Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
42 documents - page 1 of 3

Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Extent:
245 Linear feet ((375 boxes and 10 map drawers))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1878-1965
Summary:
The records in this collection embody the administrative functions of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1879 to 1965. The collection consists of correspondence, card files, registers, official notices, annual and monthly work reports, research statements, research proposals, grant applications, personnel action requests, notices of personnel action, meeting minutes, purchase orders and requisitions, property records, biographical sketches, resolutions, newspaper clippings, reviews of publications, drafts of publications, circulars, programs, pamphlets, announcements, illustrations, cartographic materials, photographic prints, photographic negatives, bibliographies, and reprinted publications.
Scope and Contents:
The records in this collection embody the administrative functions of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1879 to 1965. The collection consists of correspondence, card files, registers, official notices, annual and monthly work reports, research statements, research proposals, grant applications, personnel action requests, notices of personnel action, meeting minutes, purchase orders and requisitions, property records, biographical sketches, resolutions, newspaper clippings, reviews of publications, drafts of publications, circulars, programs, pamphlets, announcements, illustrations, cartographic materials, photographic prints, photographic negatives, bibliographies, and reprinted publications.

Correspondence comprises the bulk of this collection. A significant portion of this correspondence originates from the Bureau's duty to field inquiries regarding North American aboriginal cultures and respond to requests relating to the duplication of BAE library and archival materials. Inquiries and requests, received from all parts of the world, were submitted by colleagues, museum curators and directors, students, professors, amateur archaeologists, government agents, military officials, Smithsonian Institution officials, artists, and members of the general public. Other correspondence reflects the Bureau's day-to-day operations and internal affairs. Subjects discussed in this correspondence include research projects, field expeditions, annual budgets, personnel matters, the acquisition of manuscripts, the disbursement of specimens, and production of BAE publications. Correspondence is occasionally accompanied by announcements, circulars, programs, pamphlets, photographs, drawings, diagrams, bibliographies, lists, newspaper clippings, and maps. Also among these records are the card files and registers of incoming and outgoing correspondence maintained by early BAE administrative staff. For a list of correspondents, see the appendix to this finding aid, available in the NAA reading room.

The majority of illustrations, artwork, and photographs that appear in this collection are associated with BAE publications, including BAE Annual Reports, BAE Bulletins, Contributions to North American Ethnology and Smithsonian Institution, Miscellaneous Collection. Maps located among the collection originate, by and large, from BAE field expeditions and research projects. BAE staff also amassed great quantities of newspaper clippings that concerned BAE research or points of interest. Of particular note are three scrapbooks comprised of clippings that relate to "mound builders" and the work of the BAE's Division of Mound Explorations.

Also worthy of note are the various records relating to the 1903 investigation of the BAE. Records related to the investigation highlight the Smithsonian Institution's longstanding dissatisfaction with the internal management of the BAE, its concerns over the BAE's loose relationship with the parent organization, and displeasure with the manner in which BAE scientific research was developing. Other materials of special interest are the various administrative records covering the period 1929 to 1946 and 1949 to 1965. The majority cover personnel matters; however, others justify the work of the BAE and bear witness to growing concerns that the BAE would eventually be absorbed by the Department of Anthropology within the United States National Museum.
Arrangement:
The collection has been arranged into the following 12 series: (1) Correspondence, 1897-1965; (2) Cooperative Ethnological Investigations, 1928-1935; (3) Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1929-1946; (4) Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1949-1965; (5) Records Concerning the Photographic Print Collection, 1899-1919; (6) Records Concerning Employees; (7) Fiscal Records, 1901-1902 and 1945-1968; (8) Records Relating to the 1903 Investigation of the BAE; (9) Property Records and Requisitions; (10) Clippings; (11) Publications; (12) BAE Library Materials, Pamphlets and Reprints
Administrative History:
The Bureau of Ethnology was established by an act of the United States Congress on March 3, 1879, but it was largely the personal creation of the geologist and explorer Major John Wesley Powell. His earlier explorations of the Colorado River and Grand Canyon formed the basis of the Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region. While exploring the area, Powell became alarmed at what he perceived to be the decline of the aboriginal way of life due to rapid depopulation. In a letter to the Secretary of the Interior, he warned that "in a few years, it will be impossible to study…Indians in their primitive condition, except from recorded history" (Hinsley). He urged swift government action; the result of which was the appropriation of $20,000 (20 Stat. 397) to transfer all documents relating to North American Indians from the Department of Interior to the Smithsonian Institution and its Secretary's appointment of Powell as director of the newly established Bureau of Ethnology, a position he held until his death in 1902. In 1897, its name was changed to the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) to underscore the limits of its geographical reaches.

Under Powell, the BAE organized the nation's earliest anthropological field expeditions, in which the characteristics and customs of native North Americans were observed firsthand and documented in official reports. Images of Indian life were captured on photographic glass plate negatives, and their songs on wax cylinder recordings. Histories, vocabularies and myths were gathered, along with material objects excavated from archaeological sites, and brought back to Washington for inclusion in the BAE manuscript library or the United States National Museum.

The fruits of these investigations were disseminated via a series of highly regarded and widely distributed publications, most notably BAE Annual Reports, BAE Bulletins, and Contributions to North American Ethnology. BAE research staff also responded routinely to inquiries posed by colleagues, government agencies, and the general public on matters ranging from artwork to warfare. Moreover, the BAE prepared exhibits on the various cultural groups it studied not only for the Smithsonian Institution, but also for large expositions held nationwide.

In 1882 Powell, under instruction of Congress, established the Division of Mound Explorations for the purpose of discovering the true origin of earthen mounds found predominately throughout the eastern United States. It was the first of three temporary, yet significant, subunits supported by the Bureau. Cyrus Thomas, head of the Division, published his conclusions in the Bureau's Annual Report of 1894, which is considered to be the last word in the controversy over the mounds' origins. With the publication of Thomas' findings, the Division's work came to a close.

The course of BAE operations remained largely the same under Powell's successors: W.J. McGee (acting director) 1902; William Henry Holmes, 1902-1910; Frederick W. Hodge, 1910-1918; J. Walter Fewkes, 1918-1928; Matthew W. Stirling, 1928-1957; Frank H.H. Roberts, Jr., 1957-1964; and Henry B. Collins (acting director), 1964-1965. However, following a 1903 internal investigation of the Bureau's administrative activities, Smithsonian officials called for a broader scope of ethnological inquiry and greater application of anthropological research methodologies. The BAE responded in 1904 by expanding agency activities to include investigations in Hawaii, the Philippines, and the Caribbean.

The BAE extended its geographical reaches once again, in the 1940s, to include Central and South America. In 1943, the Institute of Social Anthropology (ISA) was established as an independent subunit of the Bureau for the purpose of developing and promoting ethnological research throughout the American Republics. The findings of ISA-sponsored investigations were published in the six volume series, Handbook of South American Indians (BAE Bulletin 143). Julian H. Steward, editor of the Handbook, was appointed director of ISA operations and held the position until 1946 when George M. Foster assumed responsibility. The ISA was absorbed by the Institute of Inter-American Affairs in 1952, thus terminating its relationship with the BAE.

In 1946 the BAE assumed partial administrative control of the recently established River Basin Surveys (RBS), its third and final autonomous subunit. The purpose of the RBS was to salvage and preserve archaeological evidence threatened by post-World War II public works programs, more specifically the rapid construction of dams and reservoirs occurring throughout the country. Excavations conducted under the RBS yielded considerable data on early North American Indian settlements, and subsequent deliberations on this data were published as reports in various BAE Bulletins.

In 1965, the BAE merged administratively with the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology to form the Office of Anthropology within the United States National Museum (now the Department of Anthropology within the National Museum of Natural History). The BAE manuscript library, also absorbed by the Department of Anthropology, became the foundation of what is today the National Anthropological Archives (NAA).

In its 86 year existence, the BAE played a significant role in the advancement of American anthropology. Its staff included some of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries' most distinguished anthropologists, including Jeremiah Curtain, Frank Hamilton Cushing, J.O. Dorsey, Jesse Walter Fewkes, Alice Cunningham Fletcher, Albert H. Gatschet, John Peabody Harrington, John N.B. Hewitt, William Henry Holmes, Ales Hrdlicka, Neil Judd, Francis LaFlesche, Victor and Cosmo Mindeleff, James Mooney, James Pilling, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, Matthew Williams Stirling, William Duncan Strong, and William Sturtevant. The BAE also collaborated with and supported the work of many non-Smithsonian researchers, most notably Franz Boas, Frances Densmore, Gerard Fowke, Garrick Mallery, Washington Matthews, Paul Radin, John Swanton, Cyrus Thomas, and T.T. Waterman, as well as America's earliest field photographers such as Charles Bell, John K. Hillers, Timothy O'Sullivan, and William Dinwiddie. Several of its staff founded the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1880, which later became the American Anthropological Association in 1899. What is more, its seminal research continues to be drawn upon by contemporary anthropologists and government agents through the use of BAE manuscripts now housed in the NAA.

Sources Consulted:

Hinsley, Curtis. Savages and Scientists: The Smithsonian Institution and the Development of American Anthropology, 1846-1910. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1981.

McGee, WJ. "Bureau of American Ethnology." The Smithsonian Institution, 1846-1896, The History of its First Half-Century, pp. 367-396. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1897.

Sturtevant, William. "Why a Bureau of American Ethnology?" Box 286, Functions of the BAE, Series IV: Miscellaneous Administrative Files, 1948-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives.
Related Materials:
Additional material relating to BAE administrative affairs and research projects can be found among the National Anthropological Archives' vast collection of numbered manuscripts. Too numerous to list in this space, these include official correspondence, monthly and annual work reports, fiscal records, field notes, personal diaries, expedition logs, catalogues of specimens, vocabularies, historical sketches, maps, diagrams, drawings, bibliographies, working papers and published writings, among various other material. Most of these documents are dispersed throughout the numbered manuscript collection as single items; however, some have been culled and unified into larger units (e.g., MS 2400 is comprised of documents relating to the Division of Mound Explorations). Artwork and illustrations produced for BAE publications are also located among the NAA's numbered manuscript collection as well as its photograph collection (e.g., Photo Lot 78-51 and Photo Lot 80-6).

Photographs concerning BAE research interests can be found among the following NAA photographic lots: Photo Lot 14, Bureau of American Ethnology Subject and Geographic File ca. 1870s-1930s; Photo Lot 24, BAE Photographs of American Indians 1840s to 1960s (also known as the Source Print Collection); Photo Lot 60, BAE Reference Albums 1858-1905; and Photo Lot 85, BAE Miscellaneous Photographs 1895 to 1930. Other photographic lots include portraits of BAE staff and collaborators, namely Photo Lot 33, Portraits of Anthropologists and others 1860s-1960s; Photo Lot 68, Portraits of John Wesley Powell ca. 1890 and 1898; and Photo Lot 70, Department of Anthropology Portrait File ca. 1864-1921.

Additional materials in the NAA relating to the work of the BAE can be found among the professional papers of its staff, collaborators and USNM anthropologists. These include the papers of Ales Hrdlicka, John Peabody Harrington, Otis Mason, J.C. Pilling, Matthew Williams Stirling, and William Duncan Strong. Documents relating to the work of the BAE can be found among the records of the River Basin Surveys (1928-1969) and the Institute of Social Anthropology (1941-1952).

Records related to this collection can also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA). SIA accession 05-124 includes information regarding the 1942 transfer of six audio recordings related to the Chumash Indian language from the Bureau of American Ethnology to the National Archives, nine pages of Chumash translations, and "The Story of Candalaria, the Old Indian Basket-Maker." The Fiscal and Payroll Records of the Office of the Secretary, 1847 to 1942 (Record Unit 93), includes voucher logs, disbursement journals and daybooks of money paid out to the BAE from 1890 to 1910. BAE correspondence can also be found among the Records of the Office of the Secretary (Record Unit 776, accession 05-162). The Papers of William Henry Holmes, second director of the BAE, are also located among the SIA (Record Unit 7084).

Accession records concerning artifacts and specimens collected by the BAE are located in the registrar's office of the National Museum of Natural History.

Related collections can also be found at the National Archives and Records Administration. RG 57.3.1, the Administrative Records of the United States Geological Survey, includes register of applications for BAE ethnological expositions conducted between 1879-1882. RG 75.29, Still Pictures among the Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, includes 22 photographs of Arapaho, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, Navajo, and Apache Indians taken by William S. Soule for the BAE during 1868-1875. RG 106, Records of the Smithsonian Institution, includes cartographic records (106.2) relating to Indian land cessions in Indiana created for the First Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, 1881 (1 item); a distribution of American Indian linguistic stock in North America and Greenland, by John Wesley Powell, for the Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, ca. 1887 (1 item); a distribution of Indian tribal and linguistic groups in South America, 1950 (1 item); the Indian tribes in North America, for Bulletin 145, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1952 (4 items). Sound Recordings (106.4) include songs and linguistic material relating to the Aleut, Mission, Chumash, and Creek, gather by the BAE in 1912, 1914, 1930-41. Some include translations (122 items).
Provenance:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology were transferred to the Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives with the merger of the BAE and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History in 1965. The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Archives was renamed the National Anthropological Archives in 1968.
Restrictions:
The Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology are open for research.

Access to the Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0155
See more items in:
Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw391046c25-21e2-4334-a01f-9a6f734ae9cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0155
Online Media:

Priscilla Reining papers

Creator:
Reining, Priscilla  Search this
Extent:
2 Flat boxes
60.25 Linear feet (145 boxes)
23 Computer storage devices (floppy discs, zip discs, data tapes, and magnetic tape)
6 Sound recordings
2 Map drawers
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Kikuyu (African people)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Red Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Haya (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Computer storage devices
Sound recordings
Map drawers
Correspondence
Photographs
Electronic records
Place:
Tanganyika
Tanzania
Kenya
Uganda
Niger
Burkina Faso
Bukoba District (Tanzania)
Date:
1916-2007
bulk 1934-2007
Summary:
The Priscilla Reining papers, 1916-2007, primarily document the professional life of Reining, a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records. Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection.
Scope and Contents:
These papers primarily document the professional life of Priscilla Reining. The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records.

Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection. Her consultancy work is also well-represented, as well as her involvement in a large number of professional organizations. The collection also contains a great deal of material relating to her work on different programs and projects at AAAS, including the Committee on Arid Lands, Ethnography of Reproduction Project, and Cultural Factors in Population Programs. Also present in the collection are materials from her time as Urgent Anthropology Program Coordinator at the Smithsonian Institution, her files as an instructor and professor, and her files as a student at University of Chicago. Materials from her personal life can also be found in the collection, such as correspondence and childhood mementos.
Arrangement:
The Priscilla Reining papers are organized in 13 series: 1. Correspondence, 1944-2007; 2. Research, 1955-1970; 3. AAAS, 1971-1990; 4. Professional Activities, 5. 1957-2007; Daily Planners and Notebooks, 1960-2002; 6. Writings, 1952-1996; 7. Smithsonian Institution, 1964-1971; 8. University, 1958-1994; 9. Student, 1937-1975; 10. Biographical and Personal Files, 1934-2004; 11. Maps, 1916-1989, undated; 12. Photographs, circa 1950-1987, undated; 13. Electronic records.
Biographical / Historical:
Priscilla Copeland Reining was a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

Reining was born on March 11, 1923 in Chicago, Illinois. She studied anthropology at University of Chicago, where she earned both her A.B. (1945) and Ph.D. (1967) in anthropology. During her graduate studies, she studied peer group relations among the Ojibwa of the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota (1947, 1950-51). Her husband, Conrad Reining, accompanied her to the field, an experience that inspired him to also become an anthropologist.

In 1951-53 and 1954-55, Reining conducted fieldwork among the Haya of Bukoba District, Tanganyika (now known as Tanzania) as a Fellow of the East African Institute of Social Research. While research for her dissertation focused on the agrarian system of the Haya, Reining also conducted fertility surveys for the East African Medical Survey, studying the relationship between STDs and fertility in Buhaya and Buganda. During the 1980s, Reining became interested in AIDS when she observed that the Haya were dying from the disease at a much higher rate than neighboring groups. When she learned of a possible link between circumcision and the spread of HIV, she drew a map of circumcision practice among the ethnic groups of Africa and found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. These results were published in "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989), which she coauthored with John Bongaarts, Peter Way, and Francis Conant.

Beginning in the 1970s, Reining began exploring the use of satellite imagery in ethnographic research. In 1973, she used Landsat data to identify individual Mali villages, the first use of satellite data in anthropology (Morán 1990). That same year, as a consultant for USAID, she also used ERTS-1 imagery to estimate carrying capacity in Niger and Upper Volta (now known as Burkino Faso). She continued to apply satellite data in her research throughout her career, including in 1993, when she returned to Tanzania to study the environmental consequence of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya.

In 1974, Reining joined the Office of International Science of AAAS as a research associate. She stayed on to become Project Director for the Cultural Factors in Population Programs and to direct a number of projects under the Committee on Arid Lands. She also served as Project Director of the Ethnography of Reproduction project, for which she conducted fieldwork in Kenya in 1976. In 1990, she left AAAS for an appointment as Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida.

Prior to working for AAAS, Reining worked at the Smithsonian Institution (1966, 1968-70), during which she was the coordinator for the Urgent Anthropology Program in the now defunct Center for the Study of Man. She also taught at University of Minnesota (1956-59), American University (1959-60), and Howard University (1960-64). In addition, she worked as a consultant for various organizations, including Department of Justice, Peace Corps, International Bank for Reconstruction & Development (IBRD), Food and Agriculture Organization, and Carrying Capacity Network.

Reining was also actively involved in various organizations. She served as Secretary of the AAAS Section H (Anthropology) and was a founding member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Task Force on AIDS. She was also a fellow of the African Studies Association, AAA, AAAS, East African Academy, Society for Applied Anthropology, and Washington Academy of Science. In 1990, she was honored with a Distinguished Service Award from AAA.

Reining died of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19, 2007.

Sources Consulted

PR Vita. Series 10. Biographical and Personal Files. Priscilla Reining Papers. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Morán, Emilio F. 2000. The Ecosystem Approach in Anthropology: From Concept to Practice. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. Page 359

Schudel, Matt. 2007. Anthropologist Broke Ground on AIDS, Satellite Mapping. Washington Post, July 29. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/28/AR2007072801190.html (accessed December 8, 2011).

1923 -- Born March 11 in Chicago, Illinois

1944 -- Marries Conrad C. Reining

1945 -- Earns A.B. from University of Chicago

1947, 1950-51 -- Conducts field research on the Ojibwa of Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota.

1949 -- Earns A.M. from University of Chicago

1951-1953, 1954-1955 -- Field research on Haya of Tanzania

1967 -- Earns Ph.D. from University of Chicago

1972 -- Returns to Tanzania for IBRD consultancy work

1974 -- Begins working at AAAS as a research associate in the Office of International Science

1975 -- Project Director, AAAS

1976 -- Field research on Kikuyu of Kenya for Ethnography of Reproduction

1986-89 -- Program Director, AAAS

1990 -- Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida Receives Distinguished Service Award from AAA

1993 -- Field research in Tanzania studying environmental consequences of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya

2007 -- Dies of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19
Related Materials:
Additional materials at the NAA relating to Priscilla Reining can be found in the papers of Gordon Gibson and John Murra, as well as in the records of the Center for the Study of Man and the records of the Department of Anthropology. Photo Lot 97 contains two Haya photos taken by Reining that are not duplicated in this collection. The papers of her husband, Conrad Reining, are also at the NAA.

The archives of the American Association for the Advancement of Science also holds Reining's papers relating to her work for the organization.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Priscilla Reining's sons, Robert Reining and Conrad Reining, in 2009.
Restrictions:
The Priscilla Reining papers are open for research.

Some materials from the East African Medical Survey and Ethnography of Reproduction project contain personal medical history and are thus restricted. Grant applications sent to Reining to review are also restricted as well as her students' grades, and recommendation letters Reining wrote for her students. Electronic records are also restricted.

A small portion of the materials relating to Reining's Haya research, Ethnography of Reproduction project, and IBRD ujamaa research suffered severe mold damage. These materials have been cleaned and may be accessed. The legibility of some of the documents, however, is limited due to water and mold stains. Mold odor is also still present.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Fertility, Human  Search this
Kinship  Search this
population  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Remote sensing  Search this
Desertification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Electronic records
Citation:
Priscilla Reining Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2009-25
See more items in:
Priscilla Reining papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34d98c2cd-c075-443f-b007-9dd7cea86fe2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-25

["Oral reading of brief inscribed bamboo message; early morning after all night celebration; Parina, Yāgaw, Manaul Mansalay…Philippines"]

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 474
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 9: Subject Files / 9.3: Linguistics
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33d935700-0697-4161-992d-a257558221d0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref12531

"Commonwealth of the Philippines"

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 1083
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 12
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies / 8.14: Records Relating to State Names, Province Names, and Other Geographical Names / Notes on Etymologies of State Names and Province Names :
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32a3feeb5-6a7f-4bbc-8439-9de855372c05
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15520

Philippines

Collection Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Container:
Box 71a
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1900
Scope and Contents:
Notebook, Otis T. Mason, "Materials for a Guide to Collections in the Philippine Islands, including notes, illustrations, J. McK. Cattell to Mason, 6/7/00, stating he would try to help him while he (Woodruff) was in the Philippines, and W. J. McGee to Mason, 7/3/00 re Philippine photographs and problems in ethnology and linguistics.
Collection Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Department of Anthropology records / Series 17: Division of Ethnology / 17.1: Manuscript and Pamphlet File
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ef94bd95-d569-4598-8843-546006c685c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-xxxx-0311-ref15167

Alexander Schadenberg photographs of the Philippines

Creator:
Schadenberg, Alexander  Search this
Extent:
145 Glass negatives
2 Folders (Manuscript envelope)
Culture:
Filipinos  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Glass plate negatives
Place:
Philippines -- Ethnology
Philippines -- Fishing
Pasig River (Luzon, Philippines)
Philippines
Date:
circa 1881-1896
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs of the Philippines, including images of Spanish and Philippine people, military personnel, houses and government buildings, churches, villages and towns, rivers and landscapes, and material culture.
Biographical/Historical note:
Alexander Schadenberg (1851-1896) was a chemist and ethnographer, and a natural history enthusiast. Born in Breslau, Germany, he studied chemistry and botany. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked as the assistant director of the Potassic Salt Works in Stassfurt. In 1876, he went to worked as a chemist for the drug company Pablo Sartorius in Manila and in 1879, illness forced him to move back to Breslau.

From 1881 to 1883, Schadenberg and his friend Otto Koch visited southern Mindanao to carry out ethnographic and linguistic studies, basing themselves in the Bagobo village of Sibulan. There, they also made ethnographic and natural history collections. Upon their return to Germany Schadenberg spent several years working on his collections, publishing, lecturing and corresponding with museums and anthropological societies throughout Europe.

Schadenberg later returned to the Philippines and became a partner of Pablo Sartorius. He settled with his family in Vigan in 1885 and continued his excursions among the native people of the islands. After Schadenberg's death in 1896, his collections passed to several museums in Dresden, Vienna, Berlin, and Leyden.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The Dresden Museum holds the bulk of the photographs donated by Schadenberg's wife. The National Library of Australia holds some of Schadenberg's photographs in the Otley Beyer collection of photographs.
Provenance:
The collection was given to the Smithsonian Institution in 1903 by Dr. A.B. Meyer, Director of the Dresden Museum (Original accession no. USNM 41586). In his letter offering the smaller set of negatives to the Smithsonian, Meyer's writes,"The Dresden Museum recently received a present from the widow of Dr. Schadenberg who lived for years in the Philippines, and with whom together I published, as you will be aware, several works on these islands, some hundreds of negatives, the result of the photographic work of her late husband. Among these are about 150 which are of no value, whatever, for this Museum."
Restrictions:
The original negatives are fragile and not available for viewing. Digital surrogates are available.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Architecture -- Philippines  Search this
Church Interiors  Search this
Church buildings  Search this
Habitations and other structures -- Philippines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Citation:
Photo Lot 152, Alexander Schadenberg photographs of the Philippines, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.152
See more items in:
Alexander Schadenberg photographs of the Philippines
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ddbd1fb8-bdd7-4a0a-a2c8-99b49216081d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-152
Online Media:

Michiko Takaki papers

Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Extent:
134.16 Linear feet (167 boxes, 7 rolls, and 7 map-folders)
Culture:
Kalinga (Philippine people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Philippines
Date:
1921-2011
bulk 1960s
Summary:
The papers of Michiko Takaki, 1921-2011 (bulk 1960s), document her field work among the Kalinga people of the northern Philippines and her professional contributions as a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. The papers consist primarily of economic and linguistic field data gathered between 1964 and 1968, used in the production of her doctoral dissertation ("Aspects of Exchange in a Kalinga Society, Northern Luzon," 1977) and throughout her anthropological career. The collection consists of field notes, maps, photographic prints, negatives, slides, sound recordings, recorded film, data and analysis, correspondence, working files and drafts, and publications.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Michiko Takaki, circa 1921-2011 (bulk 1960s), document her research into the Kalinga people of the northern Luzon region of the Philippines as both an economic and lingustic anthropologist. The collection consists of field notes; maps; photographic prints, negatives, and slides; sound recordings; recorded film; data and analysis; correspondence; working files and drafts; and publications.

The bulk of the collection consists of field-gathered data into the economics, culture, and language of the Kalinga people, created and compiled during Takaki's doctoral fieldwork in the Philippines between 1964 and 1968. This data was used in the production of her doctoral dissertation, "Aspects of Exchange in a Kalinga Society, Northern Luzon" (1977) and throughout the remainder of her career as a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. In addition to Takaki, this material was often created or edited by her Kalinga research assistants during the period of her fieldwork or by her graduate student assistants at UMass-Boston. The material can be divided into the analytical categories related to the two main threads of Takaki's research: economic and subsistence activities, and linguistics. Economic material in the collection includes tables and tabulations of data on property, rice cultivation, and livestock use, as well as climatic data and cultural stories about exchange systems and subsistence work. Also included is gathered research into the Kalinga response to the Chico River Dam development project of the northern Luzon, an electric power generation project from the 1980s. Language material in the collection includes word lists, vocabulary slips, and morphology and phonology analysis that document the Kalinga language family of the northern Luzon. Also included are working files related to Takaki's project to translate Morice Vanoverbergh's Iloko Grammar into Kalinga.

Maps, photographic images, sound, and film contained in this collection largely document Takaki's fieldwork and research interests into Kalinga society and culture. Field-gathered data has been separated out into its own series. These materials - field notes and field data, maps, photographs, and sound and film recordings - form the first five series of the collection (Series 1-5). Research and analysis, compiled and refined from field-gathered data on the topics of culture, economics, and language, are arranged into their own three topical series (Series 6-8).

The collection also contains correspondence, as well as material documenting Takaki's professional life as a graduate student and faculty member. It includes grant applications, graduate essays, course preparation materials, professional presentations and publications, a curriculum vitae and tenure dossier from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and a copy of her master's thesis, "A Case Study of Cross-Cultural Communication: Some Aspects of the Psychological Warfare as Applied by the United States against Japan during the World War II" (1960).
Arrangement:
The Michiko Takaki papers are divided into 10 series:

Series 1: Field data and field notes, 1935-1985 (bulk 1960s)

Series 2: Maps, circa 1950-2003, undated

Series 3: Photographs, circa 1964-2006

Series 4: Sound recordings, circa 1964-1995

Series 5: Films, circa 1964-1968

Series 6: Kalinga texts, circa 1960-2006, undated

Series 7: Economic and subsistence activities research and analysis, circa 1961-1997

Series 8: Lingustic research and analysis, 1921-1993

Series 9: Correspondence, 1960-2002

Series 10: Professional materials, circa 1958-2011
Biographical / Historical:
Michiko "Michi" Takaki was born on September 11, 1930 to Noboru Takaki and Sumiko Kohaka in Tokyo, Japan.

As a GARIOA Scholar (Government Appropriation for Relief in Occupied Areas), Takaki earned an associate's degree from Stephen's College in Columbia, Missouri (1952) and a bachelor's degree in comparative literature from Lindenwood College in St. Charles, Missouri (1953). She also earned a second bachelor's degree from the Tokyo Women's Christian University (1954), returning to the US to earn a master's degree in journalism from Southern Illinois University (1960). In the fall of 1960, Takaki began graduate studies in anthropology under Prof. Harold C. Conklin at Columbia University. Conklin transferred to the Department of Anthropology at Yale University in 1962. Takaki followed, completing her dissertation and earning her PhD from Yale in 1977.

From 1964 to 1968, Takaki completed a 46-month period of ethnographic fieldwork in the Philippines. Her dissertation, published in 1977, was entitled "Aspects of Exchange in a Kalinga Society, Northern Luzon." After a brief stint as a curator of Pacific ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History (1970-1973), Takaki became a faculty member in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. While teaching, Takaki continued her research into the Northern Luzon region of the Philippines. Her early research into economic and subsistence activities gave way, in later years, to lingustic anthropology centered on the Kalinga language family. Takaki was granted tenure in 1980, and she remained on the UMass-Boston faculty until her retirement in 2002.

Michiko Takaki died in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 5, 2014.

Chronology

1930 September 11 -- Born in Tokyo, Japan

1951-1953 -- GARIOA Scholar (Government Appropriation for Relief in Occupied Areas)

1952 -- A.A. Stephens College

1953 -- B.A. Lindenwood College

1954 -- B.A. Tokyo Women's Christan University

1960 -- M.A. Southern Illinois University (Journalism)

1960-1962 -- Graduate coursework, Columbia University Department of Anthropology

1962-1968 -- Graduate coursework, Yale University Department of Anthropology

1964-1968 -- Field work in the Philippines

1964-1965 -- Research Fellow, International Rice Research Institute

1970-1973 -- Curator, Pacific Ethnology, Division of Anthropology, American Museum of Natural History

1973-2002 -- Faculty, University of Massachusetts, Boston

1977 -- Ph.D. Yale University (Anthropology)

1980 November -- Awarded tenure by the University of Massachusetts, Boston

2014 December 5 -- Died in Boston, Massachusetts
Separated Materials:
The eleven film reels in the collection have been transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives, accession number HSFA 2017-009, but are described in this finding aid in Series 5: Films.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by R. Timothy Sieber, Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, in 2016.
Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Economic anthropology  Search this
Ethnology -- Philippines  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Kalinga languages  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d1124dfc-79fa-49ad-aa1e-d27b573e8fed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-23
Online Media:

Linguistic research and analysis

Collection Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Extent:
16.92 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1921-1993
Scope and Contents:
This series is comprised of Takaki's linguistic research and analysis regarding the Kalinga language group, as distinct from Takaki's field data. It contains word lists, morphology and phonology analysis, dialect comparisons, glosses, and vocabulary slips. The series also contains the working files from Takaki's project to translate Morice Vonoverbergh's Iloko Grammar into Kalinga (1990). This includes instructions, drafts, copies, and vocabulary lists from various chapters in the manuscript, as well as correspondence between Takaki and various graduate student assistants at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Also included in this series are vocabulary sets, sentence typology sets, and verbal form lists originally created by Ernesto Constantino of the University of the Philippines Linguistics Department.
Arrangement:
Series 8 is divided into the following 3 subseries: (8.1) Kalinga language files from Uma, Butbut, and Basaw, 1921, circa 1957-1972; (8.2) Constantino's lists, circa 1964-1966; (8.3) Kalinga translation of "Iloko Grammar," circa 1967, 1982-1993.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23, Series 8
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a8d9e72c-1f7a-41bc-96f6-c2681a8d8315
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-23-ref1936

Constantino's lists

Collection Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1964-1966
Scope and Contents:
This subseries consists of linguistic research material on the Kalinga language family, originally created by Ernesto Constantino of the University of the Philippines Linguistics Department. It includes vocabulary sets, sentence typology sets, and verbal form lists.
Arrangement:
The material is arranged in alphabetical order.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23, Subseries 8.2
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Michiko Takaki papers / Series 8: Linguistic research and analysis
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3755d5d13-2865-4dbf-a662-80b561d5599d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-23-ref1949

Kalinga translation of "Iloko Grammar"

Collection Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1967, 1982-1993
Scope and Contents:
The subseries consists of the working files from Takaki's professional project on the Kalinga translation of Iloko Grammar, from the 1990s. Iloko Grammar was a publication by Morice Vanoverbergh regarding the Iloko, or Ilocano, language of the northern Luzon region of the Philippines. The subseries includes instructions, drafts, copies, and vocabulary lists from various chapters in the manuscript, created and edited by Takaki and various graduate student assistants at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.
Arrangement:
The material is arranged in loose chronological order.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23, Subseries 8.3
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Michiko Takaki papers / Series 8: Linguistic research and analysis
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33d27d04b-5d24-470f-b121-6457ff350255
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-23-ref2000

Field data

Collection Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1935, circa 1950-1985
Scope and Contents:
This subseries consists of the field data gathered during Michiko Takaki's doctoral fieldwork in the Philippines between 1964 and 1968. It includes economic, linguistic, and cultural material about the Kalinga people of the northern Luzon region, as well as background data on the region gathered before her fieldwork began. Documents include typed and handwritten drafts, forms, lists, tables, stories, and correspondence created by Takaki, her research assistants and informants, and colleagues and contacts in the Philippines. While created in the Philippines, this material was referenced throughout Takaki's career and in some cases has been amended or added to by Takaki or her graduate student assistants at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Analysis and finalized compiled data on economic and linguistic themes, often derived from or copies of material in this subseries, can be found in Series 7 and 8. Bound drafts and final copies of texts and transcriptions of Kalinga stories can be found in Series 6. See Subseries 2.2 for maps that were included with field data.
Arrangement:
The material is arranged in alphabetical order by topical heading, provided by Takaki.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23, Subseries 1.1
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Michiko Takaki papers / Series 1: Field data and field notes
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37f88e60f-10a1-45fe-8650-874aeacd2725
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-23-ref2219

Field data: Butbut

Collection Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1960-1969
Scope and Contents:
This subseries consists of the field data related to Takaki's fieldwork in the northern Luzon village of Butbut, one of the villages in which she spent the majority of her time between 1964 and 1968. These files were maintained separately from Takaki's main group of field data, now Subseries 1.1. The material documents economic, linguistic, and cultural data specifically about the Kalinga people in Butbut. This includes typed and handwritten stories, tables, notes and notebooks, lists, forms, drafts, and correspondence created by Takaki, her research assistants and informants, and colleagues and contacts in the Philippines.

Butbut field data is divided into groups under headings. Certain material has been labeled as related to "kuwa" (property), "matagūwan," and "qalos" (exchange). The remainder of the material was labeled by Takaki as "in process," "raw data," and "superceded," distinctions that have been maintained here. A final grouping of materials that was separated but unlabeled has been given the label "miscellaneous." The subseries also includes 4x6 index cards containing typed and arranged data from Butbut, included at the end of the subseries.

Related material on economic and linguistic topics can be found in Series 7 and 8.
Arrangement:
The material is arranged in alphabetical order by topical heading, provided by Takaki.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23, Subseries 1.2
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Michiko Takaki papers / Series 1: Field data and field notes
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3219cd64f-7527-4cf8-8202-68b77f460db3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-23-ref2222

Field data and field notes

Collection Creator:
Takaki, Michiko, 1930-2014  Search this
Extent:
21.35 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1935-1985
bulk 1960s
Scope and Contents:
This series is comprised of field-gathered data, notes, notebooks, and administrative materials related to Michiko Takaki's doctoral fieldwork in the Philippines between 1964 and 1968. It contains economic, linguistic, and cultural material about the Kalinga people of the northern Luzon region, as well as background data on the region gathered before her fieldwork began. It also includes administrative data related to the organization, logistics, and financial aspects of field study – notably, grant applications and inventories of artifacts, specimens, maps, and notes.

The series includes bound notebooks and unbound sequential notes written by Takaki and her Kalinga informants (some of which were later typed and can be found in Series 6: Kalinga texts); forms, lists, and tables recording climate and subsistence activities in the northern Luzon region; drafts of analysis of the gathered data; carbon copies of typed documents for editing and emendation; interfiled correspondence from informants, colleagues, and Filipino contacts; and language files.

Takaki's field data consists largely of loose (unbound) material that was stored as a unit from the 1960s until her death in 2014 – passing from her research station in the Philippines, to her office at the American Museum of Natural History, through various offices at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and finally on to her home on Isabella Street in Boston.
Arrangement:
Series 1 is divided into the following 4 subseries based on original order: (1.1) Field data, 1935, circa 1950-1985; (1.2) Field data: Butbut, circa 1960-1969; (1.3) Field notes, circa 1964-1968; (1.4) Fieldwork administration, circa 1962-1984.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.

Digital media in the collection is restricted for preservation reasons.

Access to the Michiko Takaki papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Michiko Takaki papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-23, Series 1
See more items in:
Michiko Takaki papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3760cddab-c17a-495c-bfb9-a7e612a73c73
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-23-ref902

A re-statement of Tagalog grammar. Appended with José Rizal's Nueva ortografía del lenguaje Tagalog

Author:
Wolfenden, Elmer P  Search this
Rizal, José 1861-1896 Nueva ortografia del lenguaje Tagalog  Search this
Summer Institute of Linguistics  Search this
Institute of National Language (Philippines)  Search this
Physical description:
ii, 44 p. 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1961
Topic:
Tagalog language--Grammar  Search this
Call number:
PL6053 .W855
PL6053.W855
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_72705

Discourse, paragraph, and sentence structure in selected Philippine languages [by] Robert E. Longacre

Author:
Longacre, Robert E  Search this
Summer Institute of Linguistics  Search this
Physical description:
3 v. illus. (part fold., col.), map. 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1968
1969
1968-69
Topic:
Philippine languages  Search this
Philippine languages--Syntax  Search this
Call number:
PL5506 .L84
PL5506.L84
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_4875

Windows on bilingualism / Eugene H. Casad, editor

Author:
Casad, Eugene H  Search this
Physical description:
xii, 208 p. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1992
Topic:
Bilingualism  Search this
Call number:
HM258 .W76 1992
HM258.W76 1992
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_428839

The poetic conventions of Tina Sambal / Hella Eleonore Goschnick

Author:
Goschnick, Hella Eleonore  Search this
Linguistic Society of the Philippines  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 452 p. : music ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Philippines
Luzon
Zambales
Date:
1989
Topic:
Tina Sambal dialect  Search this
Philippine poetry  Search this
Tina Sambal poetry--Translations into English  Search this
English poetry--Translations from Tina Sambal  Search this
Poetics  Search this
Songs, Tina Sambal  Search this
Songs  Search this
Call number:
PL5529.L9 G67 1989
PL5529.L9G67 1989
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_431538

Papers from the first annual Meeting of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, 1991 / edited by Martha Ratliff and Eric Schiller

Author:
Southeast Asian Linguistics Society Meeting (1st : 1991 : Wayne State University)  Search this
Ratliff, Martha Susan 1946-  Search this
Schiller, Eric  Search this
Arizona State University Program for Southeast Asian Studies  Search this
Physical description:
x, 481 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Congresses
Place:
Southeast Asia
Date:
1992
C1992
Topic:
Languages  Search this
Call number:
PL3501 .A72 1991
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_454318

A voice from the hills : essays on the culture and world view of the Western Bukidnon Manobo people / Francisco Col-om Polenda ; translated and edited by Richard E. Elkins

Author:
Polenda, Francisco Col-om  Search this
Elkins, Richard E  Search this
Linguistic Society of the Philippines  Search this
Physical description:
xviii, 375 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Philippines
Date:
1989
Topic:
Social life and customs  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Manobo languages  Search this
Call number:
DS666.M34 P76 1989
DS666.M34P76 1989
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_432897

Culture contact and language convergence / A. Kemp Pallesen

Author:
Pallesen, Alfred Kemp  Search this
Linguistic Society of the Philippines  Search this
Physical description:
xxix, 365 p. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Philippines
Date:
1985
Topic:
Philippine languages--History  Search this
Language and culture  Search this
Call number:
PL5507 .P16 1985
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_492864

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By