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Audio Log Sheets

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5603c05dc-94c1-46e0-9b6d-2ef2cafc6f3a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref2018
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Audio Log Sheets digital asset number 1

First Year No.1

Creator:
New Negro Alliance (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Hastie, William, 1904-1976  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Advertisements
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
December 16, 1933
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American newspapers  Search this
Activism  Search this
Discrimination in employment  Search this
Business enterprises  Search this
Genre/Form:
Advertisements -- 20th century
Collection Citation:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
New Negro Opinion newspaper
New Negro Opinion newspaper / Series 1: December 1933- December 1934
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa70ad0eb50-232c-412a-89fc-29d7949e517f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-10-012-3-ref4
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View First Year No.1 digital asset number 1

Erie -- Stout/Bestoso Garden

Former owner:
Stout, Donald F.  Search this
Metcalf, John  Search this
Landscape designer:
Wayside Gardens  Search this
Provenance:
Carrie T. Watson Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Stout/Bestoso Garden (Erie, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Erie -- Erie
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, garden plans, a planting list, historical images, and photocopies of garden tour directories.
General:
This six acre property had been farmland before it was purchased and developed by the Stout family, who built a ranch style house in 1956 and installed trees, shrubs, and foundation plantings. Circa 1962 a formal garden of French style was designed by Wayside Gardens, laid out symmetrically in four quadrants hedged in by privet and viburnum, and anchored by four blue spruce trees at the corners. The French garden remains today but two of the spruce trees and some of the privets were removed to open the formal garden to other parts of the property. Gardens that have been added over time include vegetable and herb gardens with boxwood hedges, a swimming pool and surrounding garden containing rosa rugosa, rhododendron, ornamental grasses and tropical plants, an all-white secret garden behind privet hedges, a 115-foot long perennial border, a vineyard, and a grove of bamboo.
The 1960s plan included an orchard, still existing but replanted with fruit trees, black walnut, chestnut and hazelnut trees, black raspberries, black currants and hundreds of naturalized daffodils. Originally four acres were left as field and brush-hogged twice each year; now there are three acres of field populated by redwing black birds, monarch butterflies, deer, turkeys and pheasants, designated an official Backyard Wildlife Habitat in 1994 by the National Wildlife Federation.
The Stout/Bestoso Garden has participated in the Garden Conservancy's Open Days, and the owner is active in the Carrie T. Watson chapter of the Garden Clubs.
Persons associated with the garden include: John Metcalf (former owner, -1955) and Donald F. Stout (former owner, 1955-1986).
Related Materials:
Stout/Bestoso Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 digital images; 1 photographic print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Erie  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA732
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb674f27350-4087-4296-81d1-164017cd6fe3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16459

Sewickley -- Topiary Folly

Former owner:
Robinson, Stewart, Mrs.  Search this
Devins, Harry  Search this
Devins, Harry Mrs  Search this
Woodland designer:
Smith, Elise Keely  Search this
Gardening services:
Vaccaro, Michele  Search this
Provenance:
Garden Club of Allegheny County  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Topiary Folly (Sewickley, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Allegheny -- Sewickley
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and a photocopy of an article.
General:
The fenced one-acre property had a sloping terraced garden on three levels with a woodlands in back and a circa 1955 house with French-influenced styling. The holly foundation hedge was diseased, an arbor vitae hedge had grown out of bounds, the perennials and flowering shrubs on the terraces had become unsightly, and the woodlands, which were populated by deer, needed clearing and shaping. The first project was the woodlands: a meandering path and brick seating area were installed and the cleared understory was replanted with azaleas, rhododendrons and oak leaf hydrangeas. Below the woodlands a 30 by 60 feet open space was a trial area for roses and hydrangeas but now is planted with a circle of clipped boxwood surrounding yellow roses and an antique iron urn, with an outer circle of clipped white azaleas surrounding topiary balls.
The three terraces are marked off by low dry stone walls and feature alternating shapes of topiary boxwood and arbor vitae in beds approximately 100 feet long, separated by gravel paths. Occasional statues and planted containers enhance the formality of the terrace garden. At the end of these rows there is a rose arbor that marks the beginning of another garden, perpendicular to the terraces, that has more topiary shapes, roses, perennials and occasionally annuals planted in rows. In front of the house the foundation beds are planted with various shaped topiary, too.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mrs. Stewart Robinson (former owner, 1955-1974); Mr. and Mrs. Harry Devins (former owners, 1974-2006); Elise Keely Smith (woodland designer, 2006); Michele Vaccaro (gardening services, 2006).
Related Materials:
Topiary Folly related holdings consist of 1 folder (13 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Sewickley  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA739
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6efcbe440-0c16-4a8b-80c7-12914d569ee8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16577

Lambertville -- Hart-Vorhees Farmstead-Lipson Garden

Former owner:
Waligunda, Bob  Search this
Dunham, Robert  Search this
Coleman, Keith  Search this
Hayden, Maximillan  Search this
Alderson, Jonathan  Search this
Landscape designer:
Pugliese, Chris  Search this
Dear, Bill  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hart-Vorhees Farmstead-Lipson Garden (Lambertville, New Jersey)
United States of America -- New Jersey -- Mercer County -- Lambertville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, plant lists, and photocopies of articles .
General:
An historic New Jersey dairy farm was divided into two ten acre properties about 40 years ago, with one containing the house and this one containing two massive stone barns.The barns were converted into livable structures by subsequent owners, with the completion of the house and installation of the gardens surrounding it commencing in 1998. Now there are five distinct garden areas: the driveway and front circle planted with low maintenance shrubs; the front courtyard which is protected by an extensive cedar trellis style fence and features shade plants in chartreuse, dark green and maroon; the back patio along the barn wall with the dining area, fire pit, a dogwood tree espaliered against the barn wall, and a stone ruin that is a wind block; the swimming pool surrounded by ornamental grasses that grow tall enough to give privacy; and a natural pond with the native plants augmented with grasses and yellow water iris.
Among the challenges faced by landscape designers Chris Pugliese and Jonathan Alderson were an extensive native deer population, compacted clay soil from the days when livestock lived in the barn, the massive scale of the converted barns, and converting an entirely exposed property into gardens and outdoor entertaining rooms. Their solutions included planting trees near the house for shade including fast growing river birches, honey locust and magnolias, designing the fence and ruin to define garden rooms and offer protection from the deer and other elements, planting ornamental grasses and other species that deer do not eat, and sinking the garden areas down steps, again to keep out the deer. The compacted soil was removed and replaced with ten inches of mushroom compost.
The massive two-story stone dairy barn has been balanced with large-scale containers including an oil jar and by allowing ivy planted along the side path to climb and soften the façade. The front courtyard and back patio floor are dry laid blue stone that allows small plants to grow between the stones. The height of the trellis fence is staggered so it does not appear to cut the house off from the rest of the property.
Persons associated with the garden include: Bob Waligunda (former owner, 1970-1994); Robert Dunham (former owner, 1994-1996); Mr. and Mrs. Keith Coleman (former owners, 1996-1998); Maximillian Hayden (architect, 1996); Chris Pugliese, ASLA (landscape architect, 1998-2000); Jonathan Alderson, ASLA (landscape architect, 1998-2000); Bill Dear (landscape designer, 2009- ).
Related Materials:
Hart-Vorhees Farmstead-Lipson Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (32 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- New Jersey -- Lambertville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NJ612
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / New Jersey
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb61f5c4bdc-40a2-45aa-a7b2-ab2b0f023427
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref20089

[Druim Moir]: View of rain-filled pool populated by cattails.

Photographer:
Fisher, Gerry  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital image (color, JPEG file.)
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Druim Moir Formal Garden
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
Date:
2018 December 12
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Swimming pools  Search this
Fountains  Search this
Shrubs  Search this
Trees  Search this
Castles  Search this
Typha  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, Item PA474008
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania / PA474: Philadelphia -- Druim Moir Formal Garden
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6b83c9b60-26c3-4b5b-82f6-b9fb6a037acf
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref33125

General fieldwork 8

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 4 (Series 5)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1964, 1972, 1976
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of correspondence, British Record, lyrics, Acadian music essay, handwritten notes. Materials relate to Newport Folk Festival Foundation fieldwork. File also includes handwritten notes on Indigenous populations from Pennsylvania and Tennessee (Lenape/Delaware, Cherokee). Materials were originally grouped with General Fieldwork 7.
Collection Restrictions:
Large portions of this collection are digitized, and while these materials are being prepared for public access through this finding aid, researchers can request digital copies by contacting the Rinzler Archives at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_05_004_015
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 5: Fieldwork / 5.3: Louisiana
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk58b4571c5-ce74-4852-81a5-a20b5aac2835
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref2641

Washington -- Enid A. Haupt Garden

Donor:
Haupt, Enid A. (Enid Annenberg), 1906-2005  Search this
Principal architect:
Carlhian, Jean Paul  Search this
Consultant:
Collins, Lester, -1993  Search this
Stonecarver:
Seferlis, Constantine, 1928-2005  Search this
Architect:
Renwick, James, 1818-1895  Search this
Creator:
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon), 1913-2001 (Smithsonian secretary)  Search this
Sasaki Associates  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Varying Form:
Victorian Garden, formerly known as.
General:
The Enid A. Haupt Garden was dedicated on May 22, 1987. It is located between the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arts and Industries Building, and south of the Smithsonian Institution Building, commonly referred to as the Castle. This 4.3 acre area actually sits atop the Quadrangle complex - an underground facility made up of three Smithsonian museum spaces: the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, and the S. Dillon Ripley Center. Above-ground kiosk entrances to the Sackler and African Art museums are located in the Haupt Garden itself. The Haupt Garden contains three discrete gardens within it: the Parterre, the Moongate Garden, and the Fountain Garden.
After the Castle's construction was completed in 1855, the area to its south became known as the South Yard. In 1887, it functioned as a zoo for bison to promote the conservation of their over-hunted population. The bison were moved to the newly-established National Zoological Park in 1889, and for nearly a century, the South Yard was home to a number of different buildings including the Aerodrome Shop, a solar radiation lab, a bug house (where beetles cleaned skeletal remains of animal specimens), temporary storage and collection buildings, a U.S. Army hangar, and a greenhouse and Quonset hut for the Office of Horticulture. In 1976, the Smithsonian's Office of Horticulture (now Smithsonian Gardens) planted the Victorian Garden parterre on the South Yard, in celebration of America's Bicentennial and to complement a Victoriana exhibition on horticulture in the adjacent Arts and Industries Building. This garden was inspired by a similar parterre made for the 1876 Centennial celebration in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter authorized $500,000 for the planning and construction of the Quadrangle - an underground complex built in the South Yard - to house the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the National Museum of African Art, and the S. Dillon Ripley Center. In 1982, the Victorian Garden was removed. Construction on the Quadrangle spanned from June 21, 1983 to 1987. Architect Jean Paul Carlhian of the firm Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbot was in charge of designing the Quadrangle complex which incorporated an initial design concept by Japanese architect Junzo Yoshimura.
Once basic construction was complete and soil returned to the ground-level (i.e. roof) of the Quadrangle, it was clear that there was more room for gardens beyond the reincorporated parterre. Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley invited philanthropist Enid A. Haupt to tour the garden site, hoping Mrs. Haupt would finance a Zen garden west of the parterre. In fact, she financed the entire design and construction of the new garden with a $3 million endowment, stipulating that the garden be mature when it opened in 1987. With funds in place, work on the garden began, with the primary goal being to harmonize the stylistically varied buildings in and around the Quadrangle (the three entrance pavilions to the underground museums, the Smithsonian Castle, Freer Gallery of Art, and the Arts and Industries Building). The design of the garden was a collaborative effort between principal architect Jean Paul Carlhian, the landscape architectural firm Sasaki Associates, Inc., landscape architect Lester Collins, and James R. Buckler, Director of the Smithsonian's Office of Horticulture. Together they designed the three gardens described below.
Enid A. Haupt (1906-2005) was a publishing heiress and philanthropist who especially supported American horticulture. In addition to this garden, Mrs. Haupt's horticultural philanthropy created and/or preserved several renowned garden spaces including The Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden at the Howard A. Rusk Institute, NYU Medical Center in New York City; the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, New York; The Haupt Fountains on the Ellipse in Washington, D.C.; River Farm in Alexandria, Virginia; and The Cloisters in New York City. In 1994, the American Horticultural Society awarded her the Liberty Hyde Bailey award for her philanthropy.
The Parterre is the Victorian-style centerpiece of the Haupt Garden. It is a carefully manicured garden with a changing palette of colors and textures, laid out in symmetrical patterns that are redesigned every few seasons. Designs incorporate such motifs as diamonds, fleurs-de-lis, and scallops. While parterre is a French term meaning "on the ground," parterres as an ornamental garden style originated in 16th century Renaissance Italy.
The Moongate Garden is next to the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, and was inspired by the Temple of Heaven in Beijing, China. The Temple of Heaven was designed using a geometrical, axial layout, centered on the cardinal points of the compass. The Moongate Garden's dominant features are stone and water, which symbolize the body and spirit of the earth in Chinese culture. Two 9-foot-tall pink granite moon gates stand on the southwest and northeast corners of the garden; two more lie as benches in the opposite corners. A circular platform lies in the center of a granite-paved square pool, connected by bridges to each side of the square.
The Fountain Garden is next to the National Museum of African Art, and was modeled after the Court of the Lions at Alhambra, a 13th-century Moorish palace in Granada, Spain. As with most Islamic gardens, the Fountain Garden is symmetrical and includes a central fountain with four water channels. Respectively, these channels represent paradise itself, and the four rivers of paradise described in the Koran: water, milk, honey, and wine. At the garden's north end is a chadar - a patterned, sloping stone ramp that has water running down it.
The Renwick Gates are cast iron carriage gates at the garden's entrance on Independence Avenue. The gates were erected in 1979, based on an 1849 drawing by James Renwick, Jr., architect of the Castle. The design includes piers made of the same sandstone that went into the Castle's great reddish walls from a quarry in Seneca, Maryland.
A European linden tree once stood in the northeast corner of the South Yard. When construction on the Quadrangle began, Secretary Ripley directed that the tree remain unharmed. Construction personnel and arborists minded the tree, helping it live through the end of construction. However, it died of old age two years later, in 1989.
The Downing Urn was originally erected on the National Mall in 1856 in memory of landscape designer and horticulturist Andrew Jackson Downing (1815-1852). The urn was restored in 1972. In 1989, it was moved to where the linden tree had stood in the Haupt Garden.
Plantings include saucer magnolia (Magnolia x soulangeana), Wollemi pine (Wollemia nobilis), weeping Higan cherry (Prunus pendula 'Pendula Rosea'), golden shrimp plant (Pachystachys lutea), coneflower (Echinacea), dusty miller (Senecio cineraria), and pansy (Viola x wittrockiana).
Persons associated with the garden include: Enid A. Haupt (donor, 1987). Jean Paul Carlhian (principal architect, 1987). Lester Collins (landscape architect consultant, 1987). Constantine Seferlis (stonecarver, 1979). James Renwick Jr. (architect, 1849). James Goode (SI Castle keeper, design and construction supervisor, 1979-1987). S. Dillon Ripley (Smithsonian Secretary, 1964-1984). Michael Riordan (horticulturist, 1995- ).
Related Materials:
Enid A. Haupt Garden related holdings consist of 3,124 35mm slides (photographs), 979 photographic prints, 15 contact sheets, 12 transparencies, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb60d9f707f-530a-4f59-a462-57374ec70dd7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref4

The Subterranean Asellids of Maryland: Description of Caecidotea Nordeni, New Species, and New Records of C. Holsingeri and C. Franzi (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Isopoda)

Author:
Lewis, Julian J.  Search this
Bowman, Thomas E.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2010
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_92601

A retrospective study of gestational weight gain in relation to the Institute of Medicine's recommendations by maternal body mass index in rural Pennsylvania from 2006 to 2015

Author:
Mackeen, A. Dhanya  Search this
Schulkin, Jay  Search this
Power, Michael L.  Search this
DiBari, Jessica  Search this
Lott, Melisa L.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2018
Topic:
Zoology  Search this
Animals  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Animal health  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_147725

Geographic population structure and subspecific boundaries in a tidal marsh sparrow

Author:
Wilson, Amy G.  Search this
McInerney, Nancy C.  Search this
Ballentine, Barbara  Search this
Greenberg, Russell S.  Search this
Fleischer, Robert C.  Search this
Cammen, Kristina M.  Search this
Olsen, Brian J.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2016
Topic:
Zoology  Search this
Animals  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Animal health  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_138628

Pathogenic Chytrid Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, but Not B. salamandrivorans, Detected on Eastern Hellbenders

Author:
Lipps, Gregory  Search this
Chapman, Eric  Search this
Hyman, Oliver J.  Search this
Terrell, Kimberly A.  Search this
Kleopfer, John D.  Search this
Harris, Reid N.  Search this
Loudon, Andrew H.  Search this
Roblee, Kenneth  Search this
Bales, Emma K.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2015
Topic:
Zoology  Search this
Animals  Search this
Veterinary medicine  Search this
Animal health  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_135053

Climatic and human controls on Holocene floodplain vegetation changes in eastern Pennsylvania based on the isotopic composition of soil organic matter

Author:
Messner, Timothy C.  Search this
Williamson, Forrest C.  Search this
Nordt, Lee C.  Search this
Stinchcomb, Gary E.  Search this
Driese, Steven G.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2013
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Natural History  Search this
See others in:
Anthropology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_115482

Beer in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

Author:
Unger, Richard W  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (344 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
History
Place:
Europe
Date:
2007
To 1500
16th century
16e siècle
Topic:
Beer--History  Search this
Brewing industry--History  Search this
Bière--Histoire  Search this
Brasserie--Histoire  Search this
Beer  Search this
Brewing industry  Search this
Call number:
TP577 .U54 2004 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1154582

Old Ways in the New World

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
June 30-July 4, 1973
Introduction:
Old Ways in the New World was launched at the 1973 Festival as a cooperative, comparative presentation prepared and mounted by a joint effort involving the Smithsonian and the Government of Yugoslavia. Musicians, singers and dancers from Serbia and Croatia joined with their cultural descendants in America for a five-day celebration of the bechar tamburashi tradition. A series of concerts comparing American Anglo-Scots-Irish material with the English, Scots and Irish forms was intended as a preview of future Festivals.

Like the other Festival programs, Old Ways was concerned with the presentation of elements of group identity. Here the point of focus was the cultural traditions that newcomers - early and late, forced and willing - brought to the United States and creatively used in maintaining their unique sense of community. These traditions serve to reinforce, reassure and stabilize people struggling to survive in an unaccustomed environment.

As the Smithsonian began planning a multi-month Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife projected for 1976, it established relationships with foreign governments to initiate joint research programs, with U.S. scholars working abroad and visiting specialists coming to the U.S. to map and compare traditions as they exist in the mother country and here. The resources of ethnographic museums, folklore institutes, universities and independent scholars were mobilized to approach this material with fresh perspectives and techniques.

Andrew Oerke was Program Coordinator for the Old Ways in the New World program, with Carla Borden as Field Reseach Coordinator and Martin Koenig and Ethel Raim-Zinser serving as Program Directors for Slavic and Balkan Cultures. Major sponsors for the Old Ways program included the Government of Yugoslavia, the Croatian Fraternal Union, and the Serb National Federation. Subsequent to their participation in the Festival, Yugoslav participants toured to perform in U.S. cities with Serbian and Croation populations; those Touring Performances were coordinated by Mark Mason.
Participants:
Tribute to the Tamburashi

Participants from Yugoslavia

Group from Vršac -- Group from VršacGroup Coordinator: Desimir Daković-Daca"Žarko Zrenjanin"Ivan DjodjevSredoja GranićSvetislav HerićŽiva JovanovŽarko MišićDoka MitrovVasa RadakŽiva RadakJoca StanisavljevBogoslav Vinchila

Group from Gundinci -- Group from GundinciGroup Coordinator: Drago KolesarMarica HorvatovićStjepan HorvatovićKata KadićManda KarovidovićPavo KarovidovićLuka KokanovićMato KokanovićManda MataševićFranjo MatasovićMarija MatasovićDurda MatićDuro MatićMarija MatićJosip MihićManda PlasićDurda UžarevićMarija Užarović

Group from Šiškovci -- Group from ŠiškovciAdam KneževićVinko KneževićAntun ToldiFranjo ToldiMato Toldi

Group from Novi Sad -- Group from Novi SadGroup Coordinator: Sava VukosavljevTvrdjeva Orchestra featuring Janika Balaz

Participants from America

Balkan Serenaders from Lackawanna, New York -- Balkan Serenaders from Lackawanna, New YorkCharlie Bukovich, Lackawanna, New YorkNick (Tillie) Klaich, Lackawanna, New YorkVlad Popovich, Lackawanna, New YorkCharlie Smilinich, Lackawanna, New YorkSteve Vranjes, Lackawanna, New York

Balkan Serenaders from Youngstown, Ohio -- Balkan Serenaders from Youngstown, OhioDave Egercic, Youngstown, OhioMelvyn Evanovich, Youngstown, OhioSteve Markulin, 1910-1988, Youngstown, OhioPaul Milanovich, Youngstown, Ohio

Banat Tamburitzans -- Banat TamburitzansWalter Bachinich, Elizabeth, New JerseyZdravko Jezdimir, 1896-1979, Elizabeth, New JerseyWalter Yezdimir, 1918-1983, Elizabeth, New JerseyMilutin Yezdimir, Elizabeth, New Jersey

Popovich Brothers -- Popovich BrothersPete Mistovich, 1914-2001, Chicago, IllinoisAdam Popovich, 1909-2001, Chicago, IllinoisMarko Popovich, 1915-1976, Chicago, IllinoisTed Popovich, 1912-2005, Chicago, Illinois

Sloboda from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania -- Sloboda from Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaCoordinator: Joe Grčevich

British Isles Music, Song, and Dance Traditions from England, Scotland, Ireland and America

Consultant: Dr. Kenneth S. Goldstein

Workshop leaders: Kay Cothran, Dr. Kenneth S. Goldstein

Ralph Aldous, 1909-1984, fiddler, Adirondacks

Ted Ashlaw, 1905-1987, singer, Adirondacks

Sam Bayard, 1908-1997, fife and whistle player, fiddler, Pennsylvania

The Boys of the Lough -- The Boys of the LoughAly Bain, 1946-, fiddler, ShetlandCathal McConnell, ballad singer, flute and whistle player, Northern IrelandRobin Morton, ballad singer, concertina and bodhran player, Northern IrelandDave Richardson, 1948-, ballad singer, instrumentalist, England

Sara Cleveland, 1905-1992, ballad singer, story teller, Adirondacks

Kay Cothran, singer, Georgia

Hazel Dickens, 1935-2011, singer, West Virginia

Jimmy Driftwood, 1907-1998, ballad singer, story, teller, Ozarks

Roscoe Holcomb, 1912-1981singer, banjo player, Kentucky

Norman Kennedy, 1934-, ballad singer, story, teller, Aberdeen

Lou Killen, 1934-2013, ballad singer, story, teller and instrumentalist, Northeast England

Margot Mayo, 1910-1974, dance caller, Texas

Owen McBride, 1941-, ballad singer, story, teller, Ireland

Larry Older, 1912-1982, fiddler, ballad singer, story, teller, Adirondacks

Maggi Peirce, singer, story teller, North Ireland

Almeda Riddle, 1898-1986, singer, Ozarks

Jean Ritchie, 1922-2015, ballad singer, story, teller, dulcimer player, Kentucky

Grant Rogers, 1907-1979, fiddler, ballad singer, story, teller, New York

Wilf Wareham, singer, Newfoundland out port

Nimrod Workman, 1895-1994, singer, storyteller, West Virginia

African Traditions

From the Republic of the Gambia:

Al Haji Bai Konte, kora player
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1973 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1973, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1973 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fc15c5fe-b2f1-49d5-aea1-b1377ad24eb3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1973-ref30

Pitcairn-Cierva PCA-1A

Materials:
Overall - steel tube, wood, cotton fabric.
Dimensions:
Overall: Height 401.3cm (158in), Length 660.4cm (260in), Winspan 660.4cm (396in),
Weight 1043.3kg (2300lb)
Rotor diameter: 1341.12cm (528in)
Type:
CRAFT-Rotary Wing
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Gift of the Autogiro Company of America.
Inventory Number:
A19560048000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv98b6aa939-b9ae-4915-8534-2abef4a7a36d
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19560048000
Online Media:

Map of the State of New York

Embroiderer:
Elizabeth Ann Goldin, (American, 1814–1896)  Search this
Medium:
Medium: silk embroidery on wool foundation, pencil Technique: embroidered in cross, stem, chain, back, and four-sided stitches on plain weave foundation Label: wool embroidered with silk in cross, stem, chain, back, and four-sided stitches
Dimensions:
H x W: 51.5 x 59 cm (20 1/4 x 23 1/4 in.)
Type:
embroidery & stitching
Embroidered map
Object Name:
Embroidered map
Made in:
New York, New York, USA
Date:
1829
Credit Line:
Bequest of Mrs. Henry E. Coe
Accession Number:
1941-69-124
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Textiles Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kq4b3329b87-73e3-49c3-af3e-e6214b2bbfd2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1941-69-124
Online Media:

Eastern Wind: The Asian-American Community Newsletter of Washington, D.C. Vol. 4, No. 1

Collection Designer:
Eng, Miu, 1955-  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1975 September-October
Scope and Contents:
This issue of Eastern Wind includes cover art designed by Miu Eng, organizational news, and an essay on Asians and the Women's Movement.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Miu Eng Eastern Wind collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Miu Eng.
See more items in:
Miu Eng Eastern Wind Collection
Miu Eng Eastern Wind Collection / Series 2: Newsletters
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa70e7d559a-63e4-4706-9500-478e5dcacbda
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-102-ref6
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Eastern Wind: The Asian-American Community Newsletter of Washington, D.C. Vol. 4, No. 1 digital asset number 1

Carol Kramer papers

Creator:
Kramer, Carol, 1943-2002  Search this
Extent:
31 Linear feet (64 boxes, 2 cassette tapes, 1 oversize box, 1 map drawer)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Slides (photographs)
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Field notes
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Maps
Place:
Iran
Jodhpur (India)
Udaipur (Rajasthan, India)
Rajasthan (India)
Guatemala
Date:
1943-2002,
bulk 1961-2002
Summary:
The bulk of these papers document the professional life of Carol Kramer, a leading figure in ethnoarchaeology, specializing in the Middle East and South Asia. She was also a major advocate for the professional development of women in anthropology and archaeology.

Dating 1943-2002, the collection includes field notes, writings, correspondence, daily planners, teaching files, photographs, sound recordings, maps, computer disks, and botanical specimens. Her ethnoarchaeological research in "Shahabad" (a.k.a. "Aliabad") in Iran and in Rajasthan, India is well-represented in the collection.
Scope and Contents Note:
The bulk of these papers document the professional life of Carol Kramer. The collection contains field notes, writings, correspondence, daily planners, teaching files, photographs, sound recordings, maps, computer disks, and botanical specimens. Also in the collection are her notes and grade transcripts as a college and graduate student.

Her ethnoarchaeological research in "Shahabad" (a.k.a. "Aliabad") in Iran and in Rajasthan, India is well-represented in the collection in the form of her notes, maps, writings, and photographs. In addition, there are plant specimens that Kramer collected in Iran. Also among her research files are photocopies of her field notes from her work in Guatemala. Although her field notes from the Hasanlu Project are absent, the collection does contain a few photographs and some notes and correspondence from her research for her article on the Hasanlu Project's excavations at Dalma Tepe. In addition, the collection contains "A System of Pottery Classification According to Shape," a paper by Robert H. Dyson, Jr. and T. Cuyler Young, Jr. for the Hasanlu Project. Materials relating to the Godin Project consist of correspondence from 1996 and 1997 and a 1973 group photo.

Copies of her monographs are present in the collection along with drafts, figures, and correspondence for her published writings and dissertation. Many of the papers that she presented at professional meetings, seminars, and special lectures can also be found in the collection, including her 1994 AAA Distinguished Lecture, "The Quick and the Dead: Ethnography in and for Archaeology." In addition, there are two cassette tape recordings of Kramer presenting her paper, "Ceramics in Two Indian Cities," and the subsequent group discussion at the 1985 School of American Research Advanced Seminar, "Social and Behavioral Sources of Ceramic Variability." Also of special interest are materials documenting her involvement in the 1981 "Resolution to Implement the 1972 American Anthropological Association Resolution on Fair Practices in Employment of Women."

Kramer's professional correspondence is spread throughout the collection, mixed together with other documents, filed by subject. Much of her later correspondence is in the form of e-mail printouts. Letters of reference she wrote can also be found on her computer disks, which consist of several 3.50" and 5.25" floppy disks. Other files on the disks include materials for her books and articles, research data, her performance evaluations files, notes for courses she taught, and her will.

It should be noted that Kramer was briefly married during the 1960s and 1970s to Christopher Hamlin, who was a fellow graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania. Thus, she is referred to as Carol Hamlin in some of the documents from that period.
Arrangement note:
Arranged into 15 series: (1) Research, 1961-1997; (2) Writings, 1972-2002; (3) Talks, 1972-1999; (4) Grants/Fellowships, 1974-2000; (5) Professional Activities, 1966-2002; (6) Teaching, 1971-2002; (7) Student, 1961-1973; (8) Personal, 1943-2001; (9) Writings by Others, 1949-2001; (10) Photographs, 1967-1996; (11) Card Files; (12) Maps; (13) Botanical Specimens; (14) Sound Recordings, 1985; (15) Computer Disks
Biographical/Historical note:
Selected Bibliography

1971 -- "The 1971 Excavations at Seh Gabi, Iran," Archaeology, Vol. 26, pp. 224-227.

1974 -- "The Early Second Millennium Ceramic Assemblage of Dinkha Tepe," Ibid. with Louis D. Levine. "The Godin Project: Seh Gabi," Iran XII, pp. 211-213. "Seh Gabi, 1973," Archaeology, Vol. 27, pp. 274-277

1977 -- "Pots and Peoples," Mountains and Lowlands: Essays in the Archaeology of Greater Mesopotamia, edited by L.D. Levine and T.C. Young, Jr. Malibu: Undena Publications

1979 -- editor. Ethnoarchaeology: Implications of Ethnography for Archaeology. New York: Colombia University Press.

1980 -- "Estimating Prehistoric Populations: an Ethnoarchaeological Approach," L'Archéologie de I'Iraq, edited by Marie-Thérèse Barrelet, Paris: Centre National de la Rechere Scientifique.

1982 -- Village Ethnoarchaeology: Rural Iran in Archaeological Perspective. New York: Academic Press.

1988 -- with Miriam Stark. "The Status of Women in Archaeology," Anthropology Newsletter. Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 11-12.

1991 -- Co-editor with W.A. Longcre. "Ethnoarchaeology," special issue of Expedition "Ceramics in Two Indian Cities," Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology, edited by William Longacre. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

1997 -- Pottery in Rajasthan: Ethnoarchaeology in Two Indian Cities. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

2001 -- with Nicholas David. Ethnoarchaeology in Action. Cambridge (U.K.): Cambridge University Press

Chronology

1943 -- Born May 3 in New York, New York

1964 -- Earns B.A. from The City University of New York

1967, 1969 -- Site supervisor of archaeological excavations at Godin Tepe, Iran for the Royal Ontario Museum's Godin Project

1968 -- Site supervisor of archaeological excavations at Dinkha Tepe and Se Girdan, Iran for University of Pennsylvania-Metropolitan Museum of Art's Hasanlu Project.

1970 -- Ethnoarchaeological research with an urban potter in Antigua, Guatemala

1971 -- Receives Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Pennsylvania 1971 Hired as Assistant Professor at City University of New York Assistant director of archaeological excavations at Seh Gabi, Iran for Godin Project

1973 -- Assistant director of archaeological excavations at Seh Gabi, Iran for Godin Project

1975 -- Ethnoarchaeological research in Iranian village

1977 -- Associate Professor, Lehman College and the Graduate Center, CUNY

1980 -- Ethnoarchaeological research in Rajasthan, India

1982-1984 -- Ethnoarchaeological research in Rajasthan, India

1985 -- Visiting Professor at Yale University

1986-1988 -- Visiting Professor at University of Arizona

1990 -- Hired as Professor at University of Arizona

1994 -- Presents distinguished lecture to Archaeology Section of American Anthropological Association

1995 -- Site supervisor of archaeological excavations at Gordion, Turkey

1996 -- Ethnoarchaeological research near Gordion, Turkey

1999 -- Receives "Squeaky Wheel Award" from COSWA/American Anthropological Association

2002 -- Died on December 3 at the age of 59

Carol Kramer was a leading figure in ethnoarchaeology, specializing in the Middle East and South Asia. She was also a major advocate for the professional development of women in anthropology and archaeology.

She was born on May 3, 1943 in New York City to Aaron Kramer, a poet and professor of English at Dowling College, and Katherine Kolodny Kramer, a social worker. She attended the High School of Music and Art and earned her B.A. at the City University of New York in 1964. Kramer initially studied archaeology in the graduate program at the University of Chicago, but transferred to the University of Pennsylvania after a year, where she earned her doctorate in 1971. Her dissertation was entitled "The Habur Ware Ceramic Assemblage of Northern Mesopotamia: An Analysis of its Distribution."

In 1968, she was a site supervisor for University of Pennsylvania and Metropolitan Museum of Art's joint archaeological excavations at Dinkha Tepe and Se Girdan, Iran as part of the Hasanlu Project, directed by Robert H. Dyson, Jr. She also served as site supervisor (1967, 1969) and Assistant Director (1971, 1973) for the Royal Ontario Museum's archaeological excavation at Godin Tepe, known as the Godin Project, which was directed by Louis D. Levine and T. Cuyler Young, Jr. In 1970, she conducted her first ethnoarchaeological fieldwork under Ruben Reina, working with an urban potter in Antigua, Guatemala.

Kramer returned to Iran in 1975 to conduct ethnoarchaeological research in a Kurdish village in the Hamadān Province. Her work there resulted in several papers, including "An Archaeological View of a Contemporary Kurdish Village: Domestic Architecture, Household Size, and Wealth," published in Ethnoarchaeology: Implications of Ethnography for Archaeology (1979), which she edited. She expanded upon her paper in her 1982 book, Village Ethnoarchaeology: Rural Iran in Archaeological Perspective.

For her next project, she intended to study pottery communities in Iran, but the outbreak of the Iranian Revolution forced her to change her plans, and she decided to shift her location to India. In 1980 and 1982-1984, she studied ceramic production and distribution in Rajasthan. Articles produced from her research include "Ceramics in Two Indian Cities" (1991), "Ceramics in Rajasthan: Distribution and Scalar Variation" (1992), "A Tale of Two Cities: Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology in Rajasthan" (1994), and "Social and Locational Contexts of Ceramic Distribution in Rajasthan" (1995). She also authored Pottery in Rajasthan: Ethnoarchaeology in Two Indian Cities, published in 1997.

Kramer returned to the field in 1995, serving as site supervisor for archaeological excavations in Gordion, Turkey. She returned the next year to explore the possibility of conducting research in Yassihöyük and other villages near Gordion as an extension of her village ethnoachaeology research in Iran.

In 2001, Kramer further contributed to the field of ethnoarchaeology with the publication of Ethnoarchaeology in Action, which she co-wrote with Nicholas David. The landmark book is the first comprehensive study of ethnoarchaeology.

In addition to her work in ethnoarchaeology, Kramer was also involved in promoting the professional advancement of women in anthropology. In 1980, Kramer and her colleagues (Roger Sanjek, Rayna Rapp, Carole Vance, and Glenn Peterson) drew up a resolution to implement the 1972 Resolution on Fair Practices in Employment of Women. They campaigned to raised funds and support for the resolution, which called for the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to censure universities that hired or promoted a low percentage of women. Due to their work, the resolution passed and AAA censured five departments in 1981. In 1988, she and Miriam Stark published, "The Status of Women in Archeology," a study of gender equity in archaeology. They looked at gender differences in the number of graduate students, PhD recipients, and funding recipients as well as in faculty composition. Kramer was also a member of the Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology (COSWA) from 1973 to 1975 and host and discussion leader at the COSWA Roundtable on professional skills and the female archaeologist at the 1998 annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA).

In 1999, Kramer was awarded the Squeaky Wheel Award by COSWA in recognition of her contributions to equity for women in anthropology. She also delivered the 1994 Distinguished Lecture to the Archaeology Section for the AAA, "The Quick and the Dead: Ethnography in and for Archaeology." In 2003, she was posthumously awarded the SAA's Award for excellence in Archaeological Analysis.

From 1971 to 1990, Kramer taught at Queens College and later Lehman College and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York, during which time she was a visiting professor at Yale University (1985). She also taught at the University of Arizona (1986-1988) as a recipient of a National Science Foundation Visiting Professorship for Women. In 1990, she joined the faculty of the University of Arizona, where she taught until her death.

Kramer passed away at the age of 59 on December 3, 2002.

Sources Consulted

Rothschild, Nan A. "Carol Kramer (1943-2002)." American Anthropologist 106.1 (2004): 214-220.

Thompson, Raymond H. and Norman Yoffee. "Carol Kramer." Anthropology News 44.3 (2003): 30.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Kramer's sister, Laura Kramer.
Restrictions:
The Carol Kramer papers are open for research.

Materials with student grades and social security numbers have been restricted. The dates that the restricted items will be made available for access range from 2047 to 2064. Access to Kramer's computer disks is also restricted. Please consult an archivist for more information.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnoarchaeology  Search this
Pottery industry -- India  Search this
Women anthropologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Slides (photographs)
Manuscripts
Sound recordings
Field notes
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Maps
Citation:
Carol Kramer Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2006-14
See more items in:
Carol Kramer papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bfc16c62-46b6-4d4c-a4e5-fbd7f4cd7407
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2006-14

Black-Brown Coalition Building - Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-23T22:37:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0YpDizbH_gY

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