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Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection

Extent:
21.66 cu. ft. (34 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (11 3x5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Glass negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Alaska
Mexico
France
Saint Michael (Alaska)
Wrangell Island (Wrangell, Alaska)
Arizona
California
Date:
circa 1873-1946 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
This collection consists primarily of papers documenting the professional career and personal life of Edward William Nelson. A smaller amount of material was created by Edward Alphonso Goldman and relates to both professional and private matters. Apparently, Goldman assumed control of Nelson's papers after the latter's death, probably for reference in his continuing work summarizing the results of their Mexico field investigations. Due the pair's close professional relationship, it was decided to keep the collection intact. The papers of each individual have been kept distinct and reside in separate series, with the exception of photographs, which mostly document the Mexico field work. Other photographic materials have been placed in the same series as a matter of convenience.

Nelson's papers are valuable in documenting his work as a field naturalist, particularly in Alaska and Mexico; his administrative career with the Bureau of Biological Survey and consequential involvement in conservation issues of the day; his research on birds and mammals; his participation in professional societies and conservation organizations; personal and family matters; and commercial ventures, especially his ownership of fruit-growing businesses in California and Arizona.

The papers include a large file of incoming and outgoing correspondence that relates to all aspects of his professional life, but is particularly important in documenting his administrative tenure with the Bureau of Biological Survey, 1914-1927. The letters provide information on the role of the Biological Survey in conservation issues of the era, as well as Nelson's own attitudes on the matters--attitudes that sometimes clashed with other conservationists, including William Temple Hornaday. He corresponded extensively with most of the major figures in the conservation movement including Hornaday, John B. Burnham, Charles Sheldon, George Bird Grinnell, and John C. Phillips. Especially well represented by correspondence are the negotiations for the passage of the Migratory Bird Treaty between the United States and Great Britain, 1916, and the protracted fight over the Public Shooting Grounds-Game Refuge Bill during the 1920s. The correspondence also relates Nelson's role in the formative periods of several professional societies and conservation organizations including the American Society of Mammalogists, the American Game Protective Association, and the American Wild Fowlers.

Nelson's career as an explorer and field worker is documented in a series of journals and notebooks maintained between 1877 and 1930. The journals kept during his landmark work in Alaska and Mexico provide a running narrative of his daily activities and include notes on the fauna, flora, and physiography of the areas explored; information on specimens and artifacts collected; observations on native peoples and their cultures; and sketches of people, villages, fauna, and natural phenomena. The journals from his Alaska work are relatively complete; however, journals from the Mexico investigations from 1903 to 1906 are missing. Also included is a journal from the Death Valley Expedition, 1890-1891, and journals and notebooks kept during many of Nelson's official trips for the Bureau of Biological Survey.

The collection includes a series of records documenting Nelson's private life and business affairs. Especially well represented is his involvement with the Nelson-Goldman Orchard Company, 1911-1933, and the Arizona Orchard Company, 1921-1923. Also included is a voluminous correspondence with his brother, Fred W. Nelson, which concerns family and business matters; and various records concerning health issues, investments, real estate, and other financial matters.

Nelson's research is documented in a large series of notes, lists, manuscripts, newspaper clippings, photographs, and publications. Most of the material concerns his work on birds and mammals. The file also contains collected materials on many of the conservation issues of the day.

The papers of Edward Alphonso Goldman found in this collection are just a fragment of the material generated during his long career with the Bureau of Biological Survey. They are most valuable in documenting his biological survey of Mexico with Nelson. Included is an incomplete series of journals which contain a chronological narrative of Goldman's activities. Specific volumes are devoted to notes of birds and mammals observed and collected. Other papers of Goldman include correspondence, mostly with Nelson, and his brothers, George and Luther; and materials documenting his research on mammals.

The collection contains a series of photographs, photograph albums, and glass plate negatives documenting the careers of both men. Most of the material relates to their biological investigations of Mexico, 1892-1906. Included are images of areas visited, native peoples, and flora and fauna. Many of the photographs are unidentified. Also included are photographs of Nelson and Goldman; photographs of colleagues; and photographs taken in France during Goldman's service in World War I.

The collection also contains some papers of the conservationist Charles Sheldon, a close personal friend of Nelson. Apparently, Nelson acquired the papers when he was writing a biographical memorial on Sheldon. They consist of correspondence, notes, photographs, manuscripts, and related materials documenting Sheldon's work in conservation and natural history.

Finally, the collection includes a manuscript (with Nelson's annotations) of George Shiras' "Hunting Wild Life with Camera and Flashlight; A Record of Sixty-Five Years' Visits to the Woods and Waters of North America," and a few pieces of correspondence concerning the manuscript.

Additional materials documenting field work of Nelson and Goldman can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives Record Unit 7176, Field Reports of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, 1860-1961, Field Reports. Voluminous field notebooks, lists, and other specimen related records for both men are housed in the Division of Birds and the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History.
Historical Note:
The biological explorations made by Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman in Mexico from 1892 to 1906 have been described as ". . . among the most important ever achieved by two workers for any single country." They conducted investigations in every state in Mexico, collecting 17,400 mammals and 12,400 birds, as well as amassing an enormous fund of information on the natural history of the country. The best account of the work is Goldman's Biological Investigations in Mexico, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vol. 115, July 1951.

EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON (1855-1934)

Described by Theodore Roosevelt as ". . . one of the keenest naturalists we have ever had . . .," Edward William Nelson was born in Manchester, New Hampshire. He developed an interest in the outdoors around his boyhood home in New England, and in Chicago where his family moved in 1868. Shortly after enrolling in Cooke County Normal School in 1872, Nelson was invited to join Edward Drinker Cope and Samuel Garman on a fossil collecting trip to the Badlands of Wyoming. After returning to Chicago, his interest in natural history continued to grow as he became acquainted with Joel Asaph Allen, Robert Ridgway, Stephen A. Forbes, Henry W. Henshaw and others.

In the winter of 1876, Nelson traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet Spencer F. Baird, Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and enlist his help in securing a position as a field naturalist. Through Baird's influence, Nelson traveled to Alaska as a weather observer in the Signal Corps of the United States Army in April 1877. From June 1877 to June 1881, he was stationed at St. Michael on the Bering Sea coast of Alaska with a charge to ". . . secure an unbroken series of meteorological observations, and, in addition, to obtain all the information possible concerning the geography, ethnology, and zoology of the surrounding region." Nelson made several dog-sled excursions around the region, compiling data on the lives and customs of the native people, and making ethnological and natural history collections for the Smithsonian. The results of his work were published in "Report upon Natural History Collections Made in Alaska between the Years 1877-1881," 1887, and "The Eskimo about Bering Strait," 1900. In June 1881, he accompanied the revenue steamer Corwin on its search for the missing arctic ship Jeannette. The expedition was the first to reach and explore Wrangell Island.

Nelson spent most of the period from 1882 until 1890 in Arizona recovering from pulmonary tuberculosis contracted in Washington, D.C., while preparing his report on the birds of Alaska. In 1890, he accepted an appointment as a Special Field Agent with the Death Valley Expedition under C. Hart Merriam, Chief of the Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy, United States Department of Agriculture. This was the start of a career with the Division and its successor, the Bureau of Biological Survey, that would continue until 1929. In January 1892, Nelson received orders to conduct a three-month field survey in Mexico with Edward Alphonso Goldman, whom he had recently hired as an assistant. The trip evolved into an exhaustive, fourteen-year biological investigation of the entire country.

After concluding the Mexico work, Nelson's duties with the Bureau of Biological Survey gradually shifted from scientific to administrative. He was Chief Field Naturalist, 1907-1912; Assistant in charge of Biological Investigations, 1913-1914; Assistant Chief, 1914-1916; Chief, 1916-1927; and Senior Biologist, 1927-1929. Nelson was also an honorary Research Associate of the Smithsonian Institution from 1930 until his death. During the decade in which he led the Biological Survey, Nelson was actively involved in most of the major conservation issues of the era. He helped negotiate the Migratory Bird Treaty of 1916 with Great Britain and was an enthusiastic supporter of the Public Shooting Grounds-Game Refuge Bill, the Alaska Game Law Bill, and the Migratory Bird Conservation Act. He was also instrumental in developing policies to improve conditions of domestic reindeer herds in Alaska, and the promoting of bird-banding as a method of ornithological research.

In the field, Nelson was an all-round naturalist, observing and collecting most things that he encountered. He was a prolific author, and his bibliography included over two hundred titles, mostly concerning birds and mammals. Over one hundred animals and plants were named in his honor. Nelson Island and Nelson Lagoon, along the coast of the Bering Sea, and Nelson Range, a short mountain range in California, also bear his name. Nelson was President of the American Ornithologists' Union, 1908-1909, the Biological Society of Washington, 1912-1913, and the American Society of Mammalogists, 1920-1923. He received an honorary M.A. from Yale University in 1920, and an honorary Doctor of Science from the George Washington University in the same year.

Nelson was involved with the Goldman family in the operation of fruit orchards in California and Arizona. He was a co-owner and director of the Nelson-Goldman Orchard Company, 1911-1934, and the Arizona Orchard Company, 1921-1923.

For more detailed biographical information on Nelson, see Edward Alphonso Goldman, "Edward William Nelson - Naturalist," The Auk, April 1935, vol. 52, no. 2; Margaret Lantis, "Edward William Nelson," Anthropological Papers of the University of Alaska, December 1954, vol. 3, no. 1; and William W. Fitzhugh and Susan A. Kaplan, Inua. Spirit World of the Bering Sea Eskimo, (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1982).

EDWARD ALPHONSO GOLDMAN (1873-1946)

Edward Alphonso Goldman, field naturalist and mammalogist, was born in Mount Carroll, Illinois. His family moved to Tulare County, California, in 1888, and he went to work as a foreman in a vineyard near Fresno at the age of seventeen. After a fortuitous meeting between his father and Edward William Nelson of the Bureau of Biological Survey, Goldman was hired by Nelson in January 1892 to assist his biological investigations of California and Mexico. Thus began an association with Nelson and the Biological Survey that would continue for the remainder of his life. Shortly thereafter, he received appointment as a Field Naturalist with the Biological Survey, and he spent most of the next fourteen years with Nelson collecting in every region of Mexico.

Goldman served in a variety of positions with the Biological Survey. He was Field Naturalist, 1892-1917; Biologist in Charge, Division of Biological Investigations, 1919-1925; Biologist in Charge, Game and Bird Reservations, 1925-1928; and Senior Biologist, Division of Biological Investigations, 1928-1943. Goldman also had an honorary position with the Smithsonian Institution as Associate in Zoology from 1928 to 1946. His service with the Biological Survey was marked by extensive field investigations in every region of the United States.

In 1911-1912, Goldman conducted faunal studies as part of the Biological Survey of Panama during construction of the canal. His results were published in The Mammals of Panama in 1920. During World War I, he was a Major in the Sanitary Corps of the American Expeditionary Forces, in charge of rodent control in France. In 1936, he was chosen to assist the United States Government in negotiations with Mexico for the protection of migratory birds and game mammals.

Goldman's bibliography included more than two hundred titles. He named over three hundred forms of mammals, most of them subspecies. Approximately fifty mammals, birds, reptiles, mollusks, and plants bear his name. Goldman Peak in Baja California was also named in his honor. A member of many professional organizations, Goldman was President of the Biological Society of Washington, 1927-1929, and the American Society of Mammalogists, 1946.

For additional biographical information on Goldman, see Stanley P. Young, "Edward Alphonso Goldman: 1873-1946," Journal of Mammalogy, May 1947, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 91-109.
Chronology:
-- CHRONOLOGY OF THE LIFE OF EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON

1855 -- Born in Manchester, New Hampshire, May 8

1868 -- Family moved to Chicago

1872 -- Assisted Edward Drinker Cope and Samuel Garman on a fossil collecting expedition to the Badlands of Wyoming

1876 -- Visited Washington, D.C. and met Spencer F. Baird

1877-1881 -- Weather Observer for the Signal Corps of the U.S. Army at St. Michael, Alaska. Made extensive natural history and ethnology collections and observations of the Bering Strait Eskimos.

1881 -- Accompanied revenue steamer Corwin on search for missing arctic exploring ship Jeannette. Was a member of the first party to explore Wrangell Island.

1887 -- "Report upon Natural History Collections made in Alaska between the years 1877-1881" (Arctic Series of Publications Issued in Connection with the Signal Service, United States Army, no. 3)

1890-1891 -- Special Field Agent, Death Valley Expedition, Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy, United States Department of Agriculture

1890-1907 -- Field Naturalist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1892-1906 -- Field investigations of Mexico with Edward Alphonso Goldman

1899 -- "Revision of the Squirrels of Mexico and Central America" (Proceedings of the Washington Academy of Sciences, vol. 1)

1900 -- "The Eskimo about Bering Strait" (Eighteenth Annual Report, Bureau of American Ethnology, Pt. 1)

1907-1912 -- Chief Field Naturalist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1908-1909 -- President, American Ornithologists' Union

1909 -- "The Rabbits of North America" (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 29)

1911-1934 -- Part owner, Nelson-Goldman Orchard Company, Orosi, California

1912-1913 -- President, Biological Society of Washington

1913-1914 -- Assistant in charge of Biological Investigations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1914-1916 -- Assistant Chief, Bureau of Biological Survey

1916-1927 -- Chief, Bureau of Biological Survey

1918 -- "Wild Animals of North America" (National Geographic Society; rev. ed., 1930)

1918-1919 -- Vice-President, American Society of Mammalogists

1920 -- Honorary Master of Arts, Yale University

1920 -- Honorary Doctor of Science, George Washington University

1920-1923 -- President, American Society of Mammalogists

1921-1922 -- President and Director, Arizona Orchard Company

1922 -- "Lower California and its Natural Resources" (Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 16)

1927-1929 -- Senior Biologist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1930-1934 -- Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution

1934 -- Death, May 19

-- CHRONOLOGY OF THE LIFE OF EDWARD ALPHONSO GOLDMAN

1873 -- Born in Mount Carroll, Illinois, July 7

1888 -- Family moved to Tulare County, California

1891 -- Hired by Edward William Nelson as a field assistant, beginning a long professional and personal association

1892-1917 -- Field Naturalist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1892-1906 -- Biological investigations of Mexico, mostly with Nelson

1910 -- Revision of the Wood Rats of the Genus Neotoma (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 31)

1911 -- Revision of the Spiny Pocket Mice (genera Heteromys and Liomys) (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 34)

1911-1912 -- Conducted faunal studies as part of the Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone

1913-1917 -- Biological investigations of Arizona

1918 -- Rice Rats of North America (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 43)

1918-1919 -- Major, Sanitary Corps, American Expeditionary Forces, in charge of rodent control in France

1919-1925 -- Biologist in Charge, Division of Biological Investigations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1920 -- Mammals of Panama (Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vol. 69, no. 5)

1922-1937 -- Reserve Major, Sanitary Corps, U.S. Army

1925-1928 -- Biologist in Charge, Game and Bird Reservations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1928-1944 -- Senior Biologist, Division of Biological Investigations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1928-1946 -- Associate in Zoology, United States National Museum

-- 1936 assisted with negotiations of United States-Mexico migratory bird and mammal treaty

1944 -- "The Wolves of North America," with Stanley P. Young (American Wildlife Institute)

1944-1946 -- Collaborator, United States Fish and Wildlife Service

1946 -- President, American Society of Mammalogists

1946 -- "The Puma: Mysterious American Cat," with Stanley P. Young (American Wildlife Institute)

1946 -- Death, Washington, D.C., September 2

1951 -- Biological Investigations in Mexico (Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vol. 115)
Topic:
Mammalogy  Search this
Ornithology  Search this
Orchards  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Glass negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7364, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7364
See more items in:
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7364
Online Media:

Folder 14 Speech given by Nelson at meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 1893.

Container:
Box 24 of 50
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7364, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
See more items in:
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection / Series 4: RESEARCH FILES OF EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON, 1893-1931 AND UNDATED. / Box 24
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7364-refidd1e4501

Folder 7 American Ornithologists' Union, 1901, 1911-1914, 1927.

Container:
Box 1 of 50
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7364, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
See more items in:
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection / Series 1: PROFESSIONAL CORRESPONDENCE OF EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON, 1878-1934 AND UNDATED. / Box 1
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7364-refidd1e889

PROFESSIONAL CORRESPONDENCE OF EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON, 1878-1934 AND UNDATED.

Type:
Archival materials
Note:
This series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence documenting the official and professional career of Edward William Nelson. He maintained a voluminous correspondence with ornithologists, mammalogists, conservationists, and other professional colleagues. The letters document Nelson's involvement with conservation issues and legislation, especially the Migratory Bird Treaty between the United States and Great Britain, 1916, and the Public Shooting Grounds-Game Refuge Bill; his work with professional societies and conservation organizations including the American Ornithologists' Union, the American Society of Mammalogists, the American Game Protective Association, and the American Wild Fowlers; his field work in Alaska and Mexico; his research on birds and mammals; and the preparation of scientific and popular papers.

Of special interest are several letters from Edward Alphonso Goldman documenting his service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I; letters of Alice Eastwood and Leverett Mills Loomis describing the San Francisco earthquake of 1906; and letters of David Starr Jordan and Wilfred Hudson Osgood concerning the selection of the fourth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in 1907.

Occasional photographs, drawings, manuscripts, and publications are found with the correspondence. This material is noted in the folder descriptions.

Arranged alphabetically.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7364, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7364, Series 1
See more items in:
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7364-refidd1e791

Birds of North America : life histories for the 21st century

Title:
BNA
Author:
Poole, Alan Forsyth  Search this
Stettenheim, Peter R  Search this
Gill, Frank B  Search this
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia  Search this
American Ornithologists' Union  Search this
Cornell University Laboratory of Ornithology  Search this
Physical description:
716 v. ill. (some col.), maps ; 28 cm
Type:
Identification
Place:
North America
Date:
1992
2002
C1992-2002
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Birds--Behavior  Search this
Call number:
QL681 .B618
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_440376

Himalayan Songbirds Adapted to the Cold by Sporting Thicker Down 'Jackets'

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 17 Feb 2021 19:45:31 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_e6d83669efd3842e32f702bcfeb01591

Alexander Wetmore Papers

Topic:
Birds of the Republic of Panama (Monograph : 1965)
Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Extent:
116.34 cu. ft. (206 document boxes) (10 half document boxes) (1 12x17 box) (2 16x20 boxes) (29 3x5 boxes) (13 5x8 boxes) (oversize materials)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Lantern slides
Color transparencies
Drawings
Date:
circa 1848-1983 and undated
Introduction:
The papers of Alexander Wetmore were received in the Smithsonian Archives in several different accessions between 1978 and 1987.

The Archives would like to thank Mrs. Beatrice T. Wetmore for her help in transferring her husband's papers to the Archives. We also appreciate the assistance of the staff of the Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History. The authors thank Susan Glenn and Pamela Henson for their thorough review of the manuscript.
Descriptive Entry:
The papers of Alexander Wetmore provide comprehensive documentation of his professional career and personal life. The collection is especially valuable in illustrating his research career in systematic ornithology and avian paleontology; his many collecting trips and field expeditions; his involvement in professional organizations, scientific societies, and social groups; his education and the development of his interest in ornithology; his administrative career at the United States National Museum (USNM) and the Smithsonian Institution; his family history; and personal matters. Less well represented in the collection is material concerning his brief tenure as Superintendent of the National Zoological Park, 1924-1925. Interested researchers should consult Smithsonian Archives Record Unit 74, National Zoological Park, Records, 1887-1965, and undated.

Wetmore was a prolific correspondent and nearly a third of this collection is made up of letters written and received between 1901 and 1977. The correspondence documents most aspects of his career and is particularly valuable in illustrating his research on recent and fossil birds. Wetmore exchanged letters with many of the prominent ornithologists and avian paleontologists of his day, and the correspondence is an important source of information on the history of both disciplines during the twentieth century. It is also helpful in documenting USNM and Smithsonian history from the mid-1920s to the early 1950s. Especially valuable are letters exchanged with USNM curators which concern field work, research programs, and exhibits. Wetmore corresponded with many foreign specialists, and several letters from British and European ornithologists contain descriptions of World War II and its effects on society and science. Also included are countless letters written by Wetmore giving information and advice to amateur ornithologists, bird watchers, and youngsters interested in birds.

A large file of correspondence, reports, fiscal records, publications, and related materials documents Wetmore's constant involvement in professional activities and national and international scientific affairs. His seventy-year membership in the American Ornithologists' Union is thoroughly illustrated. Included are files concerning Wetmore's work with the AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature, and his role in the preparation of the fifth edition of the Check-list of North American Birds. Also included are files concerning Wetmore's work as a delegate and President of meetings of the International Ornithological Congress. Records concerning his work as Secretary-General of the Eighth American Scientific Congress, and as United States Representative to the Inter-American Committee of Experts on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation provide documentation of initial inter-American cooperation on conservation issues. Also found are substantial records documenting his associations with the National Geographic Society; the Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine; the Washington Biologists' Field Club; the Cosmos Club; and the Explorers Club. Contained in a separate series are records dealing with his work as Chairman of the National Academy of Sciences Daniel Giraud Elliot Award Committee.

Wetmore's work as a field ornithologist and scientific expedition member is documented from his first recorded observation of a Florida pelican in 1894 through his last collecting trip to Panama in 1966. The majority of records concerning his field work are found in three series. The first documents Wetmore's work prior to his appointment to the U.S. Biological Survey in 1910 and includes field notes, migration records, and lists made during his boyhood in Wisconsin; similar materials compiled during his college days in Lawrence, Kansas, and on trips to the western United States; and catalogues of his ornithological and natural history collections. The second series consists of correspondence, field notes, diaries, reports, expense records, and related materials documenting field work carried out for the U.S. Biological Survey and the Smithsonian Institution (with the exception of trips to Panama). Also included are records created during trips to professional meetings, trips to study museum specimens, and other official travel. The third series contains records concerning his field trips to Panama, 1944, 1946-1966. Also included is a file of permits used during his field investigations, as well as expense accounts from his official travel.

Photographic documentation of Wetmore's life and career is a major strength of the collection. Included are voluminous photographs, albums, lantern slides, 35mm color slides, motion pictures, and negatives documenting his field work and other official travel. Also included are portraits of Wetmore; photographs of Wetmore with family, friends, and colleagues; photographs from his boyhood; photographs of Smithsonian events, scientific meetings, and social gatherings; and photographs of professional colleagues.

The papers contain a file of collected materials documenting Wetmore's personal life and family history. The file includes correspondence with his immediate family and other relatives; various biographical information; genealogical data on his family; school and college records; papers and drawings from his early work on birds; congratulatory correspondence and letters of introduction and recommendation; transcripts of an oral history interview; and personnel records from his service in the federal government. Of special interest is Wetmore's "private zoo" - a card catalogue of species and subspecies named in his honor. A series of daily diaries and appointment books helps to illustrate his day-to-day activities.

Wetmore's twenty-eight-year administrative career at the USNM and Smithsonian is partially documented in the collection. Most of the records consist of routine correspondence inquiring about employment at the USNM. Also included are various files concerning Smithsonian activities, offices, and administrative matters.

The remainder of the collection primarily consists of materials relating to his research in ornithology and avian paleontology. Included is a large group of unpublished manuscripts, speeches, and radio talks prepared by Wetmore. Also included are numerous letters; specimen lists; notes; published manuscripts; field records; and publications relating to his research. Of special interest are original journals, lists, and correspondence from field work in Haiti by William Louis Abbott, 1916-1928, and Watson M. Perrygo, 1928-1929. The collection also contains a sample of original illustrations used in his publications on fossil birds; and manuscripts, proofs, drawings, and other materials from his magnum opus, The Birds of the Republic of Panama.

Also included in the collection are diplomas, certificates, and awards received by Wetmore, and typescript copies of correspondence between John Xantus and Spencer F. Baird.

Additional records documenting Wetmore's professional career can be found in the Smithsonian Archives. Researchers interested in Wetmore's career as Assistant Secretary in charge of the USNM and Secretary of the Smithsonian should consult Smithsonian Archives Record Units 192 and 46. Field reports written during several investigations he conducted for the U.S. Biological Survey can be found in Record Unit 7176, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Field Reports, 1860-1961. Records dealing with Wetmore's work on the fifth edition of the AOU Check-list of North American Birds are a part of record unit 7050, American Ornithologists' Union Collection, 1883-1977. An oral history interview (record unit 9504) conducted by the Archives in 1974 provides insight to all aspects of Wetmore's career. Record unit 9516, the Watson M. Perrygo oral history interviews, include many reflections on Wetmore by his long-time field companion.

A voluminous collection of Wetmore's field catalogues, field notes, lists, and other specimen-related records are housed in the Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History.
Historical Note:
(Frank) Alexander Wetmore (1886-1978), ornithologist, avian paleontologist, and science administrator, was the sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, serving from 1945 to 1952. He was born in North Freedom, Wisconsin, the son of Nelson Franklin and Emma Amelia (Woodworth) Wetmore. He developed an early interest in birds and at the age of eight made his first field journal entry - an observation on the pelican recorded on a family vacation to Florida in 1894. His first published paper, "My Experience with a Red-headed Woodpecker," appeared in Bird-Lore in 1900. By the time he entered the University of Kansas in 1905, Wetmore had made extensive natural history collections around his Wisconsin home and in Independence, Kansas.

Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, Kansas, Wetmore received his first museum job as Assistant at the University Museum under Charles D. Bunker. His undergraduate career was interrupted on several occasions as he took jobs in Arizona, California, and Colorado to finance his education. He also used these opportunities to study and collect the native avifauna. Wetmore received the Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Kansas in 1912. Wetmore continued his education in Washington, D.C., receiving the Master of Science degree in 1916 and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1920 - both from George Washington University. He would later receive honorary doctorates from the University of Wisconsin, George Washington University, Centre College, and Ripon College.

Wetmore's career in the federal government began in 1910 when he was appointed an Agent for the Biological Survey, a bureau of the United States Department of Agriculture. During the summers of 1910-1911 he assisted on field investigations in Wyoming and Alaska. He traveled to Puerto Rico in late 1911 and spent nearly a year surveying the bird life of that and adjacent islands. In 1913, Wetmore was promoted to Assistant Biologist with the Biological Survey, and he moved to Washington to begin work in the program on the food habits of North American birds. His career with the Biological Survey was highlighted by constant field investigations which took him to most of the United States, as well as Canada, Mexico, and South America. Among his more important investigations were a study of the causes of waterfowl mortality around the Great Salt Lake, Utah, 1914-1916; a survey of North American birds that migrated to the southern part of South America, 1920-1921; and the leadership of the Tanager Exploring Expedition to the islands of the mid-Pacific, 1923. Wetmore was promoted to the rank of Biologist with the Survey in 1924.

As his professional status grew, Wetmore received offers of curatorial and research positions from several of the leading museums in America. Perhaps the most interesting came in 1920 when the American Museum of Natural History asked him to join the Roy Chapman Andrews Asiatic Expedition and take charge of the zoological collections. Wetmore declined this and several other offers. Finally, in November 1924, he accepted appointment as Superintendent of the National Zoological Park (NZP). He remained at the NZP until March 1925 when he was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian in charge of the United States National Museum (USNM). Wetmore held this position for nearly twenty years, when, in 1945, he was elected the sixth Secretary of the Smithsonian. He retired in 1952 and became a Research Associate of the Institution where he continued his research on recent and fossil birds.

Wetmore's administration of the USNM and Smithsonian during the era of the Great Depression and World War II faced many constraints. However, he managed to continue the Institution's basic research aims, while instituting improvements in its administrative operations and exhibits program. Among his most important accomplishments was a move toward professional management of the Institution by hiring specialists such as John E. Graf and John L. Keddy to assist with federal budgetary procedures and other administrative matters. He also steered the Smithsonian toward a period of exhibit modernization which was realized after his retirement. Two new bureaus were added to the Smithsonian during Wetmore's tenure as Secretary - the National Air Museum (now the National Air and Space Museum) and the Canal Zone Biological Area (now the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute).

Despite his administrative responsibilities at the Smithsonian, Wetmore continued an active research program in the field and the laboratory. He conducted several collecting expeditions to the American tropics between 1927 and 1940. When the outbreak of World War II restricted travel outside the country, he undertook a study of the birds of Shenandoah National Park in nearby Virginia. In the mid-1940s, Wetmore began a research program that would occupy his energies for the remainder of his life. Between 1946 and 1966 he took annual trips to Panama - making an exhaustive survey of the birds of the isthmus. This work culminated in the publication of his magnum opus, The Birds of the Republic of Panama. Three volumes of the work appeared during his life. The final volume was completed by his Smithsonian colleagues and published posthumously.

Wetmore was widely recognized as the dean of American ornithologists, and he worked extensively in the field of avian paleontology and as a systematic specialist. His bibliography contained over seven hundred entries; including 150 papers and monographs on fossil birds. He described 189 species and subspecies of birds new to science. Wetmore made enormous natural history collections, which were eventually donated to the Smithsonian. Included were 26,058 bird and mammal skins from North America, South America, Central America, and the Caribbean area; 4,363 skeletal and anatomical specimens; and 201 clutches of birds eggs. Fifty-six new genera, species, and subspecies of birds (both recent and fossil), mammals, amphibians, insects, mollusks, and plants were named in his honor - an assemblage which Wetmore called his "private zoo." Also named in his honor was the "Wetmore Glacier" in the Antarctic and the "Alexander Wetmore Bridge," a canopy bridge in the Bayano River Basin in Panama.

Wetmore was a member of countless professional organizations, scientific committees, conservation groups, and social clubs. He served many of the groups in elected or appointed capacities. He was a member of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) for seventy years and served as President from 1926 to 1929. For many years he was Chairman of the AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature and was instrumental in the publication of the fifth edition of the Check-list of North American Birds. Wetmore also had a long-term association with the National Geographic Society, serving as a Trustee, 1933-1976, and as Vice-Chairman of the Committee on Research and Exploration. He also authored several popular publications on birds for the Society.

Wetmore served as President of the Washington Academy of Sciences, 1927; the Washington Biologists' Field Club, 1928-1931; the Biological Society of Washington, 1929-1931; the Cosmos Club, 1938; the Explorers Club, 1944-1946; and the X International Ornithological Congress held at Uppsala, Sweden, 1950. He was Home Secretary of the National Academy of Sciences, 1951-1955, and a Trustee (or Director) of the Textile Museum of Washington, 1928-1952; the George Washington University, 1945-1962; and the Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine, 1949-1976.

During his career at the Smithsonian, Wetmore was named to several national and international scientific committees. He was Secretary-General of the Eighth American Scientific Congress, 1940; United States Representative to the Inter-American Commission of Experts on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation, 1940; Vice-Chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, 1945-1952; and Chairman of the Interdepartmental Committee on Research and Development, 1946.

His contributions to science resulted in many honors and awards. He was the recipient of the Otto Herman Medal of the Hungarian Ornithological Society, 1931; the Hubbard Medal of the National Geographic Society, 1957; the Brewster Medal, 1959, and the Elliott Coues Award, 1972, of the American Ornithologists' Union; the Explorers Club Medal, 1962; the Bartsch Award of the Audubon Naturalist Society, 1964; and the Arthur Allen Award of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, 1970. Wetmore married Fay Holloway in 1912, and a daughter, Margaret Fenwick, was born in 1916. After a long illness, his wife died in 1953. That same year he married Annie Beatrice Thielen. Wetmore died at his home in Glen Echo, Maryland, on December 7, 1978.

For more detailed biographical information on Wetmore, see Paul H. Oehser, "In Memoriam: Alexander Wetmore," The Auk, July 1980, vol. 97, no. 3, pp. 608-615; S. Dillon Ripley and James A. Steed, "Alexander Wetmore, June 18, 1886-December 7, 1978," Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 56, pp. 597-626, 1987; and John Sherwood, "His Field Notebook Was Started in 1894; It Is Not Yet Complete," The Washington Star, Thursday, 13 January 1977. A discussion of his contributions to paleornithology is found in Storrs L. Olson's "Alexander Wetmore and the Study of Fossil Birds" in "Collected Papers in Avian Paleontology Honoring the 90th Birthday of Alexander Wetmore," Storrs L. Olson, editor, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, 1976, no. 27, pp. xi-xvi.
Chronology:
June 18, 1886 -- Born in North Freedom, Wisconsin

1900 -- Wrote first published paper, "My experience with a Red-headed Woodpecker" (Bird-Lore, vol. II, pp. 155-156)

1905-1908, 1910 -- Assistant, University of Kansas Museum

1909 -- Assistant, Colorado Museum of Natural History

1910-1912 -- Agent, United States Bureau of Biological Survey

1910 -- Field work, Wyoming

1911 -- Field work, Alaska

1911-1912 -- Field work, Porto Rico

1912 -- Bachelor of Science, University of Kansas

October 13, 1912 -- Married Fay Holloway

1913-1923 -- Assistant Biologist, United States Bureau of Biological Survey

1914 -- Field work, Utah and California

1914-1915 -- Field work, Utah and Montana

1916 -- Master of Science, George Washington University

1916 -- Birth of daughter, Margaret Fenwick

1916 -- Field work, Utah

1916 -- Birds of Porto Rico (U.S. Dept. Agric. Bull. 326, pp. 1-140)

1917 -- Field work, North Carolina

1917-1918 -- Field work, Arkansas and Texas

1918 -- Field work, Western United States

1919 -- Field work, Florida; Arizona

1920 -- Doctor of Philosophy, George Washington University

1920-1921 -- Field work, South America

1921 -- Field work, Georgia

1922 -- Field work, South Carolina; Minnesota; North Dakota; Pennsylvania; Maryland

1923 -- In charge of the Tanager Exploring Expedition to the mid-Pacific islands

1924 -- Biologist, U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey

1924-1925 -- Superintendent, National Zoological Park

1925-1944 -- Assistant Secretary, Smithsonian Institution (in charge of the U.S. National Museum)

1926 -- Observations on the Birds of Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and Chile (U.S. National Museum, Bull. 133, pp.1-448)

1926 -- The Migration of Birds (Harvard University Press)

1926-1929 -- President, American Ornithologists' Union

1927 -- Field work, Haiti and Dominican Republic

1927 -- President, Washington Academy of Sciences

1927 -- Isidore Geoffroy St. Hilaire Medal, Societe Nationale d'Acclimitation de France

1928 -- Trip to study bird collections of museums in the western United States

1928-1931 -- President, Washington Biologists' Field Club

1928-1952 -- Trustee, Textile Museum of Washington

1929-1931 -- President, Biological Society of Washington

1930 -- A Systematic Classification for the Birds of the World (Proc. U.S. Nat. Mus., vol. 76, art. 24, pp. 1-8). Revised and reprinted in 1934, 1940, 1948, 1951, and 1960.

1930 -- U.S. Delegate, VII International Ornithological Congress, Amsterdam; field work, Spain

1931 -- The Birds of Haiti and the Dominican Republic, by Wetmore and B. H. Swales (U.S. National Museum Bull. 155, pp. 1-483)

1931 -- Field work, Haiti

1931 -- Otto Herman Medal, Hungarian Ornithological Society

1931-1957 -- Chairman, American Ornithologists' Union Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North American Birds

1932 -- Honorary D.Sc., George Washington University

1932 -- Field work, western United States

1933-1976 -- Trustee, National Geographic Society

1934 -- U.S. Delegate, VIII International Ornithological Congress, Oxford

1936 -- Field work, Guatemala

1937 -- Field work, Venezuela

1937-1978 -- Vice Chairman, Acting Chairman, and Chairman Emeritus, Committee on Research and Exploration, National Geographic Society

1938 -- President, Cosmos Club

1938 -- Chairman of U.S. delegation, IX International Ornithological Congress, Rouen, France

1939 -- Field work, Mexico

1940 -- A Check-list of the fossil birds of North America (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 99, no. 4, pp. 1-81)

1940 -- Secretary-General, Eighth American Scientific Congress

1940 -- U.S. Representative, Inter-American Commission of Experts on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation

1940 -- Field work, Costa Rica

1941 -- Field work, Colombia

1941 -- Distinguished Service Award, University of Kansas

1944-1946 -- President, Explorers Club

1944, 1946-1966 -- Field work, Panama

1945 -- Alumni Award for Achievement in Science, George Washington University

1945-1952 -- Secretary, Smithsonian Institution

1945-1952 -- Vice-Chairman, National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics

1945-1962 -- Trustee, George Washington University

1946 -- Honorary D.Sc., University of Wisconsin

1947 -- Honorary D.Sc., Centre College of Kentucky

1947-1963 -- Chairman, Daniel Giraud Elliot Fund Award Committee, National Academy of Sciences

1948 -- Chairman, Interdepartmental Committee on Scientific Research and Development

1948 -- Orden de Merito, Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, Cuba

1949-1976 -- Member, Board of Directors, Gorgas Memorial Institute for Tropical and Preventive Medicine

1950 -- President, Academy of Medicine of Washington, D.C.

1950 -- President, X International Ornithological Congress, Uppsala, Sweden

1951-1955 -- Home Secretary, National Academy of Sciences

February 14, 1953 -- Death of Fay Holloway Wetmore

December 16, 1953 -- Married Annie Beatrice Thielen

1953-1978 -- Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution

1954 -- Field work, Venezuela

1957 -- Hubbard Medal, National Geographic Society

1959 -- Honorary D.Sc., Ripon College

1959 -- Brewster Medal, American Ornithologists' Union

1962 -- Explorers Club Medal

1963 -- Treasurer, XVI International Congress of Zoology

1964 -- Bartsch Award, Audubon Naturalist Society

1965 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 1 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pp. 1-483)

1968 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 2 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pt. 2, pp. 1-605)

1969 -- Field work, Netherlands Antilles

1970 -- Arthur Allen Medal, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

1972 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 3 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pt. 3, pp. 1-631)

1972 -- Elliott Coues Award, American Ornithologists' Union

1973 -- "Alexander Wetmore Bridge" dedicated in Panama

1975-1978 -- Honorary President, American Ornithologists' Union

1976 -- Collected Papers in Avian Paleontology Honoring the 90th Birthday of Alexander Wetmore, Storrs L. Olson, editor (Smiths. Contrib. to Paleobio., no. 27)

December 7, 1978 -- Death, Glen Echo, Maryland

1984 -- The Birds of the Republic of Panama, vol. 4 (Smiths. Misc. Coll., vol. 150, pt. 4, pp. 1-670)
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Lantern slides
Color transparencies
Drawings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7006
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
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ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7006

American Ornithologists' Union. Honorary President, undated.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 249 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 16: Diplomas, Certificates, and Awards, 1901-1970, and undated, with Related Materials from 1876. / Box 249
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e24012

General Correspondence, 1901-1977, and undated, with Related Materials from 1879.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Note:
This series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence documenting the professional career of Alexander Wetmore. He maintained a voluminous correspondence with domestic and foreign ornithologists and avian paleontologists concerning research projects, nomenclatural questions, and various professional issues.

Other correspondents include staff and officials of the Bureau of Biological Survey, United States National Museum (USNM), and Smithsonian Institution; staff and officials of museums, universities, and research foundations; officers and members of professional organizations; editors of scientific journals and popular publications; bird watchers and amateur ornithologists; and personal acquaintances.

The correspondence documents all aspects of Wetmore's professional life. In addition to providing a wealth of information on his research on recent and fossil birds, it is especially strong in illustrating field work and scientific expeditions; the development of his career as a professional ornithologist, museum director, and science administrator; his participation in professional organizations; and the preparation of scientific papers and popular works. The correspondence is also a valuable source of information on the history of the Bureau of Biological Survey, 1910-1924, and the USNM/Smithsonian, 1925-1952.

Occasional photographs, manuscripts, and field notes are found in the correspondence. This material is noted in the folder list.

Arranged Alphabetically
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7006, Series 1
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
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ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e1042

Folder 9 Royal Australasian Ornithologists' Union, 1921-1940, 1967-1969, 1975

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 116 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 2: Organizational File, 1901-1977 and undated. / Box 116
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e12589

Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Note:
This series provides comprehensive documentation of Alexander Wetmore's extensive field work and travel during his service in the federal government. Included are records documenting field trips undertaken for the Bureau of Biological Survey and the Smithsonian Institution; his attendance at scientific conferences and professional meetings, especially of the American Ornithologists' Union and the International Ornithological Congress; inspection trips for the National Geographic Society; and study trips to foreign and domestic museums.

The records include correspondence, field notes, field diaries, expense records, reports, itineraries, photographs and photographic data, newsclippings, reference materials, maps, publications, and memorabilia.

Records concerning Wetmore's Panama field work are found in series 9. Researchers interested in his field work and other travel should also consult series 1, general correspondence, and series 13, photographic materials.

Arranged Chronologically
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7006, Series 8
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e15259

Folder 1 Massachusetts, 1923. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Cambridge. Includes correspondence and a report.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 143 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 143
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e15961

Folder 2 Pennsylvania, 1924. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Pittsburgh. Includes correspondence and a report.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 143 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 143
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e15972

Folder 7 Nebraska, 1948. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union at Omaha. Correspondence and itinerary. Correspondents include Olin Sewell Pettingill, Jr., and Frederick C. Lincoln.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 145 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 145
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16233

Folder 5 California, 1953. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Los Angeles. Correspondence, expense records, programs, and memorabilia.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 146 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 146
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16320

Folder 10 Wisconsin, 1954. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Madison. Correspondence, expense records, travel notes, programs, abstracts of papers, and memorabilia.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 146 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 146
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16375

Folder 1 Massachusetts, 1955. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Boston. Correspondence, expense records, reports, and meeting records.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 147 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 147
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16394

Folder 3 Colorado, 1956. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Denver and Boulder. Correspondence, expense records, travel notes, and meeting records.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 147 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 147
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16416

Folder 7 New Jersey, 1957. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in Cape May. Correspondence, expense records, travel notes, meeting materials, and memorabilia.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 147 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 147
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16461

Folder 1 New York, 1958. To attend the annual meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union in New York City. Programs and memorabilia.

Collection Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978  Search this
Container:
Box 148 of 253
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7006, Alexander Wetmore Papers
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Papers
Alexander Wetmore Papers / Series 8: Field Work and Official Travel Files, 1910-1974. / Box 148
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7006-refidd1e16491

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