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John Silas Reed

Artist:
Alfred A. Cohn, 05 Sep 1897 - 15 Nov 1972  Search this
Sitter:
John Silas Reed, 22 Oct 1887 - 19 Oct 1920  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 17 × 12.3 cm (6 11/16 × 4 13/16")
Mount: 25.3 × 16.9 cm (9 15/16 × 6 5/8")
Mat: 45.7 × 35.6 cm (18 × 14")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
c. 1918
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Necktie  Search this
John Silas Reed: Male  Search this
John Silas Reed: Literature\Writer  Search this
John Silas Reed: Literature\Writer\Poet  Search this
John Silas Reed: Communications\Journalist\Reporter\Newspaper  Search this
John Silas Reed: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist\Political activist  Search this
John Silas Reed: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Revolutionary  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.88.17
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4af6484e6-600a-4225-ab6a-54b000a800af
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.88.17

Oral history interview with John Wilson, 1993 March 11-1994 August 16

Interviewee:
Wilson, John Woodrow, 1922-  Search this
Wilson, John Woodrow, 1922-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Subject:
Aronson, David  Search this
Bengtz, Ture  Search this
Gaither, Edmund B.  Search this
Hurwitz, Sidney  Search this
Kay, Reed  Search this
Kramer, Jack  Search this
Léger, Fernand  Search this
Lewis, Elma  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Zerbe, Karl  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Boston University. School of Fine and Applied Arts  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11501
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216507
AAA_collcode_wilson93
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216507

Oral history interview with Robert Vázquez-Pacheco, 2017 December 16-17

Interviewee:
Vázquez-Pacheco, Robert, 1956-  Search this
Vázquez-Pacheco, Robert, 1956-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore, 1979-  Search this
Subject:
Ayala, George  Search this
Bordowitz, Gregg  Search this
Callen, Michael  Search this
Elovich, Richard  Search this
Finkelstein, Avram  Search this
Foreman, Matt  Search this
France, David  Search this
Garcia, Robert  Search this
George, Carl  Search this
Guzmán, Manolo  Search this
Kalin, Tom  Search this
King, Charles Bird  Search this
Kirschenbaum, David A.  Search this
Kramer, Larry  Search this
Levine, Deb  Search this
McAlpin, Loring  Search this
McCarty, Marlene  Search this
Metroka, Craig  Search this
Moffett, Donald  Search this
Rice-González, Charles  Search this
Russo, Vito  Search this
Simpson, Mark  Search this
Staley, Peter  Search this
Walsh, Joey  Search this
ACT UP (Organization)  Search this
Gay Switchboard (Berkeley, Calif.)  Search this
Gran Fury (Artists' collective)  Search this
National Latino/a Lesbian and Gay Organization  Search this
Other Countries, Inc.  Search this
People with AIDS Coalition  Search this
State University College (Oswego, N.Y.)  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Activism  Search this
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Theme:
Latino and Latin American  Search this
African American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17530
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)391841
AAA_collcode_vazque17
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_391841
Online Media:

Delegate

Published by:
MelPat Associates, American, 1965 - 1986  Search this
Created by:
C. Melvin Patrick, American, died 1985  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 7/16 × 9/16 in. (27.5 × 21.4 × 1.5 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Harlem, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Houston, Harris County, Texas, United States, North and Central America
San Francisco, California, United States, North and Central America
Oakland, Alameda County, California, United States, North and Central America
Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1984
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Business  Search this
Communities  Search this
Dance  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Fraternities  Search this
Government  Search this
Hollywood (Film)  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Labor  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Men  Search this
Olympics  Search this
Political organizations  Search this
Politics  Search this
Professional organizations  Search this
Religious groups  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Sororities  Search this
Sports  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Women  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Anne B. Patrick and the family of Hilda E. Stokely
Object number:
2012.167.18
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5a99826b2-563a-492a-9d22-e03c2c02f99c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.167.18
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Oral history interview with Judith Bernstein

Interviewee:
Bernstein, Judith, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Gillespie, Benjamin, 1988-  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((22 min.), digital, mp4)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 July 21
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Judith Bernstein conducted 2020 July 21, by Benjamin Gillespie, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Bernstein's studio in New York, New York.
Biographical / Historical:
Judith Bernstein (1942- ) is a painter, feminist, and activist in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Black Lives Matter movement  Search this
Pandemics  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease) -- Social aspects  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.bernst20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bernst20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Guillermo Gómez-Peña

Interviewee:
Gómez-Peña, Guillermo  Search this
Interviewer:
Franco, Josh T., 1985-  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((23 min.), digital, mp4)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 September 11
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Guillermo Gómez-Peña conducted 2020 September 11, by Josh Franco, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Gómez-Peña's home in San Francisco, California.
Biographical / Historical:
Guillermo Gómez-Peña (1955- ) is a Chicano performance artist, arts educator, installation artist, and activist in San Francisco, California. Gómez-Peña was a founding member of Border Arts Workshop and is the executive director of La Pocha Nostra.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Performance artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Installation artists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Educators -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Political activists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Pandemics  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.gomez20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gomez20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Carrie Moyer

Interviewee:
Moyer, Carrie, 1960-  Search this
Interviewer:
Gillespie, Benjamin, 1988-  Search this
Names:
Hunter College. Department of Art -- Faculty  Search this
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((21 min.), digital, mp4)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 August 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Carrie Moyer conducted 2020 August 20, by Benjamin Gillespie, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Moyer's studio in Brooklyn, New York.
Biographical / Historical:
Carrie Moyer (1960- ) is a painter, activist, and educator in New York, NY. Moyer was co-founder of Dyke Action Machine! from 1991-2008 and is a professor and the Director of the MFA Program in Studio Art at Hunter College in Brooklyn.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Pandemics  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Black Lives Matter movement  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.moyer20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-moyer20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with John Wilson

Interviewee:
Wilson, John, 1922-2015  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Boston University. School of Fine and Applied Arts  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Aronson, David, 1923-2015  Search this
Bengtz, Ture, 1907-1973  Search this
Gaither, Edmund B.  Search this
Hurwitz, Sidney, 1932-  Search this
Kay, Reed  Search this
Kramer, Jack  Search this
Lewis, Elma  Search this
Léger, Fernand, 1881-1955  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Zerbe, Karl, 1903-1972  Search this
Extent:
497 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1993 March 11-1994 August 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Woodrow Wilson conducted 1993 March-1994 August, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Wilson discusses his childhood as a member of a family of middle class blacks from British Guiana (now Guyana); his father's grave disappointments in the face of racial discrimination; his parents' push for their children to succeed; early urge to read and draw; encouragement by School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston students who taught at the Roxbury Boys Club; his secondary education; and friends.
He talks about his education at the MFA School, Boston, and comments on such teachers as Ture Bengtz and Karl Zerbe and compares their exacting methods with those of Fernand Leger, his teacher in Paris.
His work of the 1940s prior to going to Paris; the importance of early awards and sales received while still a student at the MFA School; the excitement of sharing a studio with fellow students, Francesco Carbone and Leo Prince; and encouragement to stay in school during WW II with the promise of a European study fellowship after the war.
The great impact of his years in Paris (1948-49); the lack of racial prejudice; the liberating effect of Leger's teaching; his awe of the work of Masaccio and Piero della Francesca during a trip to Italy; and the deep impression made on him by seeing tribal art in the Musee de l'Homme, Paris.
Continued discussion of Leger; his teaching methods; and influences on his work.
His first teaching position at the MFA School; his involvement in civil rights in Boston; his gregariousness and the use of his studio as a meeting place for artists and political activists; his involvement with socialism in Boston and New York; and working in a socialist children's camp. He remembers meeting Paul Robeson, Charles White, Elizabeth Catlett, and Bob Blackburn, who was then setting up his printmaking atelier in New York; marriage to a fellow socialist (June 1950); move to Mexico on a fellowship to study with Jose Orozco on the advice of Leger, only to find that Orozco had died; terrors of travel as an interracial couple through the U.S.; and different racial attitudes in Mexico and the U.S.
Living in Mexico (1950-56) and anecdotes of David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera; his wife's meeting with Frieda Kahlo and seeing her collection of folk art; their free and cosmopolitan, if impoverished, life in Mexico; his work in a printmaking atelier and on the production of frescoes, and a lengthy aside about his brilliant brother, Freddie, who because he was black was not allowed to pursue his first love, geology, for many years.
Continued discussion of his experiences in Mexico; the dreary year (1957) he spent doing commercial art for a meatpackers' union in Chicago, a city he disliked; his move to New York in 1958, taking on commercial work to support his family, and teaching anatomy at the Pratt Institute.
Teaching art at a junior high school in the Bronx, and his gaining respect of students through special projects; teaching drawing at Boston University (1965-86), his approach to teaching including his demanding standards, the seriousness of the students, his opposing rigid attendance and grading rules, and colleagues, such as David Aronson who had created the School, Reed Kay, Jack Kramer, Sidney Hurwitz, and the University president, John Silber.
Working with the black arts entrepreneur, Elma Lewis, in setting up a visual arts program for the Boston black community (late 1960s-1970s), including the selection of a curator, Edmund Barry Gaither, a young art historian, who eventually established a museum of African-American art; his participation in various black art exhibitions, despite his belief that art should be seen regardless of the ethnic origins of artists; his move toward sculpture, beginning in the early 1960s, as a medium most expressive of black persons, culminating in the 1980s in a series of colossal heads and a statue of Martin Luther King, Jr. for the U.S. Capitol (1985-86); and why he makes art and will so long as he is able.
Biographical / Historical:
John Wilson (1922- ) is an African American painter, sculptor, illustrator, printmaker, and educator from Boston, Massachusetts. Full name John Woodrow Wilson.
General:
Originally recorded on 11 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 22 digital wav files. Duration is 16 hr., 2 min.
Uneven transcription reflects Wilson's unusual speech pattern.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the transcription and microfilming of the interview provided by the Newland Foundation.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.wilson93
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wilson93
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Robert Vázquez-Pacheco

Interviewee:
Vázquez-Pacheco, Robert, 1956-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
ACT UP (Organization)  Search this
Gay Switchboard (Berkeley, Calif.)  Search this
Gran Fury (Artists' collective)  Search this
National Latino/a Lesbian and Gay Organization  Search this
Other Countries, Inc.  Search this
People with AIDS Coalition  Search this
State University College (Oswego, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Ayala, George  Search this
Bordowitz, Gregg  Search this
Callen, Michael, 1955-1993  Search this
Elovich, Richard  Search this
Finkelstein, Avram, 1952-  Search this
Foreman, Matt  Search this
France, David, 1959-  Search this
Garcia, Robert, 1933-2017  Search this
George, Carl  Search this
Guzmán, Manolo  Search this
Kalin, Tom  Search this
King, Charles Bird, 1785-1862  Search this
Kirschenbaum, David A.  Search this
Kramer, Larry  Search this
Levine, Deb  Search this
McAlpin, Loring, 1960-  Search this
McCarty, Marlene, 1957-  Search this
Metroka, Craig  Search this
Moffett, Donald, 1955-  Search this
Rice-González, Charles  Search this
Russo, Vito  Search this
Simpson, Mark, 1965-  Search this
Staley, Peter  Search this
Walsh, Joey, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
8 Items (sound files (6 hr., 59 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
131 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 December 16-17
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Robert Vázquez-Pacheco conducted 2017 December 16 and 17, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at The New School, in New York, New York.
Vazquez-Pacheco speaks of his childhood in South Bronx housing projects; members and dynamics of his family growing up; experiences and discourses of religion, race, gender, sexuality, reading, and the arts as a child and adolescent; attending SUNY Oswego for one year; an existentially pivotal year in Miami in 1975; returning to New York in 1976, immersing himself in Latino gay culture, and being exposed to white gay culture; living in Hempstead, New York for two years with a boyfriend, and beginning to paint again; working at Chase Manhattan Bank and volunteering for the Gay Switchboard in New York City in the late '70s; the beginning of the AIDS epidemic; caring for his boyfriend, Jeff, who died of AIDS in 1986; the particular experience and effect of HIV on communities of color and low-income communities; mounting societal homophobia during the epidemic; leading Gay Circles, a gay men's consciousness-raising group, in the late '80s; his involvement in ACT UP, and burgeoning political consciousness, after Jeff's death; activism as a creative outlet; working at different times with the People With AIDS health group, the Anti-Violence Project, the Minority AIDS Taskforce, Latino Gay Men of New York, Minority AIDS Coalition in Philadelphia, and LLEGO in Washington; AIDS activism's failure to think intersectionally and build coalitions; his involvement in Gran Fury; becoming a more prolific writer, and getting involved with Other Countries, in the early '90s; Gran Fury's 2011 retrospective; the need for racial diversity and representation in activism and the art world; white flight from AIDS activism following the arrival of protease inhibitors; personal frustrations with the current AIDS activism discourse and nonprofit organizational complex, and the general cultural conversation about HIV/AIDS; contrasting representations of AIDS activism in How to Survive a Plague and BPM; and the essential role of art in AIDS activism. Vazquez-Pacheco also recalls Mark Simpson, Craig Metroka, David Kirschenbaum, Maxine Wolfe, Avram Finkelstein, Deb Levine, Charles King, Robert Garcia, Ortez Alderson, Derek Hodel, Gregg Bordowitz, Michael Callen, Carl George, Joey Walsh, Matt Foreman, Vito Russo, Larry Kramer, Tom Kalin, Marlene McCarty, Charles Rice-González, George Ayala, Essex Hemphill, Manolo Guzmán, Donald Moffett, Cladd Stevens, Richard Elovich, Loring McAlpin, Michael Nesline, Peter Staley, David France, Andrew Miller, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Vázquez-Pacheco (1956- ) is a visual artist and writer in New York, New York. Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Activism  Search this
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.vazque17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-vazque17
Online Media:

Rockwell Kent papers, circa 1840-1993, bulk 1935-1961

Creator:
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Subject:
Wildenstein, Felix  Search this
Phillips, Duncan  Search this
Hays, Lee  Search this
Untermeyer, Louis  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl  Search this
Robeson, Paul  Search this
DuBois, W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt)  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano)  Search this
Ruggles, Carl  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur  Search this
Nearing, Helen  Search this
Nearing, Scott  Search this
Pach, Walter  Search this
Rasmussen, Knud  Search this
Reeves, Ruth  Search this
Seeger, Pete  Search this
Daniel, Charles  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland)  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen)  Search this
Chamberlain, J. E.  Search this
Boyesen, Bayard  Search this
Chase, William Merritt  Search this
Freuchen, Peter  Search this
Gellert, Hugo  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry  Search this
Hartley, Marsden  Search this
Fitzgerald, James  Search this
Keller, Charles  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
Jones, Dan Burne  Search this
United American Artists  Search this
United Office and Professional Workers of America  Search this
United Scenic Artists  Search this
National Farmers' Union (U.S.)  Search this
National Maritime Union of America  Search this
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists League of America  Search this
Citizens' Committee for Government Arts Projects  Search this
Farmers Union of the New York Milk Shed  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Federal Writers' Project  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
International Workers Order  Search this
Type:
Poems
Sketches
Business records
Photographs
Drawings
Topic:
Designers -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Politics and culture  Search this
Authors -- New York  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States -- Political aspects  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Illustration of books  Search this
Works of art  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Civilian relief  Search this
Art and war  Search this
Commercial art  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9557
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211757
AAA_collcode_kentrock
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211757
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Hunter Reynolds

Interviewee:
Reynolds, Hunter, 1959-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
10 Items (sound files (6 hrs., 1 min.), digital, wav)
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2016 August 10-September 7
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Hunter Reynolds, conducted 2016 August 10-September 7, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Fales Library in New York, New York.
Reynolds speaks of his childhood in Minnesota, Florida, and California; early sexual experiences; attending Otis College of Art and Design; moving to New York in 1984 and becoming part of the East Village scene; the beginning of the AIDS crisis and safe sex discourse; his involvement in ACT UP; being diagnosed with HIV and starting ART+ Positive in Los Angeles in 1989; his body of artwork, performances, exhibitions, and activist actions; resonances between AIDS activism of the 1980s and '90s and contemporary activism around the Black Lives Matter movement; the politics of identifying as an HIV-positive artist; experimenting with drag and developing his alter ego Patina du Prey; performances with "Memorial Dress," "The Banquet," "Dervish Dress;' "Mummification" performance; living and working in Germany in the 1990s; and his personal struggle with long-term HIV survivorship; his "disaster" series and "Survial AIDS" series; and making his life, past and present, his personal masterpiece. Reynolds also recalls Kathy Burkhart, Susan Silas, Fred Tomaselli, Scott Hill, Leslie Dahlgren, Paula Cooper, Ray Navarro, Mark Kostabi, Bill Dobbs, Dread Scott, Kim Levin, Simon Watson, Maxine Henryson, Herr Vishka, Tony Feher, Jim Hodges, Dylan Nayler, Kathleen White, Krista Naylor, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Interviewee Hunter Reynolds (1959- ) is a performance artist and activist in New York, New York. Interviewer Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.reynol16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-reynol16
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Raquel Rabinovich

Interviewee:
Rabinovich, Raquel, 1929-  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James Lancel, 1952-  Search this
Names:
Hispanic American Arts Center (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Station Hill Press  Search this
Beethoven, Ludwig van, 1770-1827  Search this
Borges, Jorge Luis, 1899-1986  Search this
Braque, Georges, 1882-1963  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Del Giocondo, Lisa, 1479-  Search this
Denes, Agnes  Search this
Farina, Ernesto, 1912-  Search this
Herzberg, Julia P.  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Kelly, Robert, 1956-  Search this
Lenin, Vladimir Ilʹich, 1870-1924  Search this
Lhote, André, 1885-1962  Search this
Maggi, Marco, 1957-  Search this
Martin, Agnes, 1912-2004  Search this
Mondolfo, Rodolfo, 1877-1976  Search this
Mondrian, Piet, 1872-1944  Search this
Pavia, Philip, 1915-2005  Search this
Perón, Juan Domingo, 1895-1974  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Quasha, George  Search this
Rockburne, Dorothea  Search this
Schwabsky, Barry  Search this
Stein, Charles, 1944-  Search this
Strauss, David Levi  Search this
Velázquez, Diego, 1599-1660  Search this
Weintraub, Linda  Search this
Zimmer, William, 1946-2007  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (Sound recording: 4 sound files (3 hr., 6 min.), digital, wav)
64 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Argentina -- Description and Travel
Denmark -- Copenhagen -- Description and Travel
Egypt -- description and travel
France -- Paris -- Description and Travel
India -- description and travel
Machu Picchu Site (Peru)
Nepal -- Description and Travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Thailand -- description and travel
Date:
2012 September 25 and October 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Raquel Rabinovich conducted 2012 September 25 and October 9, by James McElhinney, for the Archives of American Art, at Rabinovich's home, in Rhinebeck, New York.
Rabinovich speaks of growing up in Argentina; becoming aware of art; reproductions and books; European art; her Jewish heritage; her parents moving to Argentina before World War I; Jewish persecution; her parents' background; living in Cordoba; speaking Spanish and Yiddish growing up; quiet reflections; church; art exposure; traveling and moving to Paris; the influence of Ernesto Farina; Peron's dictatorship and rebellion; attending medical school and the call of art; political activities and spending time in jail; meeting Jose and moving to Scotland; Paris and exposure to artwork; teachings of Andre Lhote; her early works; abstraction; painting; the Mona Lisa; darkness and light; "The Dark is Light Enough"; exposure to literature and poetry; living in Copenhagen; meeting Jorge Luis Borges; the Book of Sand; her siblings; her children and her relationship to them; staying up to date with current events; libraries and a lack of books growing up; meditation; texture and the monochromatic works; interest in Jasper Johns' work; meeting Jasper Johns; living in New York; trip to Machu Picchu and spending the night outdoors; "Cloister, Crossing, Passageway 1.32"; glassworks and transparency; exhibiting artwork; her divorce; Rodolfo Mondolfo; environment and exposure; quiet contemplation; spending time with artwork; commissioned work near High Falls; "River Library"; libraries as places of knowledge; minimalism; the 1980s; her daughter's wedding and her relationship with Jose; stones; traveling to Nepal, Thailand, India, and Egypt; temples; Buddhism; "Chhodrtens"; garbhagrihas; NEA fellowship and residency in Paris; "Thrones for the Gods"; INTAR Gallery; "Gateless Gates"; artifacts; Pabhavikas sculpture; Charles Stein; Linda Weintraub; George Quasha; Station Hill Press; "Enfolded Darkness" and "Light Unworn". Rabinovich also recalls Baron Hughes, Beethoven, Lenin, Diego Velazquez, Andre Lhote, Mondrian, Picasso, Braque, David Levi Straus, Robert Kelly, Cezanne, Philip Pavia, Agnes Martin, Dorothea Rockburne, Barry Schwabsky, Bill Zimmer, Agnes Denes, Louisa Valenzuela, Julia Herzberg, and Marco Maggi.
Biographical / Historical:
Raquel Rabinovich (1929- ) is a painter and sculptor in Rhinebeck, New York. James McElhinney (1952- ) is a painter and educator from New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Political activists  Search this
Topic:
Buddhism  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Function:
Libraries
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.rabino12
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rabino12
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Larry Jordan

Interviewee:
Jordan, Larry, 1934-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Berman, Wallace, 1926-1976  Search this
Brackage, Stan  Search this
Conner, Bruce, 1933-2008  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
DeFeo, Jay, 1929-1989  Search this
Deren, Maya  Search this
Duncan, Robert Edward, 1919-  Search this
Ernst, Max, 1891-1976  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997  Search this
Hedrick, Wally, 1928-2003  Search this
Herms, George, 1935-  Search this
Jess, 1923-  Search this
Jordan, Patricia M., 1937-1989  Search this
McClure, Michael  Search this
Nauman, Bruce, 1941-  Search this
Rexroth, Kenneth, 1905-1982  Search this
Extent:
6 Sound cassettes (Sound recording, analog)
100 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 Dec. 19 - 1996 July 30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Larry Jordan conducted 1995 Dec. 19-1996 July 30, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, at the artist's home, in Petaluma, Calif.
Jordan discusses his family background in Denver; his attraction to contemporary avant-garde; his brief time at Harvard, and his mental breakdown and return to Denver; his move to San Francisco in 1954 because of the artistic and literary atmosphere there; meeting Kenneth Rexroth, Robert Duncan and other poets and his initial introduction to the creative community in San Francisco; his friendships with Jordan Belsen, Michael McClure, Wally Hedrick and Jay DeFeo; the San Francisco Renaissance, the beat era, and what it means to be "beat;" the distinction in intensity between bohemianism and the resurrection of the self during the beat era, the social impact of the anti-establishment movement; and the difference between artists and political activists.
Jordan discusses his influences and important moments in his experimental film career; the surrealist methods for social changes as seen in film; the west coast filmmakers focus on the interior and mystical; the rivalry in the film world; his association with Bruce Conner and their founding a film society together in 1956 and establishing an experimental theater; meeting Joseph Cornell and his invitation to assist him with films, their time spent together, Cornell as a filmmaker, preparing Cornell boxes, and the influence of Cornell on is own art. He discusses his own art; his role as an artist in society; the religious aspect in his art; his place in the avant-garde film world; the major influences in his art; and the concept of death and the celebration of the mind as a major theme in his film and artwork.
He recalls Wallace Berman, Stan Brackage, Bruce Conner, Jay DeFeo, Maya Deren, Robert Duncan, Max Ernst, Allen Ginsberg, Wally Hedrick, George Herms, Jess, Patricia Jordan, Michael McClure, Bruce Nauman, and Kenneth Rexroth.
Biographical / Historical:
Larry Jordan (1934- ) is a filmmaker and collagist from Petaluma, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the transcription of this interview provided by the Pasadena Art Alliance.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Filmmakers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Collagists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Beat generation  Search this
Art -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.jordan95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jordan95
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Alexandra Juhasz

Interviewee:
Juhasz, Alexandra  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Swarthmore College  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Carlomusto, Jean  Search this
Cato, Kenrick  Search this
Cunningham, Megan  Search this
Dunye, Cheryl  Search this
Durand, Yannick  Search this
Edwards, Marcia  Search this
Engebreston, Jon  Search this
Finkelstein, Avram, 1952-  Search this
Guimento, Joe  Search this
Hasty, Glenda  Search this
Haynes, Todd  Search this
Hebert, Pato  Search this
Hollibaugh, Amber L., 1946-  Search this
Kalin, Tom  Search this
Lamb, James Robert  Search this
Lebow, Alisa  Search this
Leonard, Zoe  Search this
Lesjak, Carolyn, 1963-  Search this
Ludlam, Charles  Search this
Matta, Aida  Search this
Mohammed, Juanita  Search this
Penceal, Sharon  Search this
Prieto, Miguel  Search this
Quinton, Everett  Search this
Schulman, Sarah, 1958-  Search this
Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky  Search this
Spiro, Ellen  Search this
Vasquez-Pacheco, Robert  Search this
Wolf, Maxine  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (sound files (5 hr., 56 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
117 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 December 19-21
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Alexandra Juhasz conducted 2017 December 19 and 21, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Juhasz's home in Brooklyn, New York.
Juhasz speaks of her commitment to AIDS activism; her intellectual, bohemian, culturally Jewish upbringing; developing her feminism, political consciousness and activism in high school and college; her relationship with James "Jim" Robert Lamb; moving to New York for graduate school in 1986; the beginning of her AIDS activism and video-making practice in the late '80s; reflecting on her privilege and positionality in her activist work; her commitment to making marginal work; Jim Lamb's role in Video Remains, followed by his death and enduring inspiration for her work; the striking and surprising aspects of participating in an oral history; historical and theoretical underpinnings of video-making as an activist strategy and process; making activist video with the WAVE collective; the stakes, challenges, and costs of marginalized communities fighting for self-representation; making activist video with Swarthmore college students; the artistic milieu of New Queer Cinema; producing The Watermelon Woman and recently re-releasing it; moving to Los Angeles and having a period of silence in AIDS activism; returning to AIDS activism by making Video Remains; her ongoing collaborative writing about AIDS with Theodore Kerr; and her most recent projects. Juhasz also recalls Eve Sedgwick, Joe Guimento, Jon Engebretson, Jean Carlomusto, Tom Kalin, Avram Finkelstein, Amber Hollibaugh, Maxine Wolfe, Miguel Prieto, Robert Vasquez-Pacheco, Charles Ludlam, Everett Quinton, Carolyn Lesjak, Yannick Durand, Juanita Mohammed, Sharon Penceal, Aida Matta, Glenda Hasty, Marcia Edwards, Kenrick Cato, Megan Cunningham, Cheryl Dunye, Zoe Leonard, Pato Hebert, Alisa Lebow, Sarah Schulman, Todd Haynes, Ellen Spiro, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alexandra Juhasz (1964- ) is an AIDS activist, media maker, and scholar in New York, New York. Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Feminists  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.juhasz17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-juhasz17
Online Media:

Oral history interview with John Held, Jr

Interviewee:
Held, John, 1947-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
9 Items (Sound recording: 9 sound files (5 hr., 4 min.), digital, wav)
131 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 September 28-October 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview with John Held, Jr. conducted 2017 September 28 and October 3, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, at Karlstrom's home in San Francisco, California.
Biographical / Historical:
John Held (1947-) is a rubberstamp artist, participant in the international mail art network, activist, performance artist, collector of mail art, and a fine arts librarian in San Francisco, California. Interviewer Paul Karlstrom (1941-) is a writer and art historian in San Francisco, California.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the papers of John Held.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Librarians -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Mail art  Search this
Political activists -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Performance artists -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Rubber stamps  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.held17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-held17
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Rupert Garcia

Interviewee:
Garcia, Rupert, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
San Francisco State University -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Montoya, Malaquias, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
9 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (8 1/2 hrs.), analog)
166 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 Sept. 7-1996 June 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rupert Garcia conducted 1995 Sept. 7-1996 June 24, by Paul J. Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, at Rupert Garcia's home and studio, in Oakland, Calif.
SEPT. 7, 1995 SESSION: Session opens with a discussion of Garcia's exhibition, Aspects of Persistence (1993); the deaths in 1968 of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Marcel Duchamp; Garcia's self-conception and his two roles as political activist and artist; the influence on him of Sartre's "Being and Nothingness"; racism, power, control; his background and being a Mexican-American; need to establish ethnic identity; his realization in high school of wanting to become an artist; his lost opportunity for a scholarship at the San Francisco Art Institute; moving to San Francisco; enlisting in the Air Force and serving in Vietnam; ambivalence about war; experiences at San Francisco State University and his switch from painting to silkscreen; Artes Seis and Galerie de la Raza; artists in the Mission District.
NOV. 10, 1995 SESSION: Painting vs. graphic art; posters; Lucy Lippard; Chicano art; Los Four, Asco, and other artists groups and conferences; conflicts between San Francisco and Oakland groups; emergence of identity groups; Malaquias Montoya, Carlos Almaraz; making art from experience.
JUNE 24, 1996: Politics of culture; social progress; being optimistic but realistic; the Latino movement in the 1990s; Mexican attitudes toward Chicanos; the CARA exhibition at UCLA; Garcia's students at San José State; current work, interests and projects; interest in art history and other intellectual pursuits; and the art market, dealers, and galleries.
Biographical / Historical:
Rupert Garcia (1941-) is a painter and teacher from the San Francisco Bay area, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Chicano artists  Search this
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.garcia95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-garcia95
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Julie Ault

Interviewee:
Ault, Julie  Search this
Interviewer:
Kerr, Theodore  Search this
Names:
Group Material (Firm : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Endowment for the Arts  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Alderfer, Hannah  Search this
Alexander, Vikky, 1959-  Search this
Ashford, Doug  Search this
Beck, Martin, 1962-  Search this
Blake, Nayland, 1960-  Search this
Brennan, Patrick  Search this
Evans, Steven, (Curator)  Search this
Garrels, Gary.  Search this
Gonzalez-Torres, Felix, 1957-1996  Search this
Hawkins, Yolanda  Search this
Kalin, Tom  Search this
Klein, Jochen, 1967-1997  Search this
Lindell, John  Search this
Locks, Sabrina  Search this
Maharaj, Sarat (Sarat Chandra), 1952-  Search this
McCarty, Marlene, 1957-  Search this
McLaughlin, Mundy  Search this
Meyer, Richard, 1966-  Search this
Miller-Keller, Andrea  Search this
Moffett, Donald, 1955-  Search this
Nelson, Marybeth  Search this
Olander, William  Search this
Pasternak, Anne, 1964-  Search this
Phillips, Lisa, 1954-  Search this
Ramspacher, Karen  Search this
Rinder, Lawrence  Search this
Rollins, Tim, 1955-  Search this
Sandqvist, Gertrud  Search this
Serrano, Andres, 1950-  Search this
Staniszewski, Mary Anne  Search this
Szypula, Peter  Search this
Tucker, Marcia  Search this
Wagner, Frank  Search this
Wright, Charles  Search this
Extent:
6 Items (sound files (6 hr., 3 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
90 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Washington (D.C.) -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 November 14-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Julie Ault conducted 2017 November 14 and 16, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at a studio in Brooklyn, New York.
Ault speaks of the nature of memory and giving an oral history; her skepticism of linear narratives; leaving rural Maine for Washington, DC at age 17; her family history; her interest in popular culture and commercial culture as a teenager; disco and nightclubs in Washington and New York in the late 1970's; working a variety of day jobs in New York, including a telephone answering service; meeting Tim Rollins for the first time in Maine; her interest in conversation; her relationship to questions; the formation of Group Material in 1979; her relationship with Andres Serrano; Group Material's collaborative dynamic, and its effect on her personal development; the complexities of trying to write or tell history; the shifting configurations and contexts of Group Material over 17 years of activity; mounting, and thinking critically about, individual exhibitions after Group Material; the first AIDS Timeline in 1989; the ephemerality of the Timeline; book projects as a means of depositing personal memories; her first memories of the AIDS crisis beginning in 1983; Group Material's Democracy and AIDS series at Dia in 1988; investigating the tension between art and activism in the context of HIV/AIDS; Karen Ramspacher's entry and contributions to Group Material; the initial decision to employ the form of a timeline and four arenas of research; different audience relationships and reactions to the Timeline; the collaborative process of creating the Timeline; losing NEA funding after the Timeline, amid the early '90s culture wars; Group Material's second exhibition of AIDS Timeline in 1990; her friendship with Felix Gonzalez-Torres; Group Material's third exhibition of AIDS Timeline in 1991; the Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart exhibition; and an acknowledgement of topics that could not be covered in the interview. Ault also recalls Doug Ashford, Vikky Alexander, Yolanda Hawkins, Mundy McLaughlin, Sarat Maharaj, Gertrud Sandqvist, Marybeth Nelson, Patrick Brennan, Hannah Alderfer, Peter Szypula, Sabrina Locks, Larry Rinder, Richard Meyer, Bill Olander, Marcia Tucker, Gary Garrels, Charles Wright, Frank Wagner, Martin Beck, Nayland Blake, Anne Pasternak, Mary Anne Staniszewski, John Lindell, Tom Kalin, Donald Moffett, Marlene McCarty, Jochen Klein, Lisa Phillips, Andrea Miller-Keller, Steven Evans, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Julie Ault (1957- ) is an artist, writer, and curator in New York, New York. Theodore Kerr (1979- ) is a writer and organizer in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Political activists  Search this
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
History -- Philosophy  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ault17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ault17
Online Media:

Zina Saro-Wiwa: On Mourning and Memory (Interview Only)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-05-03T13:50:32.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianVideos
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianVideos
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_G1Z3jrHrgOI

International Women's Day: Fannie Lou Hamer: "This Little Light...": A Portrait by Billie Jean Young

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 15, Folder 8
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1986 March 8
Scope and Contents:
Fannie Lou Hamer: "This Little Light": A Portrait documented in the Program in African American Culture Collection highlighted the life of Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper, determined voter registrant, and field worker for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). She was an orator, political activist, and founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In addition to these contributions, she is noted for her speeches and singing, which influenced many during the Civil Rights Movement. Her strong religious background was often expressed through a sacred hymn before each of her speeches. She opened many gatherings with "This Little Light of Mine", one of her favorite songs.

Linda Reed. "Fannie Lou Hamer" in Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia. Volume A-L. New York: Carlson Publishing Incorporated, 1993.

Program was a dramatic presentation Fannie Lou Hamer: "This Little Light" - A Portrait held March 8, 1986, at Carmichael Auditorium, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. The program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.40.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1184

Fannie Lou Hamer: Songs My Mother Taught Me

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 90, Reel 3
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Date:
1980-01-21
Scope and Contents:
Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper, determined voter registrant, and field worker for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). She was an orator, political activist, and founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In addition to these contributions, she is noted for her speeches and singing, which influenced many during the Civil Rights Movement. Her strong religious background was often expressed through a sacred hymn before each of her speeches. She opened many gatherings with "This Little Light of Mine," one of her favorite songs.

Linda Reed. "Fannie Lou Hamer" in Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia, volume A-L. New York: Carlson Publishing Incorporated, 1993.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1619

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