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Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Container:
Box 21, Folder 50
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1949-1971
Scope and Contents note:
Fairhaven College

Fairmount Park Association

Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego

Florida Gulf Coast Art Center

Florida Technology University

Ford Foundation

Fort Wayne Art School and Museum

Fort Worth Art Association Center

Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts

Francis G. Mayer Art Slides

Frank Perls Gallery

Franklin Siden Gallery

Frederick A. Praeger, Inc., Publishers

French and Co.

Frenkel and Co., Inc.

Allan Frumkin Gallery
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 3: Correspondence Files / 3.1: Institutions and Dealers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref814

Audrey Wells "Women in Jazz" Radio Series

Creator:
Young, Martha  Search this
Wilson, Nancy, 1937-  Search this
Williams, Mary Lou, 1910-  Search this
Teagarden, Norma, 1911-  Search this
Rushen, Patrice  Search this
Purim, Flora, 1942-  Search this
Parker, Chan  Search this
McRae, Carmen, 1922-  Search this
McPartland, Marian  Search this
Lincoln, Abbey, 1930 -  Search this
Maria, Tania, 1948-  Search this
Kral, Roy, 1921  Search this
Lieb, Sandra  Search this
Keane, Helen  Search this
KJAZ radio station (San Francisco, California)  Search this
Jones, Etta, 1928-  Search this
Jordan, Sheila, 1928-  Search this
Fitzgerald, Ella, 1917-1996  Search this
Humes, Helen, 1913-1981  Search this
Donald, Barbara, 1942-  Search this
Escovedo, Sheila  Search this
Dearie, Blossom, 1926-  Search this
Dodgion, Dottie, 1925-  Search this
Carter, Betty, 1930-  Search this
Coltrane, Alice, 1937-  Search this
Brackeen, Joanne, 1938-  Search this
Bloom, Jane Ira  Search this
Carroll, Barbara, 1925-  Search this
Cain, Jackie, 1928-  Search this
Anderson, Ernestine, 1928-  Search this
Akiyoshi, Toshiko, 1929-  Search this
Donor:
Wells, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Date:
1981-1982
Scope and Contents:
Thirty-four tapes of radio shows Wells did on radio station KJAZ in San Francisco on the subject of women in jazz. Some of the sessions featured interviews, while others featured recorded music. The performers and interviewees are listed below.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Biographical / Historical:
Film director and producer, Wells was once a disc jockey on radio station KJAZ in San Francisco.
Related Materials:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

John and Devra Hall Levy Collection, NMAH.AC1221

Ella Fritzgerald Papers, NMAH.AC0584

Bill Holman Collection, NMAH.AC0733

W. Royal Stokes Collection of Music Photoprints and Interviews, NMAH.AC0766

Joel Dorn Papers, 1966-1987, NMAH.AC.0536

Jeffrey Kliman Photographs, NMAH.AC0628

John Gensel Collection of Duke Ellington Music, NMAH.AC0763

Leonard Gaskin Papers, NMAH.AC0900

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts, Accession T90055
Provenance:
Donated by Audrey Wells to the Archives Center in 2005.
Restrictions:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Jazz  Search this
Jazz musicians -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Musicians -- United States  Search this
Radio programs, Musical  Search this
Women in music  Search this
Women musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes -- 1990-2000
Interviews -- 1990-2000
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Citation:
Audrey Wells "Women in Jazz" Radio Series, 1981-1982, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0899
See more items in:
Audrey Wells "Women in Jazz" Radio Series
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0899

Alan R. Solomon papers, 1907-1970, bulk 1944-1970

Creator:
Solomon, Alan R.  Search this
Solomon, Alan R.  Search this
Subject:
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Louis, Morris  Search this
Segal, George  Search this
Fahlström, Öyvind  Search this
Poons, Larry  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Bontecou, Lee  Search this
Picasso, Pablo  Search this
Provinciali, Michele  Search this
Reed, Lou  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy  Search this
Mulas, Ugo  Search this
Sonnabend, Ileana  Search this
Rosenquist, James  Search this
Sabol, Audrey  Search this
Grisi, Laura  Search this
Noland, Kenneth  Search this
Scull, Ethel  Search this
MacElroy, Robert R.  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Newman, Barnett  Search this
Finkelstein, Nat  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Sisler, Mary  Search this
Greenberg, Jeanine  Search this
Oldenburg, Patty  Search this
Morris, Robert  Search this
Scull, Robert C.  Search this
Hay, Alex  Search this
Dine, Jim  Search this
Kron, Joan  Search this
Chamberlain, John  Search this
Greenberg, Clement  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen  Search this
Paxton, Steve  Search this
Moore, Peter  Search this
Whitman, Robert  Search this
Novick, Elizabeth  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert  Search this
Redon, Odilon  Search this
Schute, Terry  Search this
Warhol, Andy  Search this
Hay, Deborah  Search this
Rainier, Yvonne  Search this
Childs, Lucinda  Search this
Johns, Jasper  Search this
Dunn, Judith  Search this
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Expo 67 (Montréal, Québec)  Search this
Pasadena Art Museum  Search this
Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Albright-Knox Art Gallery  Search this
Art Gallery of Ontario  Search this
Velvet Underground (Musical group)  Search this
Biennale di Venezia  Search this
Artforum  Search this
Amsterdam (Netherlands). Stedelijk Museum  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
University of California (System)  Search this
Cornell University.  Search this
San Francisco Art Institute  Search this
Centro de Artes Visuales (Asunción, Paraguay)  Search this
Los Once (Artists' group)  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Type:
Drawings
Transcripts
Photographs
Interviews
Lithographs
Place:
Italy -- Venice
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Art, Abstract -- United States  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theater  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7165
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209301
AAA_collcode_soloalan
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209301
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Alison Knowles, 2010 June 1-2

Interviewee:
Knowles, Alison, 1933-  Search this
Knowles, Alison, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch, 1947-  Search this
Subject:
Albers, Josef  Search this
Brecht, George  Search this
Callahan, Harry M.  Search this
Chicago, Judy  Search this
De Kooning, Willem  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Gordon, Coco  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph  Search this
Hamilton, Richard  Search this
Hendricks, Jon  Search this
Higgins, Dick  Search this
Johnson, Ray  Search this
Jones, Joe  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Kuehn, Kathy  Search this
Lauf, Cornelia  Search this
Lindner, Richard  Search this
Maciunas, George  Search this
Mac Low, Jackson  Search this
Moorman, Charlotte  Search this
Ono, Yōko  Search this
Paik, Nam June  Search this
Pollock, Jackson  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert  Search this
Saito, Takako  Search this
Schapiro, Miriam  Search this
Schneemann, Carolee  Search this
Schöning, Klaus  Search this
Silverman, Gilbert  Search this
Shiomi, Mieko  Search this
Spoerri, Daniel  Search this
Tenney, James  Search this
Teitelbaum, Richard  Search this
Waśko, Ryszard  Search this
California Institute of the Arts  Search this
Middlebury College  Search this
Pratt Institute. Art School  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Fluxus (Group of artists)  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15822
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)290220
AAA_collcode_knowle10
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_290220

Oscar Homolka

Artist:
Trude Fleischmann, 22 Dec 1895 - Jan 1990  Search this
Sitter:
Oscar Homolka, 12 Aug 1899 - 27 Jan 1978  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 11.4 × 8.2 cm (4 1/2 × 3 1/4")
Sheet: 13.3 × 8.7 cm (5 1/4 × 3 7/16")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1930
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Costume\Headgear\Hat  Search this
Equipment\Smoking Implements\Cigarette  Search this
Equipment\Smoking Implements\Ashtray  Search this
Oscar Homolka: Male  Search this
Oscar Homolka: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Oscar Homolka: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.83.197
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Dorothy Garfein
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4e6dab691-3eb3-4bc3-8bf2-e89d01cafb97
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.83.197

P. T. Barnum and Family

Artist:
Unidentified Artist  Search this
Sitter:
Phineas Taylor Barnum, 5 Jul 1810 - 7 Apr 1891  Search this
Medium:
Albumen silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 40.5 × 100.3 cm (15 15/16 × 39 1/2")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
c. 1865
Topic:
Phineas Taylor Barnum: Male  Search this
Phineas Taylor Barnum: Performing Arts\Performer\Showman  Search this
Phineas Taylor Barnum: Performing Arts\Circus Owner  Search this
Phineas Taylor Barnum: Society and Social Change\Administrator\Museum  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.76.67
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm44f85e190-553c-4138-aa96-78a4e545ee37
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.76.67

W.C. Handy

Artist:
Prentice H. Polk, 25 Nov 1898 - 29 Dec 1985  Search this
Sitter:
William Christopher Handy, 16 Nov 1873 - 28 Mar 1958  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 24.3 × 19.2 cm (9 9/16 × 7 9/16")
Sheet: 25.2 × 20.4 cm (9 15/16 × 8 1/16")
Mat (Verified): 45.7 × 35.6 cm (18 × 14")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1942
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Mustache  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Handkerchief  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Pin  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Necktie  Search this
William Christopher Handy: Male  Search this
William Christopher Handy: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
William Christopher Handy: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Rhythm and Blues  Search this
William Christopher Handy: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Bandmaster  Search this
William Christopher Handy: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Horn\Trumpet  Search this
William Christopher Handy: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Blues  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.83.196
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© The Prentice H. Polk Estate
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm49833212a-3bbb-4796-9b63-764910d09428
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.83.196

Maurice Grau

Artist:
John Case, 1808 - 1880  Search this
Studio:
Case & Getchell Studio, active c. 1863 - 1865  Search this
Sitter:
Maurice Grau, 1849 - 14 Mar 1907  Search this
Medium:
Albumen silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 8.7 × 5.5 cm (3 7/16 × 2 3/16")
Mount: 10.2 × 6.2 cm (4 × 2 7/16")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\Massachusetts\Suffolk\Boston
Date:
c. 1863
Topic:
Costume\Headgear\Hat  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Architecture\Balustrade  Search this
Artist's Effects  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Mustache  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Bowtie  Search this
Photographic format\Carte-de-visite  Search this
Interior\Studio\Photography  Search this
Maurice Grau: Male  Search this
Maurice Grau: Performing Arts\Director\Opera  Search this
Maurice Grau: Performing Arts\Producer\Impresario  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.80.191
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4d6151622-0143-44f6-a93e-67c2337692a6
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.80.191

Richard Berry Harrison

Artist:
Doris Ulmann, 29 May 1882 - 28 Aug 1934  Search this
Sitter:
Richard Berry Harrison, 28 Sep 1864 - 14 Mar 1935  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 20.5 × 15.6 cm (8 1/16 × 6 1/8")
Sheet: 21.3 × 16.4 cm (8 3/8 × 6 7/16")
Mount: 35.6 × 28 cm (14 × 11")
Mat (Verified): 45.7 × 35.6 cm (18 × 14")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
c. 1932
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Home Furnishings\Furniture\Seating\Chair  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Bowtie  Search this
Richard Berry Harrison: Male  Search this
Richard Berry Harrison: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.79.113
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4ebbb1761-9a0d-4638-a209-b57e2272fdbb
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.79.113

Edward Everett Hale

Artist:
James Wallace Black, 10 Feb 1825 - 05 Jan 1896  Search this
Sitter:
Edward Everett Hale, 3 Apr 1822 - 10 Jun 1909  Search this
Medium:
Albumen silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 9 × 7.9 cm (3 9/16 × 3 1/8")
Sheet: 14.8 × 10.1 cm (5 13/16 × 4")
Mount: 16.4 × 10.6 cm (6 7/16 × 4 3/16")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\Massachusetts\Suffolk\Boston
Date:
c. 1875
Topic:
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Mustache  Search this
Indeterminable  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Bowtie  Search this
Photographic format\Cabinet card  Search this
Edward Everett Hale: Male  Search this
Edward Everett Hale: Literature\Writer\Poet  Search this
Edward Everett Hale: Literature\Writer\Novelist  Search this
Edward Everett Hale: Religion and Spirituality\Clergy\Minister  Search this
Edward Everett Hale: Performing Arts\Performer\Story Teller  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.77.188
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm407a607ad-4602-4300-8cec-22a063606a01
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.77.188

Committee and Political Campaign Files

Collection Creator:
Biddle, Livingston, 1918-2002  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Linear feet (Boxes 27-30)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1944-2001
Scope and Contents:
This series consists of files, primarily accumulated after Biddle's NEA chairmanship, documenting his service as a prominent fundraiser and organizer for multiple committees and political campaigns. The files contain correspondence, meeting agendas and notes, solicitation letter drafts, and printed material for the American Council for the Arts, American Field Service Committee, Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, Corcoran Museum Board of Overseers Exhibitions Committee, Cosmos Club Arts Committee, Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, National Museum of Women in the Arts, various Washington, D.C. arts organizations, and the Catherine Bertini, Jimmy Carter, Judy Hancock, Walter Mondale, Claiborne Pell, and Sidney Yates campaigns. This series includes one sound recording.
Arrangement:
This series is arranged as 2 subseries.

6.1: Committees, 1944-2001

6.2: Political Campaigns, 1964-1994
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers, circa 1940-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.biddlivi, Series 6
See more items in:
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-biddlivi-ref288

Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Golden Circle Member

Collection Creator:
Biddle, Livingston, 1918-2002  Search this
Container:
Box 29, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1973-1995
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers, circa 1940-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers / Series 6: Committee and Political Campaign Files / 6.1: Committees
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-biddlivi-ref319

Washington Performing Arts Society

Collection Creator:
Biddle, Livingston, 1918-2002  Search this
Extent:
Includes 1 sound cassette
Container:
Box 29, Folder 22-23
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1979-1989
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers, circa 1940-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. papers / Series 6: Committee and Political Campaign Files / 6.1: Committees
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-biddlivi-ref337

Jack Mitchell Photography of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Collection

Choreographer:
Ailey, Alvin  Search this
Photographer:
Mitchell, Jack, 1925-  Search this
Dancer:
Allen, Sarita  Search this
Chaya, Masazumi  Search this
DeLavallade, Carmen , 1931-  Search this
DeLoatch, Gary, 1953-1993  Search this
Jamison, Judith  Search this
Roxas, Elizabeth  Search this
Truitte, James  Search this
Tyson, Andre  Search this
Williams, Dudley, 1938-2015  Search this
Wood, Donna, 1954-  Search this
Extent:
16 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Modern dance
Dance photography.
Date:
1961-2004
Summary:
Jack Mitchell (1925- 2013) was an acclaimed photographer who began chronicling the work of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1961. Alvin Ailey (1931- 1989), one of the most influential African American choreographers of modern dance, dedicated himself and his dance company to creating ballets that not only accelerated the careers of young African American dancers, but also stole the attention of national and international audiences in displaying the racial perspective of dance in the African American experience. This collection serves as Mitchell's documentation of the dance company's evolution while capturing the true idiosyncrasies and physicality of movement through still images. Through Alvin Ailey and Jack Mitchell's partnership, they were able to collaborate and produce a unique production of art, fusing the meaning and movements of dance and the techniques of photography.
Scope and Contents:
The Jack Mitchell Photography of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Collection is comprised of approximately 10,000 black and white prints of solo and ensemble acts, portraits of principle dancers and various associates of the company, color slides and transparencies for private photo sessions and performances, black and white film strips and their corresponding contact sheets, and reference materials.
Arrangement:
The material in this collection has been kept primarily at the folder level in the order that was declared by the initial owner and photographer, Jack Mitchell. Oversize prints were separated and housed in an associated series in the collection. The order of the material has been organized based on the medium of the material. Each subseries has been organized based on the following:

Series I: Black and White Prints Subseries A: Solo and Ensemble Images and Portraits were organized alphabetically by ballet name. Subseries B: Prints for Jack Mitchell Publication were organized by page number in the publication.

Series II: Color Photography Subseries A: Original Slide Boxes were organized numerically based on Jack Mitchell's label assignments. Subseries B: Color Slides were organized numerically based on subseries A's label assignments. Subseries C: Color Transparencies were organized numerically based on subseries A's label assignments.

Series III: Black and White Negatives Subseries A: Black and White Film Strips were organized chronologically by date. Subseries B: Contact Sheets were organized chronologically by date.

Series IV: Reference Material

OVERSIZE Series I: Black and White Prints were organized chronologically by date.
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Mitchell was born on September 13, 1925 in Key West, Florida. Although he was not in the field of photography, Mitchell's father bought him his first camera when Jack was a teenager. His first published photograph was of actress, Veronica Lake, for a War Bond Tour, a tour issued by the government that promoted debt securities to soldiers to finance military operations and expenditures He enlisted in the United States army and became a photographer in Italy at the end of World War II. In 1949, Ted Shawn, a dancer and choreographer who is respected among the dance community as a pioneer of American modern dance, invited Mitchell to Massachusetts photograph his dancers at his dance center, Jacobs's Pillow. It was during this time where Mitchell's interest and appreciation for moving bodies was realized. In the lifespan of his career, Mitchell created over 150 covers for Dance Magazine1, the New York Times, Time, Life, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, and Vogue.2

As Jack Mitchell started to photograph the poses and ballets of the American Ballet Theater throughout the late 1950s, Alvin Ailey saw some of Mitchell's photographs. By 1961, Mitchell had established himself as a distinguished photographer of dance, coining the term, "moving stills". His photographs became the benchmark and standard that other dance photographers measured their work. In November 1961, Ailey invited Mitchell to a performance space in Clark Center, NY, and with his dancers, they performed for Mitchell's camera; some of the photographs from that first photo session can be found in this collection.

Alvin Ailey was born on January 5, 1931 in in Rodgers, Texas, during the Great Depression. As his repertory reflected, the beginning of his life was defined by a tight-knit, predominantly African American folk culture. At age 12, Ailey and his mother, Lula Cooper, moved Los Angeles, California. It is here that he was exposed to the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, which led him to study under the Lester Horton Dance Theater, where he danced with Carmen DeLavallade, James Truitte, and Joyce Trisler. After 3 years of performing and training, he was positioned as a choreographer and later became the director of the company when Lester Horton suddenly died in 1953. His influence from Lester Horton, Martha Graham, and Katherine Dunham help to establish his philosophy that "Everything in dancing is style, allusion, the essence of many thoughts and feelings, the abstraction of many moments. Each movement is the sum total of moments and experiences".3 After Horton's death, Ailey went to perform at Ted Shawn's Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, and then on to New York with his longtime schoolmate and fellow dancer, Carmen DeLavallade, to perform in the 1954 Broadway production of "House of Flowers". The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Company was established in 1958.

From the beginning of his journey as a dancer and choreographer, Ailey wanted to show African American experience in his performances. He embedded folk culture in his early works "Revelations" and "Blue Suites". In reflection, before his first South Asian Tour, Alvin expressed, "The cultural heritage of the American Negro is one of America's richest treasures. From his roots as a slave, the American Negro- sometimes sorrowing, sometimes jubilant but always hopeful -has touched, illuminated, and influenced the most preserved of world civilization. I and my dance theater celebrate this trembling beauty."4 "Revelations" was well- received by national and international audiences, Ailey recognized by the dance community as a choreographer with promise and his company and ballets he created were highly anticipated. By 1965, Ailey went from being a dancer to being the company's choreographer. From the onset, Ailey embraced diversity and invited interracial and interdisciplinary perspectives at of the company. He also created ballets for other notable companies including the American Ballet Theatre, Royal Danish Ballet, London Festival Ballet, the Joffrey Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet, and LaScala Opera Ballet.5 He was invited to choreograph Samuel Barber's Anthony and Cleopatra for the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center in 19666, and Leonard Bernstein's Mass for the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 1971.7

As the company embraced racial diversity, Ailey never lost his sense of obligation to the African American community. In 1969, he established the Alvin Ailey American Dance Center, which became the Ailey School, formed the Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble, and pioneered programs promoting arts in education, particularly those that benefitted deprived communities. Among his numerous distinctions were the Dance Magazine Award (1975), the NAACP Spingarn Medal (1976), given for "the highest and noblest achievement by an American Negro during the previous year or years"8 , the Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award (1987), the most prestigious award for modern dance for a lifetime contribution to the field, the Kennedy Center Award (1988) and Honorary Doctorates from Princeton University (1972)9 , Bard College (1977)10 , and Adelphi University (1977). President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Ailey the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014, the country's highest civilian honor, in recognition of his contributions and commitments to civil rights and dance in America.11

Through Jack Mitchell and Alvin Ailey's work, they were able to collaborate and create something "rich in historical connotations, the liveliest kind of permanent record of the works of important creators and creations that formed the nucleus of Ailey's remarkable vision of American dance and what it could be"12. Alvin Ailey's reputation for creating eclectic dance methods produced movements and poses that are still studied and idolized today. Mitchell was able to pay homage to many of the world's best dance artists from James Truitte, Carmen DeLavallade, Dudley Williams, Donna Wood, Renee Robinson, Gary DeLoatch, as well as Ailey, through his photography. With Ailey's longstanding and established stature within the dance community, and Mitchell's pronouncement of the detailed through his use of lighting in his photographs, this collection highlights the incredible collaboration between Ailey and Mitchell, and serves as a unique document of one of the world's most renowned American dance company's.

Alvin Ailey's vision for a dance company was dedicated to enriching the American modern dance heritage and preserving African American culture. In a 1989 interview with Dance Magazine, shortly before his death, Ailey discussed how he took pride in knowing that "No other company around [today] does what we do, requires the same range, and challenges both the dancers and the audience to the same degree." Ailey searched for a collaborator that would help him display the value of communicative movement; he found his match in Mitchell. Ailey's influence went beyond the stage and Jack Mitchell's images in this collection document that evolution. With Alvin Ailey's passing in 1989 at age 58 and Jack Mitchell's death in 2013 at age 88, these photographs of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Collection serves as one of the few sources of this dynamic dance company, from its early days to an internationally recognized troupe.

Footnotes

2. Jack Mitchell. Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Jack Mitchell Photographs. (Kansas City: Andrews and McMeel, 1993), viii

3. Bruce Weber, "Jack Mitchell, Photographer of the Arts, Dies at 88", The New York Times Obituaries (November 9, 2013): -- http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/arts/jack-mitchell-photographer-of-the-arts-dies-at-88.html

4. Jennifer Dunning, Alvin Ailey: A Life in Dance. (New York; Addison- Wesley, 1996), 123

5. Ibid, 146.

6. Alvin Ailey, Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey. (New York: Birch Lane, 1995), 6-7.

7. Alvin Ailey, Revelations: The Autobiography of Alvin Ailey. (New York; Birch Lane, 1995), 7.

8. Ibid.

9. Ibid.

10. Dunning, Jennifer. -- Alvin Ailey: A Life in Dance -- . (New York: Addison-Wesley, 1996), 286.

11. "Bard College Catalogue 2016-17: Honorary Degrees": -- https://www.bard.edu/catalogue/index.php?aid=1205177%26sid=670501

12. Office of the Press Secretary, "President Obama Names Recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom" (November 10, 2014): -- https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/11/10/president-obama-names-recipients-presidential-medal-freedom

13. Jack Mitchell. Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Jack Mitchell Photographs. (Kansas City: Andrews and McMeel, 1993), ix.
General:
COLLECTION LIST OF FEATURED REPERTORY

After Eden, Archipelago, Been Here and Gone, Black Belt, Blues Suite, Butterfly, Caravan, Carmina Burana, Caverna Magica, Chelsea's Bells, Come and Get the Beauty of It Hot, Concert in F, Congo Tango Palace, Crossword, Cry, Dance at the Gym, District Storyville, Divining, Episodes, Escargot, Facets, Fever Swamp, Flowers, Folkdance, Fontessa and Friends, For Bird – with Love, Forgotten Time, Frames, Gazelle, Hermit Songs, Hidden Rites, Hobo Sapiens, How to Walk an Elephant, Hymn, Icarus, Journey, Jukebox for Alvin, Lament, Landscape, Mary Lou's Mass, Masekela Langage, Memoria, N. Y. Export, Op. Jazz, Night Creature, North Star, Opus McShann, Pas de Duke, Passage, Pigs 'n Fishes, Portrait of Billie, Prodigal Prince, Quintet, Rainbow 'round my Shoulder, Revelations, Rift, Roots of the Blues, Sarong Paramaribo , Satyriade, Seven Journeys, Shards, Shelter, Spectrum, Speeds, Speeds, Streams, Suite Otis, The Beloved, The Lark Ascending, The Letter, The Mooche, The River, The Road of the Phoebe Snow, The Stack-Up, The Winter in Lisbon, Three Black Kings, Tilt, Toccata, Treading, Variegations, Vespers
Separated Materials:
There were 3 inscribed copies of "Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Jack Mitchell Photographs" originally stored in the collection. One copy of this text can be found in Series IV: Reference Materials with the publication draft, another copy is housed in the National Museum of African American History and Culture Library, and the last copy has been designated to serve as an archival reference text.
Provenance:
Acquired from the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation, Inc. in 2013.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
Jack Mitchell Photography of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Collection is jointly owned by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution, and the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation. Permission for commercial use or publication of the digital images may be requested from the Smithsonian Institution.
Occupation:
Dancers -- Photographs  Search this
Topic:
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater  Search this
Choreography -- United States  Search this
Dance  Search this
Dance schools -- United States  Search this
Dance -- Production and direction  Search this
Dance companies  Search this
Dance -- North America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Modern dance -- United States -- 20th century
Dance photography.
Citation:
Photography by Jack Mitchell © Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation, Inc. and Smithsonian Institution, All rights reserved.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2013.245
See more items in:
Jack Mitchell Photography of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2013-245
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Alison Knowles

Interviewee:
Knowles, Alison, 1933-  Search this
Interviewer:
Richards, Judith Olch  Search this
Creator:
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Names:
California Institute of the Arts -- Faculty  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Middlebury College -- Students  Search this
Pratt Institute. Art School -- Students  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Brecht, George  Search this
Callahan, Harry M.  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Gordon, Coco, 1938-  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Hamilton, Richard, 1922-  Search this
Hendricks, Jon  Search this
Higgins, Dick, 1938-1998  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-1995  Search this
Jones, Joe, 1909-1963  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Kuehn, Kathy  Search this
Lauf, Cornelia  Search this
Lindner, Richard, 1901-1978  Search this
Mac Low, Jackson  Search this
Maciunas, George, 1931-1978  Search this
Moorman, Charlotte  Search this
Ono, Yōko  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Saito, Takako, 1929-  Search this
Schapiro, Miriam, 1923-2015  Search this
Schneemann, Carolee, 1939-  Search this
Schöning, Klaus  Search this
Shiomi, Mieko, 1909-1948  Search this
Silverman, Gilbert  Search this
Spoerri, Daniel, 1930-  Search this
Teitelbaum, Richard  Search this
Tenney, James  Search this
Waśko, Ryszard  Search this
Extent:
86 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 June 1-2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Alison Knowles conducted 2010 June 1-2, by Judith Olch Richards, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project, at Knowles' home and studio, in New York, N.Y.
Knowles speaks of her family background; her father's (an English professor) influence on her education; her love of nature and isolation as a young girl; her French studies at Middlebury College; her transfer to Pratt Institute to study art; the social and academic environment at Pratt; her inclinations towards abstraction; her first marriage to Jim Ericson; her first studio at 423 Broadway; her early jobs as a commercial artist; her first gallery show at Nonagon, in 1958, and how she subsequently burned the paintings in that show; her second marriage to Dick Higgins in 1960; her Judson Gallery Show in 1962 and how she subsequently discarded those works; her involvement in the Fluxus group; her involvement with the "Cage class," and its early performances; her collaboration with John Cage on the book, "Notations" (1968); her collaboration with Marcel Duchamp on a print (1967); the circumstances surrounding her performance piece, "Make a Salad" (1962), her travels through Europe with Higgins; the birth of her twins; her computerized poetic piece and installation, "House of Dust" (1967) and how it was later vandalized; her move to Los Angeles to teach at CalArts; the rebuilding of "House of Dust" at CalArts; her move back to New York; the processes leading up to several projects and collaborations including "Loose Pages," "Big Book," "Bread and Water," and more; where she finds her inspiration; her thoughts on performance art; her studio environment in Barrytown, N.Y.; the influence and support of Germany on her work and Fluxus in general; her recent work, including "Identical Lunch"; and current challenges she faces as an artist.
She recalls Richard Lindner, Adolph Gottlieb, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Judy Chicago, Josef Albers, Dorothy Podber, Ray Johnson, Dick Higgins, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, Klaus Schöning, Jon Hendricks, Gilbert Silverman, George Maciunas, George Brecht, Jack Mac Low, Yoko Ono, Mieko Shiomi, Takako Saito, Joe Jones, Marcel Duchamp, Daniel Spoerri, Richard Hamilton, Nam June Paik, Charlotte Moorman, Helmut Becker, Coco Gordon, Jim Tenney, Cornelia Lauf, Rirkrit Tirvanija, Allan Kaprow, Simone Forte, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Teitelbaum, Miriam Schapiro, Miguel Abrau, James Fuentes, Cyrilla Wozenter, Kathy Kuehn, Ryszard Wasko.
Biographical / Historical:
Alison Knowles (1933- ) is an artist and a founding member of Fluxus in New York, N.Y. Judith Olch Richards (1947- ) is a former director of iCI in New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 mini discs. Duration is 5 hr., 45 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Fluxus (Group of artists)  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.knowle10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-knowle10

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Negatives
Business records
Video recordings
Photographic prints
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Notes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Jamaica
Date:
October 5-10, 1977
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1977 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora Street Culture

Series 3: America's Appetite (for Energy)

Series 4: Folklife in the Museum: Hall of Musical Instruments

Series 5: Folklife in the Museum: A Nation of Nations

Series 6: Folklife in the Museum: Renwick Gallery

Series 7: Native American Musical Styles

Series 8: Other Programs

Series 9: Virginia Folk Culture
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1977 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Folklife Program of the Office of American and Folklife Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
As early as 1974, managers within the Smithsonian had wondered what to do after the Bicentennial Festival - return to the pattern of smaller Folklife Festivals that had preceded, expand its scope to a Smithsonian Summer Festival that would present popular artistic forms as well, or discontinue it and focus on curating the research and Festival documentation. In the immediate wake of the Bicentennial Festival, plans were proposed for Ralph Rinzler to become head of a new, unnamed folklife unit that would process the documentary materials developed by the Festival and produce scholarly and educational publications. James R. Morris and the Division of Performing Arts would continue to produce the Festival. A broader Smithsonian Summer Festival was accordingly announced for 1977. However, a newly-constituted Folklife Advisory Council decided instead that the Festival's emphasis on traditional cultural should continue, but that the Festival should be moved to the fall and should be more closely integrated with the activities of relevant units of the Smithsonian, especially within the National Museum of History and Technology and National Museum of Natural History. A Folklife Program was established under Rinzler's direction, attached to the Office of American and Folklife Studies headed by Wilcomb E. Washburn (also chair of the Folklife Advisory Council).

The 1977 Festival was thus held October 5-10, on a site within the National Mall later to be occupied by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, between 14th and 15th Streets and between Constitution Avenue and Madison Drive (see site plan). Additional outdoor activities were held on the terrace of the National Museum of History and Technology, and indoor activities took place in that museum, the National Museum of Natural History, and the Renwick Gallery. The Division of Performing Arts continued to provide overall technical support for the Festival, but each program component was curated by a different team, typically including cooperation between a Folklife Program folklorist and a curator within another Smithsonian museum (see the individual programs for the specific units collaborating on each presentation). Programming was originated by museum staff, then reviewed by the Advisory Council, to broaden the base of staff involvement in the research, planning, and presentation of this and other folklife endeavors.

The Festival featured several larger and numerous smaller programs; documentation of the 1977 Festival is divided into eight series:

African Diaspora Street Culture

America's Appetite (for Energy)

Folklife in the Museum: Hall of Musical Instruments (including presentations of hammered dulcimers andmusical traditions of India)

Folklife in the Museum: A Nation of Nations (including presentations of saddle making, Dunham Schoollore, Ellis Island & immigrant lore, pencil making, baseball bat turning, ethnic foods, Hispanic crafts)

Folklife in the Museum: Renwick Gallery (including presentations of paint on wood and crafting withnatural fibers)

Native American Musical Styles

Other Programs (including presentations of transportation, folklore in your community, family folklore,Louisiana Cajun social music)

Virginia Folk Culture

The 1977 Program Book provided information on each of the programs.

The Festival was jointly presented by the Smithsonian Institution and the National Park Service, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Council for Traditional Arts, and Music Performance Trust Funds. The 1977 Festival resulted from cooperation among a number of entities; those with overall responsibility included:

Folklife Advisory Council

Wilcomb E. Washburn, Chairman, Roger Abrahams, Richard Ahlborn, Robert H. Byington, Richard Dorson, William Fitzhugh, Lloyd Herman, Robert Laughlin, James Morris, Scott Odell, Bernice Reagon, Ralph Rinzler, E. Richard Sorenson

Folklife Program, Office of American and Folklife Studies

Ralph Rinzler, Director; Robert H. Byington, Deputy Director; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Ethnomusicologist; Susan Kalcik, Ethnic Folklore Specialist; Frank Proschan, Archivist; Steve Zeitlin, Family Folklore Specialist; Jack Santino, Occupational Folklore Specialist; Mike Herter, Documentation Coordinator; Jeffrey LaRiche, Energy Program Coordinator

Division of Performing Arts

James R. Morris, Director; Rosie Lee Hooks, African Diaspora Program Coordinator; African Diaspora Program Cultural Historian, Bernice Reagon; Shirley Cherkasky, Production Coordinator

National Park Service

William Whelan, Director

In addition, persons and bodies responsible for individual programs are identified in the relevant series note.
Fieldworkers, presenters, and curators:
Carl Scheele, William Sturtevant, Scott Odell, Eugene Knez, Nancy Groce, Holly Baker, Amy Kotkin, Karen Peiffer, Paul Wagner, William Foshag, James Leary, Diane Hamilton, Winifred Brendel, Robert Vogel, Richard Ahlborn, Roddy Moore, Chuck Perdue, Peter Row, Arnold Burghardt, Charlotte Heth, William Powers, Elaine Eff, Robert McCarl, Peter Seitel
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Negatives
Business records
Video recordings
Photographic prints
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Notes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1977
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1977

African Diaspora Street Culture

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
In black communities throughout the African Diaspora, streets form the link between "home" and the "rest of the world." Being "in the streets" connotes a state of living in the open, the place where anything can happen. Successfully maneuvering the streets of one's environment requires special tenacity and skill. In the United States, streets in black communities often carry powerful and graphic cultural statements revealing basic methods of human survival and creativity - in the midst of economic and political depression.

The project on Street Culture focused on cultural forms and the carriers of those forms who use the streets for a way to the rest of the world, for their living, and for the celebration of life. A powerful dynamic exists as individuals move into a space within their community, which by definition is of and within the outside world. Streets lead to and from home and community. They are also the place where many people spend a great deal of their working time creating a cultural and life force.

Rather than focus on a prototype of a specific street, the Festival program sought to capture a blend of secular and sacred activities in black street culture. Visitors were invited to smell and eat the foods, hear the street calls of the children and musicians, and listen to the sounds of everyday activity, punctuated by old men playing chess and children skipping rope. Presentations included street singing, steel band, crafts, cooks, fife and drum band, yard games, shoeshine stands - what one would find on a street comer or front porch.

The program was organized by the African Diaspora Program within the Division of Performing Arts. Rosie Lee Hooks was African Diaspora Program Coordinator and Bernice Johnson Reagon, Cultural Historian.
Participants:
Kings of Harmony, Spiritual Band of the United House of Prayer, Washington, D.C.

Kweku, jewelry maker, instrument maker, sculptor, Washington, D.C.

Gregory McKnight, drum maker, Washington, D.C.

Flora Molton, guitar player, street singer, Washington, D.C.

Avery "Slim" Montgomery, 1906-1996, blues singer, harmonica & accordion Player, Baltimore, Maryland

Sambistas de Rio, African Brazilian samba group, Washington, D.C.

Charlie Sayles, harmonica player, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Elizabeth Scott, quilt maker, Baltimore, Maryland

Joyce Scott, quilt maker, Weaver, Baltimore, Maryland

Philip Simmons, 1912-, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Rev. Dan Smith, 1911-1994, harmonica player, White Plains, New York

Rising Star Fife and Drum Band, Senatobia, Mississippi

Trinidad Steel Band, Washington, D.C.

George Franklin Washington, spoons player, Louisville, Kentucky

Mrs. Veronica Wisdom, Jamaican cook, Washington, D.C.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1977, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1977 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1977-ref19

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Business records
Video recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiocassettes
Videotapes
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Contracts
Digital images
Notes
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Date:
June 26-July 7, 2002
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 2 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
For ten days in the summer of 2002, the great geographical and cultural distance that lies between the heart of Europe and the far reaches of Asia was reduced to the length of a leisurely afternoon stroll on the National Mall. For the first time in its 36-year history, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival had a single - and remarkably ambitious - theme: the Silk Road. The name denotes the network of trade routes, over both land and sea, along which merchants and travelers began to move across Asia and Europe from the first millennium B.C.E. The most famous east-west component of the Silk Road began in Xi'an, the ancient capital of China, broke north and south of China's Takla Makan Desert, and traversed a vast stretch of Central and Western Asia on its way to the eastern end of the Mediterranean. Along those staggering distances lay a wealth of cultures and traditions. They are still there; during the Folklife Festival, they came to life in the heart of Washington as well.

Merchants took to the Silk Road for commercial gain. But their movement also brought riches of another kind: the cultural traditions that were transported along the Silk Road. The ingenious, distinctive emblems of peoples - their science, technology, religions, customs, crafts, music, food, architecture, fashions - made the journey, too, and the dazzling variety of the world that commerce opened was diffused, welcomed, and adapted.

That's the tale that was told in the 2002 Folklife Festival, The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust. Produced in association with the Silk Road Project, Inc., an organization founded by the cellist Yo-Yo Ma, supported in large part by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, and featuring exhibits designed by Rajeev Sethi, the Festival turned the National Mall into a mammoth visual representation of the Silk Road, with the Great Gate in Nara, Japan, at the eastern end, toward the Capitol, and St. Mark's Square in Venice at the western end, in the shadow of the Washington Monument. And between the two, visitors could wander Eurasia, through Istanbul, Samarkand, and Xi'an. On the way they moved among hundreds of musicians, artists, dancers, crafts workers, and chefs from some two dozen nations of the Silk Road, working side by side with Americans who trace their origins to the region or have been culturally influenced by its traditions.

An especially valuable aspect of the event was its focus on Central Asia, a region to which Americans were all too indifferent before events of the preceding year. We now know the names of the nations in that part of the world, but the Festival gave the people of those nations and their traditions a human face. Visitors who made the journey across the Festival site could immerse themselves in the energy and larger educational purpose of the Festival; they had an opportunity to travel across continents, centuries, and cultures. They could meet with a diversity of artists who, through their demonstrations of skill - with silk, jewelry, ceramics, carpets, paintings, paper, calligraphy, food, and, not least, music - did more than merely affirm their cultural traditions. They embodied them. The 2002 Folklife Festival, like every other, celebrated humanity and breathed a spirit of human engagement. On a great green stretch of this nation's capital, people from many different societies were brought together face to face. And those chance, transient encounters might affect the way they think about the world.

The 2002 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 26-30 and July 3-7) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The Program Book provided information on the history and culture of the Silk Road and included a schedule and participant information.

The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival was a partnership of the Smithsonian Institution Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and the Silk Road Project, Inc. The Festival site was designed by Rajeev Sethi Scenographers and produced in cooperation with the Asian Heritage Foundation. The Festival was co-sponsored by the National Park Service.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Diana Parker, Festival Director; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Smithsonian Folkways Recordings: Daniel Sheehy, Director; Anthony Seeger, Director Emeritus; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director; Ralph Rinzler Archives: Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Save Our Sounds: Frank Proschan, Project Director; Smithsonian GlobalSound: Jon Kertzer, Project Director; Cultural Heritage Policy: James Early, Director; Cultural Research and Education: Olivia Cadaval, Chair; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Nilda Villalta, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Gigi Bradford, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corinne Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Rajeev Sethi, Research Associates; Rhea Combs, Steven Garabedian, Mark Jackson, Ajaya Khanal, Anthony McCann, Fellows

Center Advisory Council

Kurt Dewhurst, Anthony Gittens, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Enrique Lamadrid, David Maybury-Lewis, Judy Mitoma, J. Scott Raecker, Ricardo Trimillos (Chair)

Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch (Chair), Phyllis Barney, Hal Cannon, Don DeVito, Ella Jenkins, Fred Silber

The Silk Road Project, Inc.

Yo-Yo Ma, Artistic Director; Jean Davidson, Managing Director; Theodore Levin, Project Director

The Asian Heritage Foundation

Rajeev Sethi, Founder Trustee

National Park Service

Fran P. Mainella, Director; Terry R. Carlstrom, Director, National Capital Region

The Festival was supported by federally appropriated funds, Smithsonian trust funds, contributions from governments, businesses, foundations, and individuals, in-kind assistance, volunteers, food and craft sales, and Friends of the Festival. The 2002 Festival was made possible through the following generous sponsors and donors to the Silk Road Project, Inc.:

Lead Funder and Key Creative Partner: The Aga Khan Trust for Culture

Global Corporate Partners: Ford Motor Company; Siemens

Major Funding by: The Starr Foundation; Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Kravis; Mr. Richard Li; Mr. William Rondina; Wolfensohn Family Foundation; Octavian Society; National Endowment for the Arts; Carolyn G. Mugar/The Armenian Tree Project

and by the following supporters of the Smithsonian Institution:

Lead Donor: ExxonMobil

Donors: U.S. Department of State; Mr. Arthur Pacheco; Trust for Mutual Understanding; Music Performance Trust Funds; Asian Cultural Council; J.S. Lee

In-Kind Donors: Turkish Airlines; Motorola/Nextel; Go-Ped; APL; Fresh Fields/Whole Foods Market
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Food habits  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Business records
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Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiocassettes
Videotapes
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Photographic prints
Contracts
Digital images
Notes
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2002

The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Silk Road defines an exchange of products, both material and intellectual, across Eurasia from China to the Mediterranean, traditionally from the 2nd century B.C.E. through the first twelve centuries of the Common Era. People who know something of the Silk Road think first of the transport of silk to Rome or the expansion of Buddhism from India to China, although certainly it is much more. But why silk, and why a road to describe this exchange? Silk provides the example of a mysterious luxury product for which people throughout the region were willing to pay high prices and even jeopardize lives. And the "road" refers to the exchange of those material products that traveled by land, although this literal meaning must be extended to include cultural and spiritual exchanges that would be part of a metaphorical Silk Road. Beyond these definitions the idea of the Silk Road is still available for new interpretations. And in the political environment prevailing in 2002, the idea was particularly evocative.

Visitors to the Festival were greeted by five "sentinels of arrival," landmarks along the ancient Silk Road: St. Mark's Square in Venice, Hagia Sophia (Ayasofya) mosque/church/museum in Istanbul, Registan Square in Samarkand, the Xi'an bell tower, and the great gate to Todaiji Temple in Nara. Each housed a stage that reflected a different performance tradition. The performing arts selected for the Festival were grouped into spiritual activities, courtly entertainment, local celebrations and entertainments, nomadic presentations, and new musics that draw from tradition. Spiritual music, for example, provided the program an opportunity to present the stories of the expansion of religion - Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity - along the Silk Road. Buddhist monks from Tibet and Sufi Muslim devotees from Turkey and Bangladesh highlighted the central role that religion played in Silk Road trade.

Existing examples of ancient silk, pottery, carpets, and glass all tell very specific stories of travel and exchange and remind us of the extent to which people across the region have been connected throughout history. What may be surprising to some, however, is how many such objects are still made today. The curatorial staff chose to feature ceramics, silk and cotton textiles, carpets, paper, and stone and metal products, including glass. Each was in a different compound - the Paper Garden, the Ceramics Courtyard, the Silk Grove, the Family Oasis, and the Jewel Garden - and told a story from a different period along the Silk Road, including, in some cases, a chapter from life in the United States. Paper, for example, was invented in China and remained a secret of the region for centuries; along with written language, writing materials were thought to possess magical qualities. Religious texts as well as commercial bills were written out and transported along a route that, through such communication, could more easily function. Each region added its own distinctive features of paper art including Turkish marbling and Italian watermarks. Similar elaborations have been made in the art of calligraphy, which, particularly in Islamic and Chinese cultures, has become highly refined and stylistically differentiated as to school and usage. Representatives of these schools still train new generations of artists along the Silk Road and in the United States.

The movement of religious traditions around the world has arguably been one of the most important forces throughout world history. Both Islam and Buddhism were introduced to millions of new adherents along the Silk Road, and these conversions continue to alter the face of our world. These religions, along with all of the above exchange goods, have also altered the face of the United States. Many Americans drink tea in fine china, buy "Oriental" carpets, and certainly wear garments of cotton, wool, and silk. They are likely familiar with Asian martial arts and may attend an Islamic mosque. The Silk Road has extended to the United States and, since the tragic events of September 11, 2001, understanding that connection clearly has become more important. The 2002 Festival offered its million visitors the opportunity to learn more about the roots of this vital connection and to celebrate the long-standing relationships that have existed between East and West and North and South. The Festival provided a rare opportunity to connect with other cultures as well as with one's own and in doing so, in a small way, to build trust between and within cultures of the global Silk Road.

Richard Kennedy and Theodore Levin were Co-Curators, assisted by a Curatorial Committee whose members included Milo Beach, Jean During, Henry Glassie, Tom Kessinger, Alma Kunanbay, and Yo-Yo Ma. Cristin Bagnall, Jean Davidson, Catherine Gevers, Richard Kennedy, Richard Kurin, Theodore Levin, Diana Parker, and Esther Won made up the Production Committee. Rajeev Sethi was Festival Scenographer, and James Deutsch, Stephen Kidd, Arlene Reiniger, and Shayna Silverstein were Program Coordinators. Betty Belanus was Family Activities Coordinator; Jane Farmer was Paper Garden Coordinator; Marjorie Hunt was Silk Grove Coordinator; and Diana Baird N'Diaye was Fashion Court Coordinator.
Researchers and local coordinators:
Abduvali Abdurashidov, Mila Ahmedova, Omer Akakça, Bassam AI-Kahouaji, Dinara Amirova, Nahomi Aso, Najmieh Batmanglij, Betty Belanus, Laura Beldiman, Susan Blader, Guanghui Chen, Rta Kapur Chishti, Shafique Rahman Choudhury, Jerome Cler, Ardasher Dekhoti, James Deutsch, Hermine Dreyfuss, Cloe Drieu, Jean During, Jane Farmer, Sasan Fatemi, Walter Feldman, Henry Glassie, Chen Guanghui, Harold Hagopian, Elias Hanna, Rachel Harris, K. David Harrison, Bhagwati Prasad Hatwal, Martha Huang, George Jevremovic, Neslihan Jevremovic, Stephen Jones, Richard Kennedy, Jonathan Mark Kenoyer, Stephen Kidd, Doug Kim, Peg Koetsch, Alma Kunanbay, Gavyn Lavergne, Theodore Levin, Firoz Mahmud, Elshan Mansurov, Peter Marsh, Andranik Michaelian, Nataliya Mussina, Afanassij Myldyk, Olima Nabiva, Eden Naby, Mohammed Nasseripour, Liesbet Nyssen, Susan Pertel-Jain, Aziz Rahman, Marjorie Ransom, Arlene Reiniger, Rajeev Sethi, Pravina Shukla, Razia Sirdibaeva, Atesh Sonneborn, Youssef Summad, Nancy Sweezy, Takashi Takahara, D. Tserenpil, Shu-ni Tsou, Oguzhan Tugral, Mark van Tongeren, Seric Walley, Philippa Watkins, Chris Walter, Toshio Watanabe
Presenters:
Sibel Akad, Omer Akakça, Bassam AI-Kahouaji, Dina Amirova, William Belcher, Susan Blader, Camilla Bryce-Laporte, Sertac Çakim, Charles Camp, Guanghui Chen, Rta Kapur Chishti, Dinara Chochunbaeva, Shafique Rahman Choudhury, Jerome Cler, David d'Heilly, Tenzin Dickyi, Hermine Dreyfuss, Jean During, Jane Farmer, Walter Feldman, Alysia Fischer, Gail Forman, Helen Frederick, Ganbold, Henry Glassie, Harold Hagopian, Rachel Harris, K. David Harrison, Bhagawati Prasad Hatwal, Catherine Hiebert Kerst, Neslihan Jevremovic, Alison Allen Jia, Mark Kenoyer, Dipti Khera, Doug Kim, Benjamin David Koen, Peg Koetsch, Alma Kunanbay, Gavyn Lavergne, Tom Leech, Theodore Levin, Yo-Yo Ma, LaVerne Magarian, Firoz Mahmud, Peter Marsh, Nataliya Mussina, Eden Naby, Joan Nathan, Liesbet Nyssen, Nilgun Peksalli, Susan Pertei-Jain, Steven Prieto, Frank Proschan, Marjorie Ransom, Philip Schuyler, Shubha Sankaran, Pravina Shukla, Robin Ami Silverberg, Madan Gopal Singh, Nancy Sweezy, Takashi Takahara, Geshe Lobsang Tenzin, Oguzhan Tugral, Michael Twitty, Kojiro Umezaki, Mark van Tongeren, Yuriko Yamaguchi, Wang Yousheng, Chris Walter, Philippa Watkins, Jeffrey Werbock
Participants:
PERFORMANCE TRADITIONS

AFGHAN MUSIC

(AFGHANISTAN, UNITED STATES)

Homayoun Sakhi, vocal, -- rubab

Toryalay, tabla

Araa Zalmai, vocal, -- doira

AITYS: -- NOMADIC TOURNAMENT

(IRAN)

Masheallah Akbari (Azeri), vocal, -- balaban

Asheq Hasan (Azeri), vocal, -- saz

Youssef Dibaei (Turkmen), vocal, -- kamanche

Anaberdy Vejdani (Turkmen), vocal, -- dutar

(KAZAKHSTAN)

Almasbek Almatov, vocal

Sayan Aqmolda, vocal, -- qylqobyz

Rysbek Ashimov, vocal

Sholpan Beimbetova, vocal

Yedil Khussainov, jew's harp

Amandik Komekulu, vocal, -- dombra

Serzhan Shakrat, vocal

(KYRGYZSTAN)

Ruslan Jumabaev, -- komuz

Kenjekul Kubatova, -- komuz -- , vocal

(TAJIKISTAN)

Sator Fozilov, -- doira

Oumar Temourov, -- ghijak

(TURKMENISTAN)

Lale Begnazarova, vocal

Maksat Begnazarov, vocal

Osman Gujimov, -- dutar

(QARAQALPAKSTAN, UZBEKISTAN)

Zulfiya Arzumbetova, vocal, -- dutar

Salamatdin Kaipnazarov, -- ghijak

BADAKHSHANI MUSICAL TRADITIONS (TAJIKISTAN)

Nobovar Tchanorov, -- satar -- , -- rubab -- , vocal

Mouborakcho Djoumaev, -- rubab

Zarina Kobilova, dancer

Djoumakhon Madjidov, -- rubab -- , vocal

Ulfatmo Mamadambarova, vocal, -- doira -- , -- chang

Moussavar Minakov, -- satar -- , -- ghijak -- , -- rubab

Gulbek Saodatov, -- satar

BEIJING OPERA FEATURING QI SHU FANG (CHINA)

Ding Mei-Kui

Huang Chen Lin, second fiddle

Huang Shi Rong, big drum

Li Peng

Li Shi-sheng, gong

Liu Chunnuan

Qi Shufang

James Qian, fiddle

Sun Ya Hui

Zhao Zhen Ping, moon mandolin

Zhao Zong Quan

BEZMÂRÂ (TURKEY)

Kemal Caba, -- kamanche

Ayse Serap Çağlayan, -- kanun

Walter Feldman, -- kudum

Aziz Şenol Filiz, -- ney

Fikret Karakaya, -- çeng

Osman Kırklıkçı, -- sehrud

Birol Yayla, -- tanbur -- , -- kopuz -- , guitar

BUKHARAN JEWISH MUSIC AND DANCE (UNITED STATES)

Ilyas Malaev Ensemble -- Ilyas Malaev EnsembleYusuf Abramov, tarMatat Barayev, doiraOchil Ibrahimov, vocal, tar, ghijakTamara Kataev, dancerIlyas Malaev, vocal, tarIzro Malakov, vocalMuhabbat Shamoeva, vocal

Shashmaqam -- ShashmaqamAboshaul Aminov, vocalOsher Barayev, doiraDavid Davidov, tarFiruza Junatan, dancerBoris Kuknariyev, vocal, accordionShumiel Kuyenov, doiraIzro Malakov, vocalShoista Mulldzhanova, vocal

Sazandas -- SazandasTravis F. JarrellFiruza JunatanTamara KataevTofahon Pinkhasova

CALICANTO (ITALY) -- CALICANTO (ITALY)Claudia Ferronato, vocalNicola Marsilio, clarinet, flute, sax, dudukGiancarlo Tombesi, double bassRoberto Tombesi, vocal, mandola, diatonic accordion, bagpipesPaolo Vidaich, percussion

CHINESE STORYTELLING (CHINA)

Chong Yujie, Jingyun -- dagu

Jai Jainguo, Kuaiban

Jiang Yunxian, Suzhou -- tanci

Lian Liru, Beijing -- pingshu

Mu Xiangzheng, -- sanxian -- accompanist

Tang Gengliang, Suzhou -- pinghua

ETHNOS SHINGIGAKU: ASIAN MASK DANCE THEATER (JAPAN)

Mannojo Nomura, producer

Théodore Bah (Guinea), actor

I Made Djimat (Indonesia), actor

Fujita Shuji, staff

Hashimoto Katsutoshi, actor

Hatakeyama Yuko, musician

Ino Makiko, actor

Irino Tomoe, musician

Challissery Antony Joy (India), actor

Kang Cha Wook (Korea), musician

Kawamura Kohei, musician

Kim Do Yoen (Korea), actor

Kim Yong Mok (Korea), actor

Koga Kumiko, staff

Lakshmipathy Narendra Kumar (India), actor

Kuwabara Kayo, staff

Lee Dong Yong (Korea), actor

Lu Hairong (China), actor

Miura Tsuneo, actor

Qian Tenghao (China), musician

I Ketut Rudida (Indonesia), actor

Sugawara Kaori, actor

Latyr Sy (Senegal), musician

Shinsuke Suzuki, staff

Ye Fang (China), actor

HUA FAMILY SHAWM AND PERCUSSION BAND (CHINA)

Hua Jinshan, drum

Hua Lei, small cymbals

Hua Yinshan (leader), shawm

Hua Yun, shawm

Xie Jian, gong

INDIAN MELA PERFORMERS (INDIA)

Aziz Khan, magician

Kishan, son of Laxman Bharti, juggler

Kishan, son of Sharwan Nath, -- behrupia

INDIAN OCEAN (INDIA)

Ashim Chakravarthy, tabla, drums

Amit Kilam, drums

Rahul Narasimha Ram, bass

Susmit Sen, guitar

KATHPUTLI PUPPET THEATRE (INDIA)

Guddi Bhatt

Jagdish Bhatt

Puran Bhatt

MANGANIYAR MUSIC OF RAJASTHAN (INDIA)

Gazi Khan Bar ana, -- dholak -- , -- khartal -- , -- morchang

Anwar Khan, vocal

Kheta Khan, vocal

Chanan Khan Manganiar, -- khamayacha -- , -- vocal

MAQAM (UZBEKISTAN, TAJIKISTAN)

Mastona Ergashova, vocal

Abdurahim Hamidov, -- dutar

Jurabek Nabiev, vocal

Shawkat Nabiev, -- ghijak

Shuhratdjon Nabiev, -- tanbur

MONGOLIAN MUSICAL TRADITIONS

I. Amartüvshin, -- morin huur

G. Khongorzul, -- urtiin duu -- (long song singer)

Ts. Sansarbayar, -- yatga

N. Sengedorj, -- hoomii -- throat-singer, fiddles

B. Tsengelmaa, -- bielgee -- dancer

MUGHAM -- (AZERBAIJAN)

Elnur Ahmadov, -- kamanche

Aydin Aliyev, -- garmon

Niyamettin Babyev, vocal

Elchin Hashimov, -- tar

Adalat Nasibov, -- saz

Leyla Rahimova, vocal

MUQAM OF THE UYGHURS (CHINA)

Rozi Tukhluk (Uzbekistan), vocal, -- rawap -- , -- tanbur

Nur Mähämmät Tursun, -- satar -- , -- tanbur

Sänubär Tursun, vocal, -- dutar

MURAS (KYRGYZSTAN)

Toktobek Asanaliev, komuz, vocal

Gulbara Baigashkaeva, -- komuzl temir komuz

Bakytbek Chatyrbaev, -- qylqiyak

Nurlanbek Nyshanov, -- komuz -- , -- chor -- , -- chopo chor -- , -- temir komuz

PARISA AND DARIUSH TALAI: PERSIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC (IRAN)

Parisa, vocal

Dariush Talai, -- tar

ROKSONAKI (KAZAKHSTAN)

Yermek Diyarov, vocal, guitar

Ruslan Karin, vocal, -- saz-syrnai -- , -- shan-kobyz

Viktor Khomenkov, keyboards

Yedil Khussainov, vocal, -- djetygen -- , -- shan-kobyz -- , -- saz-syrnai -- , -- sybyzgy -- , -- kamys-syrnai

Abay Rakhyshev, vocal, drums

Kazbek Spanov, vocal, guitar

SABJILAR (KHAKASIA, RUSSIA)

Altyn Tann Anna Burnakova, -- khai -- , percussion

Chanar Khyr Khaas, -- khai -- , -- chatkhan

Aycharkh Sayn, -- khai -- , -- chatkhan -- , -- qobyz

SHOGHAKEN ENSEMBLE (ARMENIA)

Tigran Ambaryan, -- kamanche

Gevorg Dabaghyan, -- duduk

Aleksan Harutyunyan, vocal, dancer

Hasmik Harutyunyan, vocal, dancer

Karine Hovhannisyan, -- kanun

Kamo Khachatryan, -- dhol

Grigor Takushyan, -- dham duduk

Levon Tevanyan, -- shvi -- , zurna

THE SILK ROAD ENSEMBLE

Edward Arron, cello

Nicholas Cords, viola

He Cui, -- sheng

Gevorg Dabaghyan, -- duduk

Sandeep Das, tabla

Joel Fan, piano

G. Khongorzul, long song vocal

Jonathan Gandelsman, violin

Joseph Gramley, percussion

Colin Jacobsen, violin

Dong-Won Kim, -- chang-go

Yo-Yo Ma, cello, -- morin huur

Shane Shanahan, percussion

Mark Suter, percussion

Kojiro Umezaki, shakuhachi

Yang Wei, -- pipa

Beixing Xiang, erhu

UZBEK PUPPET THEATER

Venera Yusupova

Gulshat Nazarova

Dinara Yuldasheva

CRAFT TRADITIONS

BEAD MAKERS

Haji Ashoor (Pakistan)

Luigi Cattelan (Italy)

Abdul Momin (Pakistan)

CALLIGRAPHERS

Issa M. Benyamin (United States)

Niyaz Kerim Xarki (China)

Muhittin Serin (Turkey)

Alvin Y. Tsao (United States)

Oğuzhan Tuğrul (Turkey)

John S.C. Wang (United States)

CERAMICISTS

Chen Xinching (China)

İbrahim Erdeyer (Turkey)

Mehmet Gürsoy (Turkey)

Higaki Hachiro (Japan)

Kang Qing (China)

Maekawa Denko (Japan)

Masuda Shigeyuki (Japan)

Haripada Pal (Bangladesh)

Ahmet Hürriyet Şahin (Turkey)

Nurten Şahin (Turkey)

Tatebayashi Hirohisa (Japan)

Xu Xiutang (China)

Yie Dongxi (China)

CLOTHING DESIGNERS

Lola Babayeva (Uzbekistan)

Turdukan Borubaeva (Kyrgyzstan)

Tatiana Vorotnikova (Kyrgyzstan)

Nakagawa Sochi (Japan) -- Nakagawa Sochi (Japan)Azechi RikaKishimoto KanehiroKoiwa JunNakagawa MasahiroNakagawa Tatsuya

Taras Volikov (Uzbekistan)

GLASS BLOWERS (SYRIA)

Hasan al Kazzaz

Mhd. Nazir al Kazzaz

METALWORKERS AND JEWELERS

Richard Furrer (United States)

Sirajul Islam (Bangladesh)

Mohamad al Malli (Syria)

George Oubid (Syria)

B.D. Soni (India)

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT MAKERS

John Bertles (United States)

Marat Damdyn (Tuva, Russia)

PAINTERS

Yeshi Dorjee (United States)

Mohammed Nasseripour (United States)

Gyan Prakash Soni (India)

Aram Vartanov (United States)

PAPER ARTISTS

Tohtu Baqi Turdi (China)

Fukunishi Hatsumi (Japan)

Fukunishi Masayuki (Japan)

Guerrino Lovato, mask maker (Italy)

Asif Mian, kite maker (India)

Feridun Ozgoren (Turkey, United States)

Roberto Rapanotti (Italy)

Zhang Fengxue (China)

STONE CARVERS

Iftikar Ahmed (Pakistan)

Ghulam Mustafa (Pakistan)

Lorisa Norbu (Tuva, Russia)

Alexei Salchak (Tuva, Russia)

TEXTILE ARTISTS

BLOCK PRINTER (INDIA)

Shaikh Mohammad Hussain

BROCADE WEAVERS (SYRIA)

Ahmad Chakkaki

Louai Jarkas

IKAT WEAVERS (UZBEKISTAN)

Bobir Ismailov

Dilbar Khalimova

Davlat Umaralyev

IKAT PATOLA WEAVERS (INDIA)

Salvi Bharatkumar Kantilal

Salvi Rohitkumar Kantilal

Salvi Vinayak Kantilal

JAMDANI WEAVERS (BANGLADESH)

Shawkat Ali

Md. Enamul Haque

NAVAJO CARPET WEAVER (UNITED STATES)

D.Y. Begay

RABARI WEAVER (INDIA)

Ramiben Ratna Rabari

TIBETAN CARPET WEAVERS (NEPAL)

Tsering Bhuti

Dawa Tsamchoe

TURKISH CARPET WEAVERS (TURKEY)

Ahmet Balcı

Mukaddes Kavak

Ummu Gülsum Yılmaz

TURKMEN CARPET WEAVERS (PAKISTAN)

Abdul Baqi

Sadaf Baqi

TUSSAH SILK WEAVER (INDIA)

Gunia Devi

TRUCK PAINTERS (PAKISTAN)

Haider Ali

Jamil Uddin

NOMADIC TRADITIONS (KAZAKHSTAN)

Almasbek Almatov, yurt builder

Sayan Aqmolda, yurt builder

Rysbek Ashimov, yurt builder

Baltabay Ibrayev, yurt builder

Amangul Ikhanova, felt maker

Zhangir Umbetov, leatherworker, yurt builder

FOODWAYS TRADITIONS

Najmieh Batmanglij (Persian)

Mukadder (Katie) Buyukunsal (Turkish)

Jinghua Chi (Chinese)

Roberto Donna (Italian)

Enzo Fargione (Italian)

Shajan Fazelyar (Uzbek)

Huilan Hu (Chinese)

Nahid Javadi (Azerbaijani)

Jila Naim (Afghan)

Marco Nocco (Italian)

Shukrieh Raad (Afghan)

Shobha Shah (Indian)

Fay Shahidi (Persian)

Nikta Shahidi (Persian)

Behjat Shahverdiani (Persian)

Sakina A. Shehadi (Syrian)

Leda Zenian (Armenian)

SACRED TRADITIONS

ALEVI SEMAH OF HUBYAR (TURKEY)

Aysel Adigüzel

Rıza Adigüzel

Allı Aydın

Hasan Aydın

Bahar Bayrı

Tutca Cücü

Hüseyin Denizhan, -- ashik

Rüştü Durna

Süleyman Duran

Ahmet Güngör, -- ashik

Dürdane Karagöz

Cemal Özcan

THE KUSHTIA BAULS (BANGLADESH) -- THE KUSHTIA BAULS (BANGLADESH)Anjali Ghosh Durga, vocalShunil Kormakar, vocalMd. Naimul Karim Melal, vocalSanchita Paul, vocalMd. Belal Siddique, vocal

Madan Gopal Singh (India)

TIBETAN MONKS FROM THE DREPUNG MONASTERY (INDIA, UNITED STATES)

Geshe Lobsang Chogyal

Lobsang Chophel

Lobsang Dhargye

Wangchen Dorjee

Thupten Kungkhen

Dhakpa Norbu

Tsering Phuntsok

Dondup Tenzin

URHOY CHOIR (SYRIA)

Sandy Amsih

Adnan Aziz

Edwar Danho

Ilona Danho

Fadi Karat

Izla Karat

Jean Karat

George Kentar

Maya Stifo

Samira Steifo

SPORTS AND MARTIAL ARTS TRADITIONS

ASIAN MARTIAL ARTS (UNITED STATES)

Steve Brown

Sifu Tony Chen

Christopher Cheung

Patrick Chew

Laura Copenhaver

Janet Gee

Bernard Beno Hwang

Kaela Kang

Jia Tao Zhang

BUKH: LEGENDARY WRESTLING TRADITION (MONGOLIA)

THANG-TA (INDIA)

Khilton Nongmaithem

POTOMAC POLO CLUB

Greg Ford

Mara Hagan

Charlie Muldoon

Joe Muldoon, Jr.

Joe Muldoon III

Martine Maldanado

Dave Polan

ZURKHANE (IRAN)

Morshed Mehregan, -- morshed
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2002, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2002-ref18

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Digital images
Correspondence
Negatives
Photographic prints
Business records
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Memorandums
Audiotapes
Contracts
Plans (drawings)
Video recordings
Place:
Caribbean Area
Date:
June 24-July 5, 1987
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1987 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 4 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Cultural Conservation and Languages: America's Many Voices

Series 3: Metropolitan Washington

Series 4: Michigan
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1987 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1987 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 24-28 and July 1-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). Held on parkland among many of the nation's most treasured memorials and institutions, the Festival explored the city beyond Washington's federal buildings. Visitors learned of its diverse, vibrant and evolving musical traditions - a hometown to Americans of many cultures. In any culture language is a primary source of unity and pride. Through the 1987 Festival visitors had the opportunity to learn about the valued role of language in some of America's linguistic communities. Culture and language have played an important role in shaping the character of each state in the union. In this, Michigan's sesquicentennial celebration year, traditional craftspeople, musicians, cooks, woodworkers, boatmen, and others shared with Festival-goers the particular history and culture of their state.

The 1987 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book essays provided a larger context for the Festival presentations, without being limited to traditions actually presented at the 1987 Festival.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Peter Seitel, Director; Richard Kurin, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Alicia María González, Director, Folklife Quincentenary Programs; Marjorie Hunt, Phyllis M. May-Machunda, Frank Proschan, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Folklorists; Peter Magoon, Archivist

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Digital images
Correspondence
Negatives
Photographic prints
Business records
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Memorandums
Audiotapes
Contracts
Plans (drawings)
Video recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1987
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