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William C. Seitz papers

Creator:
Seitz, William C. (William Chapin)  Search this
Names:
University of Virginia -- Faculty  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Banks-Woodson, Ellen  Search this
Barr, Alfred Hamilton, 1902-  Search this
Baziotes, William, 1912-1963  Search this
Conner, Bruce  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Rene, 1901-1968  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Elliott, Philip Clarkson, 1903-1985  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Krebs, Rockne, 1938-2011  Search this
Monet, Claude, 1840-1926  Search this
Rosati, James, 1912-1988  Search this
Segal, George, 1924-2000  Search this
Seitz, Irma  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Extent:
32.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Resumes
Poems
Photographs
Awards
Sound recordings
Interviews
Sketches
Notebooks
Drafts (documents)
Lectures
Date:
circa 1930-1995
Summary:
The papers of educator, painter, and art historian William C. Seitz measure 32.5 linear feet and date from circa 1930-1995. The collection includes biographical information, correspondence, notebooks, subject and people files, thesis research files, interviews and lecture recordings, teaching files, personal business records, scattered printed materials, photographs, and artwork. The bulk of the papers focus on Seitz's research and teaching career.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of educator, painter, and art historian William C. Seitz measure 32.5 linear feet and date from circa 1930-1995. The collection includes biographical information, correspondence, notebooks, subject and people files, thesis research files, interviews and lecture recordings, teaching files, personal business records, scattered printed materials, photographs, and artwork. The bulk of the papers focus on Seitz's research and teaching career.

Biographical materials consist of resumes and CV's, identification cards including one from the WPA, documents from the memorial held at the University of Virginia for Seitz, poetry written by Irma for William on their wedding anniversaries, and x-rays.

The majority of Seitz's correspondence is professional and concerns job offers and opportunities, lectures requests, recommendation letters for Seitz and for others by Seitz, the Kress Fellowship, exhibitions, awards, and organizations. Also found are posthumus materials to Irma Seitz concerning book royalites. Personal correspondence is scattered and includes condolence letters sent to Irma.

Personal business records focus on Seitz's personal art collection, copyright information, publishing records including royalty statements, reports, scholarship and fellowship information, and professional organization membership records.

The bulk of the collection consists of research and writing files which include notebooks, subject and people files, thesis research files and drafts, general research which include writings by Seitz, card files, and recordings of lectures and interviews. Subject and people files may include correspondence, printed materials, research notes, photographs, works of art, and writings concerning and by artists, art historians, curators, subjects, and art movements. Research files are found for Dore Ashton, Alfred H. Barr Jr., William Baziotes, Bruce Conner, Rene D'Harnoncourt, Marcel Duchamp, Arshile Gorky, Adolph Gottlieb, Rockne Krebs, George Segal, James Rosati, and Frank Stella among many others. Also found are research materials on Claude Monet, some of which are written in French.

Teaching files contains extensive reference material likely used by Seitz during his career as well as correspondence, exams, and lecture materials used in specific classes.

Printed material is scattered and includes clippings, exhibition announcements, and articles. Exhibition announcements and catalogs are for Seitz's personal works and for exhibitions he curated.

The bulk of the photographs are of works of art by William Seitz, Irma Seitz, and others which were likely owned by Seitz. Also found are photographs of exhibition installations at the Univeristy of Virginia and scattered photographs of Seitz with others.

Artwork include several pencil sketches by Seitz, two works by Ellen Banks-Woodson, and a sketch by Phil Elliott.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1930s-1974 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1945-1995 (Boxes 1-2; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, circa 1947-1990 (Boxes 2-3; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Research and Writing Files, 1940s-1970s (Boxes 4-26; 23.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Teaching Files, 1945-1970s (Boxes 27-31, OV 34-35; 5 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1937-1984 (Boxes 31-2; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1940s-1981 (Box 32, 33; 11 folders)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1950s-1972 (Box 32, 33; 6 folders)
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Seitz (1914-1974) was an art historian and scholar, painter, educator, and museum curator who worked primarily in New York and Virginia. He completed the first dissertation on Abstract Expressionism while a student at Princeton University in 1955.

Born in 1914 in Buffalo, New York, Seitz studied at the Albright Art School at the University of Buffalo and the Art Institute of Buffalo. Seitz met artist Irma J. Siegelman, whom he married in 1938. Due to the Depression, he left school and worked with the Federal Arts Project in New York City in the 1930s and worked as an aircraft fuel cell deigner for the Hewitt Rubber Company during World War II. Returning to the University of Buffalo after the war, Seitz completed his undergraduate degree and remained by accepting a teaching job.

Although he saw success as a painter and exhibited in one-man shows, Seitz focused his career in academia and enrolled at Princeton University for a graduate degree in Art History. Princeton faculty held divided views on Seitz's desire to write a dissertation on the Abstract Expressionist movement and debated the subject for over a year. Seitz's dissertation topic was eventually approved and in addition to writing the first dissertation on Abstract Expressionism, Seitz received the first PhD in Modern Art from Princeton. Seitz remained at Princeton as an assistant professor and advised students such as Frank Stella.

In 1960, he accepted a job as a curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. At MOMA, Seitz curated The Art of Assemblage (1961), The Responsive Eye (1965), and an exhibition on Monet (1960). Other MOMA exhibitions focused on artists Mark Tobey, Arshile Gorky, and Hans Hofmann. Additionally, he served as director of the Rose Art Museum of Brandeis University from 1965-1970. During that time, Seitz organized the United States exhibition at the Ninth Biennial in Sao Paulo (1967) and the Seventh Biennial of Canadian Painting (1968). In 1971, Seitz returned to teaching at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia and was the Visiting Kress Professor at the National Gallery of Art from 1972-1973.

In addition to his successes in painting, education, and the curatorial field, Seitz was an accomplished writer. He published many articles, essays, and books on art and artists including Art in the Age of Aquarius, on which he worked until his death.

William C. Seitz died of cancer in 1974.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Museum of Modern Art Archives in New York City holds the William C. Seitz papers which contain exhibition files and records relating to an interview with Marcel Duchamp. Correspondence relating to the debate concerning the viability of Seitz's dissertation are found in the Alfred H. Barr, Jr. papers also at the Museum of Modern Art Archives.
Provenance:
The William C. Seitz papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Seitz's widow, Irma Seitz, in 1975 and 2003. A transcript of an interview with Mark Tobey by Seitz was donated by Rebecca Massie Lane in 1988. Seitz gave these transcripts to Lane for her graduate work and they remined in her possession after his death.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Educators -- Virginia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Resumes
Poems
Photographs
Awards
Sound recordings
Interviews
Sketches
Notebooks
Drafts (documents)
Lectures
Citation:
William C. Seitz papers, circa 1930-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.seitwill
See more items in:
William C. Seitz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw944428879-be52-442b-b3a0-1e263ac364f1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-seitwill
Online Media:

Roots of Virginia Culture: The Past is Present

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Today's Virginians include people whose ancestors have always been here, descendants of the original Jamestown settlers, the progeny of the first West Africans, and more recent immigrants from Africa, Southeast Asia, and Central America. They live and work from Virginia's Atlantic coast to its Appalachian Mountains, from remote coal-mining towns in the southwest to bustling suburbs in the north. But no matter how deep their roots, Virginians strive with dedication and innovation to document and present their cultural heritage, adapting tradition to change and using the past to inform the present and future.

The 2007 Festival explored three "roots" of Virginia's culture: Native American, English, and African American. These groups supported the growth of a diverse, yet unified society in what would become Virginia. At the Festival, present-day Virginians were joined by delegations from Kent County, England (one of the counties from which the original settlers came and the burial place of Pocahontas) and West Africa (an area from which many enslaved Africans came to Virginia). By demonstrating and performing many parallel cultural traditions side by side, craftspeople, musicians, cooks, agriculturalists, and maritime experts demonstrated that different cultures can have much in common and can borrow from each other to forge a nation. Festival presentations were organized around three themes:

Continuing the Past. -- Many traditions in Virginia; Kent County, England; and West Africa remain "unbroken" within families and communities. A number of crafts, such as pottery, blacksmithing, wood carving, and needlework, span the generations; craftspeople interpret and produce them according to their own tastes and market demand. Festival visitors could interact with contemporary adherents of these ancient traditions.

Transforming the Past. -- While tracing the roots of Virginia culture, historians find many tradition bearers who, by necessity or desire, refashion their skills. For example, in Virginia, as well as in Kent County, England, fruit farmers find it hard to keep their businesses profitable because of cheaper imports; many have quit farming and have sold their land to developers. Growers have responded and now gourmet cooks can find heirloom varieties of Virginia apples at farmers' markets. The growers bring the taste of Virginia's past to the present and make it profitable and sustainable.

Researching and Interpreting the Past. -- The ability to research and interpret the past requires years of study, determination, and "learning by doing." Digging up the past is the professional passion of archaeologists at sites such as Historic Jamestowne. Family and community researchers collect oral histories and search for clues in archives and databases. Festival visitors could listen as they explained their work, and could pose questions about adapting such skills to their own lives.

Betty J. Belanus was Curator of the program, and Diana N'Diaye was Curator of African/African American Roots. Dorey Butter was Program Coordinator and Beverly Simons was Program Assistant. For Jamestown 2007, Jeanne Zeidler was Executive Director and Amy Ritchie was Manager of Statewide Programs and Smithsonian Project Manager. For Kent, England, Rebecca Casson was Head of Kent Virginia Development; Hollie Snelson was Smithsonian Project Manager; and Leila Maggs was Smithsonian Project Coordinator.

The program was produced in partnership with Jamestown 2007: America's 400th Anniversary and the Kent County Council. The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture was the Smithsonian Institution partner. Lead supporters of Jamestown 2007 included the Norfolk Southern Corporation, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Verizon, and Anheuser-Busch Companies. Other supporters included AirTran Airways, Dominion, James City County, Philip Morris USA, SunTrust, and Wolseley PLC/Ferguson Enterprises Inc.
Researchers:
Advisors

Howard Bass, Ann Bay, Mary Briggs, Lonnie Bunch, George Carter, Rex Ellis, Anthony Gualtieri, Portia James, Gail Lowe, Helen Schierbeck, Gabriella Tayac, Esther Washington, C. Brian Williams, Chris Williams, CiCi Williamson

Virginia fieldworkers

Harold Anderson, Olivia Cadaval, Mary Eckstein, Roland Freeman, Ywonne Edwards Ingram, Jon Lohman, Kip Lornell, Roddy Moore, Jennifer Neely, Vanessa Thaxton-Ward, Richard Vidutis, Vaughan Webb, Karenne Wood

Senegal fieldworkers

Abdoulaye Camera, Gorgui N'Diaye

Kent, England fieldworkers

Teri Brewer, Paul Cowdell, Hannah McNorton, George Monger
Presenters:
Harold Anderson, Olivia Cadaval, Paul Cowdell, Marjorie Hunt, Paula Johnson, Jon Lohman, Kip Lornell, Hannah McNorton, George Monger, Roddy Moore, Jeff Place, Mark Puryear, Gabriella Tayac, Vaughan Webb, Chris Williams, CiCi Williamson, Karenne Wood
Participants:
AGRICULTURE AND ENTERPRISE

Fruit Growing

Tom Burford, 1935-, Monroe, Amherst County, Virginia

Margaret Burns, 1941-, Herne Bay, Kent, England

Philip Johnson "PJ" Haynie III, 1977-, Hague, Northumberland County, Virginia

Paul Saunder, Piney River, Nelson County, Virginia

Saunders Brothers, Piney River, Nelson County, Virginia

Charlotte Shelton, 1936-, Vintage Virginia Apples, Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Virginia

Virginia Wineries Association, Alexandria, Virginia

Ham, Peanuts, and Cattle

Babacar Bâ, Ndjilasséme, Senegal

Ciré Bâ, Ndjilasséme, Senegal

Dee Dee Darden, Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

Tommy Darden, Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

Sam Edwards, 1956-, Edwards and Sons, Surry, Surry County, Virginia

Stuart Gibbons, 1952-, Canterbury, Kent, England

Henry Goodrich, 1965-, Wakefield, Suffolk County, Virginia

Virginia-Carolina Peanut Promotions, Nashville, Nash County, North Carolina -- Virginia-Carolina Peanut Promotions, Nashville, Nash County, North CarolinaWilliam Bain, Wayne Barnes, Dell Cotton, Melissa Everett, Natalie Everett, Randy Everett, Fred Felts, Martha Felts, Linda Hass, Gail Moody Milteer, Brad Monahan, Drew Monahan, Janet Monahan, Kevin Monahan, Betsy Owens, Donna Pittman, John Pittman

Horse Crafts

Marc Stevenson, rocking horse maker, Bethersden, Kent, England

Tony Stevenson, 1956-, rocking horse maker, Bethersden, Kent, England

Theresa Trussell, 1952-, horse trainer, Kent, England

Danny Wingate, 1951-, saddle & harness maker, Elk Creek, Grayson County, Virginia

Outdoor Crafts

Norman Amos, 1925-, snake cane carver, Callands, Pittsylvania County, Virginia

Susan Bridges, 1954-, forager, food processor, Meadows of Dan, Patrick County, Virginia

Grayson Chesser, 1942-, decoy carver, Sanford, Accomack County, Virginia

Salla Diagne, basket maker, Diama Thiendou, Tivawon, Senegal

Pat Harrison, 1957-, birdcall maker, Covington, Alleghany County, Virginia

John Arthur Leonard, 1964-, decoy carver, Chincoteague, Accomack County, Virginia

Metal Crafts

Mbaye Fall, blacksmith, Ndjilasseme, Senegal

Billy Phelps, 1950-, blacksmith, Woodlawn, Carroll County, Virginia

Kelly Smyth, 1953-, marine blacksmith, Chadds Ford, Delaware County, Pennsylvania

Godfrey South, 1960-, blacksmith, Eynsford, Kent, England

Rural Crafts

Clyde Jenkins, 1954-, split-oak basket maker, Stanley, Page County, Virginia

Yoro Kébé, woodcarver, Ndjilasseme, Senegal

John Waller, 1971-, woodcarver, basket weaver, Blackham, Kent, England

Robert M. Watson, Jr., woodworker, Williamsburg, Virginia

Tobacco and Hops

Bob Cage, 1923-, tobacco auctioneer, South Boston, Halifax County, Virginia

Jim Crawford, 1951-, tobacco auctioneer, Roanoke, Virginia

Colin Felton, 1945-, hop picker, Kent, England

Derek Hitcham, 1942-, beer brewer, Kent, England

Kevin Owen, 1970-, tobacco farmer, Chatham, Pittsylvania County, Virginia

Bobby Wilkerson, 1941-, tobacco farmer, Ringgold, Pittsylvania County, Virginia

Working Dogs

Debbie Johnson, 1956-, dog trainer, Gladys, Campbell County, Virginia

Roy Johnson, 1935-, dog trainer, Gladys, Campbell County, Virginia

BUILDING ARTS

Jimmy Price, 1952-, mason, restorer, Monroe, Amherst County, Virginia

Peter Massey, master carpenter, house mover, Ashford, Kent, England

Colin McGhee, thatcher, Staunton, Virginia

Charles McRaven, 1935-, restorer, Free Union, Virginia

Linda McRaven, 1945-, restorer, Free Union, Virginia

Judy Hill, glass painter, Rochester, Kent, England

Keith Hill, stained glass conservator, Rochester, Kent, England

DECORATIVE CRAFTS

Car Culture

Larry Rathburn, 1948-, car builder, Catawba, Roanoke County, Virginia

Tom Van Nortwick, 1955-, designer, pinstriper, Ferrum, Franklin County, Virginia

Pottery

Fatou Wade, potter, Ndjilasséme, Senegal

Quilting Stories

54-40 African American Quilters Guild, Hampton, Virginia

Virginia Quilt Museum, Harrisonburg, Virginia -- Virginia Quilt Museum, Harrisonburg, VirginiaJoan Knight, 1945-, Harrisonburg, VirginiaJulia Renken, 1951-, Fairfax, VirginiaLoretta Shinol, 1940-, Springfield, VirginiaHelen L. Spittle, 1942-, Springfield, Virginia

Virginia Tribal Crafts

Lee Lovelace, 1987-, tribal artist, Mechanicsville, Hanover County, Virginia

Mildred Gentle Rain Moore, 1934-, blackware potter, Pamunkey Indian Reservation, King William County, Virginia

Debora Littlewing Moore, 1967-, blackware potter, dancer, West Point, King William County, Virginia

Randy Robinson, 1982-, scratchboard artist, Southampton County, Virginia

George Whitewolf, 1942-, basket weaver, Lynchburg, Virginia

Karenne Wood, 1960-, linguist, beader, poet, dancer, Charles City, Charles City County, Virginia

FOODWAYS AND GARDENS

Cooking

Janice Canaday, 1957-, cook, caterer, Williamsburg, Virginia

Dawn Chesser, 1947-, cook, Saxis, Accomack County, Virginia

Amanda Cottrell, 1941-, cook, Ashford, Kent, England

Frances Davis, 1949-, cook, Rocky Mount, Franklin County, Virginia

Maïmouna Diène, cook, Ndjilasséme, Senegal

Mo Joslin, 1948-, cook, Tilmanstone, Kent, England

Patrice Olivon, 1957-, cook, Arlington County, Virginia

Clevie H. Wingate, 1951-, cook, Elk Creek, Grayson County, Virginia

Brunswick Stew

John D. Clary and The Proclamation Stew Crew, Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia -- John D. Clary and The Proclamation Stew Crew, Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, VirginiaJames P. Batchelor, Lawrenceville, VirginiaTim Bendall, Petersburg, VirginiaChiles Cridlin, Richmond, VirginiaRodney Elmore, Bracey, VirginiaLonnie Moore, Lawrenceville, Virginia

Gardening

George Carter, formal gardener, North Elmham, Norfolk, England

Sophia Sidney, formal gardener, Tonbridge, Kent, England

Michael Twitty, 1977-, provision gardener, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland

Tyrone Mangum, 1983-, school gardener, Hampton, Virginia

MARITIME TRADITIONS

Boat Building

Raynell Smith, 1948-, Deltaville Boat Builders, Deltaville, Middlesex County, Virginia

Steve Smith, 1945-, Deltaville Boat Builders, Deltaville, Middlesex County, Virginia

Jamie Smith, Smith's Marine Railway, Dare, York County, Virginia

Tim Smith, 1954-, Smith's Marine Railway, Dare, York County, Virginia

Alan Staley, 1945-, wooden boat builder, Faversham, Kent, England

Harbor Crafts and Activities

Ted Boscana, carpenter, Williamsburg, Virginia

Linda Benson, rope maker, Chatham Historic Dockyard, Chatham, Kent, England

Brenda O'Donovan, 1954-, rope maker, Chatham Historic Dockyard, Chatham, Kent, England

Marshall Scheetz, cooper, Williamsburg, Virginia

Historic Maritime Projects

Alexandria Seaport/Thomas Jefferson High School Project, Alexandria, Virginia

Reedville Fishermen's Museum/John Smith Boat Project, Reedville, Northumberland County, Virginia -- Reedville Fishermen's Museum/John Smith Boat Project, Reedville, Northumberland County, VirginiaRichard W. Bradt, Midlothian, VirginiaGordon Burgess, Reedville, VirginiaBill Rogers, Heathsville, VirginiaLionel Whitcomb, Reedville, Virginia

Sultana Shipyard/John Smith Boat Project, Chestertown, Kent County, Maryland

Working the Water

Danny K. Bowden, 1956-, gill-netter, crabber, guide, Chincoteague, Accomack County, Virginia

Marie Hill, oystering, Hobson Village, Suffolk County, Virginia

Mary Hill, 1960-, oystering, Hobson Village, Suffolk County, Virginia

Andy Riches, oystering, Whitstable, Kent, England

Ken Thomas, 1952-, gill-netter, fisher, Dungeness, Kent, England

Virginia Institute for Marine Science (VIMS), Gloucester Point, Gloucester County, Virginia -- Virginia Institute for Marine Science (VIMS), Gloucester Point, Gloucester County, VirginiaWyatt Vaughan, Farmville, VirginiaLester Vincent Williams, Prospect, Virginia

MUSIC AND PERFORMANCE

Anansegromma -- AnansegrommaKofi Denis, 1959-, Burke, VirginiaKwame Ansah-Brew, 1967-, Laurel, Maryland

Gerald Anderson, 1953-, instrument-maker, Troutdale, Grayson County, Virginia

Dave Arthur, 1942-, musician, singer, Towbridge Wells, Kent, England

Husnu Aydogdu, 1948-, instrument maker, singer, Arlington County, Virginia

"Big Day Out" Powwow

Gretchen Bulova and dancers, Gadsby's Tavern Museum, Alexandria, Virginia

John Cephas, 1930-, guitarist, singer, Bowling Green, Caroline County, Virginia

La Chanchona de los Hermanos Lobo, Northern Virginia -- La Chanchona de los Hermanos Lobo, Northern VirginiaEfrain Lobo, 1967-, violin, Leesburg, VirginiaEliseo Lobo, vihuelaOsmar Lobo, conga, guïroOsmin Lobo, bassTrinidad Lobo, violin, Arlington, Virginia

The Church of God and Saints of Christ, Alexandria, Virginia

Cheikh Hamala Diabaté and Ensemble, Bambare, Mali -- Cheikh Hamala Diabaté and Ensemble, Bambare, MaliCheick Hamala Diabate, ngoni, Adelphi, MarylandFamouro Diabate, New York, New YorkMakany Kouyate, New York, New YorkBala Tounkara, New York, New York

Rex M. Ellis, 1951-, historian, Williamsburg, Virginia

Brien Fain, singer, banjoist, Stuart, Patrick County, Virginia

Scott Fore, guitarist, Radford, Virginia

Gospel Traveliers, Junior Traveliers, and Gospel Travelettes, Farmville, Prince Edward County, Virginia

Wayne Henderson and Friends, 1947-, Mouth of Wilson, Grayson County, Virginia

Lao Heritage Foundation, Springfield, Virginia -- Lao Heritage Foundation, Springfield, VirginiaBounchanh MouangkhamPatricia PennPhongsee PennNiphasone Souphom, Alexandria, VirginiaXayxana SouphomSengchanh SouvannaphanhThongtanh Souvannaphanh, saw player, Springfield, Virginia

Lined-out Hymn Singers, Dillwyn, Buckingham County, Virginia

Linda Lay and Springfield Exit -- Linda Lay and Springfield ExitDavid Lay, Winchester, VirginiaLinda Lay, 1962-, Winchester, VirginiaSammy ShelorRicky Simpkins, Laurel, Maryland

Madison Hummingbirds, shout band, Portsmouth, Virginia

Jim Marshall, singer-songwriter, Hillsville, Carroll County, Virginia

The Midnight Ramblers, bluegrass band -- The Midnight Ramblers, bluegrass bandCherise Bates, 1990-, Wise, VirginiaPaula Bates, 1961-, Wise, VirginiaTony Bates, 1947-, Wise, VirginiaAustin Boggs, 1989-, Wise, VirginiaMarcus Johnson, 1989-, St. Paul, VirginiaAbe Mullins, 1988-, Dungannon, Virginia

The Millen Family, glee club harmony -- The Millen Family, glee club harmonyDonald Brian Levett, 1936-, Smarden, Ashford, Kent County, EnglandGerald Millen, 1926-, Bethersden, Ashford, Kent County, EnglandHilary David Millen, 1955-, Bethersden, Ashford, Kent County, EnglandHoward Batt Millen, 1928-, Bethersden, Ashford, Kent County, EnglandNeil Barrington Thrift Ridley, 1948-, Bethersden, Ashford, Kent County, England

Lucky Moyo, 1966-, Music for Change, Canterbury, Kent, England

Lonesome Will Mullins & The Virginia Playboys, Clintwood, Dickenson County, Virginia -- Lonesome Will Mullins & The Virginia Playboys, Clintwood, Dickenson County, VirginiaJarrod ChurchDuran DuttonRandy DuttonTom IsaacsWill Mullins, Clintwood, VirginiaKody Norris

Bou Counta Ndiaye Ensemble, Senegal -- Bou Counta Ndiaye Ensemble, SenegalBou Counta Ndiaye, Pikine, Daker, SenegalMamadou Ngoma Ndiaye, Pikine, Dakar, SenegalSidy Ndiaye, Department of Thies, SenegalBassirou Seck, Department of Diourbel, Senegal

New Ballard's Branch Bogtrotters, Galax, Virginia -- New Ballard's Branch Bogtrotters, Galax, VirginiaEddie Bond, 1971-, fiddle, Fries, VirginiaJosh Eller, mandolin, Galax, VirginiaLeon Frost, banjo, Galax, VirginiaDennis Hall, guitar, Galax, VirginiaJesse Morris, bass, Abingdon, Virginia

Reverend Frank Newsome, 1942-, Regular Baptist hymn-singer, Haysi, Dickenson County, Virginia

No Speed Limit, Galax, Virginia -- No Speed Limit, Galax, VirginiaStevie Barr, Galax, VirginiaRyan BlevinsAmber CollinsJacob Eller, Galax, VirginiaJosh Pickett

Vera Oye Yaa-Anna, 1949-, storyteller, Washington, D.C.

The Paschall Brothers, a cappella religious singers, Chesapeake, Virginia -- The Paschall Brothers, a cappella religious singers, Chesapeake, VirginiaTarrence Paschall, Sr., 1959-, Chesapeake, VirginiaTarrence Paschall, Jr., 1984-, Chesapeake, VirginiaFrank Paschall, Jr., 1953-, Chesapeake, VirginiaWilliam Paschall, 1963-, Norfolk, VirginiaRenard Freeman Sr., 1964-, Chesapeake, VirginiaRenard Freeman, Jr., 1987-, Chesapeake, VirginiaJohnny Lewis, 1949-, Virginia Beach, Virginia

Buddy Pendleton, 1935-, fiddle, Basset, Henry County, Virginia -- Buddy Pendleton, 1935-, fiddle, Basset, Henry County, VirginiaRobin Kauffman, 1979-, fiddle, Basset, Henry County, Virginia

Tim Laycock, 1952-, playwright, Kent, England

Sonia Ritter, 1958-, playwright, Kent, England

Kinney Rorrer and The New North Carolina Ramblers, old-time string band, Danville, Virginia -- Kinney Rorrer and The New North Carolina Ramblers, old-time string band, Danville, VirginiaDarren Moore, 1976-, guitar, autoharp, Keeling, VirginiaKinney Rorrer, 1946-, banjo, Danville, VirginiaJeremy Stephens, 1984-, guitar, fiddle, Danville, VirginiaKirk Sutphin, 1968-, fiddle, Walkertown, North Carolina

The Sama Ensemble, Persian music, Vienna, Fairfax County, Virginia -- The Sama Ensemble, Persian music, Vienna, Fairfax County, VirginiaGiti AbrishamiBahman AmeenAli Analouei, 1954-, drumsSofi BastaniBehzan BibizadehSteve BloomAudrey ElizabethHayedeh EradatArjan GanjiNeda HosseiniPuneh HosseiniNaser KhorasaniMohsen SalehiNeema ShabestariNazanin Zolriyasatein

Ubaldo Sánchez Hernández, 1981-, -- alfombra -- carpet maker, Arlington, Virginia

Jeffrey Scott, 1965-, Piedmont blues guitarist, Culpeper, Culpeper County, Virginia

La Sensual, salsa band, Northern Virginia -- La Sensual, salsa band, Northern VirginiaBrenda Lee Bonano, maracas, Woodbridge, VirginiaRolando Marcos, keyboards,Woodbridge, Virginia

Ron Short, 1965-, guitar, singer-songwriter, Big Stone Gap, Wise County, Virginia

Spencer Strickland, mandolin maker, Troutdale, Grayson County, Virginia

Los Tecuanis, tiger dancer, Manassas, Virginia

Speedy Tolliver, fiddler, Arlington County, Virginia -- Speedy Tolliver, fiddler, Arlington County, VirginiaAndrew Acosta, Falls Church, VirginiaJohn Kaparakis, Arlington, VirginiaWilliam Patrick McCauley, Front Royal, Virginia

Larnell Starkey and the Spiritual Seven, gospel singers, Wirtz, Franklin County, Virginia -- Larnell Starkey and the Spiritual Seven, gospel singers, Wirtz, Franklin County, VirginiaDarledia Alexander, 1959-, Wirtz, VirginiaTravis Moore, 1996-Danny Starkey, 1954-Eric Starkey, 1980-Larnell Starkey, 1948-Tim Starkey, 1970-Walter Starkey, 1951-, Wirtz, VirginiaOtario Wells, 1995-Coleman Wright, 1956-

Virginia Tribal Dancers -- Virginia Tribal DancersPowhatan Red Cloud-Owen, 1948-, dancer, Charles City, Charles City County, VirginiaTara Danielle Bradby, 1984-, Providence Forge, VirginiaRufus Elliott, 1984-, Monroe, VirginiaDebora Littlewing Moore, 1967-, West Point, VirginiaQuinton Talbott, 1995-, Big Island, VirginiaKarenne Wood, 1960-, Charles City, Virginia

Whitetop Mountain Band -- Whitetop Mountain BandThornton Spencer, fiddle, Mouth of Wilson, Grayson County, VirginiaEmily Spencer, 1952-, banjo, Mouth of Wilson, Grayson County, VirginiaMartha Spencer, 1985-, guitar, fiddle, banjo, Mouth of Wilson, Grayson County, VirginiaDeborah Bramer, bass, Fancy Gap, VirginiaJackson Cunningham, 1977-, mandolin, Christiansburg, VirginiaSpencer Pennington, 1934-, guitar, Warrensville, North Carolina

Phil Wiggins, 1954-, harmonica player, Takoma Park, Montgomery County, Maryland

Wuoxinkan, Dancing Folkloric -- Wuoxinkan, Dancing FolkloricJulia CabreraVinicio Cabrera, Arlington, VirginiaLuisa LópezMiguel Angel LópezUbaldo Sánchez, 1981-, Arlington, VirginiaJulia Victoria Sánchez Hernández, 1977-, Arlington, Virginia

Yarawi, Spanish and Andean music, Sterling, Fairfax County, Virginia -- Yarawi, Spanish and Andean music, Sterling, Fairfax County, VirginiaDiego Azuga, Sterling, VirginiaGustavo Azuga, 1960-, Sterling, VirginiaDirk Bayer, 1963-, Sterling, VirginiaFelipe Ugalde, 1978-, McLean, VirginiaLuis Velasco

RESEARCHING HISTORY

Community and Family History

The Alexandria Black History Museum, Alexandria, Virginia

Arlington African American Heritage Museum, Arlington County, Virginia

Char McCargo Bah, 1957-, genealogist, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Harvey Bakari, director of African American interpretation, Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg, Virginia

Abdoulaye Camara, 1950-, historian, archaeologist, Dakar, Senegal

Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg, Virginia -- Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg, VirginiaTed Boscana, Williamsburg, VirginiaMarshall Scheetz, Williamsburg, VirginiaTerry ThonRobert Watson, Williamsburg, Virginia

Liz Finn, archivist, Kent Archives, Canterbury, Kent, England

Julius Fuller, fraternity historian, Hampton, Virginia

Historic Jamestowne, Jamestown, James City County, Virginia

Jamestown Settlement, Jamestown, James City County, Virginia

Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier, Petersburg, Virginia -- Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier, Petersburg, VirginiaDaniel Beasley, 1978-, Petersburg, VirginiaAaron Bradford, 1983-, Petersburg, VirginiaJeffrey Dean, 1950-, Petersburg, VirginiaBrian Musselwhite, 1972-, Petersburg, VirginiaAl Neale, Petersburg, VirginiaWisteria Perry, 1975-, Petersburg, VirginiaAndrew Talkov, 1972-, Petersburg, Virginia

Virginia Raye, 1974-, sorority historian, Alexandria, Virginia

Paula Royster, 1966-, genealogist, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, Sperryville and Richmond Virginia Projects

Historic Archaeology

Enid Allison, 1957-, environmental archaeologist, Kent, England

Amanda Danning, sculptor, painter, woodcarver, Bay City, Texas

Marion Green, 1952-, archaeologist, Kent, England

Jamestown 2007 Community Program, Jamestown, James City County, Virginia

Mariner's Museum, Newport News, Virginia -- Mariner's Museum, Newport News, VirginiaPedro Goncalves, 1971-, Newport News, VirginiaSusanne Grieve, 1981-, Norfolk, VirginiaCarson Hudson, 1952-, Surry, VirginiaDave Krop, 1978-, Newport News, VirginiaAl Mitchell, 1947-, Yorktown, VirginiaJuliette MitchellEric Nordgren, 1971-, Newport News, VirginiaMarcie Renner, 1958-, Newport News, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2007, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2007 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c669f3d0-879c-43eb-a60c-1038985ee720
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2007-ref33

Stanton Macdonald-Wright papers

Creator:
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Names:
Russell, Morgan, 1886-1953  Search this
Seuphor, Michel, 1901-1999  Search this
Summerfield, Anne, 1917-  Search this
Summerfield, John, 1917-  Search this
Extent:
14.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Blueprints
Diaries
Essays
Travel diaries
Place:
Italy -- description and travel
Hawaii -- description and travel
Japan -- Description and Travel
Date:
1890-2018
Summary:
The papers of Southern California painter Stanton Macdonald-Wright measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1907 to 1973. The collection contains correspondence with family, friends, and artists, including Morgan Russell, and his wife Suzanne Binon, Michel and Suzanne Seuphor, Ann and John Summerfield, and Bethany Wilson. Also found are writings, six diaries, travel journals, printed materials, and artwork. There is an 11.3 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated 2019 that includes biographical material, personal and professional correspondence including illustrated letters, two scrapbooks, a diary by Stanton macDonald-Wright, works of art includind sketches in various media, photographs, scrapbooks, Jean's research and writing, Stanton's teaching materials, printed material, interviews on three cassettes, and files related to Stanton's estate.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Southern California painter Stanton Macdonald-Wright measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1907 to 1973. The collection contains correspondence with family, friends, and artists, including Morgan Russell, and his wife Suzanne Binon, Michel and Suzanne Seuphor, Ann and John Summerfield, and Bethany Wilson. Also found are writings, six diaries, travel journals, printed materials, and artwork. There is an 11.3 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated 2019 that includes biographical material, personal and professional correspondence including illustrated letters, two scrapbooks, a diary by Stanton macDonald-Wright, works of art includind sketches in various media, photographs, scrapbooks, Jean's research and writing, Stanton's teaching materials, printed material, interviews on three cassettes, and files related to Stanton's estate.

Writings consist of drafts of essays, plays, and book manuscripts. There are drafts of A Treatise on Color with palettes and color wheels, The Basis of Culture, and Macdonald-Wright's autobiography Bittersweet: An Artist's Life.

There are six diaries and numerous travel journals. One diary was written in Paris in 1909 in which Macdonald-Wright muses over the aesthetics of art and his color theories. Five additional disbound diaries cover his life from 1939-1973. Travel diaries date from 1959-1972 and cover trips to Italy, Japan, and Hawaii.

Printed material includes a copy of Les Synchromistes exhibition catalog, a newspaper clipping, and The Future of Painting by Willard Wright. Artwork consists of blueprints for Macdonald-Wright's Synchrome Kineidoscope, a color and light projecting machine first envisioned by Macdonald-Wright and Morgan Russell as early as 1913 and finally completed in the late 1950s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, circa 1907-circa 1972 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Writings, 1920-circa 1970 (0.9 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Diaries, 1909-1973 (1.3 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1913-1967 (0.3 linear feet; Box 3, OV 4)

Series 5: Artwork, 1969 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3, OV 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Stanton Macdonald-Wright (1890-1973) was the creator of a modernist style of painting based on pure spectral color known as chromatic abstraction or "Synchromism." He worked in New York and later primarily in Los Angeles.

Stanton Macdonald-Wright was born in 1890 in Charlottesville, Virginia. In 1900 the family moved to Santa Monica, California where they ran a seaside hotel. A few years later he took courses at the Art Students League in Los Angeles, studying under Warren T. Huges. His older brother was Willard Huntington Wright, a respected art critic who wrote Modern Painting: Its Tendency and Meaning (1915), upon which he collaborated with his younger brother Stanton, and The Future of Painting (1923), and later became a detective novelist under the name S. S. Van Dine.

At the age of seventeen, Stanton Macdonald-Wright married his first wife and moved to Paris where he immersed himself in European art and studied at the Sorbonne, the Académie Julian, the École des Beaux-Arts, and the Académie Colarossi. While in Europe he also befriended fellow American painter Morgan Russell and the two artists began working closely together. They studied with Canadian painter Percyval Tudor-Hart between 1911 and 1913 and were deeply influenced by their teacher's color theory, which connected the qualities of color to those of music. Together Macdonald-Wright and Russell developed a style of painting based on color and named it "Synchromism." They introduced their work in 1913 at the Der Neue Kuntsalon in Munich and in Paris at the Galerie Bernheim-Jeune. These exhibitions helped to establish Synchromism as an major influence in modern art well into the 1920s.

Stanton Macdonald-Wright and Morgan Russell returned to the United States eager to promote their work and theory. It was not long before the two separated, but both continued to work in the Synchromist style. Together, they held one more Synchromist exhibition in New York in 1916 which received significant critical support. Macdonald-Wright also participated in the prestigious 1916 "Forum Exhibition of Modern American Painters" in New York and exhibited his work at Alfred Stieglitz's famed 291 gallery in New York in 1917. Yet, financial success evaded him.

Macdonald-Wright moved to Santa Monica in 1918, where he taught and served as director of the Los Angeles Art Students League. In 1924 he published his instructive Treatise on Color. In 1927 he organized another joint exhibition with Morgan Russell at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where he also exhibited five years later. He exhibited at the Oakland Art Gallery, the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco, Alfred Stieglitz's An American Place gallery in New York, and the Stendahl Galleries in Los Angeles. From 1935 to 1942 Macdonald-Wright served as director of the Works Progress Administration's Federal Art Project for Southern California, followed by a faculty position at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles where he taught for sixteen years.

In the late 1950s, Macdonald-Wright completed the Synchome Kineidoscope, a color and light projecting machine first envisioned by Macdonald-Wright and Morgan Russell as early as 1913.

Macdonald-Wright traveled extensively throughout the 1960s and early 1970s, spending time in Hawaii, Italy, and Japan. Macdonald-Wright married three times and died in California in 1973, at the age of 83.

This biographical note draws heavily on the Archives of American Art's West Coast Regional Collector Paul Karlstrom's collection description written upon acquisition of the papers.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art holds several collections related to the Stanton Macdonald-Wright papers. There is an oral interview of Stanton Macdonald-Wright conducted 1964 Apr. 13-Sept. 16, by Betty Hoag. There are also Stanton Macdonald-Wright Letters to Alan and Fanny Leslie, the Stanton Macdonald-Wright Collection of photographs, Stanton Macdonald-Wright Letters to Morgan Russell, Walter Houk Letters from Stanton Macdonald-Wright, and an Oral History of Stanton Macdonald-Wright by Jeanne M. Marshall for the Voice of America Conducted in 1967.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reels LA 1 and LA 5) including a brochure on the Santa Monica Library murals and six photographs of the panels while in Macdonald-Wright's studio. There is also a 1939 exhibition catalog for "Southern California Art Project" a master's thesis on Macdonald-Wright by Dori Jean Watson (1957), and one scrapbook of photographs, clippings, and other printed materials dating from circa 1910-1964. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Stanton Macdonald-Wright first loaned materials to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1964. David Nellis, a gallery owner, gave the Archives the artist's unpublished autobiography in 1978. The bulk of the Stanton Macdonald-Wright papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by his widow, Jean Macdonald-Wright, in 2 installments in 1995 and then in 2019 as a bequest.
Restrictions:
This collection is temporarily closed due to archival processing. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration, American -- California -- Santa Monica  Search this
Synchromism (Art)  Search this
Painting, Abstract  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Blueprints
Diaries
Essays
Travel diaries
Citation:
Stanton Macdonald-Wright papers, 1907-1973. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.macdstan
See more items in:
Stanton Macdonald-Wright papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92754d264-a987-4a95-9b40-39727bfd1bc6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-macdstan

The Crisis Vol. 9 No. 5

Published by:
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
Edited by:
W.E.B. Du Bois, American, 1868 - 1963  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
9 3/4 x 6 3/4 x 1/8 in. (24.8 x 17.1 x 0.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place printed:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
March 1915
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Business  Search this
Civil Rights  Search this
Education  Search this
Literature  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Politics  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Social reform  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Bobbie Ross in memory of Elizabeth Dillard
Object number:
2012.84.16
Restrictions & Rights:
Public Domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd58bc64d58-cb0f-40ab-ba98-6f24d2815ef2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.84.16
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>The Crisis Vol. 9 No. 5</I> digital asset number 1

Oral history interview with I.J. (Isaac J.) Sanger, 1981 November 17

Interviewee:
Sanger, I. J., 1899-1986  Search this
Sanger, I. J., 1899-1986  Search this
Interviewer:
Pennington, Estill Curtis  Search this
Subject:
Dow, Arthur W. (Arthur Wesley)  Search this
Heckman, Albert  Search this
Pins, Jacob  Search this
Von Groschwitz, Gustave  Search this
American Institute of Graphic Arts  Search this
Columbia University  Search this
University of Virginia  Search this
YMCA of the USA  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Painters -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Painting, Modern  Search this
Printmakers -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Prints  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12998
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213059
AAA_collcode_sanger81
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213059
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Perez Zagorin, 2007 January 17-18

Interviewee:
Zagorin, Perez, 1920-2009  Search this
Zagorin, Perez, 1920-2009  Search this
Interviewer:
MacCarthy, Laura, 1977-  Search this
Subject:
Sharrer, Honoré  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art criticism  Search this
Painting  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13600
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)270684
AAA_collcode_zagori07
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_270684

Oral history interview with Perez Zagorin

Interviewee:
Zagorin, Perez  Search this
Interviewer:
MacCarthy, Laura  Search this
Names:
Sharrer, Honoré, 1920-2009  Search this
Extent:
61 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2007 January 17-18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Perez Zagorin conducted 2007 January 17-18, by Laura Orgon MacCarthy, for the Archives of American Art, at Zagorin's home, in Charlottesville, Virginia.
This interview was produced in conjunction with the exhibition, "Anatomy of a Painting: Honore Sharrer's Tribute to the American Working People," which was on view at the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery of the Archives of American Art, March 8 through June 20, 2007. Zagorin speaks of his wife's upbringing and education; her early interest in art; her family, including her mother Madeleine Sharrer, a painter; Sharrer's reaction to abstract and nonobjective painting, and the movements' subsequent effects on American realism; Sharrer's motivation to work; the couples' travels and various teaching positions taken on by Zagorin; Sharrer's interest in Netherlandish painting; her studio habits; her materials and techniques, especially while working on "Tribute to the American Working People;" Zagorin's experience as a history professor during the Cold War and its effects on his profession; art criticism in the years following World War II; and Sharrer's place in American art history. He recalls Lincoln Kirstein, Peter Blume, Reginald Poland, Jerry Farnsworth, Herbert Bliss, E. Coe Kerr, Alfred Frankenstein, John Ashbery, Ben Shahn, George Tooker, Wilbur Kitchener Jordan, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Perez Zagorin (1920-2009) was a historian and professor from Charlottesville, Virginia. Zagorin is the husband of painter Honore Sharrer.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 39 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- Virginia  Search this
Topic:
Art criticism  Search this
Painting  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.zagori07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw946571f81-653c-40c9-ada1-3905d99ed374
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zagori07
Online Media:

Oral history interview with I.J. (Isaac J.) Sanger

Interviewee:
Sanger, I. J. (Isaac J), 1899-1986  Search this
Interviewer:
Pennington, Estill Curtis  Search this
Names:
American Institute of Graphic Arts  Search this
Columbia University -- Students  Search this
University of Virginia -- Students  Search this
YMCA of the USA  Search this
Dow, Arthur W. (Arthur Wesley), 1857-1922  Search this
Heckman, Albert  Search this
Pins, Jacob, 1917-  Search this
Von Groschwitz, Gustave, 1906-1991  Search this
Extent:
16 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1981 November 17
Scope and Contents:
Interview of I.J. (Isaac) Sanger, conducted 1981 November 17, by Estill Curtis "Buck" Pennington, for the Archives of American Art, in New York, N.Y.
Sanger speaks of his first encounters with art as a child growing up in rural Virginia, and of his first industrial art classes, taken at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville while he was still attending high school in Free Union. After graduating, he received what he describes as his first real training in art while working for the carpentry shop at Columbia University in New York in the early 1920s. While attending Columbia, he found work as a furniture designer for the YMCA [Young Men's Christian Association]. Sanger also worked for his professor Albert Heckman, doing linoleum cuts for "Aesop's Fables," which Heckman was illustrating. He explains that it was Heckman who encouraged him to continue practicing print making. Until then, he had been working in oil and water color while studying "Art Structure" with Arthur Dow.
When the Depression hit in 1929, Sanger lost his position with the YMCA and worked odd jobs until Albert Heckman introduced him to Gustave von Groschwitz, who brought him on to the WPA. During the 1930s, he received widespread recognition for his work; his prints were selected by the American Institute of Graphic Arts for their "50 Prints of the Year" show in 1928 and 1929. Following his work with the WPA, Sanger served the army in World War II at Camp Kearns in Utah. He explains how he continued expanding his portfolio throughout the War, and once it was over, spent 25 years as a commercial artist. He relocated to Washington, D.C. in 1951 and became a member of the Washington Print Society while Prentiss Taylor was secretary. In D.C., he was a graphic designer for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, but kept up his own private work, which Jacob Pins featured at the Smithsonian Castle. After formally retiring in 1966, Sanger decided to dedicate his time to travel, but adds that he still makes print making, painting, and furniture design a priority.
Biographical / Historical:
I. J. Sanger (1899-1986) was a painter and printmaker of Marlow Heights, Md.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 6 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Furniture designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Painting, Modern  Search this
Printmakers -- Maryland -- Interviews  Search this
Prints  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.sanger81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90ccde882-8ce2-4d68-a03a-12d87b79700f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sanger81
Online Media:

American Academy in Rome records, 1855-2012

Creator:
American Academy in Rome  Search this
American Academy in Rome  Search this
Subject:
Aldrich, Chester Holmes  Search this
Boring, William  Search this
Breck, George  Search this
Dinsmoor, William B.  Search this
Egbert, J. C. (James Chidester)  Search this
Ely, Theo. N.  Search this
Kendall, William M.  Search this
Hewlett, James Monroe  Search this
Guernsey, Roscoe  Search this
Mead, William Rutherford  Search this
McKim, Charles Follen  Search this
Marquand, Allan  Search this
La Farge, C. Grant (Christopher Grant)  Search this
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams)  Search this
Mowbray, H. Siddons (Harry Siddons)  Search this
Faulkner, Barry  Search this
Morey, Charles Rufus  Search this
Millet, Francis Davis  Search this
Stevens, Gorham Phillips  Search this
Smith, James Kellum  Search this
Roberts, Laurance P.  Search this
Pope, John Russell  Search this
Ward, John Quincy Adams  Search this
Vedder, Elihu  Search this
Vitale, Ferrucio  Search this
American Academy in Rome  Search this
American School of Architecture in Rome  Search this
American School of Classical Studies in Rome  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Topic:
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Architecture, Classical -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art schools -- Italy -- Rome  Search this
Theme:
American Art and Artists in a Global Context  Search this
Architecture & Design  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6320
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)225063
AAA_collcode_ameracar
Theme:
American Art and Artists in a Global Context
Architecture & Design
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_225063
Online Media:

Honoré Sharrer papers, circa 1920-2007

Creator:
Sharrer, Honoré Desmond, 1920-2009  Search this
Sharrer, Honoré Desmond, 1920-2009  Search this
Subject:
Kirstein, Lincoln  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning  Search this
Blume, Peter  Search this
Zagorin, Perez  Search this
Poland, Reginald  Search this
Bridaham, Lester Burbank  Search this
Caiserman-Roth, Ghitta  Search this
Carpenter, Mary  Search this
Calderwood, Kathy  Search this
Tooker, George  Search this
Crutchfield, Mary  Search this
Zagorin, Adam  Search this
Goodwin, Betty  Search this
Sachs, Honoré  Search this
Sharrer, Madeleine  Search this
Oda, Mayumi  Search this
American Academy of Arts and Letters  Search this
Terry Dintenfass, Inc.  Search this
Handmacher-Vogel, Inc.  Search this
Forum Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Topic:
Painting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Realism  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13391
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)259742
AAA_collcode_sharhono
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_259742
Online Media:

Morton Traylor papers, 1936-2003

Creator:
Traylor, Morton P. (Morton Patrick), 1918-1996  Search this
Traylor, Morton P. (Morton Patrick), 1918-1996  Search this
Subject:
Virginia Art Institute  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16042
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)309672
AAA_collcode_traymort
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_309672
Online Media:

William C. Seitz papers, circa 1930-1995

Creator:
Seitz, William C. (William Chapin), 1914-1974  Search this
Seitz, William C. (William Chapin), 1914-1974  Search this
Subject:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Banks-Woodson, Ellen  Search this
Gorky, Arshile  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Seitz, Irma  Search this
Segal, George  Search this
Rosati, James  Search this
Monet, Claude  Search this
Krebs, Rockne  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph  Search this
Elliott, Philip Clarkson  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Rene  Search this
Conner, Bruce  Search this
Baziotes, William  Search this
Barr, Alfred Hamilton  Search this
University of Virginia  Search this
Type:
Resumes
Poems
Photographs
Awards
Sound recordings
Interviews
Sketches
Notebooks
Drafts (documents)
Lectures
Topic:
Painters -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Educators -- Virginia  Search this
Theme:
Art Theory and Historiography  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8462
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210638
AAA_collcode_seitwill
Theme:
Art Theory and Historiography
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210638
Online Media:

Hartwell Wyse Priest papers, 1924-2004

Creator:
Priest, Hartwell Wyse, 1901-2004  Search this
Priest, Hartwell Wyse, 1901-2004  Search this
Subject:
National Association of Women Artists (U.S.)  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
Symmetry  Search this
Proportion (Art)  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8826
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211011
AAA_collcode_priehart
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211011

Nevadaville, (painting)

Painter:
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo 1893-1953  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Type:
Paintings
Owner/Location:
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 2800 Grove Avenue Richmond Virginia 23221 Accession Number: 44.8.1
Date:
1942
Topic:
Landscape--Nevada  Search this
Landscape--Town  Search this
Control number:
IAP 55740280
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_ari_435022

Hartwell Wyse Priest papers

Creator:
Priest, Hartwell Wyse, 1901-  Search this
Names:
National Association of Women Artists (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1924-2004
Scope and Contents:
The Hartwell Wyse Priest papers measure 1.8 linear feet and date from circa 1924-1999. The papers contain biographical material including a 1991 interview transcript with Priest by Elizabeth Howard, a certificate of recognition and miscellany; works of art including travel sketchbooks and loose drawings and sketches; writings consisting of journals and notes on art, a draft manuscript of "Dynamic Symmetry" written by Priest, and an annotated published book about Hans Hofmann; bound exhibition lists; lists of prints; sales records and price lists; scattered letters; photographs of nature used as source material and photographs of Priest and of others and slides of works of art; and printed material including 30 exhibition catalogs of the National Association of Women Artists, newspaper clippings and posthumous material.
Biographical / Historical:
Hartwell Wyse Priest (1901-2004) was a painter and printmaker in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Provenance:
Donated 1978 by Hartwell Priest and in 2018 by Hannah Priest, Hartwell's daughter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Painters -- Virginia  Search this
Printmakers -- Virginia  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
Symmetry  Search this
Proportion (Art)  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.priehart
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw937407286-ea7e-4650-b0c1-dd6b7f17981d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-priehart

Morton Traylor papers

Creator:
Traylor, Morton P., 1918-1996  Search this
Names:
Virginia Art Institute  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1936-2003
Summary:
The papers of painter and teacher Morton Traylor measure 3.4 linear feet and date from 1936 to 2003. The papers document his career as an artist and administrator of the Virginia Art Institute through biographical material, correspondence, writings, personal business records, printed material, photographs, and scrapbooks. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs, slides, and albums of artwork by Traylor. Three scrapbooks document his education and early career through clippings, photographs, exhibition materials, and letters.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and teacher Morton Traylor measure 3.4 linear feet and date from 1936 to 2003. The papers document his career as an artist and administrator of the Virginia Art Institute through biographical material, correspondence, writings, personal business records, printed material, photographs, and scrapbooks. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs, slides, and albums of artwork by Traylor. Three scrapbooks document his education and early career through clippings, photographs, exhibition materials, and letters.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1944-1996 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2003 (7 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1944-1991 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1950s-1984 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1939-1998 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 6: Photographic Material, 1936-1994 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 2-3, 5-6)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1939-1956 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 3-4, 6)
Biographical / Historical:
Morton Traylor (1918-1996) was a painter and teacher in Los Angeles, California, and Charlottesville, Virginia. Traylor founded and taught at the Virginia Art Institute.

Morton Traylor was born in Petersburg, Virginia, and studied art at Los Angeles City College, Chouinard Art Institute, and Jepson Art Institute. He also attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1947. From 1942 to 1946 he served in the U.S. Navy as a Radio and Radar man, spending time in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 1950 he worked as the personal assistant to artist Rico Lebrun, and during the 1950s worked in commercial art at several companies in California. After moving to Virginia with his wife in 1960, he taught at the Holden School of Fine and Applied Arts, and in 1966 opened the Virginia Art Institute in Charlottesville. The school closed in 1975. Traylor regularly exhibited his work throughout his career and won several awards. In 1985 Traylor and his wife moved to Days Creek, Oregon, where he continued to paint and exhibit his work until his death in 1996.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2012 by Nathan Simon, Morton Traylor's friend.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Arts administrators -- Virginia  Search this
Art teachers -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Art teachers -- Virginia  Search this
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Morton Traylor papers, 1936-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.traymort
See more items in:
Morton Traylor papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c0e331e5-79e6-4ced-9ab2-1c24a4da143e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-traymort

Honoré Sharrer papers

Creator:
Sharrer, Honoré, 1920-2009  Search this
Names:
American Academy of Arts and Letters  Search this
Forum Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Handmacher-Vogel, Inc.  Search this
Terry Dintenfass, Inc.  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Blume, Peter, 1906-1992  Search this
Bridaham, Lester Burbank  Search this
Caiserman-Roth, Ghitta, 1923-  Search this
Calderwood, Kathy, 1945-  Search this
Carpenter, Mary  Search this
Crutchfield, Mary  Search this
Goodwin, Betty  Search this
Kirstein, Lincoln, 1907-  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Oda, Mayumi, 1941-  Search this
Poland, Reginald  Search this
Sachs, Honoré  Search this
Sharrer, Madeleine  Search this
Tooker, George, 1920-2011  Search this
Zagorin, Adam  Search this
Zagorin, Perez  Search this
Extent:
9.45 Linear feet
1.12 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
circa 1920-2007
Summary:
The papers of realist painter, Honoré Sharrer, measure 9.45 linear feet and 1.12 GB and date from circa 1920-2007. The collection documents Sharrer's career through biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, writings and notes, research and source files, printed and digital material, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographs of Sharrer, her family, friends, colleagues, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of realist painter, Honoré Sharrer, measure 9.45 linear feet and 1.12 GB and date from circa 1920-2007. The collection documents Sharrer's career through biographical material, personal and professional correspondence, writings and notes, research and source files, printed and digital material, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographs of Sharrer, her family, friends, colleagues, and artwork.

Biographical material includes biographical notes and resumés, awards, paintbrushes used by Sharrer, and sales records, as well as comprehensive documentation, compiled 2004-2007 by her husband, Perez Zagorin, and her son, Adam Zagorin, of Sharrer's artwork in their possession. Included are digital images of Sharrer's artwork.

Correspondence is with family members including Sharrer's mother, Madeleine Sharrer, and her second husband, Reginald Poland; husband Perez Zagorin; son Adam Zagorin; and daughter-in-law, Mary Carpenter Also found is correspondence with artists including Peter Blume, Lester Burbank Bridaham, Gitta Caiserman-Roth, Kathy Calderwood, Mary Crutchfield, Betty Goodwin, Lincoln Kirstein, Mayumi Oda, and George Tooker. Other professional correspondents include galleries, museums, and other art institutions such as American Academy of Arts and Letters, Terry Dintenfass, Forum Gallery, Handmacher-Vogel, Inc., M. Knoedler & Co., Dorothy Miller relating to the 1946 Fourteen Americans exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, and the Women's Caucus for Art.

Writings and notes comprise drafts of several essays on art by Sharrer, preliminary notes for Tribute to the American Working People, and a mock-up for an unpublished book, "One White Christmas," written by Sharrer's grandmother, Honoré Sachs, and illustrated by Sharrer.

Research and source files consist of source material used throughout the course of Sharrer's career, including printed and photographic material used in the creation of Tribute to the American Working People, and later work dating up to, and including, the last decade of her life.

Printed material comprises announcements and catalogs for exhibitions and events featuring Sharrer, including a catalog for Fourteen Americans, as well as clippings about her and others, such as the Life Magazine cover story "Nineteen Young Americans."

Artwork and sketchbooks include studies for paintings and illustrations, and other preliminary sketches, as well as 14 sketchbooks of pencil and ink sketches dating from circa 1960s t0 2003.

Photographic material consists of photos of Sharrer, her family, friends, colleagues, exhibition installations, and houses. Also found are photos, negatives, and transparencies of Sharrer's artwork, as well as photos of artwork by Madeleine Sharrer and Lester Burbank Bridaham.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1941-2007 (0.44 linear feet; Boxes 1, 10, 1.12 GB; ER01-ER10)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1938-2006 (1.84 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 10)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1940s-circa 1990s (5 folders; Boxes 3, 10)

Series 4: Research and Source Files, circa 1920s-2005 (3.43 linear feet; Boxes 3-6, 10-11)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1930s-2005 (0.85 linear feet; Boxes 6-7, 11, OV 13, OV 17)

Series 6: Artwork, 1941-circa 1990s (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 7, 11-12, OV 13

Series 7: Sketchbooks, 1960s-2003 (0.55 linear feet; Boxes 7, 12)

Series 8: Photographic Material, circa 1930s-circa 2000 (1.83 linear feet; Boxes 8-9, 12, OVs 13-16)
Biographical / Historical:
Realist painter Honoré Sharrer (1920-2009) lived and worked in New York, Massachusetts, London, Montreal and Charlottesville, Virginia. She was best known for her five-panel painting, Tribute to the American Working People, completed in 1951 and first shown at M. Knoedler & Co. in New York to wide critical acclaim.

Sharrer was born in 1920 in West Point, New York, where her father was an Army officer, and grew up in the United States, the Philippines, Paris, and La Jolla, California. She studied at the Yale University School of Art and the San Francisco Art Institute, and worked as a welder in shipyards in California and New Jersey during World War II. She moved to New York in the 1940s and lived subsequently in Amherst, Massachusetts, London, and Montreal.

Sharrer's Workers and Paintings (1943) was included in the landmark Museum of Modern Art exhibition, Fourteen Americans, in 1946, and her painting, Man at Fountain, was featured in the 1950 Life Magazine cover story, "Nineteen Young American Artists." Tribute to the American Working People, which depicted a factory worker surrounded by smaller scenes of ordinary life, was considered her masterwork, but in the years that followed it's unveiling at M. Knoedler & Co., Sharrer was noticeably absent from the art scene; between 1951 and 1969 she did not have a single solo exhibition. While many of her contemporaries immersed themselves in Abstract Expressionism, Sharrer continued to paint, in meticulous detail, the daily experiences of ordinary working people, and her later work often dealt with female perspectives and was imbued with humor and elements of magical realism.

In 2007 the Smithsonian American Art Museum held an exhibition titled Anatomy of a Painting: Honoré Sharrer's 'Tribute to the American Working People,' which was devoted exclusively to her most famous work, now in the Smithsonian's permanent collection, and the source material she used when painting it. Sharrer's works can also be found in the Metroplitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Sharrer settled in Charlottesville, Virginia, in the early 1990s. She was married to her second husband, historian Perez Zagorin, for 61 years, before her death in 2009. Her mother, Madeleine Sharrer, was also a painter who married Reginald Poland, Director of the Fine Arts Gallery, San Diego, following the death of Sharrer's father, Robert Allen Sharrer.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Perez Zagorin, 2007, January 17-18, and the Madeleine Sharrer papers, 1954-1988.
Provenance:
The Honoré Sharrer papers were donated in 2006 and 2007 by Perez Zagorin, Sharrer's husband. A small addition was donated by Adam Zagorin, Sharrer's son, in 2018.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D. C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Virginia  Search this
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Painting -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Realism  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Honoré Sharrer papers, circa 1920-2007. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sharhono
See more items in:
Honoré Sharrer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99c06a9fc-29d0-42ee-9a3a-d6d2558dfc77
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sharhono

Allyn Cox papers

Creator:
Cox, Allyn, 1896-1982  Search this
Names:
American Battle Monuments Commission  Search this
Art Commission of the City of New York  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Century Association (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Cosmos Club (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Dumbarton Oaks  Search this
George Washington Masonic National Memorial (Alexandria, Va.)  Search this
National Society of Mural Painters (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Park Club of Kalamazoo  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
United States Capitol Historical Society  Search this
Bayley, John Barrington, 1914-1981  Search this
Bishop, Warner  Search this
Cassio, Fabrizio  Search this
Conrad, Arthur  Search this
Cox, Ethel  Search this
Cox, Kenyon, 1856-1919  Search this
Cox, Louise Howland King, 1865-1945  Search this
DeWitt, Roscoe, 1894-1975  Search this
Frost, Stuart  Search this
Harbeson, John F., 1888-1986 ((John Frederick))  Search this
Keally, Francis, 1889-1978  Search this
Keller, Deane, 1901-1992  Search this
Lamb, Adrian  Search this
Laning, Edward, 1906-1981  Search this
Lay, Charles Downing, 1877-1956  Search this
MacDonald, Pirie, 1867-1942  Search this
Schwengel, Fred, 1907-1993  Search this
Shutze, Philip Trammell  Search this
Young, Clifford, 1905-  Search this
Extent:
11 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Date:
1856-1982
Summary:
The papers of New York, N.Y., and Washington, D.C. painter and muralist Allyn Cox measure 11 linear feet and date from 1856-1982. The collection documents Cox's personal and professional life through biographical material, family and general correspondence, writings and notes, research material, printed material, sketchbooks and loose sketches, and photographs. Photographs are of Cox at work, the Cox family, including Kenyon and Louise Cox, Cox's friends and colleagues, events, and Cox's artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York, N.Y., and Washington, D.C. painter and muralist Allyn Cox measure 11 linear feet and date from 1856-1982. The collection documents Cox's personal and professional life through biographical material, family and general correspondence, writings and notes, research material, printed material, sketchbooks and loose sketches, and photographs. Photographs are of Cox at work, the Cox family, including Kenyon and Louise Cox, Cox's friends and colleagues, events, and Cox's artwork.

Biographical material includes family birth, death, and marriage certificates, and passports for Cox and his wife Ethel, whom he married in 1927; professional membership cards, awards and certificates; records related to sales of furnishings from the Cox family home in Essex, Massachusetts; and an untranscribed interview of Cox by Tony Janak of NBC TV.

Cox's family correspondence is primarily with his mother, Louise Cox. Also found is correspondence with Cox's sister, Caroline Cox Lansing, and his brother Leonard Cox and Leonard's wife, Sylvia, and letters from Ethel Cox to her mother. Additional correspondence relating to the disposition of Kenyon Cox''s artwork and archives to various institutions, can also be found here.

General correspondence documents Cox's career and professional relationships with artists and architects, including John Barrington Bayley, Fabrizio Cassio, Arthur Conrad, Roscoe DeWitt, Stuart Frost, John Harbeson, Francis Keally, Adrian Lamb, Edward Laning, Charles Downing Lay, Deane Keller, Philip Trammell Shutze, and Cliff Young; art institutions and organizations including the Art Commission of the City of New York, the Art Students League, Dumbarton Oaks, the National Society of Mural Painters, and the Smithsonian Institution; federal, state and local government agencies including the American Battle Monuments Commission, the Architect of the Capitol, and the General Grant National Memorial; members of Congress including founder of the United States Capitol Historical Society, Representative Fred Schwengel; and private social clubs in which Cox was active, including the Century Association, the Cosmopolitan Club and the Cosmos Club. Correspondence documents Cox's most well known commissions including work for the George Washington Masonic National Memorial and the United States Capitol, as well as work for many private clients including banks and residences.

Also found are typescripts, manuscripts and notes for Cox's lectures, as well as Ethel Cox's diary from 1923-1936 and her diary excerpt from 1955. Ten folders of research files, consisting primarily of clippings, comprise Cox's source material. Additional printed material provides scattered documentation of Cox's career through announcements and catalogs, and magazine and newspaper articles written by him or about his work. Also found is one folder of clippings about Kenyon Cox.

Four sketchbooks and circa twenty-two loose animal, figure, architectural and landscape sketches comprise Cox's artwork, in addition to two 1943 sketches Cox entered into a War Department mural competition. Also found is an 1873 sketchbook of Kenyon Cox, with sketches of people and scenes in Ohio.

Photographs are of Cox from childhood to the 1980s; his family, including parents, siblings, and grandparents; friends including Philip Trammell Shutze and Warner Bishop; family residences; artist models; events; and artwork, including many of Cox's commissions. In addition to photographic prints, slides, and negatives, the series includes vintage formats such as an ambrotype, 8 tintypes, 2 cyanotypes, and a platinum print. Of particular note are circa 16 photos of Kenyon Cox, one taken by Pirie MacDonald and three of him teaching a class at the Art Students League, and a series of circa 1906 photos taken in a garden, of Louise and Kenyon Cox with their children and others. Also found are 10 glass plate negatives of artwork by Cox.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and are closed to researchers.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1916-1982 (0.33 linear feet; Boxes 1, 12)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1878-1982 (6.74 linear feet; Boxes 1-7, 12)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1919-1982 (0.58 linear feet; Boxes 7-8)

Series 4: Research Files, circa 1950s-circa 1970s (0.25 linear feet; Box 8)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1920s-1982 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 8-9)

Series 6: Sketchbooks and Sketches, 1873-circa 1978 (0.25 linear feet; Box 9, OVs 13-14)

Series 7: Photographs, 1856-circa 1980 (2.25 linear feet; Boxes 9-12, OV 13)
Biographical / Historical:
New York, N.Y. and Washington, D.C. painter and muralist, Allyn Cox (1896-1982), was born in New York City to artists Kenyon and Louise Cox. Cox first trained as his father's assistant, serving as an apprentice to Kenyon Cox during the painting of the murals at the Wisconsin State Capitol, circa 1912. He attended the National Academy of Design from 1910-1915, and the Art Student's League with George Bridgman in 1915. In 1916 he was awarded the Prix de Rome and subsequently studied at the American Academy in Rome for 2 years before returning to New York City to begin a career in mural painting.

Cox completed numerous murals and decorative paintings for private residences, businesses, churches, and public buildings. Some of his most famous commissions included murals for the Royal Arch Room and Memorial Hall of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial in Alexandria, Virginia; the Law School at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; and the William A. Clark Memorial Library at the University of California, Los Angeles; panels for the National City Bank, the Continental Bank, and the Guaranty Trust Company in New York; and glass mosaics and inlaid stone maps for the United States Military Cemetery in Hamm, Luxembourg.

Cox is best known for his work in the United States Capitol, beginning in 1952 when he undertook a congressional commission to restore and complete the murals in in the Capitol rotunda begun by Constantino Brumidi and Filipo Costaggini in 1878. Over the course of the next two decades Cox, now residing in Washington, D.C., restored the Frieze of American History and the Apotheosis of Washington in the Rotunda, and designed murals for three first-floor corridors in the Capitol's House wing, now known as the Cox Corridors. Assisted by Cliff Young, Cox completed painting for two of these corridors before his death. In 1958 Cox also painted a portrait of Henry Clay for the Senate Reception Room and in 1975 completed a mural depicting the 1969 moon landing in the Brumidi Corridor.

Cox taught at the Art Students League in 1940 and 1941, and was active in professional organizations throughout his career. He served as President of the American Artists Professional League and the National Society of Mural Painters, and Vice President of both the Fine Arts Federation and the New York Architectural League. He was a member of the board of the New York Municipal Art Society and served on the the New York City Art Commission.

Cox retired in March 1982 at the age of 86 and died the following September.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Allyn Cox papers relating to U.S. Capitol murals, 1970-1974, donated by the Committee on House Administration, via Cindy Szady in 1981. Papers include a resume; a cost estimate by Cox for designing and executing mural decorations in the U.S. Capitol, 1970; a letter, 1974, from the Office of the Architect of the Capitol to the Capitol Historical Society enclosing photocopies of printed material pertinent to the unveiling and dedication of the Capitol rotunda frieze in 1954; miscellaneous printed material, 1971-1974; and 15 photographs of the murals in the Capitol.
Provenance:
The bulk of the Allyn Cox papers was donated in 1977 and 1983 by the Estate of Allyn Cox, Stephen M. Pulsifer, Exectuor, including material that had been loaned for microfiliming in 1969. Two mural sketches were donated by the Essex County Greenbelt Association in 1984.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and are not served to researchers. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Muralists -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Citation:
Allyn Cox papers, 1856-1982. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.coxally
See more items in:
Allyn Cox papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90c9efb57-6d34-4007-ad8a-8ce4b40537fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-coxally
Online Media:

Eliot Candee Clark papers

Creator:
Clark, Eliot Candee, 1883-  Search this
Names:
Clark, Margaret W. Fowler  Search this
Clark, Walter, 1848-1917  Search this
Sparks, Leon  Search this
Wyeth, Andrew, 1917-2009  Search this
Extent:
6.14 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Travel diaries
Diaries
Sketches
Photographs
Place:
India -- description and travel
Europe -- description and travel
United States -- description and travel
Morocco -- description and travel
Date:
1839-1983
Summary:
The papers of Virginia painter Eliot Candee Clark measure 6.14 linear feet and date from 1839 to 1984. The papers include biographical materials, correspondence, 21 diaries and notebooks, writings and notes, personal business records, photographs, 9 sketchbooks, and artwork and artifacts. Many of the materials relate to Clark's travels in Europe, India, and throughout the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Virginia painter Eliot Candee Clark measure 6.14 linear feet and date from 1839 to 1984. The papers include biographical materials, correspondence, 21 diaries and notebooks, writings and notes, personal business records, photographs, 9 sketchbooks, and artwork and artifacts. Many of the materials relate to Clark's travels in Europe, India, and throughout the United States.

Scattered biographical materials include awards, an address book, printed material relating to various memberships, and resumes. Records of the Fowler family are also found. Clark's correspondence is with family including Walter Clark, friends, colleagues, and galleries and institutions. Notable correspondents include Leon Sparks and Andrew Wyeth.

Twenty-one volumes of diaries and notebooks are written by Clark and his wife, Margaret Fowler Clark. The diaries contain traditional dated diary entries; others document travels. The notebooks include drafts of writings, lists of artists, financial notes, sketches, and school assignments.

Writings include drafts of articles, book manuscripts, plays, and essays by Clark. A small amount of personal business records consist of legal records, price lists, receipts for personal purchases, and sales and consignment records for Clark's works of art.

Printed materials include books containing works of art by Clark, clippings, a dismantled clippings scrapbook, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and blank postcards. Photographs are of Clark, the Clark family, friends, colleagues, events, homes, and of works of art. Travel photographs are from Clark's trips to Europe, India, Morocco, and the United States.

Nine sketchbooks depict Nova Scotia, Canada, Albemarle County, Virginia, and India. Artwork and artifacts consist of scattered sketches by Clark, and prints by others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1839-1980 (5 folders; Box 1, OV7)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1874-1984 (1 linear foot; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Diaries and Notebooks, circa 1900-1977 (0.8 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, circa 1940-1978 (1.6 linear feet; Box 2-4)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1917-1983 (0.2 linear feet: Box 4)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1878-1975 (1.0 linear feet; Box 4-5)

Series 7: Photographs, 1880s-1980 (0.5 linear feet; Box 5-6, OV7, MGP2)

Series 8: Sketchbooks, 1916-1940s (0.5 linear feet; Box 6)

Series 9: Artwork and Artifacts, circa 1900-circa 1940s (0.5 linear feet; Box 6, OV7)
Biographical / Historical:
Eliot Candee Clark (1883-1980) was a landscape painter, writer, and art historian who worked primarily in Virginia.

Eliot Clark was born in 1883 in New York City to artist Walter Clark and Jennie Woodruff Clark. As a child with his father's encouragement and guidance, Eliot Clark began exhibiting as early as the age of nine. submitted works to be exhibited at various New York City clubs as a child. By 1896, at the age of thirteen, he began exhibiting regularly at the National Academy of Design. In 1900, at the age of seventeen, Clark exhibited at the Society of American Artists' Annaul. At one point he even shared a studio with his father. From 1904 to 1906, he traveled throughout Europe and painted en plein air. Clark returned to the New York City area and summered in Kent, Connecticut where he continued to paint and exhibit his work. His first one-man show was at Doll & Richards Gallery in New York City.

Eliot Clark was also an art historian, critic, and educator. In 1916 Clark published his first monograph on Alexander H. Wyant. His other works included a book on John Henry Twachtman, published in 1924 and History of the National Academy of Design (1954). Clark also served as president of the American Watercolor Society between 1920 and 1923. He taught at the Art Students League in New York City but ultimately settled in Charlottesville, Virginia where he taught summer painting classes.

Throughout his life, Clark travelled throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, India, and to Africa. A lengthy trip to India from 1937 to 1938 inspired his study of the religion, mysticism, and art of the country.

Eliot Clark served as president of the National Academy of Design in the 1950s and exhibited until his death in 1980 at the age of ninety-seven. He was survived by his second wife, Margaret Fowler Clark.
Separated Materials:
The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries also holds Eliot Candee Clark papers.
Provenance:
The Eliot Candee Clark papers were donated by his widow Margaret Fowler Clark between 1980 and 1984.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Virginia  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American -- Virginia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Travel diaries
Diaries
Sketches
Photographs
Citation:
Eliot Candee Clark papers, 1839-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.clarelio
See more items in:
Eliot Candee Clark papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ba0dbe98-7be8-4f66-8866-72065dc81858
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-clarelio
Online Media:

American Academy in Rome records

Creator:
American Academy in Rome  Search this
Names:
American Academy in Rome  Search this
American School of Architecture in Rome  Search this
American School of Classical Studies in Rome  Search this
Aldrich, Chester Holmes, 1871-1940  Search this
Boring, William, 1859-1937  Search this
Breck, George, 1863-1920  Search this
Dinsmoor, William B.  Search this
Egbert, J. C. (James Chidester), 1859-1948  Search this
Ely, Theo. N.  Search this
Faulkner, Barry, 1881-1966  Search this
Guernsey, Roscoe  Search this
Hewlett, James Monroe  Search this
Kendall, William M.  Search this
La Farge, C. Grant (Christopher Grant), 1862-1938  Search this
Marquand, Allan, 1853-1924  Search this
McKim, Charles Follen, 1847-1909  Search this
Mead, William Rutherford, 1846-1928  Search this
Millet, Francis Davis, 1846-1912  Search this
Morey, Charles Rufus, 1877-1955  Search this
Mowbray, H. Siddons (Harry Siddons), 1858-1928  Search this
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Pope, John Russell, 1874-1937  Search this
Roberts, Laurance P.  Search this
Smith, James Kellum, 1893-1963  Search this
Stevens, Gorham Phillips, 1876-  Search this
Vedder, Elihu, 1836-1923  Search this
Vitale, Ferrucio, 1875-1933  Search this
Ward, John Quincy Adams, 1830-1910  Search this
Extent:
65.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1855-2012
Summary:
The records of the American Academy in Rome measure 65.9 linear feet and date from 1855 to 2012. The collection documents the history of the institution from its inception in 1894 as the American School of Architecture in Rome, through the end of World War II, and chronicles the contributions the academy has made to America's cultural and intellectual development. Nearly one-half of the collection consists of an unprocessed addition received in 2014 containing records that mostly post-date World War II and include correspondence and subject files of officers and executives based in the New York office of American Academy in Rome.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the American Academy in Rome measure 65.9 linear feet and date from 1855 to 2012. The collection documents the history of the institution from its inception in 1894 as the American School of Architecture in Rome, through the end of World War II, and chronicles the contributions the academy has made to America's cultural and intellectual development. Nearly one-half of the collection consists of an unprocessed addition received in 2014 containing records that mostly post-date World War II and include correspondence and subject files of officers and executives based in the New York office of American Academy in Rome.

Items predating the 1894 founding of the American School of Architecture in Rome are personal papers and memorabilia of individuals associated with the institution.

Series 1: Predecessor Institutions, is composed of the records of the American School of Architecture in Rome, 1894-1898, and the American School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1895-1913. Records of the American School of Architecture in Rome include records of its Managing Committee, correspondence, financial records, and printed matter. Among the Managing Committee's records are notes and correspondence relative to the founding of the institution, minute books and reports; also, legal documents including records concerning its dissolution prior to being reorganized as the American Academy in Rome. Correspondence is mostly that of Vice President Charles F. McKim who handled administrative matters. Financial records include capital stock certificates, invoices and receipts. Printed matter consists of scholarship competition announcements.

Records of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome include records of its Managing Committee, Committee on Fellowships, publications, printed matter, and treasurers' records. The Managing Committee's records consist of the proposed resolution concerning its merger with the American Academy in Rome. Committee on Fellowship records are comprised of correspondence, reports, and fellowship applications. Publications records include correspondence and invoices. Printed matter includes general information, annual reports of the Managing Committee and Director, annual reports of the Committee on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, fellowship applications and examination questions, and the proposed consolidation agreement. Treasurers' records include the files of Alex. Bell and Willard V. King. Bell's sparse records consist of a budget, receipts for salary payments, an invoice, canceled checks, and correspondence. King's files, while more substantial than those that survive from Bell's tenure, are quite incomplete. They include correspondence, banking records, budgets and financial statements, investment records, invoices, and receipts for salaries and expenses.

Series 2: Board of Trustees Records, is comprised of legal documents, minutes, and reports; records of Trustee committees; records of officers; and records of individual Trustees. Legal documents, 1897-1926 and undated, consist of by-laws and amendments, certificate of incorporation, and constitution and amendments. Minutes and reports of the Board of Trustees, 1897-1947 and 1957, including those of its annual meetings, are carbon copies rather than the official minute books, and are incomplete. Reports of officers are incomplete, as well. Also included are reports of Officers'/Trustees' visits to Rome, and reports of the Director and Secretary in Rome submitted to the Board of Trustees.

Records of Trustee committees, 1905-1946 and undated, consist of reports and/or minutes arranged alphabetically by committee; these, too are incomplete, with many committees represented by a single report. Committees represented are: Building Committee, Carter Memorial Committee, Endowment Committee, Executive Committee, Finance Committee, Library Committee, McKim Memorial Committee, Nominating Committee, Committee on Publications. Committee on the School of Classical Studies records consist of its own minutes and reports, reports of its Advisory Council and the Jury on Classical Fellowships. Committee on the School of Classical Studies also include reports of officers and staff of the School of Classical Studies to the Committee on the School of Classical Studies as follows: Director, Professor in Charge, Annual Professor, Director of the Summer Session, Professor of Archaeology, Curator of the Museum, Editor, Librarian, and Committee on the Welfare of Women Students. Committee on the School of Fine Arts records consist of its own minutes and reports, reports of its Special Committee on the Plan and Expense of a Department of Music in the School of Fine Arts, and report of Fine Arts Program, Triptych Project with the Citizens Committee for the Army and Navy, Inc.; also, reports of officers and staff of the School of Fine Arts to the Committee on the School of Fine Arts as follows: Director, Professor in Charge, Associate in Charge, Annual Professor, Professor in Charge of the Department of Musical Composition. In addition, there are minutes and/or reports of the Committee of Twelve and Subcommittee of Five and the Special Committee on Villa Aurelia.

Records of Officers. 1898-1957 and undated, consist mainly of correspondence files and reports, with large numbers of transcriptions and carbon copies. Included are records of: Presidents Charles F. McKim, William R. Mead, Charles A. Platt, John Russell Pope, and James Kellum Smith; Vice Presidents Theodore N. Ely, George B. McClellan, and Henry James; Secretaries H. Siddons Mowbray (Secretary/Treasurer), Frank D. Millet, C. Grant La Farge, William B. Dinsmoor, and H. Richardson Pratt; and Treasurers William R. Mead, William A. Boring, Leon Fraser, and Lindsay Bradford Office files of President Mead, Secretaries Millet and La Farge, and Treasurer Boring are the most complete; files of other individuals, the Vice Presidents in particular, are often quite sparse.

Records of individual Trustees, 1902-1946 and undated, consist of material relating to official Academy business that was created or maintained by each in his capacity as trustee. (Note: many of these individuals also served as officers or staff of the Academy, and their records documenting those functions will be found in the appropriate series.) Included in this subseries are the records of: Chester H. Aldrich, Gilmore D. Clarke, James C. Egbert, Barry Faulkner, Allan C. Johnson, William M. Kendall, C. Grant La Farge, Edward P. Mellon, Charles Dyer Norton, Charles A. Platt, John Russell Pope, Edward K. Rand, John C. Rolfe, James Kellum Smith, S. Breck Trowbridge, Ferruccio Vitale, John Quincy Adams Ward, Andrew F. West, and William L. Westerman. These records tend to be sparse; files maintained by James C. Egbert, Barry Faulkner, Allan C. Johnson, and Ferruccio Vitale are notable exceptions.

Series 3: New York Office Records, consists of records of staff, rosters, printed matter, photographs, personal papers, Association of Alumni of the American Academy in Rome, and miscellaneous records.

Records of staff, 1919-1950 and undated, include the office files of Executive Secretaries Roscoe Guersney, Meriwether Stuart, and Mary T. Williams; Librarian George K. Boyce; and Endowment Fund Campaign Secretaries Phillilps B. Robinson and Edgar I. Williams.

The rosters, 1895-1939 and undated, are printed forms completed by fellows and students, with occasional attachments (usually correspondence or photographs). Included are the rosters of the School of Fine Arts, School of Classical Studies, and School of Classical Studies Summer Sessions.

Printed matter, 1905-[1981?] and undated, has been classified as Academy produced and produced by others. Items produced by the Academy, 1905-[1981?], include general information including act of incorporation and by-laws, fundraising brochure, constitution, Directory of Fellows and Residents, histories of the institution, newsletter of the Director, and printed items relating to special events. Printed matter specifically relating to the School of Classical Studies includes annual announcements, the consolidation agreement, a directory, fellowship announcements and applications, lecture announcements, newsletters, and brochures about summer sessions. School of Fine Arts printed matter includes annual announcements, concert programs, exhibition checklists and catalogs, fellowship announcements and application forms, history, and newsletters.

Printed matter produced by others, 1905-1940 and undated, consists of three scrapbooks of news clippings and photographs compiled by the American Academy in Rome, extensive clipping files, and articles from miscellaneous publications. All of these items are about the American Academy in Rome, or by or about individuals associated with the institution. Also included is a poster for Leave Courses offered at the Academy for U. S. servicemen.

Photographs, 1891-1941 and undated, are organized into the categories of works of art, people, buildings, places, events, and miscellaneous. Works of art are by visiting students and fellows, Frank D. Millet, collaborative problems, Rome Prize Competitions in Architecture, Rome Prize Competitions in Landscape Architecture, and Prix de Rome Competition exhibitions. Photographs of people are both of individuals and groups; among the groups are summer school students and fellowship winners.

Buildings depicted are American Academy properties. Among them are the "New Building," including interior and exterior construction views; studios; and Villas Aurelia, Mirafiore, and Richardson. Also included is a group of photographs of Academy architecture students measuring buildings in Rome and Florence. Places pictured are views of the Academy property and surrounding areas.

Photographs of events include cricket games, Thanksgiving and Fourth of July dinners, Architectural League exhibition, and inauguration of the Manship Fountain. Miscellaneous photographs are of an architectural drawing for a proposed building.

Personal Papers, Memorabilia, and Ephemera, 1855-1923 an undated, were donated to the American Academy in Rome or otherwise left on its premises. None are official records generated by the institution. Included are: Ernest Lewis' photograph album/scrapbook; Allan Marquand's papers; Charles F. McKim's memorabilia, photographs, printed matter, and artifacts; Charles R. Morey's correspondence; and Elihu Vedder's Bible.

Records of the Association of the Alumni of the American Academy in Rome, 1913-1945 and undated), consist of a small number of scattered records including correspondence, fellows' war/government service information (compiled by Sidney Waugh), membership lists, and a newsletter.

Miscellaneous records, 1899-1926 and undated, are writings and architectural records. Writings consist of published and unpublished manuscript material about the American Academy in Rome and its history, and article by H. Siddons Mowbray advising on ornamentation, and text and illustrations for the Art and Archaeology issue on the Academy. Also included are fragments of unidentified letters. Architectural records [oversize] include property and floor plans of Villas Aurora, Chiaraviglio, Ferrari, and Ludovisi.

Series 4: Rome Office Records, consist of records of staff and personal papers. Records of staff, 1903-1947 and undated, include the office files of Directors H. Siddons Mowbray, George Breck, Jesse Benedict Carter, Gorham Phillips Stevens, James Monroe Hewlett, Chester H. Aldrich, Amey Aldrich [Acting Director, very briefly, perhaps unofficially], Charles R. Morey, and Laurance P. Roberts; and records of two members of the School of Fine Arts faculty, Frank P. Fairbanks, Professor of Fine Arts, and Felix Lamond, Professor of Music. Records of Carter, Stevens, Hewlett, and Aldrich appear to be fairly complete; records of early directors are sparse; those of Morey and Roberts appear to be missing significant portions; and those of Professors Fairbanks and Lamond consist of a few scattered items.

Also surviving are the personal papers of Director Gorham Phillips Stevens, 1912-1931 and undated), consisting of correspondence, financial records, and documentation of professional and charitable activities.

Series 5: Unprocessed Addition to the American Academy in Rome Records was received in 2014 and consists of 31.6 linear feet of the New York office's records for officers, directors, and executives.
Arrangement:
It was obvious that before they came to the Archives of American Art the records had been rearranged more than once, and in such a way that materials from many different departments had been intermingled. In keeping with archival theory and practice, the records were organized to reflect the structure and operation of the institution that created the records, making them more understandable and accessible to a wide variety of researchers.

In general, the records of each officer and staff member are arranged alphabetically, with general correspondence preceding the alphabetical sequence; arrangement within each file is chronological, unless noted otherwise.

Records of the American Academy in Rome are organized into five major series. Each series, except series 5, is divided into several subseries, with the arrangement described in detail in the series descriptions.

Missing Title

Series 1: Predecessor Institutions, 1894-1913 (box 1; 0.88 linear ft.; Reels 5749-5750)

Series 2: Board of Trustees Records, 1897-1957, undated (boxes 1-17, 35, 37; 15.25 linear ft.; Reels 5750-5777)

Series 3: New York Office, 1855-circa 1981, undated (boxes 17-32, 36; 15 linear ft.; 5777-5795)

Series 4: Rome Office, 1903-1943, undated (boxes 32-34; 3 linear ft.; 5795-5800)

Series 5: Unprocessed Addition to the American Academy in Rome Records, 1933-2002 (boxes 35-103; 31.6 linear ft.)
Historical Note:
While in Chicago to advise and work on the fine arts section of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, architects Charles F. McKim, Daniel Burnham, and Richard Howland Hunt, painters John La Farge and Frank Millet, and sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and Daniel Chester French, among others, met regularly. From their collaborative experience and discussions came the idea for an American school for artists in Europe. Charles F. McKim was especially enthusiastic. He strongly believed that collaborative experience should be available to future American artists, and perceived a real need for an American school in Europe--preferably in Rome, the very best place to study art, in his opinion.

By March of the following year, McKim was busy devising plans for the school and persuading like-minded architects and artists to assist. He proposed to finance the school by convincing institutions with traveling scholarships in the arts to send those students to Rome. Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, and the Rotch Scholarship fund readily agreed to the scheme, and in ensuing years many others followed suit. In October, 1894, the American School of Architecture in Rome opened temporary quarters in the Palazzo Torlonia. The school consisted of its Director, Austin Lord, three fellows, and a visiting student; its "library" contained but one volume.

A move to the larger, more suitable Villa Aurora occurred in July 1895. Rent from two subtenants (the newly established American School of Classical Studies in Rome and the British and American Archaeological Society Library in Rome), along with a personal contribution from McKim, made this financially feasible.

The American School of Architecture in Rome was incorporated in the State of New York, 1895, and 10 shares of capital stock were issued. Despite substantial fundraising efforts in Chicago, New York, and Boston, severe financial problems continued. The American School of Classical Studies in Rome vacated the Villa Aurora in 1896--and with it went a sizeable portion of the School of Architecture's income. McKim frequently made up the deficit from his own pocket.

Eventually, it was decided that the American School of Architecture in Rome must be reorganized along the lines of the French Academy and that national sponsorship needed to be obtained through an act of Congress. In June of 1897, the American School of Architecture in Rome voted to dissolve itself and create the American Academy in Rome. The new institution would assume all assets and obligations, fellowships in painting and architecture were to be added to the program, and its Board of Trustees would include architects and artists. The Academy is not a school. Its fellows and visiting students, already professionally trained, go to Rome for further development and for collaboration and association with others. In the words of Director Gorham Phillips Stevens: "The object of the American Academy in Rome is not to afford opportunities for a few individuals to perfect themselves for the practice of their chosen professions. The ideal is to create an atmosphere in which a limited number of carefully selected artists and scholars may develop that synthesis of intellectual culture which will make them worthy to preserve and continue the great traditions of the past in order that the standard of art and literature may be handed on from year to year, constantly strengthened and improved."

Beginning in 1901, bills to make the American Academy in Rome a "national institution" were introduced in Congress on several occasions. A hearing was finally scheduled in 1905, and a revised bill that prohibited government funding and specified that U.S. officials may not be Trustees was signed into law. Serious efforts to create an Endowment Fund and secure better quarters were associated with the movement to obtain status as a national institution. The Academy was successful in meeting all of these objectives. In 1904, the Academy moved to the Villa Mirafiore (also known as Villa Mirafiori), which it soon purchased and renovated. The Endowment Fund raised well over a million dollars. Donors of $100,000 to the Endowment Fund, designated "Founders" of the American Academy in Rome, were: The Carnegie Foundation, Henry C. Frick, Harvard College, Charles F. McKim, J. P. Morgan, Sr., J. P. Morgan, Jr., The Rockefeller Foundation, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., William K. Vanderbilt, and Henry Walters. Other categories of donors were "Incorporators" (a new Act of Incorporation was required at the time the American Academy in Rome was chartered as a national institution) and "Life Members."

The American School of Classical Studies in Rome, which had been established by the Archaeological Society in 1895 and during its first year shared the Villa Aurora with the American School of Architecture in Rome, entered into a consolidation agreement with the American Academy in Rome in 1911. Their merger went into effect on the last day of 1912, and ever since, the American Academy in Rome has consisted of the School of Fine Arts and the School of Classical Studies, administered by a common director. The School of Classical Studies is composed of fellows and visiting scholars who are graduate students, secondary teachers, or professors engaged in research in the areas of archaeology, ancient art, philology, and humanistic studies. Women were a part of the School of Classical Studies from its beginning, but were not permitted to participate in the School of Fine Arts until well after World War II. Beginning in 1923, the School of Classical Studies instituted Summer Sessions which appealed to secondary teachers, and attracted an enrollment that was largely female.

Originally, the School of Fine Arts offered fellowships in architecture, painting, and sculpture. Fellowships in landscape architecture were added in 1915; in 1920, a Department of Music was established, and along with it fellowships in musical composition. Fellowships in art history were established in 1947. Unmarried men under age 30 were eligible to compete for the fine arts fellowships awarded annually (except for landscape architecture, awarded every third year); the duration of fellowships ranged from one to three years at various points in the institution's history. In residence along with fellows of the American Academy in Rome, might be holders of various traveling scholarships: the McKim Fellowship, the Columbia Traveling Scholarship, the Perkins Scholarship, the Robinson Traveling Scholarship (Harvard), the Rotch Scholarship, the Julia Appleton Scholarship, the Traveling Scholarship and Stewardson Memorial Scholarship (University of Pennsylvania), the Cresson Scholarship (Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts), the Drexel Institute Traveling Scholarship, the Lazarus Scholarship (Metropolitan Museum of Art), the Lowell Scholarship (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and the Rinehart Scholarship (Peabody Institute, Baltimore). Visiting students, who remained for a much briefer period than fellows or recipients of various traveling scholarships, were admitted to all lectures and granted use the library, but resided elsewhere. The Academy opened an Atelier in downtown Rome for visiting students in 1927, which operated until financial considerations forced its discontinuation seven years later.

As the merger was being planned, J. P. Morgan, Sr., who was interested in both the American Academy in Rome and the American School of Classical Studies in Rome, began buying properties on the Janiculum, adjacent to Villa Aureilia. Villa Aurelia, built on the summit of the Janiculum in 1650, had been bequeathed to the American Academy in Rome in 1909 by Clara Jessup Heyland. Complications surrounding the gift of Villa Aurelia--including the will being contested by Mrs. Heyland's brother, and problems with unsettled tax assessments--were overcome in the interest of acquiring the outstanding building and its extensive grounds. Not long before his death in 1913, Morgan donated his neighboring land, and the American Academy in Rome continued to expand its Janiculum holdings through purchases and gifts from others. Morgan also agreed to provide a loan for construction of a new building. This building, designed by McKim, Mead, and White and known as the Main Building or Academy Building, opened in 1915; it served as the fellows' residence and work area, and included room for the library, offices, and space for exhibitions and other public events.

During World War I, the American Academy in Rome managed to remain open, although no new fellows arrived during the war years and the number of resident fellows and staff dwindled considerably. Most who remained were involved in some type of civilian war work, often with the Red Cross. In fact, Villa Aurelia was rented by the Red Cross in Italy for office space, and the Main Building was offered as a convalescent hospital, but the war ended before it could be put to that use.

After Italy declared war on the United States in 1941, the American Academy in Rome closed for the remainder of World War II. Those who had been awarded fellowships in classics just prior to the Academy's closing were given the option of using their stipends for study at home or waiting until conditions permitted travel to Rome. A very reduced staff stayed to care for the property and continue library cataloguing, coping with often severe wartime shortages of food and fuel. In addition, there were financial hardships. When bank accounts of enemy aliens were frozen and it was no longer possible to transfer funds from the United States, the Swiss Legation and Vatican arranged for loans to keep the Academy and its staff afloat. Funds that would have been awarded to new fellows during this period were put to use in other ways. In 1943, the American Academy in Rome made a grant to the Citizen's Committee for the Army and Navy, Inc. for competitions to award commissions to artists and art students throughout the country, funding more than 100 triptychs for chapels, as well as murals, medals, and sculpture. Seniors in American colleges and universities were eligible to compete for several scholarships for graduate work in classical studies awarded by the American Academy in Rome.

In 1945, the Academy was the site of Leave Courses on various aspects of Italian culture offered to servicemen. From the end of the war until the Academy reopened at the start of the 1946/47 academic year, G.I. Fellowships were offered to discharged soldiers wishing to study at the Academy, making the institution eligible to receive surplus equipment and rations. During this time intensive planning was underway for administrative changes and new programs.

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1893 -- While in Chicago to collaborate on the fine arts section for the World's Columbian Exposition, architects Charles F. McKim, Daniel Burnham, Richard Howland Hunt, painters John La Farge, and Sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and Daniel Chester French, among others, met regularly and from their collaborative experience and discussions came the idea for an American school in Europe.

1894 -- American School of Architecture in Rome opened in temporary quarters at the Palazzo Torlonia with Austin Lord, Director, three fellows, and a visiting student.

1895 -- Villa Aurora leased with 2 subtenants, the American School of Classical Studies and the British and American Archaeological Society Library in Rome American School of Architecture incorporated and 10 shares of capital stock issued (2 each to McKim and Hunt, and 1 to Burnham, Kendall, Schermerhorn, Boring, Garland, and Dill) McKim visits Rome.

1896 -- Metropolitan Museum of Art, administrator of Jacob H. Lazarus Scholarship for the study of mural painting, agrees to send the winner to Rome American School of Classical Studies in Rome vacates Villa Aurora.

1897 -- American School of Architecture in Rome dissolved and reorganized as the American Academy in Rome; the assets (including the lease on Villa Aurora) of the American School of Architecture in Rome were transferred and its program expanded to include fellowships in painting and sculpture Samuel A. B. Abbott appointed first Director Rome Prize discontinued (for 9 years) due to lack of funds.

1898 -- Incorporated in New York State; trustees begin to focus on raising an endowment.

1904 -- Move to Villa Mirafiore (also known as Villa Mirafiori); occupied until 1914.

1905 -- Chartered by the Congress of the United States; a bill signed by President Roosevelt made the American Academy in Rome a national institution (receiving no government funding and barring U.S. officials from acting as Trustees).

1906 -- Purchase of Villa Mirafiore finalized; renovations begun.

1909 -- Villa Aurelia bequeathed to the Academy by Clara Jessup Heyland (used until 1932); there were protracted problems surrounding the acquisition of the property including a brother who contested the will and unsettled taxes.

1911 -- School of Classical Studies in Rome (established by the Archaeological Institute of America in 1895) and the American Academy in Rome announce their consolidation [the merger became effective on the final day of 1912].

1912 -- Lands on the Janiculum adjacent to Villa Aurelia, recently acquired by J. Pierpont Morgan, Sr., transferred to the American Academy in Rome.

1913 -- American Academy in Rome now consists of the School of Fine Arts and the School of Classical Studies. New York office moves to the Architect's Building, 101 Park Ave., remaining at this location until 1973. By this date, largely through the generosity of J. Pierpont Morgan, Sr., nearly all of the land bounded by Via Angelo Masina, Via Giacomo Medici, Via Pietro Riselli, and the Aurelian Wall on the Janiculum had been purchased and many improvements made to the properties near the Villa Aurelia. Construction begins on the new Academy building designed by McKim, Mead, and White and situated on the grounds of Villa Aurelia; financed through a loan from J. Pierpont Morgan, Sr. (after Morgan Sr.'s death, his son offered to cancel the loan at an amount equal to funds raised by the Academy for the purpose).

1915 -- First Fellowship in Landscape Architecture established; opening of new Academy building housing the fellows' residential quarters, work areas, library, offices, and spaces for public programs.

1917 -- Villa Aurelia rented to the Red Cross for office space, and the new Main building was slated to become a convalescent hospital, but the war ended before it could be put to use.

1919 -- New York office reorganized by Roscoe Guernsey, executive secretary; sale of Villa Mirafiore; Academic Council established in Rome.

1920 -- Department of Music and Fellowship in Musical Composition established.

1923 -- School of Classical Studies establishes summer sessions, largely attended by teachers.

1926 -- Second Fellowship in Landscape Architecture funded by Garden Club of America (later permanently endowed).

1927 -- Academy opens an Atelier in downtown Rome, providing studios for visiting students (operated until 1934).

1929 -- First Thomas Spencer Jerome lecturer appointed.

1941 -- Academy closes for duration of World War II; a skeletal staff remain behind to care for the property and continue library cataloguing; Italy declares war on the United States.

1942 -- After transfer of funds from the U.S. proved impossible and enemy aliens were prohibited from withdrawing their own funds from Italian banks, the Swiss Legation and Vatican offered assistance to the Academy by providing loans.

1943 -- Academy grant to Citizen's Committee for the Army and Navy, Inc., funded hundreds of triptychs; murals, medals, and sculptures also commissioned Academy awards scholarships in classical studies at American colleges and universities.

1945 -- "Leave courses," held at the Academy, consisting mainly of lectures by distinguished scholars still in Rome, instituted for U.S. servicemen.

1946 -- Regular program resumes at the start of the academic year.

1947 -- Fellowship in the History of Art established.

1965 -- Loan of printed matter for microfilming by the Archives of American Art (reels ITRO 2-3 and 11-13).

1973 -- New York office moves to American Federation of Arts building, 41 East 65th St. (until 1993).

1982 -- Gift of New York office records to the Archives of American Art.

1990 -- Gift of Rome office records to the Archives of American Art.

1993 -- New York office moves to Metropolitan Club, 7 East 60th St.
Related Material:
Papers of a number of former fellows, trustees, and other individuals associated with the American Academy in Rome are among the holdings of the Archives of American Art.

Chaloner Prize Foundation records, 1915-1974 (microfilm reels 5664-5669) were received with the American Academy in Rome records. They have been arranged and described as a separate collection.

Valentine, Lucia and Alan Valentine. The American Academy in Rome, 1894-1969. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1973.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels ITRO 2-3, and ITRO 11-13) including annual reports, exhibition catalogues, a history of the American Academy in Rome, the American Academy in Rome at the World's Fair, and the Golden Gate Exposition and newsletter. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and can be found at the American Academy in Rome, Italy. This material is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The material on reels ITRO 2-3 and ITRO 11-13 were lent to the Archives of American Art for microfilming by the American Academy in Rome in 1965. Records of predecessor institutions, the Board of Trustees, and the New York office, including photographs and personal papers, were donated in 1982 by the Academy president, Calvin G. Rand. In 1990, Rand also gifted the Rome office records and the personal documents of Gorham Phillips Stevens. An addition of New York office records was donated in 2014 by the Academy director, Adele Chatfield-Taylor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. research center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Architecture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Architecture, Classical -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art schools -- Italy -- Rome  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
American Academy in Rome records, 1855-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ameracar
See more items in:
American Academy in Rome records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9eb425e5a-26de-478b-8ecc-8a9006e9dc52
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ameracar
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