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Emmy Lou Packard Papers

Creator:
Packard, Emmy Lou, 1914-1998  Search this
Names:
American Civil Liberties Union  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Covarrubias, Miguel, 1904-1957  Search this
Edmunds, John, 1913-  Search this
Kahlo, Frida  Search this
Lange, Dorothea  Search this
O'Gorman, Juan, 1905-  Search this
O'Higgins, Pablo, 1904-  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Reynolds, Malvina  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Extent:
9.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Interviews
Diaries
Date:
1900-1990
Summary:
The Emmy Lou Packard papers measure 9.4 linear feet and date from 1900 to 1990, and focus on the career of painter, printmaker, muralist, and sculptor Emmy Lou Packard. Also found are extensive materials relating to Packard's personal and professional relationship with muralist Diego Rivera and painter Frida Kahlo, with whom Packard lived for one year in Mexico. Papers include correspondence, financial records, notes, writings, exhibition files, photographs, and printed material.
Scope and Contents note:
The Emmy Lou Packard papers measure 9.4 linear feet and date from 1900 to 1990, and focus on the career of painter, printmaker, muralist, and sculptor Emmy Lou Packard. Also found are extensive materials relating to Packard's personal and professional relationship with muralist Diego Rivera and painter Frida Kahlo, with whom Packard lived for one year in Mexico. Papers include correspondence, financial records, notes, writings, exhibition files, photographs, and printed material.

Biographical materials include resumes, personal forms, and certificates. Correspondence is with family, friends, and colleagues, including muralist Anton Refregier, songwriter Malvina Reynolds, and composer John Edmunds. There is one letter from Dorothea Lange. Also found is correspondence with various political and arts organizations, such as the American Civil Liberties Union and the Russian magazine Soviet Woman. Much of the correspondence discusses personal relationships and political and art-related activities. Additional correspondence with and concerning Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo is arranged in Series 6.

Personal business records found within the papers include studio real estate and rent records, insurance records, price lists for artwork, consignment records, and miscellaneous receipts. There is one interview transcript of an interview with Packard for the Radical Elders Oral History Project. The papers include a series of notebooks/diaries, address lists, and other notes.

Packard's reference files and personal papers documenting her professional and close personal relationship with Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo are arranged into a separate series. They include her research files for a planned book on the two artists, personal letters between Packard and the couple, as well as several interesting photographs. Also found in this series are notes, writings, and printed materials relating to Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and other Mexican artists, such as Covarrubius, Juan O'Gorman, and Pablo O'Higgins.

The collection also includes typescripts and additional writings by Packard and others. Artwork consists of orginal drawings and prints by Packard and others not directly associated with projects. Exhibition and project files for many of Packard's commissioned projects are also found within the collection, including her files for the restoration of Anton Refregier's Rincon Annex Post Office mural in San Francisco and the Coit Tower murals in San Francisco. Many of the project files contain correspondence, reports, contracts, printed material, photographs, and artwork.

The papers also include photographs of Packard, her family, residences, artwork, friends, and colleagues, including Cesar Chavez, Juan O'Gorman, Malvina Reynolds, Charles Safford, Ralph Stackpole, and Tennessee Williams. Two scrapbooks are found, as well as additional printed materials such as clippings and exhibition announcements and catalogs. There are also two artifact items, a vinyl record of Malvina Reynolds and a political campaign button.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into fifteen series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1942-1985 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1919-1990 (Box 1-3; 2.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1945-1985 (Box 3; 21 folders)

Series 4: Interview Transcript, 1979 (Box 3; 1 folder)

Series 5: Notes, 1900-1985 (Box 3-4, 10; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 6: Reference Files on Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, 1929-1986 (Box 5, 10, OV 11; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 7: Writings by Packard, 1953-1984 (Box 6; 17 folders)

Series 8: Writings by Others, 1955-1984 (Box 6; 19 folders)

Series 9: Artwork, 1921-1976 (Box 6; 10 folders)

Series 10: Exhibition Files, 1950-1964 (Box 6, OV 11; 5 folders)

Series 11: Project Files, 1953-1985 (Box 6-7, 10, OV 11; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 12: Photographs, 1914-1982 (Box 8, 10; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 13: Scrapbooks, 1947-1950 (Box 8, 10; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 14: Printed Material, 1936-1988 (Box 8-9, 10; 1 linear foot)

Series 15: Artifacts, 1984 (Box 9-10, OV 11; 2 folders)
Biographical/Historical note:
Emmy Lou Packard was born in Imperial Valley, California on April 15, 1914, to Walter and Emma Leonard Packard. In the late 1920s she lived with her family in Mexico City where she became acquainted with Diego Rivera, from whom she received regular art criticism and encouragement. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and completed courses in fresco and sculpture at the California School of Fine Arts in 1940. That year and the next, Packard worked as a full-time painting assistant to Rivera on his 1,650 square-foot fresco at the World's Fair in San Francisco. During this project, Packard became very close to Rivera and Frida Kahlo and returned to Mexico with them and spent a year living with the couple.

From then on, except for in 1944-1945 working for a defense plant, Packard worked and grew in various aspects of her art. In addition to her work in fresco, Packard is known for her work in watercolor, oil, mosaic, laminated plastic, concrete, and printmaking, both in linocuts and woodblocks. She received numerous commissions that included installations for ships, hotels, and private homes for which she executed large woodcuts and mural panels. During the 1950s and 1960s, Packard was hired to restore several historic murals, most notably the Rincon Annex Post Office mural by Anton Refregier and the Coit Tower murals in San Francisco.

Between 1966 and 1967 she was commissioned by architects to design and execute a number of concrete and mosaic pieces, one of which went to the Mirabeau Restaurant in Kaiser Center, Oakland. She also designed and executed a mural for the Fresno Convention Center Theater during that same period. In 1973-1974, she designed and supervised a glazed brick mural for a public library in Pinole, California.

Packard had one-woman shows at the San Francisco Museum of Art, Raymond and Raymond Gallery (San Francisco), Addison Gallery of American Art (Andover, Mass.), Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts, Pushkin Museum (Moscow), and March Gallery (Chicago). Emmy Lou Packard died in 1998.
Related Archival Materials note:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Emmy Lou Packard conducted by Mary Fuller McChesney in 1964.
Provenance:
Emmy Lou Packard donated her papers to the Archives of American Art from 1984-1988.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, American  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, Mexican  Search this
Muralists -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Interviews
Diaries
Citation:
Emmy Lou Packard papers, 1900-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.packemmy
See more items in:
Emmy Lou Packard Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-packemmy
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Online Media:

Meet Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-12-03T20:39:07.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1BtEJqvhosw

Meet Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Interviews
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-12-05T14:06:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_j25Z8jzqWo0

Oral history interview with Patssi Valdez

Interviewee:
Valdez, Patssi  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Otis Art Institute  Search this
Self-Help Graphics and Art, Inc.  Search this
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Mesa-Bains, Amalia  Search this
Extent:
80 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 May 26-June 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Patssi Valdez conducted 1999 May 26-June 2, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews were conducted at the artist's home/studio in Los Angeles, California. Valdez discusses her current show at the Laguna Art Museum, "A Precarious Comfort," and the intensely personal nature of the work being exhibited; the liberating aspects of painting and her journey from dealing with the problems and concerns of the Chicano community to a more internal focus in which she examines her personal emotional life through symbol and imagination; how, in her work, landscape has come to represent emotions and states of mind; health problems and her turning to alternative methods of healing; her relationship with Asco and her eventual break from the group to pursue her art studies at Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles (now Otis College of Art and Design) and in New York, and with a NEA grant to Europe and Mexico; difficulties she experienced with her decision to focus on art school and on her survival as an artist, while trying to keep in touch with friends and peers; friendships with Amalia Mesa Bains, Christina Fernandez, and Gronk, as well as with Sister Karen Boccalero whose Self-Help Graphics contributed so much to the growth of a younger generation of Chicano artists; fellow Asco artist Harry Gamboa, Jr., and their mutual goals in their art to subvert Chicano stereotypes; what constitutes Chicano art and how the Les Demon des Anges show changed her perspective; and her ability to create change through her art.
Biographical / Historical:
Patssi Valdez (1951-) is a painter, and installation artist from Los Angeles, California. Valdez is known for her boldly rendered works that vary in themes from homages to female deities to mystical environments.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 32 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Inititatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.valdez99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-valdez99

Oral history interview with Frank Romero

Interviewee:
Romero, Frank  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
Otis Art Institute -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Mugnaini, Joseph A.  Search this
Rocha, Roberto de la  Search this
Sanchez Luján, Gilbert  Search this
Sheets, Millard, 1907-1989  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Extent:
99 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 January 17-March 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Frank Romero conducted 1997 January 17-March 2, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art, in Romero's studio, in Los Angeles, Calif.
Romero discusses his growing up in East Los Angeles and his large extended family; his earliest art studies in the public schools; attending the Otis Art Institute where he studied with Joe Mugnaini and had contact with Millard Sheets and Peter Voulkos; the "very polyglut culture" of East Los Angeles; the influences of television, western movies, rock-and-roll, and rhythm and blues on his early musical/artistic taste; time spent in New York; returning to Los Angeles in 1969; and his marriage and family.
He describes his move into Carlos Almaraz's house which became the informal meeting place of the artist group Los Four (Almaraz, Romero, Gilbert Sanchez Lujan, and Roberto "Beto" de la Rocha); the Los Four show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1974; and the stylistic aesthetics of Los Four.
Romero describes the "boys club" nature of Chicano art centers; his contributions to the Chicano art movement; his relationship to the Chicano/Mexican culture and mainstream U.S. culture; murals done by members of Los Four for the Inner City Mural Program; his work for the Metropolitan Transit Authority; the Murals of Aztlan exhibit in 1981 at the Craft and Folk Art Museum; and his shows at the ARCO Center for the Visual Arts. He concludes with his assessment of the Chicano arts movement, the relationship between economic and art cycles, and the role of the more established artists to those of a younger generation.
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Romero (1941- ) is a painter from Los Angeles, Calif.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 27 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Street art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.romero97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-romero97

Oral history interview with Gilbert Sanchez Lujan

Interviewee:
Sanchez Luján, Gilbert  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Rocha, Roberto de la  Search this
Romero, Frank  Search this
Extent:
104 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Nov. 7-17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Gilbert Lujan conducted 1997 Nov. 7-17, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art, in Los Angeles, Calif. and La Mesa, N.M.
Sanchez Lujan discusses his growing up in a rural community, East Los Angeles, and Mexico; how early experiences and changes in culture have affected his art and developed his interest in history and politics; his attraction to black culture and the relationship of art as a medium for inter-ethnic interaction where politics and human nature create divisions; his understanding of racial segregation and apartheid in California society; coming into consciousness as a Chicano; and his collaboration and the formation of Los Four with Roberto de la Rocha, Carlos Almaraz, and Frank Romero.
Biographical / Historical:
Gilbert Sanchez Lujan (1940-2011) was a painter from Los Angeles and La Mesa, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 42 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Latino Pool Allocation.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- La Mesa -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lujan97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lujan97

Oral history interview with Elsa Flores

Interviewee:
Flores, Elsa  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Extent:
11 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (60 mins. each), analog)
209 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Feb. 18-Apr. 30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Elsa Flores conducted 1997 Feb. 18-Apr. 30, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews took place in Flores' studio, in South Pasadena, Calif., over four sessions. Flores discusses her parents' diverse backgrounds and her difficult childhood and adolescence; the development of her political consciousness; her involvement with Chicanismo; her interests in art, photography, and music, including being a member of California State University, Los Angeles mariachi band; her art, which she considers more biographical and mystical than ethnic; her use, initially, of a dark palette to distinguish her work from that of her husband, Carlos Almaraz, and changing to a brighter, more optimistic palette after Almaraz's was diagnosed with AIDS. She recalls Almaraz's energy and genius; his struggles with AIDS and his search for alternative healing methods; finding solace in Kauai; and his request to have his ashes strewn around Kauai at his favorite places. Flores comments on the difficult period after Almaraz's death; her devotion to their daughter; keeping Almaraz's work at the forefront of public awareness; and her own art career.
Biographical / Historical:
Elsa Flores (1955-) is a painter from California. Married to painter Carlos Almaraz.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Women painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.flores97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-flores97

Oral history interview with Willie Herrón

Interviewee:
Herrón, Willie, 1951-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Extent:
7 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (6 hrs.), analog)
109 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2000 Feb. 5-Mar. 17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Willie Herrón conducted 2000 Feb. 5-Mar. 17, by Jeffrey J. Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews took place in a restaurant, City Terrace, East Los Angeles, Calif. Herrón describes his childhood growing up in East Los Angeles, culminating with an extensive discussion of the circumstances surrounding the painting of his most acclaimed mural, "The Wall that Cracked Open" in City Terrace; founding the avant-garde Chicano art group Asco along with Harry Gamboa, Jr., Patssi Valdez, and Gronk; his experience as leader of the band Los Illegals and as a cofounder of the alternative music space Club Vex with Self Help Graphics' Sister Karen Boccalero; the Chicano mural movement, particularly his undertakings in City Terrace, Boyle Heights, and at the Estrada Courts and Ramona Gardens housing projects in East Los Angeles; his commitment to working with at-risk youth and his strong desire to expand the stylistic and iconographic parameters of the medium through the incorporation of graffiti; and an assessment of Asco's role in expanding the continuum of Chicano art and identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Willie Herrón (1951-) is a painter, graphic artist, muralist, and musician from Los Angeles, Calif. Herrón is known as one of the premiere artists and musicians to emerge out of the Chicano arts movement during the 1970s.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview and transcription provided by the SI Latino Fund of 1997.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art and music  Search this
Graffiti art  Search this
Street art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American musicians -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.herron00
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-herron00

Oral history interview with Enrique Chagoya

Interviewee:
Chagoya, Enrique  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
95 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2001 July 25-August 6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Enrique Chagoya conducted July 25-August 6, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
The interview takes place at Chagoya's home in South San Francisco (sessions 1,2) and at Karlstrom's San Francisco office (session 3). Chagoya's wife, Kara Maria, joins in for the final portion of the interview. Chagoya discusses activities in Mexico and the U.S.; his involvement with the Galeria de la Raza and the Chicano Movement; his work, including books that are based on Pre-Columbian codices; his application of "reverse anthropology," the history of the Americas and Europe, as if Mexico conquered Europe; Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera; the legacy of Mexican muralism and the union of art and ideology; the nature of his own interest in Pre-Columbian imagery; his sabbatical year in Paris; collaborations with his wife Kara Maria, including issues of self-projection into works of art; artistic responsibility; creation of hybrid cultures; the separation of his art from other Chicano art; and identity as a Mexican. Chagoya's wife, painter Kara Maria, discusses her training at UC Berkeley, meeting Chagoya; their evolving relationship as artists; his role as mentor; and her separate artistic identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Enrique Chagoya (1953-) is a Mexican American painter, graphic artist, and educator in San Francisco, California. Kara Maria (1968-) is Chagoya's wife.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 13 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Indian art -- Central America  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chagoy01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chagoy01

Oral history interview with Barbara Carrasco

Interviewee:
Carrasco, Barbara, 1955-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Students  Search this
University of California, San Francisco. School of Fine Arts -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Chavez, Cesar, 1927-  Search this
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Valadez, John, 1951-  Search this
Extent:
87 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 April 13-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Barbara Carrasco conducted 1999 April 13 and 26, by Jeffrey Rangel, in two sessions, for the Archives of American Art.
Carrasco speaks of the roles played by her parents in her career as an artist, her experiences as a light-skinned Chicana, and the marginalization of women artists within the Chicano art movement; her relationship and marriage to fellow artist, Harry Gamboa, Jr., who has supported women artists; and her perception of Asco ("nausea" in Spanish), a group of artists and performers who joined together during the Chicano civil rights movement. She also discusses the influence of the art professors at UCLA and the quality of the training she received there; working with Carlos Almaraz and John Valadez on the "Zoot Suit" mural in Hollywood; meeting César Chávez and how he in part shaped her identity as a cultural worker; attending California School of Fine Arts, Valencia, California, and receiving her MFA there; other Chicana artists such as Carmen Lomas Garza; and the changes in her most recent work.
Biographical / Historical:
Barbara Carrasco (1955-) is a painter and muralist from Los Angeles, California. Carrasco was born in El Paso, Texas, and a resident of the Los Angeles area since 1956. She is best known for her work inspired by the United Farm Workers Union, by her experiences as a Chicana, by historical events, and by personal issues.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 41 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Initiatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.carras99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carras99

Murals of Aztlán Film Production Records

Creator:
Tartan, James, 1931-  Search this
Names:
Craft and Folk Art Museum  Search this
Extent:
5.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1981
Summary:
The Murals of Aztlán Film Production Records measures 5.1 linear feet and consists of film footage, sound recordings, and notes from the documentary produced by James Tartan during the exhibition Murals of Aztlán: the Street Painters of East Los Angeles at the Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles in 1981. Film and sound elements in the collection include original sound recordings, work print, outtakes, and trims. Also found are production notes, museum memorandums concerning the exhibition schedule, and a transcript of a recorded conversation among muralists.
Scope and Contents:
The Murals of Aztlán Film Production Records measures 5.1 linear feet and consists of film footage, sound recordings, and notes from the documentary produced by James Tartan during the exhibition Murals of Aztlán: the Street Painters of East Los Angeles at the Craft and Folk Art Museum, Los Angeles in 1981. Film and sound elements in the collection include original sound recordings, work print, outtakes, and trims. Also found are production notes, museum memorandums concerning the exhibition schedule, and a transcript of a recorded conversation among muralists.
Arrangement:
Collection arranged as 5 series.

Series 1: Exhibition and Production Notes, 1981 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Work Print and Soundtrack, 1981 (2.6 linear feet; Box 3, FC 1-30)

Series 3: Sound Recordings, 1981 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 4: Voiceover Outtakes, 1981 (0.9 linear feet; FC 31-39)

Series 5: Trims and Outtakes, 1981 (0.9 linear feet; FC 40-48)
Biographical / Historical:
Murals of Aztlán is a documentary film produced by actor and filmmaker James Tartan during the exhibition Murals of Aztlán: the Street Painters of East Los Angeles held at the Craft and Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles, California in 1981. For the exhibition, artists Carlos Almaraz, Gronk, Judithe Hernandez, Willie Herron, Frank Romero, John Valadez and the East Los Streetscrapers (David Botello, Wayne Healy, George Yepes) painted portable murals in the gallery, which was open to the public during the installation of the work. The filmmaker and his crew interviewed the artists involved in the exhibition for the film, filmed the artists creating murals in the gallery, and also filmed the public viewing the artists working and the murals themselves.

James Tartan was born in 1931 and worked as a filmmaker, actor, and voiceover artist. In addition to Murals of Aztlán, Tartan created a documentary film about the 1974 Los Angeles County Museum of Art exhibition Los Four, and has been credited with training many Chicano filmmakers in the 1970s.
Separated Materials:
Additional production material from the documentary Murals of Aztlán, including a final print, is found in the James Tartan Film Collection, 1960-1985, held at the UCLA Chicano Research Center.
Provenance:
Donated by James Tartan, the filmmaker, in 1988.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Street art  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Murals of Aztlán film production records, 1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tartjame
See more items in:
Murals of Aztlán Film Production Records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tartjame

Oral history interview with José and Malaquias Montoya

Interviewee:
Montoya, José  Search this
Creator:
Hernandez, Eduardo  Search this
Montoya, Malaquias, 1938-  Search this
Names:
Royal Chicano Air Force  Search this
Montoya, Malaquias, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
7 Sound cassettes (Sound recording, master (ca. 11 hrs.), analog)
7 Cassettes (Sound recording, duplicate)
373 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1988 Feb. 28-June 2
Scope and Contents:
Interviews of brothers José and Malaquias Montoya conducted 1988 Feb. 28-June 2, by Eduardo Hernandez, for the Archives of American Art.
The Montoya's recall growing up as Mexican-Americans in a rural town in Colorado; moving to urban areas in California; their early education and development of their political awareness; and their artistic experiences, including their founding of the Royal Chicano Air Force, a group working primarily as muralists.
Biographical / Historical:
José Montoya (1932-2013) was a Mexican-American poet and artist in Sacramento, Calif. Malaquias Montoya (1938- ) is a Mexican-American artist in Oakland, Calif. He and his brother José founded Royal Chicano Air Force, a group working primarily as muralists
Occupation:
Muralists -- California  Search this
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, American  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Painters -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.montoy88
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-montoy88

Oral history interview with David Avalos

Interviewee:
Avalos, David  Search this
Interviewer:
Nieto, Margarita  Search this
Extent:
100 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1988 June 16-July 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of David Avalos conducted 1988 June 16-July 5, by Margarita Nieto, for the Archives of American Art. Avalos speaks of his childhood, education at the University of California at San Diego; his involvement with the Centro Cultural de la Raza; the socio-political environment that produced the San Diego Chicano Muralist movement (specifically Chicano Park); the formation of the Border art Workshop (BAW/TAF); the collaboration between the Centro and the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art (presently the San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art); art activity in San Diego; Chicano activity distinct from Los Angeles; his philosophy on conceptual art; and his art career.
Biographical / Historical:
David Avalos (1947-) is a painter and administrator from San Diego, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 44 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Diego -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- San Diego  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.avalos88
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-avalos88

Oral history interview with Rupert Garcia

Interviewee:
Garcia, Rupert, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
San Francisco State University -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Montoya, Malaquias, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
9 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (8 1/2 hrs.), analog)
166 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1995 Sept. 7-1996 June 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Rupert Garcia conducted 1995 Sept. 7-1996 June 24, by Paul J. Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, at Rupert Garcia's home and studio, in Oakland, Calif.
SEPT. 7, 1995 SESSION: Session opens with a discussion of Garcia's exhibition, Aspects of Persistence (1993); the deaths in 1968 of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Marcel Duchamp; Garcia's self-conception and his two roles as political activist and artist; the influence on him of Sartre's "Being and Nothingness"; racism, power, control; his background and being a Mexican-American; need to establish ethnic identity; his realization in high school of wanting to become an artist; his lost opportunity for a scholarship at the San Francisco Art Institute; moving to San Francisco; enlisting in the Air Force and serving in Vietnam; ambivalence about war; experiences at San Francisco State University and his switch from painting to silkscreen; Artes Seis and Galerie de la Raza; artists in the Mission District.
NOV. 10, 1995 SESSION: Painting vs. graphic art; posters; Lucy Lippard; Chicano art; Los Four, Asco, and other artists groups and conferences; conflicts between San Francisco and Oakland groups; emergence of identity groups; Malaquias Montoya, Carlos Almaraz; making art from experience.
JUNE 24, 1996: Politics of culture; social progress; being optimistic but realistic; the Latino movement in the 1990s; Mexican attitudes toward Chicanos; the CARA exhibition at UCLA; Garcia's students at San José State; current work, interests and projects; interest in art history and other intellectual pursuits; and the art market, dealers, and galleries.
Biographical / Historical:
Rupert Garcia (1941-) is a painter and teacher from the San Francisco Bay area, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Pool Allocation Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.garcia95
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-garcia95

Enrique Chagoya papers

Creator:
Chagoya, Enrique  Search this
Names:
California State University, Hayward -- Faculty  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1990-1995
Summary:
The papers of Mexican-American painter, printmaker, and educator Enrique Chagoya measure 0.8 linear feet and date from 1990 to 1995. The collection includes four dossiers compiled by Chagoya for evaluations of his professorship at California State University in Hayward, California. The dossiers contain resumes, student evaluations, correspondence, exhibition announcements and catalogs, clippings, transparencies of artwork, class syllabi, lists of accomplishments as an educator, and lists of exhibitions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Mexican-American painter, printmaker, and educator Enrique Chagoya measure 0.8 linear feet and date from 1990 to 1995. The collection includes four dossiers compiled by Chagoya for evaluations of his professorship at California State University in Hayward, California. The dossiers contain resumes, student evaluations, correspondence, exhibition announcements and catalogs, clippings, transparencies of artwork, class syllabi, lists of accomplishments as an educator, and lists of exhibitions.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series.

Series 1: Enrique Chagoya papers, 1990-1995 (Boxes 1-2; 0.8 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Enrique Chagoya (1953- ) is a painter, printmaker, and educator in San Francisco, California.

Chagoya was born in Mexico City. His father, also an artist, encouraged Chagoya's interest in art from a young age. Chagoya studied political economics at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. It was during this time that he worked in rural areas on development projects. The projects helped shape the political and social perspective that often appears in Chagoya's artwork. After emigrating to the U.S. in 1977, he began working as an illustrator and graphic designer. Chagoya attended the San Francisco Art Institute where he received his bachelor's degree in 1984 and received a master's degree from the University of California at Berkeley in 1987. He also taught at the University of California at Berkeley, as well as California State University at Hayward, and Stanford University.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Enrique Chagoya conducted by Paul Karlstrom in San Francisco, California from July 25 to August 6, 2001 for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
The papers were donated by Enrique Chagoya in 2016.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Rights:
The donor has retained all intellectual property rights, including copyright, that he may own.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Art teachers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Citation:
Enrique Chagoya papers, 1990-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.chagenri
See more items in:
Enrique Chagoya papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chagenri

Oral history interview with Carlos Almaraz

Interviewee:
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Interviewer:
Nieto, Margarita  Search this
Names:
Flores, Elsa  Search this
Extent:
154 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1986 February 6-1987 January 29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carlos Almaraz conducted 1986 February 6-1987 January 29, by Margarita Nieto, for the Archives of American Art.
Almaraz discusses his childhood and education; the development of his interest in art; his experiences living in New York City from 1965 to 1970; and his return to Southern California in the early 1970s. He speaks of his participation in the muralism movement in Los Angeles in the 1970s; his political involvement in the United Farm Workers movement; his personal art work (as opposed to collective work with the muralists); his trip to China in 1974; people he met in New York and southern California; and recent developments in the Los Angeles art world. The interview is concluded with Almaraz speaking of his wife Elsa Flores and their daughter Maya.
Biographical / Historical:
Carlos Almaraz (1941-1989) was a mural painter from Los Angeles, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 8 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 14 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hrs., 56 minutes.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Mexican American art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Street art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.almara86
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-almara86

Oral history interview with Frank Romero, 1997 January 17-March 2

Interviewee:
Romero, Frank, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Subject:
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Mugnaini, Joseph A.  Search this
Rocha, Roberto de la  Search this
Sanchez Luján, Gilbert  Search this
Sheets, Millard  Search this
Voulkos, Peter  Search this
Four (Art group)  Search this
Otis Art Institute  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Street art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13587
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216102
AAA_collcode_romero97
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216102
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Judith Baca, 1986 August 5-6

Interviewee:
Baca, Judith Francisca, 1946-  Search this
Interviewer:
Mesa-Bains, Amalia, 1943-  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, American  Search this
Women painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Arts administrators -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Muralists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5436
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211937
AAA_collcode_baca86
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_211937
Online Media:

Oral history interview with David Avalos, 1988 June 16-July 5

Interviewee:
Avalos, David, 1947-  Search this
Interviewer:
Nieto, Margarita  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Diego -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- San Diego  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5428
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213765
AAA_collcode_avalos88
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213765
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Santa Barraza, 2003 November 21-22

Interviewee:
Barraza, Santa Contreras  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Subject:
Peña, Amado Maurilio  Search this
Orozco, Sylvia  Search this
Wilson, Liliana  Search this
King-Hammond, Leslie  Search this
Tibol, Raquel  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Vargas, Kathy  Search this
De Rivera, José Ruiz  Search this
Ringgold, Faith  Search this
Quirarte, Jacinto  Search this
Bailey, Ben  Search this
Schmidt, Maurice  Search this
Reyna, Israel  Search this
Trevino, Barbina Modesta  Search this
Dodson, Nora Gonzales  Search this
Starpattern, Rita  Search this
Bustamante, Jorge  Search this
Juarez, Isabel  Search this
Delgado, Viola  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13254
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)246712
AAA_collcode_barraz03
Theme:
Latino and Latin American
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_246712
Online Media:

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