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Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Memorandums
Negatives
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Business records
Digital images
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Contracts
Place:
Caribbean Area
Puerto Rico
Date:
June 26-July 7, 1985
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1985 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Cultural Conservation

Series 3: Louisiana

Series 4: Mela! An Indian Fair

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1985 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
From the first Festival of American Folklife in 1967 through the 1984 Festival, more than 10,000 participants traveled to Washington to share their wisdom and talent with visitors, Festival Director Diana Parker recalled in the 1985 Program Book. In explaining and demonstrating their skills as singers, dancers, musicians, cooks, artisans, storytellers, and workers, they represented legions more in their home communities. Because of the time and knowledge they shared, lives had been enriched, while the cultural understanding of the aesthetic variety in this and other nations had broadened. Meanwhile, the Smithsonian's archive of folklife research and programming experience had grown incrementally each year. There remained much still to be learned, and each participant's story added to our understanding of the mosaic of folk culture.

Festival participants often spoke of their struggle to maintain traditions in the face of overwhelming odds. Each year brought another person to inform visitors, "I am the last who knows how to do this the old way." For this reason the Folklife Programs viewed conservation of culture as an issue equal in urgency to the conservation of natural resources, for the pluralism reflected at each year's Festival would be terrible to lose. The Smithsonian was not, of course, the only organization concerned with cultural conservation. The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress consistently contributed on a national scale to research and preservation of traditional culture. Numerous state and local programs were also hard at work in similar efforts and have made notable contributions. As the National Endowment for the Arts celebrated its 20th anniversary in 1985, the Smithsonian was especially aware of the immense contributions of its Folk Arts Program.

The 1985 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 26-30 and July 3-7) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

For the 1985 Festival, more than two hundred participants came to Washington to share in a great celebration of cultural diversity. Three thematic programs were presented, complemented by a number of special events. The 1985 Program Book provides information on each of the programs.

The 1985 Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs. In addition to specific support (acknowledged below) for the Louisiana and Mela! programs, the recording industry provided support in part for the instrumental music in performances at the Festival through the Music Performance Trust Funds (Martin A. Paulson, Trustee).

Office of Folklife Programs

Peter Seitel, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Marjorie Hunt, Folklorist; Alicia María González, Folklorist and Program Developer; Kazadi wa Mukuna, Ethnomusicologist; Richard Derbyshire, Archivist; Laurie Kalb, Foodways Coordinator

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Memorandums
Negatives
Video recordings
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Business records
Digital images
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Contracts
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1985
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1985 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1985
Online Media:

The Garden Club of America collection

Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Names:
New York Flower Show  Search this
Extent:
37,000 Slides (35mm slides)
33 Linear feet ((garden files))
3,000 lantern slides
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Lantern slides
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Slides (photographs)
Date:
circa 1920-present
Summary:
This collection contains over 37,000 35mm slides, 3,000 glass lantern slides and garden files that may include descriptive information, photocopied articles (from journals, newspapers, or books), planting lists, correspondence, brochures, landscape plans and drawings. Garden files were compiled by Garden Club of America (GCA) members for most of the gardens included in the collection. Some gardens have been photographed over the course of several decades; others only have images from a single point in time. In addition to images of American gardens, there are glass lantern slides of the New York Flower Show (1941-1951) and trips that GCA members took to other countries, including Mexico (1937), Italy, Spain, Japan (1935), France (1936), England (1929), and Scotland.

A number of the slides are copies of historic images from outside repositories including horticultural and historical societies or from horticultural books and publications. The GCA made a concerted effort in the mid-1980s to acquire these images in order to increase its documentation of American garden history. Because of copyright considerations, use of these particular images may be restricted.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Garden Club of America was established in 1913 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when the Garden Club of Philadelphia and eleven other garden clubs met to create a national garden club. Its purpose is to foster the knowledge and love of gardening and to restore and protect the quality of the environment through educational programs and gardening and conservation efforts. The GCA was incorporated in Delaware in 1923, with its headquarters established in New York City. Today, local clubs are organized under twelve regional zones. The GCA continues its tradition of hosting flower shows and publishing material related to gardening in the United States.

The GCA's glass lantern slides were used by The GCA for presentations and lectures about notable gardens throughout the United States dating back to colonial times. An effort was made in the late 1980s, in preparation of the 75th anniversary of the Garden Club of America's founding, to collect the disbursed slides. These slides were to eventually form the Slide Library of Notable American Parks and Gardens. The informational value of this collection is extensive since a number of images of the more than 4,500 gardens represented show garden designs that have changed over time or no longer exist. While the majority of images document a range of designed upper and upper-middle class gardens throughout the U.S., the scope of the collection is expanding as volunteers photograph and document contemporary gardens including community and vernacular gardens.

The gardens illustrate the design work of dozens of landscape architects including Marian Coffin, Beatrix Farrand, Lawrence Halprin, Hare & Hare, Umberto Innocenti, Gertrude Jekyll, Jens Jensen, Warren Manning, the Olmsted Brothers, Charles Platt, Ellen Biddle Shipman, and Fletcher Steele. Because of their proximity to the gardens, works of notable architects and sculptors may also be featured in the images.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Gardens -- Mexico  Search this
Flower shows  Search this
Gardening -- United States -- societies, etc  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Spain  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Brochures
Articles
Correspondence
Clippings
Lantern slides
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-gca
Online Media:

ARCHITECTURE OF CINEMATIC SPACES BY INTERIORS

Author:
KARAOGHLANIAN, ARMEN http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/aut http://viaf.org/viaf/105159032581401180598  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Date:
2020
Topic:
Architecture in motion pictures  Search this
Call number:
PN1995.24 .A55 2020 (Internet)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145672

Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection

Topic:
Landscape architecture
Creator:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Sears & Wendell  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Donor:
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Tibbetts, Eleanor Sears  Search this
Extent:
44.5 Cubic feet (4,317 glass negatives. 363 film negatives. 182 glass lantern slides. 12 photograph albums. 56 plans and drawings. 3 monographs. )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Date:
1899-1964
Summary:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and 3 monographs by or about Sears.
Scope and Contents note:
The Thomas Warren Sears Photograph Collection documents examples of the design work of Thomas Warren Sears (1880-1966), a landscape architect and amateur photographer from Brookline, Massachusetts. Sears, who was based for most of his career in Philadelphia, designed a variety of different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments located primarily in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. In addition to some of Sears' design work, images in the collection document Sears' domestic and foreign travels, design inspirations, and family. The collection includes over 4,800 black and white negatives and glass lantern slides dated circa 1899 to 1930. While most images show private and public gardens, there are a significant number of unidentified views and views photographed in Europe during two trips he took there in 1906 and 1908. Few images are captioned or dated. In addition, there are over 50 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and monographs by or about Sears. Several of the glass lantern slides are duplicates of glass plate negatives in the collection. They apparently were chosen by Sears to illustrate some of his best design work, perhaps for lecture or client purposes.

In addition, there are 56 plans and drawings, most notably for Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland and Reynolda in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They range in date from 1917 to 1937 and from 1955 to 1964. Sears photographed some of his early plans; they are included in with the photographic images. Sears also photographed a handful of design plans by landscape architect Sibley Coslett Smith who practiced in Providence, Rhode Island; Sears and Smith shared the same business address there.

The Thomas Warren Sears Collection does not fully document the extent of Sears' design work. The use of glass plate negatives—which make up the bulk of the Thomas Warren Sears Collection—as a photography medium waned sometime during the first quarter of the twentieth century. As a result, the images in the Sears Collection capture examples of Sears' early to mid-career design work but they do not include jobs designed by Sears during the latter half of his design career.
Arrangement note:
The glass plate negatives were originally housed in numerous cardboard boxes manufactured for the sale of undeveloped glass plate negatives. Sears annotated the outside of the boxes with project or client names and/or locations, but the contents do not always match these labels. In addition, because very few of the glass plate negatives and lantern slides were labeled or captioned, it is not always evident where one job ended and another began if multiple projects were stored in the same carton. As a result, there are many instances in the Sears Collection where images have been inadvertently mislabeled because their identification is not apparent. Misidentified images are subject to correction as their proper identification is discovered. Each project has been assigned its own unique AAG job number based on its geographic origin. Those groups of images that have not been identified as to their location have been assigned a project number starting with 'SRS.' The collection is arranged into 3 series: 1) Photographic images (including glass plate negatives, film negatives, glass lantern slides, and photograph albums) 2) Plans and Drawings 3) Monographs
Biographical/Historical note:
Thomas Warren Sears was born in 1880 in Brookline, Massachusetts. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University in 1903 and Bachelor of Science degree in landscape architecture from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard in 1906. Sears was an amateur photographer who won awards for his photography while at Harvard. In 1915 his images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England. After graduation he worked for the firm of Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects for two years and then briefly practiced in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1913, Sears established a landscape design office in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he spent the remainder of his professional career. Sears at one point was in a professional partnership; some of his design plans list the firm name of Sears and Wendell. He was made a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects in 1921.

Sears designed many different types of landscapes ranging from private residences, schools, and playgrounds to parks, cemeteries, and urban housing developments. His designs were primarily located in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York. Just a few of his private landscapes include Marengo in Easton, Maryland; Sunnybrook, the Isaac H. Clothier, Jr. estate in Radnor, Pennsylvania; and Balmuckety in Pikesville, Maryland. In 1915, Sears started work on Reynolda, a country estate in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He generated design plans for the property intermittently over the next two decades. Reynolda's formal gardens, greenhouses, and acres of fields and woodlands subsequently became part of Wake Forest University.

During World War I, Sears designed Army camps in Battle Creek, Michigan and Spartanburg, South Carolina. He also helped lay out Langley Field, at that time an experimental aviation field in Hampton Roads, Virginia. In the 1940s, Sears designed the amphitheater at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania for concerts, outdoor performances, and other special events. During that decade he also worked on Colonial Revival gardens at Pennsbury, William Penn's country estate in Bucks County, Pennsylvania located by the Delaware River. Sears retired in 1964 and died in 1966.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Project (PAB), administered by The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, includes references to design projects by Sears.

Harvard University's Loeb Library includes a number of images by Sears, some of them documenting gardens that he designed.

Harvard University's Fine Arts Library, Special Collections includes a collection of photographs and negatives of English parish churches by Sears, c. 1908. Some of the images were published in the monograph, Parish Churches of England.

The Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina includes plans by Sears of Reynolda in its Estate Archives.
Provenance:
Gift of Eleanor Sears Tibbetts, Sears' daughter, to the Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens) in 1992.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
For information or study purposes only. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Photographers  Search this
Landscape architects  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Switzerland  Search this
Gardens -- Scotland  Search this
Gardens -- Italy  Search this
Gardens -- Germany  Search this
Gardens -- France  Search this
Gardens -- England  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Blueprints
Albums
Plans (drawings)
Lantern slides
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-srs
Online Media:

The Chimneys collection

Owner:
Weems, Katharine Lane, 1899-  Search this
Lane, Emma Gildersleeve  Search this
Lane, Gardiner Martin  Search this
Landscape architect:
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Olmsted, Frederick Law, Jr., 1870-1957  Search this
Whiting, Edward Clark  Search this
Creator:
Massachusetts Horticultural Society  Search this
North Shore Horticultural Society  Search this
New York Florists Club  Search this
Names:
Dana, Rich H.  Search this
Mullen, James X.  Search this
Watson, B. M. (gardener)  Search this
Architect:
Gildersleeve, Raleigh C.  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Diaries
Photocopies
Plans (drawings)
Books
Medals
Negatives
Correspondence
Trade catalogs
Place:
Massachusetts -- Manchester
The Chimneys (Manchester, Massachusetts)
Date:
1903-1985
Summary:
Correspondence, invoices, nursery and seed catalogs, estimates, planting plans, photocopies of blueprints, photographs, negatives, autochromes, and drawings relating to the gardens of The Chimneys, the home of Emma and Gardiner Martin Lane and their daughter Katharine Lane Weems in Manchester, Massachusetts. Also included are four garden journals (1903-1928), garden-related medals awarded to Emma Lane, index files of plant materials, photocopies of garden related library cards belonging to Gardiner M. Lane, a diascope and nursery and seed catalogs. The collection also includes architectural plans, invoices and specifications from, and a framed photograph of, Raleigh C. Gildersleeve, architect of The Chimneys and brother of Emma Lane.
Scope and Contents Note:
The Chimneys Collection includes extensive documentation relating to the gardens and grounds of "The Chimneys" estate in Manchester, Massachusetts, the home of Katharine Lane Weems and her parents in Manchester, Massachusetts. There is also some documentation on the residence designed by Raleigh Gildersleeve. The collection includes photographs, negatives, autochromes, a stereograph viewer, plant lists and index files of plant materials, garden journals, correspondence, nursery and seed catalogs, estimates, invoices, design specifications and plans and drawings. There are also three horticultural medals. The images focus primarily on the gardens at The Chimneys, though there are also numerous images showing the beachfront adjoining the property and images of family, friends, Weems' studio, the vicinity around Manchester, Massachusetts, and interiors of Beverwyck Manor in Rensselaer, New York. A copy of Katharine Lane Weems' autobiography, Odds Were Against Me, is also included in the collection.
Arrangement Note:
The collection is arranged into 6 series:

1) Design and Planting Records 2) Photographic images 3) Correspondence 4) Garden Journals 5) Printed Matter 6) Artifacts
Biographical/Historical note:
The property on which this estate in Manchester, Massachusetts sits was originally owned by the father of Richard Henry Dana, Jr., the author of Two Years Before the Mast. The estate was subdivided after the elder Dana's death in 1879. Gardiner Martin Lane purchased the land and had his brother-in-law, Raleigh Gildersleeve, design a large Georgian Colonial Revival summer house for him known as "The Chimneys." The Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm was hired in 1902 to help with the overall siting of the house and to plan a number of garden areas. During the next ten years, the Olmsted firm designed a number of areas including an approach road, formal terraced gardens, a water garden, and a variety of outdoor structures such as an arbor, tea house, and greenhouse.

Katharine Lane Weems (1899-1989), the daughter of Emma and Gardiner M. Lane, spent her childhood summers at "The Chimneys." She later attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and went on to specialize in sculpting animals. "The Chimneys" served as her principal studio after the stable was remodeled in 1930; later it became her primary residence. She married F. Carrington Weems in 1947 and published an autobiography, Odds Were Against Me, in 1985. She died at her family estate in 1989.
Related Archival Materials Note:
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 00273 Gardiner M. Lane / Richard H. Dana Estate.

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts has the Papers of Katharine Lane Weems (MC406) which include various files and images relating to The Chimneys.

The Smithsonian Institution's Archives of American Art in Washington, D.C. has the Katharine Lane Weems Papers, 1865-1989 which include images of The Chimneys.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Sculptors -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Manchester  Search this
Water gardens  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Diaries
Photocopies
Plans (drawings)
Books
Medals
Negatives
Correspondence
Trade catalogs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Chimneys collection.
Identifier:
AAG.CHM
See more items in:
The Chimneys collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-chm
Online Media:

American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Company architectural drawings collection

Creator:
American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Co.  Search this
Extent:
8 Cubic feet (306 architectural plans and drawings.)
The majority of plans are on tracing paper, though there are also some reprographic prints and drawings on tracing cloth.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Plans (drawings)
Date:
1923-1964
Summary:
The American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Corporation Collection includes 306 architectural plans and drawings of greenhouses, solariums, conservatories, garages, and other structures designed by American-Moninger for clients throughout the United States dating from 1923 to 1964.
Scope and Content note:
The American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Corporation Collection includes 306 architectural plans and drawings of greenhouses, solariums, conservatories, garages, and other structures designed by American-Moninger for clients throughout the United States dating from 1923 to 1964. Many of the plans were generated for private clients, though there are several greenhouses for nurseries and florists and some for universities, parks, and public entities like the Merck Company in Rahway, New Jersey and the Veterans Administration Center in Biloxi, Mississippi. The majority of the plans were made for clients located on the East Coast of the United States; there are also projects in California, Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, West Virginia, Mississippi, New Mexico and Texas. Most of the jobs in the collection include just a single plan, though it is apparent from the firm's plan numbering system that some jobs could be quite extensive with numerous plans generated. Most of the plans and drawings bear a title block by American-Moninger with the client name, city, and date. The majority of plans are on tracing paper, though there are also some reprographic prints and drawings on tracing cloth. Few plans indicate the actual street address of the project. Most of the drawings indicate sections and elevations, though there are some plan views and a small number of perspective drawings showing a completed structure. None of the plans indicate whether the structure was built or not.
Arrangement note:
Each property represented in the American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Corporation Collection has been assigned a unique AAG Garden Number based on its geographic location.
Biographical/Historical note:
The American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Corporation Collection designed and manufactured greenhouses, conservatories, solariums and other structures for clients throughout the United States. The John C. Moninger Co. of Chicago, which formed around 1870, merged with the American Greenhouse Manufacturing Co. sometime between 1928 and 1931 to form the American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Company. The company was located at 1820 Flushing Avenue in Brooklyn, New York with sales offices in Chicago, Illinois; Cleveland, Ohio; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and Amityville, New York. The firm apparently had field representatives in various locations; E.T. Orcutt is listed as 'Representative, East Orange, New Jersey' in the American-Moninger title block of one plan. The firm sometimes listed the initials of the designer or draftsman in the title block. Architectural firms that American-Moninger collaborated with are sometimes indicated on the title block of the plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
The University of Delaware Library's Special Collections Department holds additional plans generated by the American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Company.
Restrictions:
Access to original plans by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Greenhouses  Search this
Conservatories  Search this
Sunspaces  Search this
Garages  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Company Architectural Drawings Collection.
Identifier:
AAG.MON
See more items in:
American-Moninger Greenhouse Manufacturing Company architectural drawings collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-mon

American Gardens Collection

Extent:
6.75 Cubic feet (35mm slides; file folders; glass negatives; plans.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Plans (drawings)
Date:
circa 1920-
Summary:
The American gardens collection, a component of the Archives of American Gardens (AAG), includes holdings not associated with other major collections in the archives. The slides, photographs, plans, and files in this collection come from various private donors. Individual sub-units typically depict a single garden.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Negatives
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, American gardens collection.
Identifier:
AAG.AGC
See more items in:
American Gardens Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-agc
Online Media:

Boris V. Timchenko collection

Creator:
Timchenko, Boris V., 1898-1975  Search this
Boris Timchenko and Associates  Search this
Extent:
3 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Plans (drawings)
Architectural drawings
Correspondence
Diplomas
Application forms
Clippings
Certificates
Brochures
Place:
Watergate Gardens (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1919-1975
Summary:
The Boris V. Timchenko collection includes project files, business records, and personal papers of Boris Timchenko, a modernist landscape architect based in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area known for his work on The Watergate Development and the annual National Capital Flower and Garden Show.
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains the professional files of landscape architect Boris V. Timchenko. These include architectural drawings and photographic prints from landscape design projects; a client list; brochures Timchenko used to promote his firm; and photographic prints showing him at work. There are a few architectural drawings related to his work on The Watergate Development in 1965 and many photographic prints from the National Capital Flower and Garden Show dated 1950-1961. The collection also contains some personal papers, including forms and licenses Timchenko acquired from the Russian and United States governments; certificates from a French university he attended; correspondence; portraits and photographic prints of his leisure activities; and newspaper profiles and obituaries about him. The collection documents only a portion of Timchenko's known professional design work and personal life.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into three series. Series 1: Project Files (arranged alphabetically by state and city). Series 2: Business Records (arranged by format, with Subseries 3: Photographs arranged alphabetically by state and city, then event). Series 3: Personal Papers (arranged by format).
Biographical / Historical:
Boris Timchenko (1898-1975) was a modernist landscape architect based in the Washington, D.C. area. Boris Vladimir Timchenko, who occasionally spelled his last name "Timtchenko" early in his life, was born in Tambov, Russia on October 1, 1898 to Vladimir Peter Timchenko and Nataly Nazarewsky. He lived in Lipetsk, Russia until he attended Moscow University from 1916-1918. From 1918-1920, he served in the White Russian Army but fled to France when Communist Bolsheviks defeated his army. He studied landscape architecture at what he termed a "Horticulture School" (possibly the École Nationale Supérieure d'Horticulture) in Versailles until 1924, and earned a degree in Agricultural Engineering at the École Nationale de Agriculture de Grignon in Grignon, France in 1926. A year later, he emigrated to the United States and worked for a landscape contractor, A. Gude Sons & Company, in Washington, D.C.

Timchenko started his own landscape architecture firm, Boris Timchenko and Associates, in Washington in 1938. Along with his colleague Leonard Bartlett, Jr., Timchenko designed outdoor spaces in the D.C. metropolitan area, Pennsylvania, and coastal Florida. He is perhaps best known as being the landscape architect for The Watergate Development in Washington, D.C. and the consulting designer for the National Capital Flower and Garden Show from 1950 to 1967. He also created private gardens for notable clients such as former First Lady Mamie Eisenhower and the Auchincloss family, owners of Hammersmith Farm in Newport, Rhode Island. Organizations and businesses, such as the International Brotherhood of Teamsters in D.C. and the historic Gadsby's Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia, hired him as well. Timchenko was a member of professional organizations including the American Institute of Landscape Architects (later American Society of Landscape Architects) and the Texas Association of Nurserymen, and he was a founding member of the Russian Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas in D.C. By the time he died in 1975, Timchenko had contributed significantly to the design of D.C.'s urban landscape.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Landscape architecture  Search this
Landscape design  Search this
Flower shows  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Office buildings  Search this
Hotels -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Department stores  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Plans (drawings)
Architectural drawings
Correspondence
Diplomas
Application forms
Clippings
Certificates
Brochures
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Boris V. Timchenko Collection.
Identifier:
AAG.TIM
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-tim

Perry H. Wheeler collection

Landscape architect:
Wheeler, Perry H., 1914-1989  Search this
Photographer:
Stengle, James M., Dr.  Search this
Creator:
University of Georgia  Search this
Garden Club of America  Search this
Emory University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Names:
Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, Va.)  Search this
National Arboretum (U.S.)  Search this
Washington National Cathedral (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Bonnet, Henri, Ambassador  Search this
Bonnet, Henri, Madam  Search this
Estes, Billie Sol  Search this
Harriman, Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward, 1920-1997  Search this
Johnson, Lady Bird, 1912-  Search this
Mellon, Paul  Search this
Mellon, Paul, Mrs.  Search this
Mesta, Perle Skirvin, 1889-1975  Search this
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994  Search this
Palmer, Bertha Honoré, 1849-1918  Search this
Truman, Margaret  Search this
Extent:
25.75 Cubic feet
3,958 photographic items
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lists
Awards
Certificates
Invoices
Negatives
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographs
Invitations
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Place:
Canada
White House (Washington, D.C.)
Africa
Europe
Caribbean
South America
West (U.S.)
Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1880-1984
bulk 1950-1965
Summary:
The Perry H. Wheeler Collection includes the design, client and business records of Perry H. Wheeler, a landscape architect best known for his work on numerous townhouse gardens in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., during the 1960s as well as the redesign of the White House Rose Garden in collaboration with Rachel Lambert ('Bunny') Mellon during the Kennedy administration.
Scope and Contents note:
The Perry H. Wheeler Collection includes the design, client and business records of Perry H. Wheeler, a landscape architect best known for his work on numerous townhouse gardens in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. during the 1960s as well as the redesign of the White House Rose Garen in collaboration with Rachel ('Bunny') Lambert Mellon during the Kennedy adminstration. The collection includes photographic images, plans, drawings, client correspondence, plant lists, invoices, newspaper and magazine clippings, certificates, awards, and invitations. The bulk of the collection and most of the professional papers date from about 1950 to 1965 and relate to various garden design projects by Wheeler, many of them located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Of particular note are documents for Wheeler's public design work including the White House grounds, Washington National Cathedral, U. S. National Arboretum, President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery, and the British and Cambodian Embassies in Washington, D.C. Noteworthy correspondents include President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy, Ladybird Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, and Margaret Truman.

There are also over 3,000 35mm slides dating from the 1950s and 1960s that document Wheeler's personal travels to Europe, Africa, South America, the Caribbean, Canada, and the American West.
Biographical/Historical note:
Perry Hunt Wheeler (1913-1989), a Georgia native, began his higher education at Emory University, going on to graduate from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1937. Immediately afterward Wheeler enrolled in Harvard University from which he earned a graduate degree in Landscape Architecture in 1938. After graduation, Wheeler collaborated on garden projects in Atlanta, Georgia with fellow landscape architect Helen Hawkins Clarke. During World War II, Wheeler moved to Washington, D.C. to serve under the Office of Civilian Defense and the Office of Strategic Services Camouflage Division. Following the war, Wheeler worked at Garden House a Georgetown shop where he advised homeowners on tasteful garden design, accessories, and furnishings. By 1948 Wheeler had established a landscape architecture practice in Washington, D.C. His practice grew via word of mouth through Washington's social circles and through a shared office with landscape architect Rose Ishbel Greely, and later with architect Gertrude Sawyer.

In 1947, he formed a 'bachelor household' in Georgetown with James Snitzler. Later, at the invitation of Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon, he and Snitzler created a second home outside of Washington called "Spring Hill" on property owned by Mellon. Shortly after Snitzler's death in 1968, Wheeler moved permanently to Middleburg, Virginia and continued to travel, lecture, and consult with clients. Wheeler semi-retired in 1981 to 'Budfield,' a property in Rectortown, Virginia where he passed away in 1989, leaving his estate to his partner, James M. Stengle.

Wheeler is best known for his work on private gardens in Washington's Georgetown neighborhood. He frequently employed the use of intricate brickwork, low-maintenance planting, and simple water features in creating his charming and functional designs. His most noteworthy commissions outside the private realm include collaboration with Bunny Mellon on the White House Rose Garden, designing a Garden Club of America-commissioned gazebo and its surroundings for the U.S. National Arboretum, and plantings for the National Cathedral and President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in Arlington National Cemetery.
Provenance:
Gift from the estate of James M. Stengle, 1993.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Presidents -- United States  Search this
Landscape architects  Search this
Presidents' spouses -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lists
Awards
Certificates
Invoices
Negatives
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographs
Invitations
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Perry H. Wheeler collection.
Identifier:
AAG.WHE
See more items in:
Perry H. Wheeler collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-whe
Online Media:

Malcolm Howard Dill slide collection

Landscape architect:
Dill, Malcolm  Search this
Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Cubic feet (16 35mm slides., 35mm)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Date:
1929-1931
Summary:
The Malcolm Howard Dill Collection contains 17 35mm slide reproductions of photographs of and design plans for private and community projects in Ohio and Indiana by the landscape architect, Malcolm Howard Dill.
Biographical/Historical note:
Malcolm Howard Dill graduated from Harvard's School of Landscape Architecture in 1920. After establishing a private practice, he did community planning and city planning and later went on to work for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Norris Dam project in the 1930s.
Provenance:
35mm slide reproductions of original photographs and design plans in the possession of Elizabeth Dill Hume made for the Archives of American Gardens.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Indiana  Search this
Landscape architecture  Search this
Gardens -- Ohio  Search this
Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Malcolm Howard Dill slide collection.
Identifier:
AAG.DIL
See more items in:
Malcolm Howard Dill slide collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-dil

Records of the Robert Mills Papers Project,[xerographic and photographic copies]

Director:
Evelyn, Douglas E.  Search this
Names:
Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848  Search this
Alexander, Robert L.  Search this
Bache, A. D. (Alexander Dallas), 1806-1867  Search this
Bryan, John  Search this
Calhoun, John C. (John Caldwell), 1782-1850  Search this
Clay, Henry  Search this
Clinton, DeWitt  Search this
Corcoran, W. W. (William Wilson), 1798-1888  Search this
Davis, Jefferson  Search this
Hoban, James  Search this
Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826  Search this
Lafayette  Search this
Latrobe, Benjamin (architect)  Search this
Mills, Robert, 1781-1855  Search this
Peale, Rembrandt, 1778-1860  Search this
Pierce, Franklin  Search this
Renwick, James, Sr.  Search this
Scott, Pamela  Search this
Trumbull, John, 1756-1843  Search this
Extent:
23.3 Cubic feet (50 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Construction records
Plans (drawings)
Date:
circa 1800-1860s, 1984-1989
Scope and Contents:
This collection is composed entirely of xerographic and photographic reproductions made for the Robert Mills Papers Project. The copies include correspondence, plans, federal legislation regarding proposed government construction projects, construction records, and material regarding people with a relation to Mills or one of his projects.

The material is organized into three series. The first is information relating to Mills' various projects, such as payroll lists; it is organized by state. The second consists of subject files on 163 individuals, all of whom have some relation to Mills. The last series is composed of reference and research materials from the project, including correspondence with various libraries and archives seeking material on Mills, ten reels of microfilm, and 46 diskettes containing typed transcriptions of the illegible documents included in the microfilm publication.

The documents included in this collection relate to the construction of Mills's buildings, but do not mention him specifically. Of all the papers collected for this project, this collection consists of copies of those documents that were not selected for microfilming. They are, therefore, not included in the microfilm publication.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into four series.

Series 1: Projects by state

Series 2: Individuals

Series 3: Reference Materials

Series 4: Camera Ready Copy
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Mills (1781 1855) was born in August, 1781, in Charleston, South Carolina. After completing grammar school he took classes under architect James Hoban.

Hoban left in 1792 to supervise construction of the President's House in Washington (which he designed). About 1799 Mills moved to Washington and began work as a draftsman of plans for the Capitol under Hoban. For about a year, Mills presumably lived with Thomas Jefferson, studying architecture from his library.

In 1802 Mills entered his first professional design competition for the design of South Carolina College, but did not win. From 1802 1809, Mills worked (with sporadic interuptions from assorted commissions) with Benjamin Latrobe, who was at the time the acting federal engineer of the Chesapeake and Delaware region. Under Latrobe he worked as a draftsman on the design of the U.S. Capitol and the Baltimore Cathedral.

In 1814 Mills received national recognition when he won the competition for the design of Baltimore's Washington Monument. He supervised its construction until 1820, when he moved back to South Carolina to become the civil architect for the state, designing several courthouses and jails throughout the area.

Mills moved back to Washington in 1829. In 1836 he won the competition for the design of the Treasury and began a long career as an architect for the Federal Government. It was during this time that Mills designed the buildings he is most widely known for: the Post Office and the Washington National Monument. He also supervised construction of the Patent Office and submitted preliminary designs for the Capitol extension and the Smithsonian Institution. He served under seven Presidents, retiring in 1851.
Provenance:
The colletion was donated by Douglas Evelyn.
Restrictions:
Collection stored off-site at Iron Mountain, Pennsylvania. Special arrangements are necessary to use this collection. Call 202-633-3270 for more information.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Architects -- 19th century  Search this
Architecture -- United States  Search this
Architectural drawing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- Copies -- 19th century
Construction Records
Plans (drawings)
Citation:
Records of the Robert Mills Papers Project, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0344
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0344

Art To Go

Publisher:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Language:
English
Object type:
Lesson Plan
Date created:
6/5/20
Topic:
Arts  Search this
Visual Arts  Search this
Home  Search this
Do it yourself  Search this
Thinking  Search this
Artworks  Search this
Interaction  Search this
Activity  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Writing  Search this
Questioning  Search this
Children  Search this
Students  Search this
Caregivers  Search this
Parents  Search this
Typical age range 5-8  Search this
Typical age range 8-10  Search this
Data source:
SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SCLDA_4807

Arte en tu casa

Publisher:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Language:
Spanish
Object type:
Lesson Plan
Date created:
6/5/20
Topic:
Arts  Search this
Visual Arts  Search this
Home  Search this
Do it yourself  Search this
Thinking  Search this
Artworks  Search this
Interaction  Search this
Activity  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Writing  Search this
Questioning  Search this
Children  Search this
Students  Search this
Caregivers  Search this
Parents  Search this
Español  Search this
Spanish  Search this
Typical age range 5-8  Search this
Typical age range 8-10  Search this
Data source:
SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SCLDA_4808

Art To Go

Publisher:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Language:
English
Object type:
Lesson Plan
Date created:
6/5/20
Topic:
Arts  Search this
Visual Arts  Search this
Home  Search this
Do it yourself  Search this
Thinking  Search this
Artworks  Search this
Interaction  Search this
Activity  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Writing  Search this
Questioning  Search this
Children  Search this
Students  Search this
Caregivers  Search this
Parents  Search this
Typical age range 10-12  Search this
Typical age range 12-14  Search this
Data source:
SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SCLDA_4809

Arte en tu casa

Publisher:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Language:
Spanish
Object type:
Lesson Plan
Date created:
6/5/20
Topic:
Arts  Search this
Visual Arts  Search this
Home  Search this
Do it yourself  Search this
Thinking  Search this
Artworks  Search this
Interaction  Search this
Activity  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Writing  Search this
Questioning  Search this
Children  Search this
Students  Search this
Caregivers  Search this
Parents  Search this
Typical age range 10-12  Search this
Typical age range 12-14  Search this
Data source:
SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SCLDA_4810

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange)  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
MM. Jacques Seligmann & fils  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Art dealers -- France -- Paris  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- France -- Paris  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
The Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
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Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Place:
Caribbean Area
Central America
Latin America
Puerto Rico
Cuba
El Salvador
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2005
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Food Culture USA

Series 3: Forest Service, Culture, and Community

Series 4: Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture

Series 5: Oman: Desert, Oasis, and Sea

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In its 39th year, the Festival once again presented a sample of the diverse cultural heritage of America and the world to large public audiences in an educational, respectful, and profoundly democratic way on the National Mall of the United States. True to form, the Festival illustrated the living, vital aspect of cultural heritage and provided a forum for discussion on matters of contemporary concern.

For the first time, a full-scale Festival program was devoted to an Arab nation, Oman. Oman is at the edge of the Arabian Peninsula, both geographically and historically situated between East Africa and the Indian Ocean. Trade routes, frankincense, silverwork, Islam, a strategic location, and oil have connected it to the cultures of the Middle East, Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean region, and beyond. Contemporary Omanis live poised between a long and rich past and a future they are in the midst of defining. New roads, hospitals, schools, businesses, high-tech occupations, and opportunities for women are developing alongside traditionally valued religion, family life, artistry, and architecture. Omanis are well aware of the challenges of safeguarding their cultural heritage in an era of globalization. The Festival program provided a vivid illustration of the approaches they have taken and enabled American visitors and Omanis to engage in open, two-way interchange.

During the Festival, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Programs in previous years have illustrated the traditions of White House workers and of Smithsonian workers. This Festival examined the occupational culture of Forest Service rangers, smokejumpers, scientists, tree doctors, and many others devoted to the health and preservation of our nation's forests. They were joined by artists and workers from communities that depend upon the forests for their livelihood or sustenance. The Festival offered the opportunity for an active discussion of the significance of our national forests and rangelands to the American people.

Food Culture USA examined the evolution of our nation's palate over the preceding generation. New produce, new foods, new cooking techniques, and even new culinary communities have developed as a result of immigrant groups taking their place in our society, the rise of organic agriculture, and the growing celebrity of ethnic and regional chefs on a national stage. A diversity of growers, food inspectors, gardeners, educators, home cooks and prominent chefs shared their knowledge and creativity as they demonstrated the continuity and innovation in America's culinary culture.

The program in Latino music continued with a series of evening concerts. The 2004 program drew many Latinos to the National Mall, helping the Smithsonian reach out to a major segment of the American population. Audiences in both 2004 and 2005 were thrilled by the performances, as were the musicians who presented their own cultural expressions and thus helped educate their fellow citizens of the nation and the world. Smithsonian Folkways released recordings of three of the groups that had performed the previous year, and one later went on to be nominated for a Grammy award.

The 2005 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and the Rinzler Concert.

The 2005 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs (with a Spanish version of the Latino music essay).

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings/Smithsonian Global Sound: Daniel Sheehy, Curator and Director; Anthony Seeger, Curator and Director, Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Frank Proschan, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Research Associates: Robert Albro, Geri Benoit, Patrick Delatour, Kip Lornell, Mara Mayor, Joan Nathan, Sam-Ang Sam, Preston Scott, Chucho Valdez, Patrick Vilaire, Nilda Villalta; Rockefeller Humanities Fellows (2004-05): Robert Albro, Jane Anderson, Lesley Fordred-Green, Christina Kreps, Tong Lam, Lillian Manzor, Marya McQuirter, Sita Reddy

Folklife Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst (chair), Judy Mitoma (vice-chair), Michael Doucet, Anthony Gittens, John Herzog (ex-officio), Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Debora Kodish, Enrique Lamadrid, Worth Long, Libby O'Connell, J. Scott Raecker, Robert Santelli, Ricardo Trimillos

Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don De Vito, Ella Jenkins, Anthony Seeger (ex-officio), Fred Silber

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Donald W. Murphy, Deputy Director; Joseph M. Lawler, Regional Director, National Capital Region

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds; Smithsonian trust funds; contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals; in-kind assistance; and food, recording, and craft sales. Support for this year's Festival came from the Music Performance Fund, with in-kind support provided through Motorola, NEXTEL, WAMU 88.5 FM, WashingtonPost.com, Pegasus Radio Corp., and Icom America.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2005
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2005 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2005

Project Files, 1963-2016

Creator:
Smithsonian Facilities  Search this
Subject:
Smithsonian Institution Office of Design and Construction  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Museum Support Center  Search this
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory  Search this
National Postal Museum (U.S.)  Search this
Renwick Gallery  Search this
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.) Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility  Search this
Quadrangle Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Freer Gallery of Art  Search this
Arts and Industries Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.)  Search this
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum  Search this
National Museum of African American History and Culture (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) George Gustav Heye Center  Search this
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) Cultural Resources Center  Search this
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Libraries  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Safety, Health, and Environmental Management  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Service Center (Landover, Md.)  Search this
National Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
National Zoological Park (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center  Search this
Victor Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Capital Gallery Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)  Search this
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.)  Search this
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)  Search this
Physical description:
150.25 cu. ft. (84 record storage boxes) (149 blueprint storage boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Newspapers
Clippings
Compact discs
Digital versatile discs
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Architectural drawings
Floor plans
Drawings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Color transparencies
Date:
1963
1963-2016
Topic:
Buildings--Repair and reconstruction  Search this
Architectural design  Search this
Smithsonian buildings  Search this
Museum buildings  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 17-006
See more items in:
Project Files circa 1930-2018 [Smithsonian Facilities]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_391550

Exhibition and Program Records, 2004-2015

Creator:
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Office of Curatorial Affairs  Search this
Uniform title:
American Enterprise: A History of Business in America (Monograph : 2015)  Search this
Subject:
Heymann, Andrew  Search this
Fisher, Stevan  Search this
Allison, David K. 1950-  Search this
Liebhold, Peter  Search this
Fortune, Jane  Search this
Davis, Nancy E  Search this
Franz, Kathleen  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
American Enterprise (Exhibition) (2015- : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Electronic records
Collection descriptions
Digital images
Place:
United States
Date:
2004
2004-2015
Topic:
Museums--Educational aspects  Search this
Museums--Public relations  Search this
Corporate sponsorship  Search this
Business enterprises  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Fund raising  Search this
Special events  Search this
Research grants  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Congresses and conventions  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Capitalism--History  Search this
Economic conditions  Search this
History  Search this
Commerce  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 17-134
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years; until Jan-01-2031. Records may contain personally identifiable information (PII) that is permanently restricted. Transferring office; 2/14/2017 memorandum, Johnstone to Klein; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Exhibition and Program Records 1984-2015 [National Museum of American History (U.S.) Office of Curatorial Affairs]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_389085

Volunteer Program Records, circa 1967-2005

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Visitor Information and Associates' Reception Center  Search this
Subject:
Smithson, James 1765-1829  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Physical description:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Brochures
Collection descriptions
Books
Clippings
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Serials (publications)
Compact discs
Electronic records
Floor plans
Drawings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Enid A. Haupt Garden (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1967
1967-2005
circa 1967-2005
Topic:
Visitors' centers  Search this
Museum docents  Search this
Museum visitors  Search this
Tour guides (Persons)  Search this
Museums--Educational aspects  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 19-219
See more items in:
Volunteer Program Records circa 1967-2005 [Smithsonian Institution Visitor Information and Associates' Reception Center]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_398611

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