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Thomas Dale Stewart Papers

Creator:
Stewart, T. D. (Thomas Dale), 1901-1997  Search this
Names:
American Association of Physical Anthropologists  Search this
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)  Search this
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Angel, J. Lawrence (John Lawrence)  Search this
Collins, Henry B. (Henry Bascom), 1899-1987  Search this
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
McKern, T. W.  Search this
Extent:
65 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Alaska
Shanidar Cave (Iraq)
Virginia
Maryland
Delaware
Mexico
Peru
Guatemala
Chaco Canyon (N.M.) -- Archeology
Date:
1875-1991, bulk 1931-1991
bulk 1927-1991
Summary:
Thomas Dale Stewart was a physical and forensic anthropologist and worked at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History from 1931 until his death in 1997. He worked under Ales Hrdlicka until 1943, became the head curator in 1960, director of the museum in 1962, and retired in 1971. Stewart's research interests included physical and forensic anthropology and archaeology, mostly in North and South America. He also worked with the F.B.I. frequently to aid in homicide investigations, and worked extensively with the U.S. Army to identify skeletal remains from the Korean War in Operation Glory. The Thomas Dale Stewart Papers primarily deal with his life and career at the Smithsonian, particularly his research projects and publications between 1931 and 1991. Materials consist mainly of correspondence, photographic material, dossiers based on writings and research projects, and administrative files.
Scope and Contents:
The Thomas Dale Stewart Papers document his research and professional activities from 1931 to 1991 and primarily deal with his anthropological and archaeological research in North and South America. There is also significant material related to ancient human skeletal remains found in Egypt and the Middle East, Stewart's work identifying skeletal remains for the U.S. Army (Operation Glory), and the history of physical and forensic anthropology. Material documenting Stewart's work with Ales Hrdlicka and other colleagues are also represented in this collection. The collection consists of correspondence, writings and research files, project data, skeletal data punch cards, photographic and illustration materials, and administrative and financial papers.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 9 series: Series 1. Biographical and Background, 1937-1983; Series 2. Correspondence, 1931-1990; Series 3. Writings and Research, 1875, 1902-1990; Series 4. Operation Glory, 1954-1957; Series 5. Professional Organizations, 1930-1990; Series 6. Trip Files, 1945-1985; Series 7. Teaching and Lectures, 1950-1970; Series 8. Exhibit Material, 1961-1969; Series 9. Photographs, 1928-1979.
Biographical note:
Thomas Dale Stewart was a curator of physical anthropology at the Smithsonian specializing in anthropometry, early man, and forensic anthropology. He worked in the Department of Anthropology for over seventy years. Born in Delta, Pennsylvania in 1901, Stewart moved to Washington, D.C. to pursue a degree at George Washington University. While attending school, he also began working at the Smithsonian in 1924 as a temporary substitute for John Baer, a family friend from Delta. After Baer died during conducting research in Panama, Stewart was invited to stay on as assistant to Ales Hrdlicka, curator of physical anthropology. Hrdlicka was impressed by Stewart's abilities and quickly took him on as a student. Promised that he would succeed Hrdlicka one day if he obtained an M.D., Stewart enrolled at The Johns Hopkins University and graduated in 1931. After graduating, Stewart was rehired by the Smithsonian as an assistant curator.

Stewart rose through the ranks of the Department of Anthropology quickly, being promoted to associate curator in 1939 and curator in 1943 after the death of his mentor Hrdlicka. Stewart was appointed head curator of the department in 1960 and director of the Natural History Museum in 1962. He continued to work at the Smithsonian well after he retired in 1971, conducting research and producing a stream of publications well into his 90s. He died in 1997 at the age of 96. Many of Stewart's early research interests matched those of his mentor: a focus on dental caries, separate neural arch and spondylolisthesis, ossuary excavation, cranial deformations, and other examinations of archaeological remains throughout North America. While Hrdlicka was alive, Stewart provided support for many of his research projects and publications. After Hrdlicka died, Stewart expanded his interests to include forensic topics and analysis of other archaeological remains.

Anthropometry was prominent in a great deal of his work. He was the first to describe Tepexpan Man from Mexico and Midland Man from Texas. He also studied the remains of Neanderthal specimens that Ralph S. Solecki, of the Bureau of American Ethnology, had uncovered at Shanidar Cave in Iraq. In forensic work, as Hrdlicka's heir, Stewart assumed work for the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other law enforcement officials. Moreover, Stewart devised new methods and published books and articles concerning forensic analysis, including his Essentials of Forensic Anthropology. In closely related work during 1954-1955, the United States Army engaged Stewart to go to Japan to examine skeletal remains repatriated after the Korean War in a project called "Operation Glory."

In terms of his areal specialization, Stewart was essentially an Americanist. In North America, he worked in Alaska with Henry B. Collins in 1927, and in subsequent years he excavated several ossuaries and other sites in the Washington, D.C., vicinity. These included a site on Potomac Creek in Virginia, Piscataway sites in Maryland, and the Townsend site in Delaware. He also carried out laboratory studies and prepared reports on skeletal remains uncovered by Smithsonian colleagues. In the 1940s and 1950s, Stewart conducted field work at archaeological sites in Mexico, Guatemala, and Peru.

He was awarded the Viking Medal in Physical Anthropology in 1953, the Joseph Henry Medal of the Smithsonian Institution in 1967, and an award from the physical anthropology section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 1981.

Sources: Ubelaker, Douglas H. "Thomas Dale Stewart, A Biographer Memoir," National Academy of Sciences, 2006.

Pace, Eric. "T. Dale Stewart Dies at 96; Anthropologist at Smithsonian," The New York Times, 1997.

Chronology

1901 -- Born in Delta, Pennsylvania.

1922-1927 -- Moved to Washington, D.C. and attended George Washington University.

1924 -- Began working at the Smithsonian Institution.

1927 -- Sent by Ales Hrdlicka to Alaska to collect skeletal remains with Henry Collins.

1931 -- Graduated from The Johns Hopkins University with an M.D.

1931 -- Appointed assistant curator at the Smithsonian under Hrdlicka.

1939 -- Promoted to associate curator.

1939 -- Field work in Mexico.

1941 -- Field work in Peru.

1943 -- Taught at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

1943 -- Promoted to curator after Hrdlicka dies.

1943 -- Began working on forensic cases for the F.B.I.

1945 -- Field work in Mexico.

1949 -- Field work in Peru.

1947, 1949 -- Field work in Guatemala.

1954-1955 -- Traveled to Japan to assist in the identification of skeletal remains from the Korean War (Operation Glory).

1957-1967 -- Taught at the George Washington University School of Medicine.

1960-1962 -- Served as head curator of the Department of Anthropology.

1962-1965 -- Served as the director of the National Museum of Natural History.

1964 -- Assisted in the production of Smithsonian exhibits on physical anthropology.

1966 -- Retired from administrative duties and appointed senior scientist.

1971 -- Retired from the Smithsonian.

1997 -- Died in Bethesda, Maryland.
Related Materials:
The following manuscripts related to Stewart and his work can be found at the NAA:

NAA MS 1615- Excavations in Mancos Canyon, Colorado September 1943.

NAA MS 4669- The Townsend Site Near Lewes, Delaware 1962 by Henri Omwake.

NAA MS 4843- Report by T. Dale Stewart on Human Skeletal Material Excavated by W.M. Walker at Cedar Grove Cave, Arkansas and Natchitoches, Louisiana.

NAA MS 7025- A Tentative Closing Report on the Willin Site, Eldorado, Maryland September 1, 1952.

NAA MS 7121- "Memories from Half a Century at the Smithsonian January 11, 1978" recording.

NAA MS 7223- The Townsend Site January 1950.

NAA MS 7264- Documents Concerning Preserved Paleolithic Human Remains Found in the Vicinity of Cueva, Spain 1969-1972.

NAA MS 7357- Material Relating to Dermatoglyphics of Mayan Groups ca. 1947-1949.

NAA MS 7358- Personal Identification in Mass Disasters December 9-11 1968.

NAA MS 7359- T. Dale Stewart on the Identification of Human Remains April 6, 1970.

NAA MS 7474- Sketches of Burials at Ossuary 2, Juhle Site ca. 1971-1972.

Additional material T. Dale Stewart created while assisting Ales Hrdlicka is located at the National Anthropological Archives, The Papers of Ales Hrdlicka, ca. 1887-1943.

Many objects and artifact materials collected by T. Dale Stewart throughout his career are also held by the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology. These include skeletal remains and other materials from the Shanidar Cave in Iraq, forensic anthropological material including bone casts from Operation Glory, archaelogical materials from excavations in Maryland and Virginia including the Nanjemoy and Potomac Creek sites, and skeletal remains and other related materials from Stewart's 1927 expedition to Alaska with Henry Collins. Contact Anthropological Collections for more information.
Provenance:
Materials were transferred from T. Dale Stewart to the National Anthropological Archives in multiple accretions between 1975 and 2000 under accessions 1981-52, 1981-59, 1986-04, 1988-15, 1988-33, 1995-04, 1998-61, and 2000-46.The bulk of materials in this collection were transferred to the NAA from the Department of Anthropology in 1994 (1995-04).
Restrictions:
The Thomas Dale Stewart papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Physical anthropology  Search this
Operation Glory  Search this
anthropometry  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Eskimo  Search this
Physical anthropology -- American Indian  Search this
Americans  Search this
Aging  Search this
Anthropology -- Exhibits  Search this
Fossil hominids  Search this
Early man -- Neanderthal  Search this
George Washington University  Search this
Forensic anthropology  Search this
Anthropology -- History  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Early man  Search this
Primates  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.1988-33
See more items in:
Thomas Dale Stewart Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39eaa4784-50aa-40db-84d5-481a455cd42c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1988-33

Non intermediate dermatoglyphic associations of hybrid Pygmee populations

Author:
Hunt, David R.  Search this
Jantz, Richard L.  Search this
Brehme, H.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1993
Citation:
Hunt, David R., Jantz, Richard L., and Brehme, H. 1993. "Non intermediate dermatoglyphic associations of hybrid Pygmee populations." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 36 (S16): 111. (https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330360505), https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330360505.
Identifier:
155653
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330360505
https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330360505
Series Standard Number:
0002-9483
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_155653

Sex chromosomes and directional asymmetry of finger dermatoglyphic patterns

Author:
Jantz, Richard L.  Search this
Hunt, David R.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1983
Note:
Not written while at SI
Citation:
Jantz, Richard L. and Hunt, David R. 1983. "Sex chromosomes and directional asymmetry of finger dermatoglyphic patterns." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 60, (2) 207. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330600204.
Identifier:
155638
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330600204
ISSN:
0002-9483
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_155638

Influence of sex chromosomes on dermatoglyphic patterns

Author:
Hunt, David R.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1986
Note:
Not written while at SI
Citation:
Hunt, David R. 1986. "Influence of sex chromosomes on dermatoglyphic patterns." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 69, (2) 216. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330690203.
Identifier:
155639
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.1330690203
ISSN:
0002-9483
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_155639

Grover Sanders Krantz papers

Creator:
Krantz, Grover S.  Search this
Extent:
7.38 Linear feet (14 manuscript boxes, 1 oversize box, 1 manuscript folder, 47 floppy disks, and 9 audio cassettes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1904-2001
bulk 1955-2001
Summary:
Grover Sanders Krantz was a professor of physical anthropology at Washington State University and was considered a leading authority in hominoid evolution and primate bone structure, specializing in the reconstruction and casting of hominid fossils. Materials include articles, bibliographies, card files, clippings, correspondence, diplomas, computer disks, legal documents, manuscripts, maps, notebooks, notes, programs, school records, sketches, telegrams, transparencies and typescripts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the personal papers of Dr. Grover S. Krantz and documents his research in physical anthropology as well as his 30-year teaching career. The collection also contains materials on Krantz's activities in the field of cryptozoology, especially his investigations of Sasquatch. Materials include his writings, correspondence, notes, sketches, newspaper clippings, sound recordings, photographs, and electronic records. Some materials in the collection are written in code and noospel, a phonetic spelling system he had developed.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 9 series: (1) Correspondence, 1964, 1974-2001; (2) Writings, 1955-2001; (3) Research, 1959-2001; (4) Professional Activities, 1958-2001; (5) Sasquatch, 1963-2001; (6) Teaching, 1957-2001; (7) Biographical and Personal Files, 1904-1911, 1931, 1952-2002; (8) Sound Recordings, 1988-1997, undated; (9) Electronic Records, 1987-2001
Biographical Note:
Grover Sanders Krantz was born on November 5, 1931, to Swedish immigrants in Salt Lake City, Utah, and spent his childhood in Salt Lake City and Rockford, Illinois. His undergraduate studies began at the University of Utah in 1949 but were postponed in 1951 by 18 months of service in the United States Air Force. After being honorably discharged, Krantz attended the University of California, Berkeley, and earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in Anthropology. In 1970, he earned his doctorate in physical anthropology from the University of Minnesota.

From 1968-1998, Krantz served as a professor of physical anthropology at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington. He was considered a leading authority in hominoid evolution and an expert on primate bone structure, specializing in the reconstruction and casting of hominid fossils. Among his numerous publications are the books Climatic Races and Descent Groups, The Process of Human Evolution, and Geographical Development of European Languages. Publicly known for his interest in cryptozoology, Krantz was one of the first established researchers to pursue the question of Bigfoot, or Sasquatch, from a scientific approach. Other research interests included the origin of language and speech, sex identification of skeletons, and early human immigration into America.

After a battle with pancreatic cancer, Krantz passed away on February 14, 2002. At his request, his remains were sent to the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility, where scientists performed skeletal research of great forensic value. His bones were processed and sent to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History to be used in an educational capacity. In 2010, Grover Krantz's skeleton and that of his Irish Wolfhound Clyde were mounted in the museum's exhibit, "Written in Bone: Forensic Files of the 17th-Century Chesapeake."

Sources Consulted

"Dr. Grover Krantz." Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Accessed September 30, 2011. http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/grover_krantz.html

"Grover S. Krantz, 70, Port Angeles, Wash." Lewiston Morning Tribune (Lewiston, ID), February 16, 2002.

Krantz, Grover. "Curriculum Vitae."

Ruane, Michael E. "Natural History Museum Grants Professor's Dying Wish: A Display of his Skeleton." Washington Post, August 11, 2012. Accessed April 12, 2012. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/10/AR2009041003357.html.

"Sasquatch expert Grover Krantz dies at age 70." Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), February 19, 2002.

Chronology

1931 -- Born November 5 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Carl Victor Emmanuel Krantz and Esther Maria (Sanders) Krantz

1949 -- Begins undergraduate studies at University of Utah

1951-1952 -- Serves in the United States Air Force at Clovis, New Mexico, as a desert survival instructor

1953 -- Marries Patricia Howland Transfers from University of Utah to University of California, Berkeley

1955 -- Receives B.A. in Anthropology from UC Berkeley

1958 -- Receives M.A. in Anthropology from UC Berkeley

1959 -- Marries Joan Brandson

1960-1966 -- Works as Museum Technician, R.H. Lowie Museum of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

1964 -- Marries Evelyn Einstein

1966-1968 -- Works as Visiting Lecturer, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

1968 -- Begins work as Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department, Washington State University

1971 -- Receives Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, with the publication of his dissertation "The Origin of Man"

1972 -- Promoted to Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department, Washington State University

1973 -- Starts serving on Editorial Board, Northwest Anthropological Research Notes

1979 -- Starts serving on Editorial Board, Evolutionary Theory

1982 -- Serves as founding member and member of the Board of Directors for the International Society of Cryptozoology (ISC) Marries Diane Horton

1984 -- Due to high scores on the Miller Analogy Test, is accepted into Intertel, an organization that accepts only individuals who have scored at or above the 99th percentile on a standardized IQ test

1987 -- Appears in well-publicized creationism vs. evolution debate with Duane Gish, Washington State University

1988 -- Organizes and chairs Early Man symposium at the American Anthropological Association meeting in D.C.

1994 -- Offered Full Professor title within the Anthropology Department, Washington State University

1998 -- Publishes Only a Dog, a story about the relationship between Krantz and his first Irish Wolfhound Clyde Retires from Washington State University

1999 -- Appears in the documentary "Sasquatch Odyssey"

2002 -- Dies February 14 of pancreatic cancer His remains are processed at the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility His bones and bones of his Irish Wolfhounds are donated to the Smithsonian Institution for educational purposes

2010-2013 -- His mounted bones and bones of his Irish Wolfhound, Clyde, appear in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History exhibit "Written in Bone: Forensic Files of the 17th-Century Chesapeake"
Separated Materials:
Film and video, including copies of the Patterson-Gimlin film, have been transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA accession 2003-04).

Grover S. Krantz's specimens were donated to the National Museum of Natural History's Physical Anthropology Collections.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Grover Krantz's wife Diane Horton and his brother Victor Krantz, a former Smithsonian photographer.
Restrictions:
Materials that include student grades are restricted until 2081. Nude photographs of Grover were restricted until 2017. Electronic records are restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Grover Sanders Krantz papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Sasquatch  Search this
Human evolution  Search this
Fossil hominids  Search this
Primates  Search this
Biological anthropology  Search this
Citation:
Grover Sanders Krantz papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2003-21
See more items in:
Grover Sanders Krantz papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw337e0bfb9-5769-42fc-84f7-679f4ba004d0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2003-21

Dermatoglyphics in Australian aborigines (Arnhem Land)

Author:
Cummins, Harold  Search this
Setzler, Frank M.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1951
Citation:
Cummins, Harold and Setzler, Frank M. 1951. "Dermatoglyphics in Australian aborigines (Arnhem Land)." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 9, (4) 455–460.
Identifier:
120181
ISSN:
0002-9483
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_120181

MS 7357 Material relating to dermatoglyphics of Mayan groups

Creator:
Stewart, T. D. (Thomas Dale), 1901-1997  Search this
Correspondent:
Cummins, Harold, 1893-1976  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (ca. 5 inches)
Culture:
Maya  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Letters
Tables (documents)
Fingerprints
Palm prints
Date:
ca. 1947-1949
Scope and Contents:
Includes finger prints and palm prints identified by person and group; tabular documents prepared in analyzing the prints; and correspondence with Harold Cummins. The material is for Kanjobal speakers (Soloma), Quiche speakers (mostly Santa Clara la Laguna), Mam, and Cakchiquel (Patzun).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7357
Topic:
Physical anthropology -- dermatoglyphics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters
Tables (documents)
Fingerprints
Palm prints
Citation:
Manuscript 7357, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7357
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35255da63-1038-4aeb-b6f7-49cd27a51c47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7357

Measures of men; ten specialized studies in physical anthropology in Mexico, Central America and the West Indies [by] Harold Cummins, Mary Steele Lane, Stella M. Leche ... [and others]

Author:
Cummins, Harold J. 1893-  Search this
Lane, Mary Steele  Search this
Leche, Stella Marie Aglae 1901-  Search this
Physical description:
5 p. l., [17]-327, [1] p., 3 l. incl. illus., pl., tables. maps,diagrs. 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1936
Topic:
Anthropometry  Search this
Fingerprints  Search this
Call number:
GN57.I3 M48
GN57.I3 M48
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_36276

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