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Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona

Photographer:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Owner:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Source:
Lumholtz, Carl, 1851-1922  Search this
Names:
Hyde Exploring Expedition (1902-1903)  Search this
Former owner:
Lumholtz, Carl, 1851-1922  Search this
Extent:
588 Photographic prints
190 copy negatives
Culture:
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Opata  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui)  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Cora  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Tepecano  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Casa Grande (Ariz.)
Arizona -- photographs
Mexico -- Photographs
Date:
1898-1902
Summary:
This collection contains photographic prints and copy negatives taken by Ales Hrdlicka in Arizona and Mexico between 1898 and 1902. The majority of the photographs were donated by George Pepper to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1923. Native communities that Hrdlicka photographed during his research include--Purepecha (Tarasco), Yoeme (Yaqui), Hualapai (Walapai), Havasupai (Coconino), Piipaash (Maricopa), Mojave (Mahave), Tohono O'odham (Papapgo), Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan), Tepecano, Akimel O'odham (Pima), Opata, Cora, Seri, Wixarika (Huichol), Nahua, Otomi and Yoreme (Mayo). Ales Hrdlicka (1869-1943) was born in the Czech Republic moved to the United States in 1881. Hrdlicka became known as the "Father" of Physical Anthropology and worked at the U.S. National Museum (now the National Museum of Natural History).
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains photographic prints taken by Ales Hrdlicka in Arizona and Mexico between 1898 and 1902. It is likely that many of the photographs were taken in 1902 as a part of the Hyde exploring expeditions on behalf of the American Museum of Natural History. Some of these photographs were taken by Carl Lumholtz and not Hrdlicka. Native communities that Hrdlicka photographed during his research include--Purepecha (Tarasco), Yoeme (Yaqui), Hualapai (Walapai), Havasupai (Coconino), Piipaash (Maricopa), Mojave (Mahave), Tohono O'odham (Papapgo), Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan), Tepecano, Akimel O'odham (Pima), Opata, Cora, Seri, Wixarika (Huichol), Nahua, Otomi, and Yoreme (Mayo). Locations photographed in Mexico include--Michoacán, Sonora, Mesa del Encanto and the Ruins of Totoate in Jalisco, Ruins of La Quamada and Ruins of Teul in Zacatecas, Nayarit State, and the central altiplano. Locations photographed in Arizona include--Casa Grande in Pinal County, Fort Yuma Reservation, Supai in Coconino County and the Mission San Xavier del Bac.

The photographs include a large amount of posed portraits of men and women, none of them identified in our collection. Hrdlicka often posed his subjects both facing forward and in profile so that he could better examine their physical attributes.There are some group portraits as well as scenic shots of houses, churches and village views. Hrdlicka also photographed archaeological ruins inlcuding Casa Grande, Mesa del Encanto, Totoate, La Quamada and Teul.

The copy negatives that were made from the prints in the late 1960s by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Arrangement:
The majority of the photographs have been left in the order that they were originally cataloged. Photographs from the various tribal communities in Arizona and Mexico are in Series 1-16, each community with its own series. The final series, Series 17, contains photographs from various archaeological ruins in Arizona and Mexico.
Biographical / Historical:
Ales Hrdlicka (1869-1943) was born in Bohemia in and came to America when he was thirteen. As a young man, he was trained in medicine at New York's Eclectic Medical College and the New York Homeopathic Medical College, receiving degrees from each. His first professional work was as a private practitioner, but he gave that up in 1894 when he joined the staff of the New York State Hospital for the Insane at Middletown. There, in addition to other duties, he began studies of the physical characteristics of inmates. In 1896, in preparation for a research appointment with the Department of Anthropology in the Pathological Institute of the New York State hospitals, Hrdlicka went to Paris and studied with Leon Manouvrier. After his return to America, he worked for a short period with the Pathological Institute and came into contact with G.S. Huntington, of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. Hrdlicka arranged and studied Huntington's large collection of skeletal material, thus gaining knowledge of a well-documented collection representing largely normal persons of European ancestry. He furthermore came to the attention of Frederic Ward Putnam, of the American Museum of Natural History, who arranged for his first anthropological field studies.

Hrdlicka became a member of the Hyde Expeditions to the American Southwest and northern Mexico. In 1898, he traveled to Mexico with Carl Lumholtz to study the Tarahumaras, Huichols, and neighboring tribes. In subsequent years, he returned to Mexico and the Southwest alone and studied physical characteristics and medical conditions of several American Indian tribes. Following this experience and examinations of the Trenton and Lansing skeletal material for Putnam, Hrdlicka was appointed head of the newly formed Division of Physical Anthropology in the United States National Museum in 1903.

In 1905, Hrdlicka returned to the Southwest for studies of Pima and Apache children and, in the following year, traveled to Florida to examine allegedly ancient remains of man. In 1908, he worked among a number of Native American tribes, including the Menominee, Oglala Dakota, Quinailt, Hupa, and Mohave, in a study of tuberculosis among them. In 1909, he traveled to Egypt with an expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in order to study living Egyptians and to examine remains of Egypt's past population. The following year took him to Argentina, Peru, and Mexico. In the first of these, he again examined allegedly ancient remains of man. In Peru, he made a large collection of skeletal material near Trujillo, at Pachamac, and in the Chicama Valley.

Between 1912-1914, Hrdlicka undertook a physical anthropological exhibit for the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego and, for this, traveled to eastern Siberia, Mongolia, Peru, and Florida. He also examined fossil remains of man in Europe and directed field work of other anthropologists in South and East Africa, St. Lawrence Island in Alaska, the Philippines, eastern Siberia, and the Ukraine. In 1915, for the Department of Justice, he assessed the racial makeup of Chippewas on the Leech Lake and White Earth reservations in Minnesota and also studied Dakota Indians. In 1917, his field work was directed toward white American families with longtime residence in the United States. In 1918, he carried out a survey of ancient sites in eastern Florida for the Bureau of American Ethnology. In 1920, he traveled to Hawaii, Japan, Korea, and Manchuria in connection with an appointment to lecture at the Peking Union Medical College. As director of the American School for Prehistoric Studies in France, he again studied fossil remains of man in Europe in 1922 and 1923. In 1925, he carried out work in India, Ceylon, Java, Australia, South Africa, and Europe. In 1927, he was again in Europe to deliver the Huxley Memorial Lecture before the Royal Anthropological Society in Great Britain. Between 1929 and 1938, he traveled frequently to Alaska to carry on an anthropological survey. In 1939, he traveled to Russia and Siberia.

Beginning with much of the skeletal collection of the Army Medical Museum, which had been transferred to the Smithsonian in 1898 before he was appointed there, Hrdlicka amassed a bone collection that included, among many other specimens, the Huntington collection, casts of fossil remains of man, and a large and diverse North American collection. He also gathered a large collection of human brains. Over three hundred publications resulted from his study of this material, his field work, and his study of specimens in other museums. In addition, he was involved in many other activities. For United States government agencies, he provided services ranging from examinations of human remains for law enforcement officials to providing information and opinions concerning national origins and traits that were needed to interpret laws and form foreign policy. During World War II, he also advised government officials on policies to be pursued with certain national groups following the war.

In 1918, Hrdlicka founded the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and remained its editor until 1942. In 1928, he was the major force behind the organization of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and served as its president in 1928-1932. He was also president of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1907, the American Anthroplogical Association in 1925-1927, and the Washington Academy of Sciences in 1928-1929. He was chairman of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1918 and secretary of the Committee on Anthropology of the National Research Council in 1917. In addition, Hrdlicka was a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. He represented the Smithsonian at several international gatherings of scholars, including meetings of the International Congress of Americanists.

Biographical note courtesy of the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History. See Ales Hrdlicka Papers. Edited by Rachel Menyuk, Processing Archivist at the National Museum of the American Indian.
Related Materials:
The majority of Ales Hrdlicka's papers and photographs are located at the National Athropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. In addition to the Ales Hrdlicka Papers ca. 1887-1943 additional Hrdlicka photographs can be found in photographic lots 8, Division of Physical Anthropology collection; 9, photographs of Indians for the Panama-California Exposition, San Diego; 24, Bureau of American Ethnology, United States National Museum photographs of American Indians; 70, Department of Anthropology portrait file; 78, miscellaneous negatives; 97, Division of Ethnology collection (―USNM‖ Collection); 73-26B, Aleš Hrdlička photographs; 73-26G, miscellany; 77-48, group portraits of International Congress; 79-38, Division of World Archeology collection; 83-41, Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of human bones; and 92-46, anthropology lantern slides.
Provenance:
Although it is unclear when George Pepper received the photographs from Ales Hrdlicka, Pepper donated the majority of the collection of photographs to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (MAI) in 1923. The rest of the photographs were cataloged by the MAI some time in the 1920s but the provenance history is unknown.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

There are several restricted photographs in Series 2: Yoeme (Yaqui). This have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona, Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.103
See more items in:
Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-103
Online Media:

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 lantern slides
3344 negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Mazatec [Huautla]  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Maya  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Mazahua  Search this
Ute  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Triqui (Trique) [San Joan Copala]  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Chol Maya  Search this
Totonac  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Mixe  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chibcha  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Mehináku (Mehinacu)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Haida  Search this
Karajá (Caraja)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Teotihuacán (archaeological culture)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Macushi (Macusi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kansas
Kentucky
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

Otomí (Otomi)

Collection Photographer:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Collection Owner:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Collection Source:
Lumholtz, Carl, 1851-1922  Search this
Extent:
123 Photographic prints
54 copy negatives
Container:
Folder 102-118
Folder 73-80
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1898-1902
Scope and Contents:
P00923-P01003, P05079-P05120, N34631-N34648, N35547-N35558, N37630-N37654 (not N37646)
This series includes 42 photographic prints taken of Otomí (Otomi) people between 1898 and 1902 in the Hidalgo State in central Mexico. Many of the photographs were taken in the city of Ixmilquipan and the town of Tula de Allende. The Otomí (Otomi) are an indigenous group located in the central altiplano in Mexico. The photographs in this series include landscape and city views in and near Ixmilquipan, including Iglesia del Carmen, vendors in Ixmilquipan, seated posed portraits, mainly in Tula Allende, as well as images of Otomi men and women going about their daily lives.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

There are several restricted photographs in Series 2: Yoeme (Yaqui). This have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona, Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.103, Series 16
See more items in:
Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-103-ref25

MS 48 Collectanea upon the Codex Troano, terms of the Maya and other Central American languages

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
146 Pages
Culture:
Maya  Search this
Carib  Search this
Arawak  Search this
Aztec  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Narragansett Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Calendars
Date:
1879
Scope and Contents:
A collection of ethnographic and linguistic notes from diverse sources, aiming at an understanding of problems of reading Mayan hieroglyphic characters. Most of the notes cover Mayan vocabulary and glyphs, but Gatschet ranges almost at random over other data, ethnographic and linguistic, that may have caught his interest. He touches on the Maya calendar, day names, Landa's alphabet, Maya-Spanish vocabulary from the Motul dictionary at Providence, similar vocabulary from Brasseur, etc., some Narraganset-English vocabulary (page 57 only) from Williams, notes on day signs from Rosny, etc., cultural objects compared with glyphic designs, Brasseur's synonymy of glyph characters, lists of Southeast tribes from a French source, Otomi vocabulary notes especially on the numerals (see pages 84-85), notes on Cariban and Arawakan, etymologies of Mayan words (pages 110, 111), notes from Brinton's Maya Chronicles, notes on Codices Mendoza, Troano, Tellerano-Remensis, notes from Penafiel, Pinart, etc., names of Aztec and Mayan gods, etc. No problems are settled, nor is any problem carefully attended: the notes are all preliminary. H. Landar 7 July, 1969.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 48
Topic:
Mayas  Search this
Pictographs -- hieroglyphs  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Writing systems -- hieroglyphics  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Numbers  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mexico -- Yucatan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Calendars
Citation:
Manuscript 48, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS48
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms48

Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico

Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Former owner:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
93 Photographic prints
9 negatives (photographic)
24 copy negatives
Culture:
Nahua  Search this
Guerrero Nahua  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Wixarika (Huichol)  Search this
Chinantec [Chinantla]  Search this
Cora  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Copy negatives
Photographs
Negatives
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1933-1940
Summary:
Images consist mostly of portraits of the indigenous people in the Mexican states of Michoacán, Guerrero, Nayarit, Sinaloa, Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz. The collection primarily contains images of Wikarika (Huichol) people, but includes images of the Purepecha (Tarasco), Guerrero Nahua, Chinantec [Chinantla], Zoque, Otomí (Otomi), Tzotzil Maya, Yoreme (Mayo) and Zapotec peoples.
Scope and Contents:
The Donald Bush Cordry collection primarily contains photographic prints and negatives made by Cordry while he collected objects from 1935 to 1938 on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Photographic materials from his private 1933 trip to Guerreo and a few taken around 1940 are also housed in the collection. The photographs depict the native peoples of the Mexican states of Chiapas, Guerrero, Michoacán, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Sinaloa, and Veracruz and represent people preparing food, making masks, pottery and textiles, and dressing for and participating in ceremonies. In addition there are village scenes and informal portraits of individuals. Series 1: Michoacán and Guererro States, includes images shot within the Purepecha (Tarasco) and Guererro Nahua communities between 1935 and 1936. (Negatives: N21118-N21126; Prints: P11986- P12008; Copy Negatives: N36725-N36731) Series 2: Nayarit and Sinaloa States, is the largest series and includes images shot in various Wixarika (Huichol) villages in 1937 and depicts many ceremonial functions. (Prints: P12659-P12672, P12880-P12887, P13273-P13275, P13386-P13414; Copy Negatives: N36855-N36863, N41431-N41432) Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora and Mexico States, includes images from various culture groups from around 1940. These include Chinantec [Chinantla], Zoque, Otomí (Otomi), Tzotzil Maya, Yoreme (Mayo) and Zapotec. (Prints: P15052-P15053, P15202-P15203, P15347-P15348, P16553-P16562; Copy Negatives: N37306-N37307, N37335-N37336, N37506-N37507)

The photographic prints are all silver gelatin (DOP) and are a range of sizes. The majority of the negatives are copy negatives made by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation during a photo conservation project in the 1960s.
Arrangement note:
Arranged into three series by date and geographical location. Series 1: Michoacán and Guererro States: Purepecha (Tarasco), Guererro Nahua, 1933, 1935-1936; Series 2: Nayarit and Sinaloa States: Wixarika (Huichol), 1937; Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora States: Various communities, circa 1940. Within each series the prints and negatives are physically arranged by catalog number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Starting in high school, Donald Bush Cordry was deeply committed to theatrical set design and puppetry and while attending the Minneapolis Institute of Art began to carve his own wooden marionettes and hand puppets. In 1931, Cordry made his first trip to Mexico (Guerrero) and become fascinated by contemporary Mexican Indian art, especially mask making. In 1934, Cordry moved to New York to work as a marionette designer for puppeteer Tony Sarg and soon contacted George G. Heye to learn more about Mexican Indian art. From 1935 to 1938, Cordry collected Mexican masks and other art forms on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. On his first 1935 collecting trip for Heye, Cordry traveled throughout the states of Michoacán and Guerrero and collected carved and painted dance masks.

In 1936, Cordry married fellow artist Dorothy Mann. Shortly after their wedding, the newlyweds traveled by horseback for six months through Nayarit, Jalisco, and southern Sonora and extensively collected among and photographed the Huichol, Cora and Mayo Indians. The couple moved to Mexico in 1938, first settling in Oaxaca; in the mid-1940s, no longer working for Heye, they relocated to Mexico City. There Cordry established his own design business and produced decorative Mexican folk art-style crafts. His business was highly successful and his work was featured in House and Garden magazine. The couple moved to Cuernavaca, where in 1953 Cordry suffered a stroke and was forced to close his workshop. His stroke also put an end to his traveling and collecting activities. Deeply interested in the history and traditions of Mexican Indians, Cordry assembled an extensive reading library of pre- and post-conquest Mexico materials and together with his wife published "Costumes and Textiles of the Aztec Indians of the Cuetzalan Region, Puebla, Mexico" (1940); "The Costumes and Weaving of the Zoque Indians of Chiapas, Mexico" (1941); and, most importantly, "Mexican Indian Costumes" (1968). Cordry's monumental "Mexican Masks" (1980) was published shortly after his death. Cordry died in Cuernavaca, Mexico, at the age of 71.
Related Materials:
There are around 900 ethnographic items collected by Donald Cordry in Mexico in the National Museum of American Indian's ethnology collections. For more information about these materials contact NMAI Collections.

The National Anthropological Archives (National Museum of Natural History) holds several collections of Donald B. Cordry photographs. See: NAA Photo Lot 87-38, NAA Photo Lot 82-14, and NAA Photo Lot 80-3. The Donald Cordry Mexican mask collection at Natural History can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 355867.
Provenance:
The majority of the Donald Cordry photographs came to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation along with field collections in 1936 and 1938. There were additional donations of photographs made by Cordry in 1937, 1940, 1941 and 1943.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Social life and cutoms  Search this
Indians of Mexico -- Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Nayarit (Mexico)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Negatives
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-008
Online Media:

Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
16 Photographic prints
6 copy negatives
Culture:
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Chinantec [Chinantla]  Search this
Zoque  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Yoreme (Mayo)  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
This series includes photographic prints and copy negatives made across Mexico sometime around 1940, after Cordry was no longer working for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The photographs were included with additional gifts and exchanges with the MAI in 1940, 1941 and 1943. The prints include portraits of Tzotzil Maya women in San Bartolomé de los Llanos, Chiapas; Chinantec [Chinantla] women in Choapam, Oaxaca; Zoque men and women in Copainala and Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas; an Otomi fiesta in Chalma, Mexico; Yoreme (Mayo) man and woman in Huatabampo, Sonora; and a Zapotec woman in Villa Hidalgo (Yalálag), Oaxaca. There are also several images of Zoque masks Cordry collected and two photographs of watercolor paintings made by Cordry.
Prints: P15052-P15053, P15202-P15203, P15347-P15348, P16553-P16562. Copy Negatives: N37306-N37307, N37335-N37336, N37506-N37507.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Series 3
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref512

Otomí (Otomi) fiesta in Chalma

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Container:
Photo-folder 12
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
Outdoor view of an Otomí (Otomi) fiesta in Chalma, Mexico State, Mexico. Three large wooden crosses are being erected by men and women.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Item P16558
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico / Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref559

Group of Otomí (Otomi) women

Collection Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Collection Source:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print
Container:
Photo-folder 12
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents:
Group of Otomí (Otomi) women sitting on a cobblestone street in Toluca, Meixco State, Mexico.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.008, Item P16559
See more items in:
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico
Donald B. Cordry photographs from Mexico / Series 3: Oaxaca, Chiapas, Sonora, Mexico States: Various communities
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-008-ref560

MS 1083 Otomi vocabularies

Collector:
Neve y Molina, Luis, active 1767  Search this
Creator:
Gibbs, George, 1815-1873  Search this
López Yepes, Joaquín  Search this
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents:

(a)- 3 pages of data from "Reglas de Orthographia Diccionario y Arte del Idioma Othomi", etc., que dicto el. L.D. Luis de Neve y Molina, Mexico. 1767. In possession of G.W. Riggs, Esq., Washington, D.C., 3 pages. Manuscript a has about 152 Othomi words.

(b)- 6 pages includes material from Lopez Yepes (Joaquim Lopez Yepes, Doctrina, 1826). On a 10th separate, loose page are phonetic notes, probably from the work of 1767. Manuscript b has about 160 Othomi words, in a different orthography. H.L., 9-VII- 1969.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1083-a-b
General:
Previously titled "Two vocabularies by Gibbs."
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1083-a-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1083
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1083

Otomí (Otomi)

Collection Pht:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Collection Own:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Collection Source:
Lumholtz, Carl, 1851-1922  Search this
Extent:
123 Photographic prints
54 copy negatives
Container:
folder 102-118
folder 73-80
Culture:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1898-1902
Scope and Contents:
P00923-P01003, P05079-P05120, N34631-N34648, N35547-N35558, N37630-N37654 (not N37646)
This series includes 42 photographic prints taken of Otomí (Otomi) people between 1898 and 1902 in the Hidalgo State in central Mexico. Many of the photographs were taken in the city of Ixmilquipan and the town of Tula de Allende. The Otomí (Otomi) are an indigenous group located in the central altiplano in Mexico. The photographs in this series include landscape and city views in and near Ixmilquipan, including Iglesia del Carmen, vendors in Ixmilquipan, seated posed portraits, mainly in Tula Allende, as well as images of Otomi men and women going about their daily lives.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).

There are several restricted photographs in Series 2: Yoeme (Yaqui). This have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona, Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.103, Series 16
See more items in:
Aleš Hrdlička photographs from Mexico and Arizona
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-103-aspace-ref25

Woman's huipil/shirt

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Previous owner:
Eleanore Rose, Non-Indian  Search this
Donor:
Eleanore Rose, Non-Indian  Search this
Object Name:
Woman's huipil/shirt
Media/Materials:
Agave/Maguey fiber cordage, wool yarn
Techniques:
Embroidered
Dimensions:
124 x 122 cm
Object Type:
Clothing/Garments
Place:
Huixquilucan; Huixquilucan Municipality, Zumpango Region; México State; Mexico
Geographical Areas:
Valley of Mexico
Catalog Number:
10/6806
Barcode:
106806.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Clothing/Garments
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_115364
Online Media:

Canteen

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Object Name:
Canteen
Media/Materials:
Pottery
Techniques:
Painted
Object Type:
Food/Beverage Serving
Place:
Dolores Hidalgo; Dolores Hidalgo Municipality; Guanajuato State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
11/8338
Barcode:
118338.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Food/Beverage Serving
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_127042
Online Media:

Drum

Culture/People:
probably Otomí (Otomi) (attributed)  Search this
Object Name:
Drum
Media/Materials:
Wood, varnish
Techniques:
Carved, cutout, varnished
Dimensions:
47 x 13 cm
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Native Term:
teponaztle
Place:
Puebla State; Mexico
Date created:
circa 1915
Catalog Number:
14/1768
Barcode:
141768.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Music and Sound
On View:
National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_152447
Online Media:

Paper

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Collector:
Dard Hunter (William Joseph Hunter), Non-Indian, 1883-1966  Search this
Previous owner:
Dard Hunter (William Joseph Hunter), Non-Indian, 1883-1966  Search this
Donor:
Dard Hunter (William Joseph Hunter), Non-Indian, 1883-1966  Search this
Object Name:
Paper
Media/Materials:
Amate (mulberry bark) paper
Techniques:
Pounded
Object Type:
Materials: Prepared
Place:
Hidalgo State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
14/4972
Barcode:
144972.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Materials: Prepared
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_155779
Online Media:

Paper

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Collector:
Dard Hunter (William Joseph Hunter), Non-Indian, 1883-1966  Search this
Previous owner:
Dard Hunter (William Joseph Hunter), Non-Indian, 1883-1966  Search this
Donor:
Dard Hunter (William Joseph Hunter), Non-Indian, 1883-1966  Search this
Object Name:
Paper
Media/Materials:
Amate (Fig tree) paper
Techniques:
Pounded
Object Type:
Materials: Prepared
Place:
Hidalgo State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
14/4973
Barcode:
144973.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Materials: Prepared
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_155780
Online Media:

Bag

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Collector:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Seller:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Object Name:
Bag
Media/Materials:
Wool yarn
Techniques:
Woven
Object Type:
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Place:
Hidalgo State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
19/444
Barcode:
190444.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_203622
Online Media:

Bag

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Collector:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Seller:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Object Name:
Bag
Media/Materials:
Wool yarn
Techniques:
Woven
Object Type:
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Place:
Toluca; Toluca Municipality, Toluca Region; México State; Mexico
Date created:
1925-1935
Catalog Number:
19/925
Barcode:
190925.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Bags/Pouches (and parts)
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_204165
Online Media:

Woman's outfit

Culture/People:
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Collector:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Seller:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Object Name:
Woman's outfit
Media/Materials:
Cotton yarn, wool yarn
Techniques:
Woven, embroidered
Dimensions:
12 x 208 x 100 cm
Object Type:
Clothing/Garments
Place:
Toluca; Toluca Municipality, Toluca Region; México State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
19/4704
Barcode:
194704.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Clothing/Garments
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_207837
Online Media:

Woman's outfit

Culture/People:
possibly Otomí (Otomi) (attributed)  Search this
Collector:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Seller:
Reba Forbes Morse (Mrs. Howard M. Morse), Non-Indian, 1886-1982  Search this
Object Name:
Woman's outfit
Media/Materials:
Cotton cloth, wool cloth, wool yarn
Techniques:
Sewn, embroidered
Dimensions:
95 x 98 x 95 cm
Object Type:
Clothing/Garments
Place:
North of Puebla; Puebla; Puebla Municipality; Puebla State; Mexico
Catalog Number:
19/4705
Barcode:
194705.000
See related items:
Otomí (Otomi)
Clothing/Garments
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_207838

Paper-making anvil/board

Culture/People:
Otomí [San Pablito]  Search this
Collector:
Bodil Christensen, Non-Indian, 1896-1985  Search this
Donor:
Bodil Christensen, Non-Indian, 1896-1985  Search this
Object Name:
Paper-making anvil/board
Media/Materials:
Wood, amate (fig tree) paper
Techniques:
Cut, carved
Dimensions:
14 x 40 x 2 cm
Object Type:
Art and Printing tools
Place:
San Pablito; Pahuatlán Municipality; Puebla State; Mexico
Date created:
circa 1930
Catalog Number:
19/5160
Barcode:
195160.000
See related items:
Otomí [San Pablito]
Art and Printing tools
On View:
National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_208728
Online Media:

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