several construction setbacks. The tunnel connects Weehawken, New Jersey and Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, New York City. Today the Hudson River Tunnel, known as the North River Tunnels is used by Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and New Jersey Transit rail lines.

Subseries 3, Harlem River Bridge, 1878-1982, consists of blueprints, printed materials, photographs, engineer's estimates, schedules, costs, reports, proposals, contracts, specifications, and correspondence.

The Harlem River Bridge project was started in 1885 and was completed in 1889. It spans the Harlem River in New York City, New York and connects the Washington Heights section of Manhattan with the Bronx. It was later named and is still known as the Washington Bridge and has been adapted over time to carry highway traffic. These adaptations have allowed the bridge to remain in use today.

Subseries 4, Other Projects, 1858-1832, consists of drawings, maps, blueprints, plans, proposals, cost estimates, bills, correspondence, sketches, land profiles, dimensions, engineering notes, account records, photostats, supply lists, calculations, legal documents, surveys, inspection reports, financial data, and measurements on architectural and engineering projects. Highlights of this subseries include: Western Maryland Railroad, Washington Aqueduct, Panama Canal, Ramapo Water Company, Piedmont Bridge, Northern Adirondack Railroad, Columbia Railroad, Morris Canal, Pittsfield and Williamstown Railroad, Suez Canal, St. Gothard Canal, Tansa Dam, Colorado Midland Railroad Company, Memorial Bridge, Mersey Tunnel, Little Rock Bridge, Kingston Water Supply, Kanawha River Canal, Florida Ship Canal, East Jersey Water Company, Consolidated Coal Company, Dismal Swamp Canal, Boston and Baltimore Tunnels, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Annapolis Water Company, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad Company, and the Baltimore Beltline.

Subseries 5, Unidentified Project Files, 1872-1900, consists of bills of sale, engineering forms and regulations, cement test results and methods, census bulletin, contracts, cost estimates, correspondence, notes on publications, engineering data and notes, drawings, surveys, sketches, payrolls, photographs, and reports.

Subseries 6, Specifications, 1870-1900, consists of documents related to some of Hutton's projects, including specifications for bridges, reservoirs, canals, viaducts, docks, buildings, water works, and tunnels. Some specifications are more general, and some are blank proposal/specification forms. There are also proposals for estimates and a "call" or advertisement to contractors to bid on certain projects. Many of the specifications deal with projects in New York State, but projects in Pennsylvania, the City of Baltimore, and Europe are represented. The materials are arranged alphabetically by project name. There is one folder of documentation for the Potomac River Bridge (Arlington Memorial Bridge) in Washington, D.C. The Arlington Memorial Bridge was part of the 1901 McMillan Commission's plan for restoring Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant's original plan for the capital. Two decades passed before construction was initiated by the architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White. The documentation for the Memorial Bridge consists of calculations and monetary figures for materials such as granite.

Subseries 7, Legal Documents, 1886, contains documents related to a patent infringement suit for moveable dams involving Alfred Pasqueau vs. the United States. This file contains both a printed version of the case and a handwritten statement from Hutton.

Subseries 8, Professional Organizations, 1870-1902, contains documents related to professional organizations where Hutton held membership. Specific organizations represented are American Institute of Architects, American Society of Civil Engineers, Institution of Civil Engineers, Boston Society of Civil Engineers, Societe des Ingenieurs Civils de France, Librarie Polytechnique, American Agency of "Engineering" in London, Imperial Institute, League of Associated Engineers, Railroad Corporation, American Institute of Mining Engineers, and the Century Association. Material in the subseries includes correspondence, candidates for membership, membership payments, membership lists, meeting minutes, schedule of terms, professional practices, charges, articles of association, invitations for membership, and election notes. Some materials are in French.

Series 9, Printed Materials, 1850-1913, contains a variety of printed materials relating to engineering and architectural projects written by Hutton and fellow engineers. This series can be used to examine not only professional developments of the period and responses to those developments, but also to track how ideas were transferred between engineers across countries and continents. This series should be used in conjunction with the professional correspondence found in this collection, as many of the authors also appear there. Some materials are in French, German, Spanish, and Italian.

Subseries 1, Printed Materials by Hutton, 1852-1900, includes printed papers on the Missouri flood wave, the Ravine du Sud, the Potomac waterfront, the Colorado midlands, and the application of water supply machinery.

Subseries 2, Printed Materials by Others, 1826-1913, includes printed materials on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canals, Tehuantec Ship Railway, Interoceanic canals and railways, jetties, Nicaragua Canal, uses of cements, mortars, concretes, steam power, harbors, Niagara Falls, Kanawha River canal, Mississippi River, Hudson River Bridge, sewage disposal, Washington Aqueduct, specifications, construction progress reports, hydraulic experiments, water supply, drainage, road surfacing, sea walls, water-cooling apparatus, pollution reports, bridges, pipes, channels, reservoirs, irrigation, water power, and sewers.

Subseries 2 contains an issue of The North American Review in which Hutton has specifically highlighted an article entitled, "The Inter-Oceanic Canal." Please see the container list for names of authors.

Subseries 3, Printed Materials with No Author, 1852-1903, includes printed materials on harbor reports, Annapolis Water Company, Ramapo Water Company, water departments and boards, maps, engineer's reports, sea walls, preservation of structures, annual reports, Coal and Iron Railway Company, sewers, Baltimore and Drum Point Railroad, contract specifications, proposals, social club life, Croton Water Supply, law suits, water supplies, moveable dams, reservoirs, East River Bridge, Eastern Canal, water filtration, Kingston New Water Supply, water pipes, locks, docks, contracts, construction reports, Croton Water Supply, and surveys. Also included are issues of journals such as Le Correspondant, Circular of the Office of Chief Engineers, The Club, VIII Congres International de Navigation, Journal of the Association of Engineering Studies, and Journal of the Franklin Institute.

Subseries 4, Newspaper, Journals and Magazine Clippings, 1873-1900, contains clippings from a variety of newspapers such as Scientific American, andRailroad Gazette. Subjects included are the Union Tunnel opening in Baltimore, Drum Point Railroad, railroad company conflicts, Washington/Harlem River Bridge, Metropolitan Railroad, Western Maryland Railroad, crop prospects, lumber trade, North Avenue Bridge, Nicaraguan Canal, harbors, river improvements, reactions to engineering projects, Belt tunnel, city transit, Washington, D.C. flood in 1880, tunnel shields, Springfield Bridge, railroad patents, Panama Canal, jetties, Hudson Tunnel, steel boilers, composition and use of cement, and the Brooklyn Bridge.

Subseries 5, Oversized Printed Materials, 1889-1892, contains large printed materials related to the Washington Aqueduct, General Post Office Building, subway arches, cornices, Warwick's Castle, Neuschwanstein Castle, Renaissance paintings, botanical drawings, school buildings, church architecture, the Hospital for the Insane of the Army and Navy and the District of Columbia, the Panama Canal, Morningside Park, and the Mississippi Jetties. Also includes engravings of Hutton, T.N. Talfound, and F. Jeffrey and photographs of Montgomery C. Meigs, and Hutton. Some materials are in German and French.

References:

1. Ward, George Washington, "The Early Development of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Project," Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science Series XVII, no. 9-11 (1899): 8.

2. Ibid., 88.

3. Ibid., 55.

4. Ibid., 90.

5. Sanderlin, Walter S., "The Great National Project: A History of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal," Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science Series LXIV, no. 1 (1946): 21.

6. Ibid., 282.

7. Gies, Joseph, Adventure Underground (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday and Company Inc., 1962): 134.

8. Ibid., 131-132.

9. Ibid., 135-136.

10. Ibid., 145.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series.

Series 1, Letterpress Copybooks, 1858-1901

Series 2, Professional Correspondence, 1861-1901

Subseries 1, Project Correspondence, 1876-1899

Subseries 2, General Correspondence, 1861-1901

Series 3, Personal Correspondence, 1850-1942

Series 4, Personal Materials, 1835-1946

Subseries 1, Financial Records, 1876-1901

Subseries 2, Estate and Real Estate Records, 1835-1921

Subseries 3, Other Huttons, 1874-1936

Subseries 4, Personal Materials, 1878-1946

Series 5, Diaries, 1866-1901

Series 6, Notebooks, 1860-1900

Subseries 1, Engineering and Survey Field Notes, 1860-1899

Subseries 2, Notebooks, 1871-1886

Subseries 3, Notes, 1863-1900

Series 7, Cashbooks, 1856-1899

Series 8, Professional Projects, 1830-1965

Subseries 1, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 1828-1965

Subseries 2, Hudson River Tunnel, 1887-1901

Subseries 3, Harlem River Bridge, 1878-1892

Subseries 4, Other Projects, 1858-1932

Subseries 5, Identified Project Files, 1872-1900

Subseries 6, Specifications, 1870-1900

Subseries 7, Legal Documents, 1886

Subseries 8, Professional Organizations, 1870-1902

Series 9, Printed Materials, 1826-1913

Subseries 1, Printed Materials by Hutton, 1852-1900

Subseries 2, Printed Materials by Others, 1826-1913

Subseries 3, Newspaper, Journals, and Magazine Clippings, 1855-1901

Subseries 4, Oversized Printed Material, 1889-1892

Series 10: Drawings, 1875, 1883
Biographical / Historical:
Not much is known about the history of William Rich Hutton outside of his role in architectural and engineering projects of the late 1800s and early 1900s. In many cases, he is spoken of only in reference to his projects, and the short biographies that have been written read more like a resume than a life story. Because of this lack of information, this note will focus on Hutton's professional accomplishments, but will attempt to make some comments on his personal life.

William Rich Hutton was born on March 21, 1826 in Washington, D.C., the eldest son of James Hutton (died 1843) and his wife, the former Salome Rich (1). He was educated at the Western Academy (Washington, D.C.) from 1837-1840 under George J. Abbot and then at Benjamin Hallowell's School in Alexandria, Virginia, where he received special training in mathematics, drawing, and surveying (2). Hutton began his professional career in California when he, along with his younger brother James, accompanied their uncle William Rich to work for the United States Army. His uncle was a paymaster for the army and Hutton became his clerk. They traveled around the new state paying the various platoons stationed there, but Hutton also occupied his time by drawing the landscapes and structures he saw in the settlements of Los Angeles, San Francisco, La Paz, Mazatlan, Santa Barbara, Monterey, San Pedro, San Diego, and Cape San Lucas (3). These drawings are now held by the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. Hutton held the position of clerk until the spring of 1849, and in July of that year he began working with Lieutenant Edward O.C. Ord and completed the first survey of Los Angeles and its surrounding pueblo lands and islands. Hutton continued surveying in California from 1850-1851. He was hired by William G. Dana to survey the Nipomo Ranch in San Luis Obispo County and also surveyed the ranches Santa Manuela and Huer-Huero, both owned by Francis Z. Branch. After his employment with Dana, he became the county surveyor for San Luis Obispo County, where he prepared the first survey and map of the region. He also continued to survey ranches for Captain John Wilson during this time. In August 1851, he resigned from his position as county surveyor and moved to Monterey where he worked as an assistant to Captain (later General) Henry W. Hallack, superintendent of the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine in Santa Clara County (4). He remained in this position until March, 1853 when he returned to Washington, D.C. by way of Mexico (5).

Hutton began his career as a civil engineer in Washington, D.C. He was first assigned to the position of assistant engineer on a survey of the projected Metropolitan Railroad in 1853, which was chartered to connect Washington, D.C. with the mainline of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. In 1855 he began his professional relationship with Montgomery C. Meigs when he was appointed to the position of assistant engineer on the Washington Aqueduct. He also served as division engineer on this project until construction was shut down in 1861 because of the outbreak of the Civil War. Fortunately for Hutton, the construction on the Aqueduct was resumed in 1862, and when Congress transferred the supervision of the aqueduct project from the War Department to the Department of the Interior, Hutton was made chief engineer. By the end of the Civil War, Hutton's reputation as a civil engineer was established (6).

During this decade Hutton also served as the chief engineer for the Annapolis Water Works (1866) and as chief engineer for one of his most famous projects, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (1869-1871). Although some historians minimize Hutton as just one of many engineers to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, he did make one major contribution to its construction: the Georgetown Canal Incline. Perhaps the final effort of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal company to compete with the emerging and fast expanding railroad, the Georgetown Incline was designed to allow canal boats to travel through the canal with low water levels and to alleviate canal congestion. Unfortunately, by the time the incline was completed use of the canal had decreased so significantly that it was no longer needed to help control traffic (7). Despite this, Hutton continued to work as a consulting engineer for the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company until 1881, when he was let go because of the dwindling fortunes of the company (7).

In the 1870s and 1880s Hutton was busy with several engineering projects. During 1871-1873, he was the chief engineer in the completion of the Western Maryland Railroad to Hagerstown and Williamsport (9). He also practiced as an architect with his brother, the prominent Baltimore architect Nathanial Henry Hutton, during the years 1873-1880. He relocated to New York in 1880, serving as chief engineer for the Washington Bridge in 1888 and 1889 and the Hudson River Tunnel from 1889 to 1891. In 1886, he became the consulting engineer for the New Croton Aqueduct and served in the same position for the Colorado Midland Railway between the years of 1886-1889 (10).

As his personal and professional correspondence shows, Hutton continued to work on various engineering and architectural projects until his death on December 11, 1901. In addition to these projects, he also invented the innovative system of locks and moveable dams used in the Kanawha River Canal. He was awarded the Diplome d'Honneur for this featat the Paris Exposition in 1878 (11). His correspondence also demonstrates how Hutton was respected within his professional community. These letters refer to the accuracy of his work, his willingness to help other colleagues and supply them with reference materials and information, and, in addition to all this, his politeness. It seems that these qualities defined not only his personality but also his ideology. In one of the cashbooks in the collection, dated 1899, a hand written note contains a religious parable of "The Straw." The phrase in this parable that speaks most to Hutton's work ethic, and to the spirit of inventors everywhere, is this: "Even so however lowly may be the act, however little opportunities we may have of assisting others, we may still do something. Let us beg to fulfil our duty in this regards by making ourselves useful to others by some little act of thoughtful charity..." (12). Hutton, in his dedication to civil engineering, seems to have lived up to this virtue, and in his work he changed the landscape of Washington, D.C. and New York.

The Fairy Godfather: Hutton's Personal History

His professional records reveal a man who was fiercely dedicated to his work. His obituary references his professional life more than his personal life (13). Despite his reputation in the professional engineering community, his personal records demonstrate that Hutton was also dedicated to his family and children. In 1855, he married Montgomery County native Mary Augusta Clopper (died 1915). Together they lived on her family's estate known as the Woodlands, and had five children: Frank C. Hutton, Mary Hutton, Elizabeth Hutton (later Caulfield), Rosa Hutton, and Annie Salome Hutton (14). It is at this estate that Hutton died and was buried. The personal letters to his wife found in the Woodlands Collection held at the Montgomery County Historical Society show a man in love and willing to take time from his work to write to his wife. His letters to his children show a similar interest and compassion. In the many letters found in this collection from his daughter Elizabeth (Bessie) one can see a father who is interested in not only his daughter's activities abroad, but also in her opinion. This interest also extends to his son Frank Hutton, as their correspondence shows Hutton offering his son advice on his own engineering projects.

Hutton also served as executor to many of his extended family's estates. Many letters show the conflicts that Hutton had to mediate and the dependence of his cousins on him for advice and money. Although his family was wealthy (his cousin was Benjamin H. Hutton whose daughters married into the court of Napoleon III), they were volatile, and his records seem to indicate that he served as a mediator for many of their disputes. In addition to this, as his nickname of Fairy Godfather suggests, Hutton was always willing to lend his family either financial or moral support when needed. Unfortunately, little other documentation concerning Hutton's personal life exists outside of this collection and the one held at the Montgomery County Historical Society.

References:

1. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942).

2. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): ix.

3. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942). and Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): x-xi.

4. Waters, Willard O., "Introduction," California 1847-1852 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942).

5. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): xvii.

6. Waters, Willard O., "Memoir," Glances at California 1847-1853 (San Marino: The Huntington Library, 1942): xvii-xviii.

7. Skramstad, Harold, "The Georgetown Canal Incline," Technology and Culture, Vol. 10, no. 4 (Oct. 1969): 555.

8. Business Correspondence, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 22 February 1881, William R. Hutton Papers, 1830-1965, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, box number 27, folder number 29.

9. "William Rich Hutton," The Club: A Journal of Club Life for Men and Women,(July 1894):37

10. Ibid.

11. Monzione, Joseph, "William R. Hutton," A.P.W.A. Reporter (Sept. 1977): 7.

12. Cashbook, 1899, William R. Hutton Papers, 1830-1965, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, box number 23, folder number 5.

13. The Woodlands Collection, Montgomery County Historical Society.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

The Montgomery C. Meigs Papers, 1870-1890, (AC0987). Contains materials relating to the construction of the Washington Aqueduct including a book of drawings illustrating reservoirs, tunnels, culverts, and other structural elements, a Government Senate Document relating to construction progress, scrapbooks created by Meigs that include newspaper clippings about the Washington Aqueduct project, water supply, engineering projects, building construction, architecture and other subjects. Collection is currently unprocessed, but is available for research.

Materials in Other Organizations:

The William Rich Hutton Papers, 1840-1961, are located at the Huntington Library in California (see http://catalog.huntington.org).

The collection contains 95 drawings, 13 letters, and 39 facsimile copies of letters and manuscripts. The illustrative material includes both watercolor and pencil drawings of California (including Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, the New Almaden Quicksilver Mine, and the California missions), Baja California, Mexico, and Peru. There are also five pieces in the collection related to the author María Amparo Ruiz de Burton. In 1942, the Huntington Library published Glances at California 1847--853: Diaries and Letters of William Rich Hutton, Surveyor and California 1847--852: Drawings by William Rich Hutton.

The Hutton family papers are located at the Montgomery County Historical Society, Sween Library (see http://www.montgomeryhistory.org/sites/default/files/Family_Files.pdf).

The collection contains account books from the Woodlands estate, recipe books, livestock records, records of Mary Augusta Hutton (wife), Mary and Rose Hutton (daughters), newspaper clippings (including his obituary), correspondence, record books, deeds, bills and receipts, engineering papers, religious momentos (funeral service cards), and insurance papers.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Mr. and Mrs. James J. Madine, a relative of Hutton's and last owners of the Woodlands estate; the Department of Forests and Parks, Maryland; Louis Fischer; and Mr. and Mrs. Mayo S. Stuntz, 1965-1966, 1974.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Dams  Search this
Hydraulic engineering  Search this
Canals  Search this
Underwater tunnels  Search this
Railroad bridges  Search this
Railroad construction  Search this
Water-supply  Search this
Construction workers  Search this
Construction equipment  Search this
Concrete construction  Search this
Concrete  Search this
Coal -- Transportation  Search this
Civil engineers  Search this
Civil engineering  Search this
Canals -- Panama  Search this
Canals -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Canals -- Maryland  Search this
Canals -- Design and construction  Search this
Bridges -- United States  Search this
Waterworks  Search this
Tunnels  Search this
Tunnels -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Construction -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Underground construction  Search this
Locks and dams  Search this
Shipping  Search this
Iron and steel bridges  Search this
Sewage disposal  Search this
Railroads -- Maryland  Search this
Railroads -- 19th century  Search this
Railroad engineering  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Aqueducts  Search this
Arch bridges  Search this
Architects -- 19th century  Search this
Books  Search this
Bridges -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Bridges -- Design and construction  Search this
Bridge construction industry -- United States  Search this
Engineering notebooks  Search this
Docks  Search this
Domestic and family life  Search this
Architecture -- United States  Search this
Architecture -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Harlem River Bridge  Search this
Western Maryland Railroad  Search this
Annapolis Waterworks  Search this
Steam engineering  Search this
Harlem River Bridge Commission  Search this
Washington (D.C.) -- 19th century  Search this
Reservoirs  Search this
Patents  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Letterpress copybooks
Blueprints
Diaries
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Cashbooks
Business records -- 19th century
Business letters
Notebooks
Topographic maps
Tax records
Technical drawings
Stock certificates
Technical literature
Photoengravings
Notes
Maps -- 19th century
Microfilms
Linen tracings
Letter books
Letters
Land titles
Legal documents
Sketches
Salted paper prints
Reports
Receipts
Plans (drawings)
Photostats
Photographic prints
Architectural drawings
Administrative records
Albumen prints
Albums
Annual reports
Booklets
Account books -- 19th century
Books -- 19th century
Family papers -- 18th century
Financial records -- 19th century
Diaries -- 19th century
Drawings -- 19th century
Cyanotypes
Correspondence -- 19th-20th century
Deeds
Printed material
Correspondence
Contracts
Photograph albums
Specifications
Christmas cards
Menus
Citation:
William R. Hutton Papers, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0987
See more items in:
William R. Hutton Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep84f6824ce-7291-4ac4-ab0f-abaa2071815e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0987
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Julie Ault

Interviewee:
Ault, Julie  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Group Material (Firm : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Alderfer, Hannah  Search this
Alexander, Vikky, 1959-  Search this
Ashford, Doug  Search this
Beck, Martin, 1962-  Search this
Blake, Nayland, 1960-  Search this
Brennan, Patrick  Search this
Evans, Steven, (Curator)  Search this
Garrels, Gary  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Hawkins, Yolanda  Search this
Kalin, Tom  Search this
Klein, Jochen, 1967-1997  Search this
Lindell, John  Search this
Locks, Sabrina  Search this
Maharaj, Sarat (Sarat Chandra), 1952-  Search this
McCarty, Marlene, 1957-  Search this
McLaughlin, Mundy  Search this
Meyer, Richard, 1966-  Search this
Miller-Keller, Andrea  Search this
Moffett, Donald, 1955-  Search this
Nelson, Marybeth  Search this
Olander, William  Search this
Pasternak, Anne, 1964-  Search this
Phillips, Lisa, 1954-  Search this
Ramspacher, Karen  Search this
Rinder, Lawrence  Search this
Rollins, Tim, 1955-  Search this
Sandqvist, Gertrud  Search this
Serrano, Andres, 1950-  Search this
Staniszewski, Mary Anne  Search this
Szypula, Peter  Search this
Tucker, Marcia  Search this
Wagner, Frank  Search this
Wright, Charles  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (sound files (6 hr., 3 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
90 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Washington (D.C.) -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 November 14-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Julie Ault conducted 2017 November 14 and 16, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at a studio in Brooklyn, New York.
Ault speaks of the nature of memory and giving an oral history; her skepticism of linear narratives; leaving rural Maine for Washington, DC at age 17; her family history; her interest in popular culture and commercial culture as a teenager; disco and nightclubs in Washington and New York in the late 1970's; working a variety of day jobs in New York, including a telephone answering service; meeting Tim Rollins for the first time in Maine; her interest in conversation; her relationship to questions; the formation of Group Material in 1979; her relationship with Andres Serrano; Group Material's collaborative dynamic, and its effect on her personal development; the complexities of trying to write or tell history; the shifting configurations and contexts of Group Material over 17 years of activity; mounting, and thinking critically about, individual exhibitions after Group Material; the first AIDS Timeline in 1989; the ephemerality of the Timeline; book projects as a means of depositing personal memories; her first memories of the AIDS crisis beginning in 1983; Group Material's Democracy and AIDS series at Dia in 1988; investigating the tension between art and activism in the context of HIV/AIDS; Karen Ramspacher's entry and contributions to Group Material; the initial decision to employ the form of a timeline and four arenas of research; different audience relationships and reactions to the Timeline; the collaborative process of creating the Timeline; losing NEA funding after the Timeline, amid the early '90s culture wars; Group Material's second exhibition of AIDS Timeline in 1990; her friendship with Felix Gonzalez-Torres; Group Material's third exhibition of AIDS Timeline in 1991; the Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart exhibition; and an acknowledgement of topics that could not be covered in the interview. Ault also recalls Doug Ashford, Vikky Alexander, Yolanda Hawkins, Mundy McLaughlin, Sarat Maharaj, Gertrud Sandqvist, Marybeth Nelson, Patrick Brennan, Hannah Alderfer, Peter Szypula, Sabrina Locks, Larry Rinder, Richard Meyer, Bill Olander, Marcia Tucker, Gary Garrels, Charles Wright, Frank Wagner, Martin Beck, Nayland Blake, Anne Pasternak, Mary Anne Staniszewski, John Lindell, Tom Kalin, Donald Moffett, Marlene McCarty, Jochen Klein, Lisa Phillips, Andrea Miller-Keller, Steven Evans, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Julie Ault (1957- ) is an artist, writer, and curator in New York, New York. Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Political activists  Search this
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
History -- Philosophy  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ault17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw929509f5d-db8b-454a-b779-1c146a51a0e3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ault17
Online Media:

Letterpress book. Volume 6, 1900 February 19 - November 5

Collection Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Container:
Box 40, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Collection Citation:
Charles Lang Freer Papers. FSA A.01. National Museum of Asian Art Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of the estate of Charles Lang Freer.
See more items in:
Charles Lang Freer Papers
Charles Lang Freer Papers / Series 2: Correspondence / 2.2: Charles Lang Freer Letterpress Books, 1892-1910
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc37b952b61-31b5-4100-bedf-0cc0c07dc9de
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-01-ref646
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Letterpress book. Volume 6, 1900 February 19 - November 5 digital asset number 1

Charles Keller papers

Creator:
Keller, Charles, 1914-2006  Search this
Names:
Artists League of America  Search this
United American Artists  Search this
United States. Public Buildings Administration. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Workshop of Graphic Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Young American Artists Association  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Sternberg, Harry, 1904-2001  Search this
White, Charles, 1918-1979  Search this
Extent:
1.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Date:
1937-1982
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material, correspondence, writings, sketches, teaching files, files on organizations to which Keller belonged, printed material, photographs, and a video on Keller.
REELS 7-8: Files kept by Keller on art organizations, including Artists' League of America, Section of Fine Arts of the Public Buildings Administration, United American Artists, Workshop of Graphic Art, and Young American Artists Association. Files contain letters received, newsletters, bulletins, and business records.
REEL 5141: Résumé; passports; correspondence, including letters from family, friends Rockwell Kent, Ad Reinhardt, Harry Sternberg, Charles White, others, and galleries, letters regarding Keller's studio in Rome; writings and notes; sketches by Keller for a book by Henry Kraus, In a City was a Garden; exhibition catalogs and announcements, guest lists and a guest book; Keller's political cartoons from the Daily World, and other reproductions of Keller's work; notes about Keller's teaching at the Workshop School of Commercial Art, New York City; photographs and slides of Keller and his work; a videorecording, "Charles Keller at Home," filmed in conjunction with an exhibition at the Mid-Hudson Arts and Science Center, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1980; clippings; and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter and illustrator; New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Material on reels 7-8 lent for microfilming 1969 by Ted Davis who occupied Keller's studio after Keller. Materials on reel 5141 donated 1978-1984 by Charles Keller.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Graphic arts  Search this
Political cartoons  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.kellchar
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97d840573-f2ac-4cc6-8587-8ce624a1f8a2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kellchar

Max Weber papers

Creator:
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Forum Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Biddle, George, 1885-1973  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Gross, Chaim, 1904-1991  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
11.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sound recordings
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1902-2008
Summary:
The papers of New York painter and sculptor Max Weber measure 11.8 linear feet and date from 1902-2008. The collection documents Weber's career as an artist through scattered biographical material; correspondence with artists, curators, universities, arts organizations, and others; exhibition and gallery files; personal business records; writings by Weber and others; exhibition catalogs, news clippings, and other printed material; photographs of Weber, exhibitions, and works of art; audio recordings and motion picture films. Also included are records maintained by Joy Weber on the exhibition and sale of Weber's work after his death.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York painter and sculptor Max Weber measure 11.8 linear feet and date from 1902-2008. The collection documents Weber's career as an artist through scattered biographical material; correspondence with artists, curators, universities, arts organizations, and others; exhibition and gallery files; personal business records; writings by Weber and others; exhibition catalogs, news clippings, and other printed material; photographs of Weber, exhibitions, and works of art; audio recordings and motion picture films. Also included are records maintained by Joy Weber on the exhibition and sale of Weber's work after his death.

Biographical material includes biographical summaries, obituaries, award certificates, and a small amount of family memorabilia. Weber's personal and professional correspondence includes discussions of exhibitions, sales, and donations of his work, as well was requests to teach, write, or lecture. Also found is correspondence with arts organizations, clubs, and committees in which he participated. A small amount of family correspondence is also included. Artists that Weber corresponded with include George Biddle, Arthur Davies, William Gropper, Chaim Gross, Marsden Hartley, Rockwell Kent, Leon Kroll, Barnett Newman, Raphael Soyer, and William Zorach, among many others. Weber also corresponded with many art historians and critics, gallery owners, and art patrons. Joy Weber's correspondence primarily concerns the exhibition, loan, sale, and authentication of her father's artwork.

Exhibition files document various solo and group exhibitions of Weber's work. Five reels of motion picture film include footage of an exhibition at the Forum Gallery in 1975. Gallery files include correspondence, inventories, sales and loan records, gallery publications, and other documentation. Most files for exhibitions and galleries were created by Joy Weber after Max Weber's death in 1961. Personal business records include documents on sales, loans, and gifts of Max Weber's artwork; scattered financial documents; and mortgage and property records. Also found are files regarding his participation in the American Artists' Congress and art juries. Weber's writings primarily concern art theory, impressions of other artists, and social and political issues. Additionally there are notes, drafts speeches, and writings by others about Weber.

Printed material is extensive and includes exhibition publications, press releases, and two published booklets written by Weber: "Art Consciousness" and "Things." Also found are news clippings, brochures, newsletters, and publications produced by art organizations, schools, and museums. Photographs include portraits and snapshots of Weber, depicting him working in his studio, participating in art juries, at art openings, and with his family. Photographs also depict installation views of exhibitions and numerous photographs of Weber's artwork. Audiovisual materials include one sound recording of a National Gallery program on Max Weber and five reels of motion picture film that include home movies and footage of an exhibition at the Forum Gallery in 1975.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1905-1995 (Box 1; 10 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1902-2007 (Box 1-5; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1919-2003 (Box 5-6; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 4: Gallery Files, 1926-2005 (Box 6-7; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1906-2006 (Box 7; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 6: Writings, circa 1910s-1999 (Box 7-8; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1909-2008 (Box 8-10, 12; 2.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1930s-circa 2000 (Box 10-11; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 9: Audiovisual Material, 1954-2000 (Box 11, FC 13-17; 0.7 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Max Weber (1881-1961) was a painter and sculptor in New York City.

Weber was born in Bialystok, Russia. When he was ten years old his family moved to Brooklyn, New York. From 1898 to 1900 he attended Pratt Institute and studied theory and practice of design under Arthur Wesley Dow. After graduating he briefly taught drawing in Lynchburg, Virginia, and Duluth, Minnesota. In 1905 he moved to Paris to attend the Académie Julian, studying under Jean-Paul Laurens, and later attended classes at the Académie Colarossi and Académie de la Grande Chaumiere. In 1907 he attended Henri Matisse's studio class. The influence of Matisse and friend Henri Rousseau transformed Weber's painting style to include elements of cubism and fauvism.

Weber returned to New York in 1909, and over the next few years he frequently exhibited at Alfred Stieglitz's gallery 291. Initially his work was panned by American critics for being too modern. Despite criticism, Weber exhibited his work extensively in the 1910s and also began creating abstract sculptures. In 1914 he helped his friend Clarence H. White open the White School of Photography and taught art history there for four years. Also in 1914 his Cubist Poems were published in London. His second book of poetry Primitives was published in 1926.

In 1916 Weber married Frances Abrams. He began to explore narrative subjects in his paintings and in 1918 began carving woodblock prints. He also taught at the Art Students League for the 1919-1921 and 1926-1927 sessions. By the early 1920s he was recognized as an important American artist, serving as a leader in art organizations such as the Society of Independent Artists. In 1930 Weber became the first American modernist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art.

In the 1930s Weber became more active in political and socialist causes, participating in many organizations throughout the Depression and World War II. In 1937 he became the National Chairman of the American Artists' Congress. By the 1940s, his work was widely known and influenced a new generation of American painters. He continued to exhibit extensively, received many awards, such as the Temple Gold Medal at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and often served on art juries. In 1955 he was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters and received an honorary doctorate from Brandeis University. He died in Great Neck, New York, in 1961.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an Allen L. Wetmore letter from Max Weber, April 15, 1946.
Separated Material:
Material lent for microfilming in 1959 and 1969 which was not included in the 2011 donation is available on microfilm reels NY59-6 to NY59-10, N69-82 to N69-88, and N69-112.
Provenance:
Material was lent for microfilming in 1959 by Max Weber and in 1969 by Mrs. Max Weber and daughter, Joy Weber. The bulk of the microfilmed material and additional papers were donated in 2011 by Joy Weber.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Max Weber papers, 1902-2008. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.webemax
See more items in:
Max Weber papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw917740067-13ca-42b3-a394-14c9d399c717
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-webemax
Online Media:

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By