Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
1,653 documents - page 1 of 83

Robert King Harris Papers 1940s-1970s

Creator:
Harris, Robert King 1912-1980  Search this
Harris, Inus Marie  Search this
Correspondent:
Bell, Robert Eugene  Search this
Blaine, Jay C  Search this
Caver, Katy  Search this
Davison, Claire C  Search this
Fay, Robert O  Search this
Flores, Dan L  Search this
Gibson, Jon L  Search this
Haynes, Vance  Search this
Head, Lawrence H  Search this
Heizer, Robert Fleming 1915-1979  Search this
Hester, Thomas R  Search this
Jackson, Marsha F  Search this
Jacobson, Jerome  Search this
Jank, Dan  Search this
Jones, William K  Search this
King, Morton B  Search this
Krieger, Alex Dony  Search this
Latimer, Truett  Search this
Liu, Robert K  Search this
Ludwickson, John  Search this
Marmaduke, William S  Search this
McVay, Roger  Search this
Morgan, K. R  Search this
Morse, Dan F  Search this
Nye, Hermes  Search this
Olds, Dorris L  Search this
Perino, Gregory  Search this
Schmidt, Stephen  Search this
Scurlock, Dan  Search this
Skinner, S. Alan  Search this
Slesick, Len  Search this
Stephenson, Robert Lloyd  Search this
Sudbury, Byron  Search this
Tanner, Helen Hornbeck  Search this
Taylor, Lonn W  Search this
Thygesen, Ted  Search this
Tong, Marvin E Jr  Search this
Webb, Clarence H  Search this
Wedel, Mildred Mott  Search this
Weir, Frank A  Search this
Wendorf, Fred  Search this
Word, James H  Search this
Wyckoff, Don G  Search this
Subject:
De Soto, Francisco  Search this
de la Harpe, Benard  Search this
Texas Archaeological and Paleontological Society  Search this
Dallas Archaeological Society  Search this
Caddoan Conference  Search this
Physical description:
ca. 12 linear feet
Culture:
Caddo trade  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Maps
Notes
Correspondence
Manuscripts for publication
Illustrations
Family papers
Biographies
Sound recordings
Place:
Texas
Oklahoma
Louisiana
Mississippi
Arkansas
Alabama
New York
Pennsylvania
Ohio
Colorado
Montana
Bolivia
Central America
Mexico
Korea
Date:
1940s-1970s
1930-1950
Topic:
Trade--French-Caddo  Search this
Archeology  Search this
See more items in:
Robert King Harris Papers 1940s-1970s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_87858

The fossil record of predation: methods, patterns, and processes

Author:
Labandeira, Conrad C.  Search this
Culver, Stephen J.  Search this
Bambach, Richard K.  Search this
Vermeij, Geerat J.  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Blaire  Search this
Dietl, Gregory P.  Search this
Haynes, Gary  Search this
Kowalewski, Michal  Search this
Kowalewski, Michal  Search this
Holtz, Thomas Richard, Jr.  Search this
Baumiller, Tomasz K.  Search this
Bengtson, Stefan  Search this
Brett, Carleton E.  Search this
Chin, Karen  Search this
Farlow, James O.  Search this
Gahn, Forest J.  Search this
Jenkins, Ian  Search this
Kelley, P. atricia H.  Search this
Kelley, Patricia H.  Search this
Lipps, JereH  Search this
Walker, Sally E.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2002
Topic:
Paleobiology  Search this
Natural History  Search this
See others in:
Paleobiology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_20470

Paleobiology of predators, parasitoids, and parasites: accommodation and death in the fossil record of terrestrial invertebrates.

Author:
Labandeira, Conrad C.  Search this
Kowalewski, Michal  Search this
Kelley, Patricia H.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2002
Topic:
Paleobiology  Search this
Natural History  Search this
See others in:
Paleobiology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_20471

Virginia Drew Watson papers

Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Cole, J. David, 1941-  Search this
Extent:
8.13 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Brazil
Papua New Guinea
Mato Grosso (Brazil : State)
Papua New Guinea -- Social life and customs
Papua New Guinea -- Antiquities
Date:
1930-2001
Summary:
Virginia Drew Watson was a cultural anthropologist best known for her work in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Her papers attest to a variety of interests related to culture and culture change, drawing on resources both archaeological and ethnographic. This collection contains catalogs, correspondence, drawings, field notes, grant proposals, manuscripts, maps, photographs, publications, reports, and slides. The majority of the field work relates to her work in Papua New Guinea, both with her husband (James B. Watson) and with J. David Cole, but there are also materials related to her work in Brazil.
Scope and Contents:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers attest to a variety of interests related to culture and culture change, drawing on resources both archaeological and ethnographic. Her work could be conveniently separated into four areas: Brazil, Plains and Caddo Indians, Papua New Guinea ethnographic, and Papua New Guinea archaeology with Cole. This collection contains catalogs, correspondence, drawings, field notes, grant proposals, manuscripts, maps, photographs, publications, reports, and slides. Most of the correspondence is with colleagues doing related work in other museums or universities in the United States or Australia. A small part of the correspondence is with friends, including missionaries, who report relevant information of interest. The collection includes original field notes from Brazil, including notes from a lecture by Radcliffe-Brown in 1943. There are also original field notes from the Tairora, Agarabi, and Gadsup groups in Highland New Guinea. In addition, this collection includes a list of Watson's publications, a copy of most of them, and some reviews.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 5 series: (1) Correspondence, 1930s-2000; (2) Brazil, 1943-1955, 1966; (3) New Guinea, 1949-2000; (4) Manuscripts, 1939-2001; (5) Books/Monographs, 1942-1977, 1997; (6) Slides of PEHNG Archeological Sites, 1965-1973, undated
Biographical Note:
Virginia Drew Watson was born on June 17, 1918, in Tomah, Wisconsin. Her undergraduate work was completed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she received a PhB in Sociology (1940). She conducted graduate work for both AM (1943) and PhD (1965) degrees at the University of Chicago. She was a Fellow of both the American Anthropological Association and the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Virginia Watson's early work was in archaeology, but later she pursued both archaeology and socio-cultural anthropology. She married James B. Watson, a cultural anthropologist, in 1943. During that year they went to Brazil, where Virginia Watson's work was primarily ethnographic among the Cayua Indians of Mato Grosso. On the trip returning from the field to Sao Paulo the Watsons stopped at the archaeological site of Ciudad Real del Guayra. From 1944 to 1945 Watson worked in the Cultural Relations Department of the American Consulate General in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Watsons made two trips to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The first, 1954-1955, was funded by the Ford Foundation. Watson focused on socio-cultural aspects of the Tairora and Agarabi groups, and her work resulted in the 1965 publication of her dissertation, "Agarabi Female Roles and Family Structure, a study of socio-cultural change." The Watsons' second Papua New Guinea trip was in 1963-1964. It was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and focused on the Tairora and Gadsup groups. For Virginia Watson, the second trip was partly connected to archaeological work previously carried out by J. David Cole. Due to illness, he was unable to analyze the mass of material (25,000 objects) that he had collected. Watson analyzed the material and produced publications, one of which was in collaboration with Cole.

Virginia Watson often held one or more part-time positions. As a graduate student in 1942, she was a part-time Lecturer in the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. On returning from Brazil, the Watsons moved to Oklahoma University in Norman for one year. There, Watson supervised archeology students in sorting and putting in order the university collection of artifacts as well as directing them in the field. From 1948 to 1953 Watson was a Lecturer at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and she also directed students in field work. During the St. Louis years the Watsons spent two summers studying the Anglo-Spanish community in Colorado. From 1957 to 1963 she was a Lecturer at Seattle University and from 1961 to 1971 she was also an Occasional Lecturer at the University of Washington, Seattle. From 1969 to 1989 Watson held the position of Affiliate Curator at the Burke Museum, University of Washington. After she retired, Virginia Watson spent her winters in Florida and her summers in Boulder, Colorado.

Virginia Watson died in 2007.

Sources Consulted

Watson, Virgina Drew. "Curriculum vitae, 2001, For National Anthropological Archives." Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

"James Watson III." Bangor Daily News, December 10, 2009.

Chronology

1918 -- Born on June 17 in Tomah, Wisconsin

1940 -- Earned PhB in Sociology from University of Wisconsin-Madison

1942 -- Lecturer in archaeology at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago

1943 -- Earned AM from University of Chicago Married James B. Watson Field research of the Cayua Indians, Mato Grosso, Brazil

1944-1945 -- Worked in the Cultural Relations Department of the American Consulate General in Sao Paulo, Brazil

1947 -- Special Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma, Norman

1948-1953 -- Lecturer in anthropology and archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis

1949-1950 -- Field research of the Anglo-Spanish community, Del Norte, Colorado

1953-1955 -- First field research trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea

1957-1963 -- Lecturer in anthropology at Seattle University

1961-1971 -- Lecturer in anthropology at the University of Washington, Seattle

1963-1964 -- Second field research trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea

1965 -- Earned PhD from the University of Chicago Published dissertation: "Agarabi Female Roles and Family Structure, a study of socio-cultural change"

1969-1989 -- Affiliate Curator of Melanesian Archaeology at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington

2007 -- Died
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also has the papers of Virginia D. Watson's husband, James Bennett Watson.
Provenance:
Virginia Drew Watson donated her papers to the National Anthropological Archives in 2002.
Restrictions:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers are open for research.

Access to the Virginia Drew Watson papers requires and appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Citation:
Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2002-12
See more items in:
Virginia Drew Watson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2002-12

The Optima Focus of the Panhandle Aspect: description and analysis. Bulletin of the Texas Archeological and Paleontological Society, 21: 7-68

Collection Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Cole, J. David, 1941-  Search this
Container:
Box 17
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1950
Collection Restrictions:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers are open for research.

Access to the Virginia Drew Watson papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Virginia Drew Watson papers
Virginia Drew Watson papers / Series 4: Manuscripts / 4.3: Published Articles
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2002-12-ref208

Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Whitmore, Frank C., interviewee  Search this
Extent:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1989
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Frank C. Whitmore, Jr., was interviewed for the Oral History Collection by Cain because of his involvement with the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology from its inception to the late 1930s.
Descriptive Entry:
The Frank C. Whitmore, Jr., Interview was conducted in 1989 by Smithsonian Archives visiting fellow, Joseph A. Cain, as part of a research project on the history of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. Cain was a graduate student in history of science at the University of Maryland. The interview consists of 2.0 hours of audiotape and 55 pages of transcript. The Frank C. Whitmore, Jr., Interview discusses his education and career as a vertebrate paleontologist, especially his recollections of the founding of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, reminiscences of colleagues such as Alfred Sherwood Romer and William Berryman Scott, and reflections on the history of the field of vertebrate paleontology in the United States in the twentieth century.
Historical Note:
Frank C. Whitmore, Jr. (1915-2012), research geologist for the United States Geological Survey (USGS), specialized in the systematics of fossil mammals. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 17, 1915, he received the A.B. from Amherst College in 1938. He was awarded the M.S. in invertebrate paleontology in 1939 from Pennsylvania State University. He completed his graduate training in vertebrate paleontology at Harvard University, under Alfred Sherwood Romer, receiving the A.M. in 1941 and Ph.D. in 1942. In 1939, he married Martha Burling Kremers, and they had four children, Geoffrey Mason, John Kremers, Katherine Burling and Susan Hale Whitmore.

After graduation, Whitmore taught geology at Rhode Island State College from 1942 to 1944. He was appointed a Geologist at the USGS in 1944, but was detailed as a scientific consultant to the U.S. Army in the Philippines, Japan and Korea from 1945 to 1946. In 1946, he became Chief of the Military Geology Branch of the USGS, a position he held through 1959. He then transferred to the USGS Paleontology and Stratigraphy located in the Natural History Building (NHB) where he worked as a research geologist on the systematics of fossil mammals, especially Tertiary Cetacea. His field work focused on the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Plain, Panama, Kentucky and Alaska. He was also appointed a research associate of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) during his tenure in the museum.

An active member of the paleontological community since the 1930s, Whitmore joined the Geological Society of America (GSA) while a graduate student, serving as vertebrate paleontology section chair in 1972. He was present at the formative meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (SVP) in 1938 and remained active in that society, as well as the Paleontological Society (PS), the Geological Society of Washington, as President in 1970, and the Paleontological Society of Washington, as President in 1950.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Geologists  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Geology  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Cetaceans  Search this
Vertebrate paleontology  Search this
Geology, Stratigraphic$yTertiary  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9557, Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9557
See more items in:
Frank C. Whitmore Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9557

Folder 10 The Paleontological Society, 1947, 1953, 1960-1964, 1969, 1972, 1974, and undated

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 115 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 2: Organizational File, 1901-1977 and undated. / Box 115
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e12468

Folder 27 Russian Paleontological Society, Honorary Member, 1923. Includes correspondence with N. Yakovlev and George P. Merrill.

Collection Creator::
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Container:
Box 22 of 117
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7004, Charles D. Walcott Collection
See more items in:
Charles D. Walcott Collection
Charles D. Walcott Collection / Series 8: DEGREES AND HONORS, 1892-1927. / Box 22
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7004-refidd1e3087

G. Arthur Cooper Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Cooper, G. Arthur (Gustav Arthur), 1902-2000, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
6 audiotapes (Reference copies). 10 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1984
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Cooper was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long and distinguished scholarly and administrative career at the Institution spanning more than half a century.
Descriptive Entry:
Cooper was interviewed by Pamela M. Henson on three occasions in January of 1984. The interviews cover his childhood interest in natural history collections, his education, and his career as a curator of invertebrate paleobiology in the NMNH, notably his research, field work, care of the paleontological collection, administration, and reminiscences of colleagues such as Edwin Kirk, Charles E. Resser, Charles Schuchert, Edward O. Ulrich, Aldred Scott Warthin and Alexander Wetmore. For additional videotaped oral history interviews of Cooper, see Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9530, Smithsonian Institution Paleobiology Videohistory Interviews.
Historical Note:
Gustav Arthur Cooper (1902-2000), was a invertebrate paleobiologist in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), specializing in the taxonomy and stratigraphy of Paleozoic brachiopods. He began collecting natural history specimens and minerals during his youth in New York. He received the B.S. degree from Colgate University in 1924 with a major in chemistry and the M.S. degree in 1926. He continued graduate work at Yale University with Drs. Carl O. Dunbar and Charles Schuchert, and was awarded the Ph.D. in 1929 for his thesis on the stratigraphy of the Hamilton formation. Under Schuchert's direction, he began research on fossil brachiopods, his life's work. While at Yale, he served as an Assistant Curator (1928-1929) and Research Associate (1929-1930) in the Department of Invertebrate Paleontology of the Peabody Museum of Natural History.

In 1930, Cooper was appointed Assistant Curator in the Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology of the United States National Museum (USNM). In 1941, he advanced to Associate Curator and in 1944 to Curator of the Division of Invertebrate Paleontology. He assumed the Head Curatorship of the Department of Geology in 1957, and oversaw its division into separate departments of Paleobiology and Mineral Sciences in 1963. He continued as Chairman of the Department of Paleobiology until he was appointed Senior Paleobiologist in 1967. After his retirement from federal service in 1974, he continued his research as Paleobiologist Emeritus.

Cooper was known for his research on the taxonomy and stratigraphy of Paleozoic brachiopods. His major monographs include Ozarkian and Canadian Brachiopoda (1938 with E. O. Ulrich), Chazyan and Related Brachiopods (1956), Morphology, Classification, and Life Habits of Productoids (Brachiopoda) (1960 with Helen M. Muir-Wood), and Permian Brachiopods of West Texas, vols. 1-6 (1969-1977 with Richard E. Grant). He conducted field work in the United States, Canada, or Mexico virtually every year of his career at the USNM, significantly increasing both the range and depth of the national collections. Under his guidance, an acid-etching laboratory was established for work with silicified fossils, notably Permian brachiopods from the Glass Mountains in Texas. He also developed his own photographic laboratory, producing over fifty thousand images from the collections.

As an administrator, Cooper presided over a ten-fold increase in the paleobiology curatorial staff, from two in 1944 to twenty in 1967. He was the driving force behind the split of the Department of Geology into two separate departments in 1963. He also planned and supervised the move into the new wings of the Natural History Building (NHB) in 1963-1965.

Among the many honors bestowed upon him are the Penrose Medal of the Geological Society of America in 1983, the Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal of the National Academy of Sciences in 1979, the Paleontological Society Medal in 1964, and the Mary Clark Thompson Medal of the National Academy of Sciences in 1958.
Topic:
Paleontology  Search this
Geology  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9524, G. Arthur Cooper Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9524
See more items in:
G. Arthur Cooper Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9524

A. Myra Keen Oral History Interview

Creator::
Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra), 1905-1986, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
1 audiotape (Reference copy).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Date:
1983
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The Keen interview was donated to the Oral History Collection because of her long career and many contributions to the field of American malacology.
Descriptive Entry:
Keen was interviewed by Eugene V. Coan, malacologist and former student of Keen's, because of her long career and many contributions to the field of American malacology. The interview includes her reminiscences about her education, research interests, fieldwork, colleagues, and students. The interview complements the A. Myra Keen papers, also located in the Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
Angeline Myra Keen (1905-1986), an invertebrate paleontologist and malacologist, was an international expert on the systematics of marine mollusks. She influenced her profession as a researcher and fieldworker, teacher and advisor, curator and exhibitor, author and public speaker. Her work was of interest both to academic scholars and to shell collectors.

Raised in Colorado, Keen became an amateur naturalist and photographer in her teens, and pursued her research interests in birds and insects at Colorado College, graduating with an A.B. in 1930. She earned an M.A. in psychology from Stanford University the following year, and then a doctorate in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley. Finding herself with no employment prospects, graduating in the depression year of 1934, she volunteered to help identify shells in the Stanford geology department's collection. This was the beginning of Keen's serious study of shells and her thirty-eight year association with Stanford. She had some coursework in biology, geology, and statistics, but was self-taught in malacology.

In 1936 Keen was appointed Curator of paleontology in the department of geology, and began teaching there during the Second World War. She was appointed Assistant Professor of paleontology in 1954 and Curator of malacology in 1957. Despite her stature, Keen waited until 1960 for appointment as a tenured Associate Professor and until 1965 for a full professorship, becoming one of three women professors in the sciences at Stanford. Upon her retirement in 1970, she was made Professor of Paleontology Emeritus and Curator of Malacology Emeritus, and taught two more years.

Keen's research focused on molluscan systematics, but ranged widely within the field to include recent marine mollusk fauna of the Panamic Province and marine molluscan Cenozoic paleontology, neontology, and zoogeography of western North America. Keen was particularly interested in bivalve systematics and nomenclature. She spent many years adding to, cataloging, and systematically arranging the Cenozoic mollusk collection at Stanford. She also wrote fourteen books and sixty-four papers in the field of malacology.

Keen was the primary teacher of students in malacology at Stanford, advising advanced degree candidates in geology and biology. She also taught courses in advanced paleontology, biological oceanography, and curatorial methods.

Keen's professional honors included Phi Beta Kappa, a 1964 Guggenheim Fellowship, and appointment as Fellow of the Geological Society of America and as fellow of the Paleontological Society. She received the Fellows Medal from the California Academy of Sciences in 1979, becoming the first woman to do so. She served as President of both the American Malacological Union and the Western Society for Malacology, and chaired the Committee on Nomenclature of the Society of Systematic Zoology.
Topic:
Invertebrate zoology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Mollusks  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9527, A. Myra Keen Oral History Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9527
See more items in:
A. Myra Keen Oral History Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9527

Program, Paleontological Society 33rd Annual Meeting and Society of Vertebrate Paleontology First Annual Meeting, Boston, December 29-31, 1941

Collection Creator::
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology  Search this
Container:
Box 1 of 7
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2021; Transferring office; 4/1/1988 Agreement of Transfer; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 06-014, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Box 1
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa06-014-refidd1e284

Paleontological Society, 1935, 1946

Collection Creator::
Vaughan, Thomas Wayland, 1870-1952  Search this
Container:
Box 3 of 10
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 99-124, Thomas Wayland Vaughan Papers
See more items in:
Thomas Wayland Vaughan Papers
Thomas Wayland Vaughan Papers / Series 1: GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE, 1912, 1920-1947, AND UNDATED. / Box 3
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa99-124-refidd1e4524

Delaware Valley Paleontological Society, 1981-1989

Collection Creator::
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology  Search this
Container:
Box 9 of 11
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2027; Transferring office; 4/1/1988 Agreement of Transfer; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-107, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Box 9
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa12-107-refidd1e4702

Paleontological Society - Journal of Paleontology, 1951-1991

Collection Creator::
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology  Search this
Container:
Box 10 of 11
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2027; Transferring office; 4/1/1988 Agreement of Transfer; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-107, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Box 10
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa12-107-refidd1e5223

Edward Oscar Ulrich Papers

Creator::
Ulrich, E. O. (Edward Oscar), 1857-1944  Search this
Extent:
0.58 cu. ft. (1 tall document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1908-1944
Descriptive Entry:
This accession includes correspondence, notes, maps, photographs and negatives documenting Ulrich's research.
Historical Note:
Edward Oscar Ulrich (1857-1944) was an invertebrate paleontologist and authority on Paleozoic fauna and formations. He developed an interest in fossils as a youth, collecting in the rich formations around his home in Covington, Kentucky. Ulrich attended German Wallace and Baldwin College at Berea, Ohio, and the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, but did not receive a degree from either. In 1877, he was appointed Curator of the Cincinnati Society of Natural History. After working many years as a freelance geologist and paleontologist on many of the state geological surveys, Ulrich accepted appointment with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1897. He remained with the USGS until his retirement in 1932. He continued his paleontological studies as a Research Associate at the United States National Museum until his death.

Ulrich was an authority on Paleozoic invertebrates, especially the Bryozoa, Ostracoda, and conodonts. His bibliography included over 120 titles, with Revision of the Paleozoic System (1911), generally considered his classic work. He conducted extensive field work in the United States, England, and Europe. He was a Fellow of the Geological Society of America (GSA), President of the Paleontological Society, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). He was the recipient of the Mary Clark Thompson Medal of the NAS in 1930, and the Penrose Medal of the GSA in 1932. Ulrich was awarded the honorary M.A. (1886) and D.Sc. (1892) from German Wallace and Baldwin College.
Topic:
Paleontology  Search this
Geology  Search this
Paleontologists  Search this
Geologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-188, Edward Oscar Ulrich Papers
Identifier:
Accession 10-188
See more items in:
Edward Oscar Ulrich Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa10-188

Edward Oscar Ulrich Papers

Creator::
Ulrich, E. O. (Edward Oscar), 1857-1944  Search this
Extent:
4.26 cu. ft. (7 document boxes) (1 half document box) (1 3x5 box) (1 5x8 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Clippings
Manuscripts
Date:
circa 1880-1938 and undated
Introduction:
The 1879 act establishing the United States Geological Survey (USGS) declares, "And all collections of rocks, minerals, soils, and fossils, and objects of natural history, archaeology, and ethnology, made by the Coast and Interior Survey, the Geological Survey, or by any other parties for the Government of the United States, when no longer needed for investigations in progress, shall be deposited in the National Museum." Many of the paleontologists affiliated with the USGS Paleontology and Stratigraphy Branch have been stationed at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) to study and care for the national collections. This close working relationship between the USGS and the NMNH has resulted in the Smithsonian Archives acquiring records and special collections documenting paleontological work of the Survey and its scientists.
Descriptive Entry:
The papers of Edward Oscar Ulrich provide partial documentation of his professional career and personal life. The collection includes incoming and outgoing correspondence documenting Ulrich's paleontological research, professional activities, family matters, and personal affairs. Of special interest are letters documenting his unsuccessful bid to become Kentucky Inspector of Mines, 1895-1897; letters of Henry Burger and Henry Dickhaut describing activities of the Caribou Mining Company, Boulder, Colorado, during the early 1880s; and letters documenting an attempt by Ulrich and others to change the method for nominating and electing officers of the Geological Society of America, 1921. The collection also contains photographs, including shots taken at the XII International Geological Congress held at Toronto in 1913, and images taken during Ulrich's field work in England and Europe in 1925. Ulrich's paleontological research is documented by manuscripts, notes, specimen lists, plates, charts, and maps. Finally, the collection contains personal materials of Ulrich including bank books, greeting cards, certificates and awards, notebooks, newspaper clippings, and memorabilia.
Historical Note:
Edward Oscar Ulrich (1857-1944) was an invertebrate paleontologist specializing in the study of Paleozoic fauna and formations. He developed an interest in fossils as a youth, collecting in the rich formations around his home in Covington, Kentucky. Ulrich attended German Wallace and Baldwin College at Berea, Ohio and the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, but did not receive a degree from either. In 1877, he was appointed Curator of the Cincinnati Society of Natural History. He resigned the position in 1880 to become superintendent of the Little Caribou silver mines near Boulder, Colorado. Ulrich returned to Cincinnati in 1883 and for the next fourteen years worked as a free lance geologist and paleontologist, as well as an illustrator of geological monographs. During this period he was employed on the state geological surveys of Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio, and Kentucky. In 1897, Ulrich was appointed Geologist with the United States Geological Survey (USGS). He remained with the USGS until his retirement in 1932. He continued his paleontological studies as a Research Associate at the United States National Museum until his death.

Ulrich has been called "... the greatest descriptive paleontologist that America has ever produced." He was an authority on Paleozoic invertebrates, particularly the Bryozoa, Ostracoda, and conodonts. His bibliography included over 120 titles, with "Revision of the Paleozoic System," (1911) generally considered his classic work. In this work, Ulrich introduced radical changes in the classification of early Paleozoic formations and proposed two new systems -- the Ozarkian and Canadian. Ulrich did extensive field work in most of the Paleozoic formations east of the Rocky Mountains. He also conducted six field investigations in Europe between 1922 and 1931.

Ulrich was active within the scientific community, and served several organizations in elected or appointed capacities. He was an original Fellow of the Geological Society of America, President of the Paleontological Society, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He was the recipient of the Mary Clark Thompson medal of the National Academy of Sciences in 1930, and the Penrose medal of the Geological Society of America in 1932. Ulrich was awarded an honorary M.A. (1886) and D.Sc. (1892) from German Wallace and Baldwin College.

For additional biographical information on Ulrich see "Memorial to Edward Oscar Ulrich," by Ray S. Bassler. Proceedings Volume of the Geological Society of America Annual Report for 1944, pp. 331-352, May 1945, and, "Biographical Memoir of Edward Oscar Ulrich, 1857-1944," by Rudolf Ruedemann. National Academy of Sciences Biographical Memoirs, volume XXIV, 1947.
Topic:
Paleontology  Search this
Paleontologists  Search this
Geologists  Search this
Geology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Clippings
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7332, Edward Oscar Ulrich Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7332
See more items in:
Edward Oscar Ulrich Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7332

T.W. (Timothy William) Stanton Papers

Creator::
Stanton, T. W. (Timothy William), 1860-1953  Search this
Extent:
2.5 cu. ft. (5 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1885-1928, 1941 and undated
Introduction:
The 1879 act establishing the United States Geological Survey (USGS) declares "And all collections of rocks, minerals, soils, and fossils, and objects of natural history, archaeology, and ethnology, made by the Coast and Interior Survey, the Geological Survey, or by any other parties for the Government of the United States, when no longer needed for investigations in progress, shall be deposited in the National Museum." Many of the paleontologists affiliated with the USGS Paleontology and Stratigraphy Branch have been stationed at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) to study and care for the national collections. This close working relationship between the USGS and the NMNH has resulted in the Smithsonian Archives acquiring records and special collections documenting paleontological work of the Survey and its scientists.
Descriptive Entry:
The papers of Timothy William Stanton document his professional career at the United States Geological Survey, and his research on Cretaceous invertebrate fossils. The collection is also documents Stanton's many field explorations conducted in the western and southwestern United States between 1893 and 1928. This work is primarily illustrated by copies of outgoing letters written by Stanton during each field season. Included are letters written to the Chief Geologist, USGS, which provide monthly summaries of field operations, and correspondence written by Stanton to professional colleagues describing the work. The collection also includes incoming and outgoing correspondence documenting an eight year period (1921-1928) of Stanton's career. The letters provide information on his USGS duties, including his service as Chairman of the Committee on Geologic Names; his work as Custodian of Mesozoic Invertebrates in the USNM; and his professional activities, including his work as President of Paleontological Society, 1921, and Vice-President of the Geological Society of America, also in 1921. Of special interest are letters documenting John B. Reeside's field work in the western United States during the 1920s. Finally, Stanton's outgoing correspondence from 1894 to 1916 is maintained in a series of letterpress volumes. The outgoing letters primarily illustrate his official USGS duties and contain many reports on fossils sent to Stanton for identification. The volumes also contain Charles Abiathar White's outgoing correspondence from 1885 to 1894.

Researchers should also consult SI Archives Accession 88-180, United States Geological Survey, Paleontology and Stratigraphy Branch, Branch Chief Records for additional Stanton correspondence.
Historical Note:
Timothy William Stanton (1860-1953) was a paleontologist specializing in the study of Cretaceous invertebrates. He was educated at the University of Colorado (B.S., 1883; M.S., 1895) and Columbian (now George Washington) University (Ph.D., 1897). His 46-year career with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) began in 1889 when he was appointed Assistant Paleontologist to support Charles Abiathar White's work on Cretaceous invertebrates. In 1892, he replaced White as Geologist-in-Charge of the work. Stanton was promoted to Chief of the Section of Paleontology in 1900, and, in 1903, he was made Chief of the newly created Section of Paleontology and Stratigraphy. From 1930 to 1932, Stanton served as Acting Chief Geologist of the USGS. In 1932, he was promoted to Chief Geologist and he remained in the position until his retirement from the Survey in 1935. For many years, Stanton also acted as Chairman of the USGS Committee on Geologic Names. In addition to his USGS duties, Stanton served the United States National Museum (USNM) in an honorary capacity as Custodian of Mesozoic Invertebrates from 1894 to 1953. Stanton's career with the USGS was marked by extensive field research, especially in the western and southwestern United States. He has been described as an outstanding fossil collector. One biographer stated that during his early field work "... Stanton made collections of fossils that have not since been surpassed for quality and scope." Despite the press of USGS duties, Stanton managed to published several monographs and papers, mostly on the Cretaceous deposits of the western United States. He was active within the geological profession and served as President of the Paleontological Society in 1921 and Vice-President of the Geological Society of America in the same year.

For additional biographical information on Stanton see "Memorial to Timothy William Stanton (1860-1953)," by John B. Reeside, Jr. Proceedings Volume of the Geological Society of America Annual Report for 1954, pp. 137-142. 1955.
Topic:
Paleontology  Search this
Scientific expeditions  Search this
Paleontologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7325, T.W. (Timothy William) Stanton Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7325
See more items in:
T.W. (Timothy William) Stanton Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7325

G. Arthur Cooper Papers

Creator::
Cooper, G. Arthur (Gustav Arthur), 1902-2000  Search this
Extent:
18.61 cu. ft. (36 document boxes) (1 half document box) (2 3x5 boxes) (1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Date:
1923-1993 and undated,with material from 1878 to 1892
Introduction:
This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee.
Descriptive Entry:
The papers of G. Arthur Cooper offer broad documentation of his professional career. The collection documents his interest in taxonomy and stratigraphy; his scientific research on fossil brachiopods; his extensive field work in the United States, Canada, and Mexico; his curatorial duties and administrative activities in the Departments of Geology and Paleobiology, NMNH, including the development of the invertebrate paleontological collections; and his role in professional societies.

Series 1 consists mainly of the extensive correspondence Cooper maintained with scientific colleagues in the paleontological community worldwide between 1940 and 1987. Incoming and outgoing correspondence documents the exchange of ideas and information on taxonomic identifications and classifications; field work; and the loan and acquisition of fossil specimens. Scientific correspondence files also include photographs of specimens for identification; obituaries of colleagues; and nineteenth-century letters of Edward Oscar Ulrich and Thomas Davidson used for research purposes.

Series 2 contains travel and grant files, 1927-1968, that document communication with the Department while Cooper was in the field and records pertaining to grants for scientific research. It includes correspondence, memoranda, travel expense records, and itineraries from field trips, as well as grant proposals and records on Cooper's involvement in various professional societies.

Cooper's role as an administrator at the USNM and NMNH is documented in series 3. The correspondence, dated between 1933 and 1967, concerns activities of professional societies; bequests, including nineteenth-century correspondence and copies of wills and bequests; the relationship between the department and the Smithsonian Libraries; the Exhibits Modernization Program; and the opening of the paleontological halls, 1961-1963. Also included are a notebook, several manuscripts, and one folder of correspondence created by William F. Foshag during his tenure as head curator of the Department of Geology.

Overlap exists between series 1, scientific correspondence, and series 3, administrative correspondence; therefore, researchers should check both to ensure a complete search.

Series 4 consists of Cooper's manuscripts and text of speeches written before his arrival at the USNM and during the course of his career. Of special interest are Cooper's M.S. thesis, "Hamilton Group in Hamilton Township," and an incomplete draft of his Ph.D. dissertation, "Hamilton Group of New York." Oversize figures for several of these manuscripts are housed off site. It is recommended that researchers make prior arrangements with the reference staff when requesting this material.

Series 5 and 6 consist of field notes, photographs, and slides taken by Cooper during his collecting trips. Field notes and photographs from his early work in New York State, the Gaspe region of Quebec, and a variety of localities across the United States are included in these divisions. His field work and research on the Hamilton formation in New York and Glass Mountains in Texas are especially well documented.

Additional information about Cooper can be found in Record Unit 328, the chairman's files of the Department of Paleobiology, 1940-1978; Record Unit 9523, oral history interviews of Cooper; and Record Unit 9529, videohistory interviews of Cooper.
Historical Note:
G. Arthur Cooper (1902- ), paleobiologist emeritus at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), distinguished himself as an authority on the taxonomy and stratigraphy of Paleozoic brachiopods. He first developed an interest in natural history by collecting insects and minerals during his childhood in New York. During his adolescence his interest in minerals grew, and he received his B.S. degree in chemistry with a minor in geology from Colgate University in 1924. Cooper continued research on stratigraphy of upper New York state and was awarded the M.S. degree from Colgate University in 1926 on the merits of this work. Cooper continued his graduate studies at Yale University under Carl O. Dunbar and Charles Schuchert. Under Schuchert's direction, he began his study of fossil brachiopods, an interest he maintained throughout his career. He received his Ph.D. in 1929, focusing on the stratigraphy of the Hamilton formation. While at Yale, he also served as assistant curator, 1928-1929, and research associate, 1929-1930, in the Department of Invertebrate Paleontology of the Peabody Museum of Natural History.

Cooper came to the Smithsonian in 1930 as assistant curator in the Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology of the United States National Museum (USNM). In 1941, he advanced to associate curator and in 1944 to curator of the Division of Invertebrate Paleontology. He was appointed head curator of the Department of Geology in 1957, and oversaw its division into the separate departments of Paleobiology and Mineral Sciences in 1963. He continued as chairman of the Department of Paleobiology through 1967 when he was appointed senior paleobiologist. After his retirement from federal service in 1974, he continued his research at the Smithsonian as paleobiologist emeritus until 1987.

During his years as an administrator, the paleobiology staff grew from two in 1944 to twenty in 1967 as Cooper sought to fill gaps of coverage in the department. Cooper was also the motivating force behind the split of the Department of Geology into two separate departments in 1963. By implementing these changes he stimulated growth and focused research on paleobiology. He also involved himself in space planning and supervision of the move into the new wings of the Natural History Building in 1963-1965.

Cooper is well known for his research on the taxonomy and stratigraphy of Paleozoic brachiopods. His major monographs include: Ozarkian and Canadian Brachiopoda (1938 with E. O. Ulrich), Chazyan and Related Brachiopods (1956), Morphology, Classification, and Life Habits of Productoids (Brachiopoda) (1960 with Helen M. Muir-Wood), and Permian Brachiopods of West Texas, vols. 1-6 (1969-1977 with Richard E. Grant). Throughout his career, he conducted extensive field work in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, significantly increasing both the range and depth of the national collections. Under his guidance, an acid-etching laboratory was established for work with silicified fossils, notably Permian brachiopods from the Glass Mountains of Texas. He also developed his own photographic laboratory, where he produced over fifty thousand images from the collections. Many honors have been presented to Cooper over the years, including the Mary Clark Thompson Medal of the National Academy of Sciences, 1958; the Paleontological Society Medal, 1964; the Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal of the National Academy of Sciences, 1979; the Penrose Medal of the Geological Society of America, 1983; and the James Hall Medal of the New York State Geological Survey, 1986.
Chronology:
1902 -- Born in College Point, Long Island, N.Y., February 9

1924 -- B.S. degree, Phi Beta Kappa, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York

1926 -- M.S. degree, Colgate University

1928 -- Research assistant, invertebrate paleontology, Yale University

1928 -- Field work on Devonian stratigraphy of Hamilton Group of New York

1929 -- Ph.D., Yale University

1929 -- Research associate, invertebrate paleontology, Yale University

1929 -- Field work with Charles Schuchert, Gaspe, Quebec

-- 1930 Married Josephine P. Wells

1930 -- Assistant curator, USNM, Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology

1931 -- Assistant curator, USNM, Division of Invertebrate Paleontology

1932 -- Field work in Gaspe, Quebec; New Brunswick; Eastern New York

1935 -- USNM acidizing program begun

1938 -- Ozarkian and Canadian Brachiopoda published with Edward Oscar Ulrich

1939 -- Field work on Permian brachiopods of Glass Mountains, Texas

1941 -- Associate curator, USNM, Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology

1942 -- Associate curator, USNM, Division of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany

1942 -- Geological Society of America (GSA) published Devonian correlation chart with Cooper's concepts of facies, zonation, and stages

1942 -- Received Washington Academy of Sciences Award in the Biological Sciences

1942 -- Acid etching laboratory installed in NHB

1943 -- Field work in Sonora, Mexico, on Cambrian sequence with Alberto R. V. Arellano and Ignecio Flores

1944 -- Curator, USNM, Division of Invertebrate Paleontology

1945 -- Field work in Sonora, Mexico, completed

1953 -- Awarded Honorary D.Sc., Colgate University

1956 -- Acting head curator, USNM, Department of Geology

1956 -- Chazyan and Related Brachiopods published

1957 -- Head curator, USNM, Department of Geology

1958 -- President of Paleontological Society

1958 -- Awarded Mary Clark Thompson Medal of National Academy of Sciences

1960 -- Morphology, Classification, and Life Habits of Productoids (Brachiopoda) published with Helen Muir-Wood

1963 -- Department of Geology split into Department of Paleobiology and Department of Mineral Sciences; Cooper appointed chairman of Department of Paleobiology

1964 -- Awarded Paleontological Society Medal

1967 -- Resigned in February as chairman of Department of Paleobiology and appointed senior paleobiologist, NMNH

1969 -- Traveled to England and Poland

1969 -- First volume of Permian Brachiopods of West Texas published, with Richard E. Grant

1972 -- Retired from NMNH and appointed paleobiologist emeritus, February 29

1979 -- Awarded Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal of National Academy of Sciences

1981 -- Awarded Raymond C. Moore Medal of Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists

1983 -- Awarded Penrose Medal of GSA

1986 -- Awarded James Hall Medal of the New York State Geological Survey

1987 -- Retired from active research at NMNH as paleobiologist emeritus
Topic:
Geology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7318, G. Arthur Cooper Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7318
See more items in:
G. Arthur Cooper Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7318

Folder 11 Paleontological Society, 1956-1960, 1963-1964, 1969 and undated

Collection Creator::
Cooper, G. Arthur (Gustav Arthur), 1902-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 16 of 39
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7318, G. Arthur Cooper Papers
See more items in:
G. Arthur Cooper Papers
G. Arthur Cooper Papers / Series 1: SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE, 1904-1993 AND UNDATED WITH RELATED MATERIALS FROM 1865-1892. / Box 16
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7318-refidd1e3878

Folder 12 Paleontological Society Presidential Address, 1958-1960. Includes reprint of speech published in Journal of Paleontology, volume 32 (number 5), September 1958, and related correspondence.

Collection Creator::
Cooper, G. Arthur (Gustav Arthur), 1902-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 16 of 39
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7318, G. Arthur Cooper Papers
See more items in:
G. Arthur Cooper Papers
G. Arthur Cooper Papers / Series 1: SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE, 1904-1993 AND UNDATED WITH RELATED MATERIALS FROM 1865-1892. / Box 16
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7318-refidd1e3891

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By