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Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Afro-Caribbean cults  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
Plena
Place:
Caribbean Area
Haiti
Jamaica
Puerto Rico
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
June 16-September 6, 1976
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1976 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora

Series 3: Children's Program

Series 4: Family Folklore

Series 5: Festival Stage

Series 6: Native Americans

Series 7: Old Ways in the New World

Series 8: Regional America

Series 9: Working Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1976 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Festival of American Folklife's first decade culminated with the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife that took place for twelve weeks in the summer of 1976, from June 16 to September 6 (programs typically ran from Wednesday through Sunday each week). More than 5000 participants took part over the course of the summer. The 1976 Festival involved the participation of every region of the United States, 38 foreign governments, scores of American Indian tribes, and many labor organizations. Some 4.5 million people attended the Festival.

The Bicentennial Festival resulted from the collaboration of the Smithsonian with thousands of national and international scholars, community spokespeople, and cultural exemplars involved in the documentation, presentation, transmission, and conservation of cultural traditions. Preceding the Festival were several years of establishing cultural networks, training students, and providing opportunities for diverse peoples to interpret and present their traditions. The Bicentennial also saw the flowering of a touring program, begun in 1973, in which foreign groups at the Festival subsequently toured the United States. Scores of groups from the African Diaspora and Old Ways in the New World programs gave some 200 performances in 50 cities and towns across the U.S.

The 1976 Festival again took place in the western part of the National Mall to the south of the Reflecting Pool, between 17th and 23rd Streets (see site plan). It was co-organized by the Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts (James R. Morris, Director; Richard Lusher, Deputy Director) and the National Park Service (Gary Everhardt, Director). Ralph Rinzler was Director of the Festival, and Bess Lomax Hawes and Robert Byington were Deputy Directors of the Festival. Tom Vennum served as Ethnomusicologist, and Frank Proschan as Archivist. The Bicentennial Festival was sponsored by American Airlines and General Foods.

The 1976 Festival again featured seven thematic programs, complemented by a Festival Stage. African Diaspora featured different countries every two weeks. The Festival Stage brought together participants from other areas and - for the last four weeks - its own dedicated performers. Native Americans changed focus by region every week; similarly, Old Ways in the New World changed focus by country every week. Regional America (June 16-August 8) changed focus by region every week, and Working Americans changed focus by theme every two weeks, with an expanded program on Transportation the last four weeks (August 11-September 6).

The 1975 Program Book provided information on each of the programs. Biweekly, a Program Supplement provided schedules and participant information.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Vodou -- Haiti -- Rituals.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
plena
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5858643e8-749f-494f-b205-eca860d96375
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1976
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
459 Sound tape reels (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Plans (drawings)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Business records
Notes
Videotapes
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Contracts
Correspondence
Cha-chas (music)
Lindy (dance)
Jitterbug (dance)
Place:
Caribbean Area
Trinidad and Tobago
Puerto Rico
Cuba
Date:
July 3-14, 1974
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1974 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora

Series 3: Children's Program

Series 4: Family Folklore

Series 5: Festival Stage

Series 6: Native Americans

Series 7: Old Ways in the New World

Series 8: Regional America

Series 9: Working Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1974 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
With the 1974 Festival of American Folklife (July 3-7 and July 10-14, 1974), the seven programs that would constitute the Bicentennial Festival were all in place. As in 1973, the Festival took place in the western part of the National Mall alongside the Reflecting Pool, between 17th and 23rd Streets, and between Constitution Avenue N.W. and Independence Avenue S.W. (see site plan). It was co-organized by the Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts (James R. Morris, Director; Richard Lusher) and the National Park Service (Ronald H. Walker, Director). Ralph Rinzler was Director of the Folklife Program and the Festival.

The 1974 Festival included seven programs, with a Festival Stage bringing together performers from other programs and, in the second week, its own participants. The 1974 Program Book was supplemented by daily folios with additional information on that day's programs.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Afro-Caribbeans  Search this
Steel bands (Music)  Search this
Calypso (Music)  Search this
Mambos (Music)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Plans (drawings)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Memorandums
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Photographic prints
Sound recordings
Business records
Notes
Videotapes
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Contracts
Correspondence
Cha-chas (Music)
Lindy (Dance)
Jitterbug (Dance)
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c04ee5c0-e362-495e-8db1-3073cf7c17af
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1974
Online Media:

Art and trance among Yoruba Shango devotees

Author:
Drewal, Margaret Thompson  Search this
Subject:
Shango (Yoruba deity)  Search this
Type:
Articles
Place:
Nigeria, Western
Western Nigeria
Date:
1986
Topic:
Orisha religion  Search this
Art, Yoruba  Search this
Trance  Search this
Call number:
N1 .A258
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_500217

Staff for Shango (Oshe Shango, Nigeria, Yoruba, probably Oyo area

Author:
Lawal, Babatunde 1942-  Search this
Subject:
Shango (Yoruba deity)  Search this
Type:
Articles
Date:
1981
Topic:
Orisha religion  Search this
Oshe Shango  Search this
Yoruba scepters  Search this
Call number:
NB1098 .F67X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_750423

The Shango cult in Trinidad

Author:
Simpson, George Eaton 1904-1998  Search this
Subject:
Shango (Yoruba deity)  Search this
Type:
Articles
Place:
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
1965
Topic:
Orisha religion  Search this
Religion--African influences  Search this
Religion  Search this
African influences  Search this
Call number:
DT1 .A2588
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_764081

Cult Music of Trinidad

Recorder:
Simpson, George Eaton, 1904-1998  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (sound-tape reel, analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Trinidadians  Search this
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Trinidad and Tobago
Contents:
Shango oh bababa --Annual ceremony --Solo to Yoruba deity --Annual ceremony in a rural area --Bell ringing -- Singing at Shouters --Praying and singing --Singing -- Bell ringing --Singing --Fragment of sermon --Singing -- Speaking in tongues.
Local Numbers:
FW-ASCH-7RR-1007
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Trinidad and Tobago.
General:
Folkways 4478

CDR copy--Various native performers. Production notes: Music of the Shango cult, recorded in Trinidad by George Eaton Simpson. George Eaton Simpson, of Oberlin College, travelled to Trinidad in 1960, to record two quite different types of cult music, both of which incorporate at least some African elements. The Shango Cult is an amalgam of beliefs and practices of the Yoruba tribe of Nigeria, with those of Catholicism. The music is quite African in sound quality, generally including drums and/or rattles and frequently featuring a call-and-response pattern. The "Shouters, "who refer to themselves as "Spiritual Baptists," are primarily Christian, incorporating fewer African elements into their religion than the Shango cultists do. Their hymns, without drums and rattles, but with occasional handclapping, sound similar to hymns sung in the U.S. If you find this recording of interest, you might want to check out "Jamaican Cult Music" (FW04461) and "Cult Music of Cuba" (FW04410).
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Religious  Search this
World music  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-ASCH-7RR-1007
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Moses and Frances Asch Collection / Series 9: Audio Recordings / CD / Commercial / Folkways Recordings
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk58be45881-29f3-4514-9c66-9c30ea23be6e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref19505

Three Rituals

Performer:
McBurnie, Beryl, 1913-2000  Search this
Pierre, Lorna  Search this
Collection Creator:
Cook Labs  Search this
Cook, Emory, 1913-2002  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 12 in.)
Culture:
Trinidadians  Search this
Israelis  Search this
Afro-Caribbean  Search this
Cubans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Date:
1955
Track Information:
101. Shango Sacrificial Ritual / Beryl McBurnie, Lorna Pierre. Drums. Trinidad,Caribbean.

102. Yemenite Nightsongs / Drums. Israel,Middle East.

201. Tumba Francessa / Drums. Spanish. Cuba,Caribbean.
Local Numbers:
Cook.1043
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
Norwalk, CT, Cook 1955
General:
Recording location: Cuba,Caribbean
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Judaism  Search this
Voodooism  Search this
Arabic language  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
Collection Citation:
Cook Labs records, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.COOK, Item Cook.1043
See more items in:
Cook Labs records
Cook Labs records / Series 7: Audio Recordings / Commercial Recordings / LPs
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk597c7922b-a2c3-4672-8e45-5ed6d1b897c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-cook-ref2552

[Sango possession priestess dancing with her Dose], Ohori area, town of Ohumbe, Nigeria

Photographer:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Drewal, Margaret Thompson  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1975
Local Numbers:
EEPA A1992-028-01592
General:
Title source: Archives staff.
Citation source: Professor Henry John Drewal.
Exhibitions Note:
"African Art from the Permanent Collection," exhibited by the Neuberger Museum of Art, beginning in November, 2001.
Contexual image displayed in exhibit entitled, "Balance and Abundance: Concepts of Gender in African Art." held by the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, from October, 2001, through December, 2002.
Contexual image displayed in the African gallery at The Newark Museum in Newark, NJ.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. Copyright held by John and Margaret Drewal. To publish images from this collection, permission must be given by Henry and Margaret Drewal. Contact Archives staff for further information. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Orisha religion  Search this
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Religious articles  Search this
Priests  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Henry and Margaret Drewal Photographs, EEPA 1992-028, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1992-028, Item EEPA D01592
See more items in:
Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection
Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection / Nigeria / 1975
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo79431be69-4b4c-4ef9-bc80-be9cb4bea566
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1992-028-ref4407

Nigeria "Shango."

Creator:
C.M.S. Bookshop, Lagos  Search this
Enwonwu, Ben, 1917-1994  Search this
Hoa-Qui (Firm)  Search this
Mexichrome  Search this
Extent:
1 Postcard (halftone., col., 15 x 10.5 cm.)
Container:
Volume 1
Type:
Archival materials
Postcards
Postcards
Picture postcards
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
[ca. 1980]
Scope and Contents:
Printed caption on verso reads: "Nigeria; 4080 - 'Shango'; By Ben Enwonwo R.B.A. 1962."
Additional printed text on verso reads: "'C.M.S.' (Nigeria) Bookshops; P.O. Box 174 - Lagos; Mexichrome." Publisher's logo on verso: "Hoa-Qui."
Local Numbers:
EEPA NR-03-07
General:
Title source: Postcard caption.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Works of art in situ  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Picture postcards
Collection Citation:
African Postcard collection, EEPA 1985-014, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1985-014, Item EEPA NR 2010-020-0007
See more items in:
African Postcard Collection
African Postcard Collection / Series 34: Nigeria (NR)
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo77fa8f9d6-3350-4193-9721-9b8294258963
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1985-014-ref6947

Spirits, blood, and drums : the Orisha religion in Trinidad / James T. Houk

Author:
Houk, James T (James Titus) 1955-  Search this
Subject:
Houk, James T (James Titus) 1955-  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 238 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
1995
Topic:
Black people--Religion  Search this
Religion  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_498340

Afíríkà yèyé mi! -- Meine Mutter Afrika! : Reafrikanisierung, kulturelle Expansion und Transformation der Orisha-Religion Trinidads ; Geschichte und Grundlagen der Veränderungsprozesse einer afroamerikanischen Religion im Spannungsfeld von Eklektizismus, Synkretismus und Reafrikaniesierung / Patric Kment

Author:
Kment, Patric  Search this
Physical description:
226 p. : ill ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
2005
Topic:
Yoruba (African people)--Religion  Search this
Syncretism (Religion)  Search this
Afro-Caribbean cults  Search this
Black people--Religion  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_924196

Cultures of the lusophone Black Atlantic / edited by Nancy Priscilla Naro, Roger Sansi-Roca, and David H. Treece

Author:
Naro, Nancy Priscilla  Search this
Sansi-Roca, Roger  Search this
Treece, Dave  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 256 p. : map ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Portuguese-speaking countries
Date:
2007
Topic:
Black people--History  Search this
Cultural fusion  Search this
Civilization  Search this
African influences  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_970549

George Eaton Simpson photographs

Creator:
Simpson, George Eaton, 1904-1998  Search this
Photographer:
Ramsey, Frederic, 1915-1995  Search this
Extent:
521 Prints (silver gelatin)
90 Negatives (acetate)
70 Lantern slides
347 Negatives (nitrate)
185 Color slides
4 Prints (Kodachrome color)
Culture:
Haitians  Search this
Trinidadians  Search this
Black Carib Indians  Search this
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Jamaicans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Negatives
Lantern slides
Color slides
Photographs
Place:
Trinidad
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Haiti
Jamaica
Date:
1936-1987
Scope and Contents note:
The collection documents George Eaton Simpson's fieldwork in Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Nigeria from 1936-1964. There are 704 images in several formats including negatives, prints, and slides. The photographs were primarily made by Simpson, but a few were made by Frederic Ramsey, Jr. Ramsey's prints are stamped on verso with his name. Many prints and slides are annotated by Simpson.

The collection also includes a few reprints of articles based on Simpson's field work and words and musical transcription from Savalou Ricourt, a musician of Port au Prince in 1937.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into six series:

1. Haiti, 1936-1937

2. Jamaica, 1953, 1957

3. Trinidad, 1960

4. Nigeria, 1964

5. Lantern slides, undated

6. Publications, 1940-1987
Biographical/Historical note:
George Eaton Simpson (1904-1998) was an anthropologist whose focus was the various social aspects of Caribbean religions. He wrote over 60 articles and books, and taught sociology and anthropology at Oberlin College from 1947-1971.

Born in Knoxville, Iowa, Simpson received his B.S. from Coe College in 1926, his M.A. from the University of Missouri in 1927, and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1934. In 1947 he began teaching at Oberlin College in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. In addition to teaching classes, Simpson served on numerous committees and as department chair.

Simpson conducted fieldwork in the Caribbean, specifically Haiti, Jamaica and Trinidad, and Nigeria. He focused primarily on Caribbean religions such as Vodun in Haiti, Rastafarianism in Jamaica, and the Spiritual Baptists in Trinidad. His fieldwork has been documented in numerous articles and books, including "The Vodun Service in Northern Haiti", "The Shango Cult in Nigeria and Trinidad", and Black Religions in the New World. He occasionally collaborated on articles with fellow anthropologists Joseph G. Moore and J. Milton Yinger. He also served as a visiting professor at several leading universities.

He was the recipient of numerous honors and awards including the Wellcome Medal for Anthropological Research, the Anisfield-Wolf Award in Race Relations (with J. Milton Yinger), Doctor of Humane Letters – Oberlin College, and Doctor of Humane Letters – Coe College.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 93-14
Related Materials:
Additional photographs from Simpson are held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 2001-24.

The George Eaton Simpson Film Study of Plaisance, Haiti, 1937, accession No. 92.12.1 in the Smithsonian Institution Human Film Studies Archives contains silent black and white film footage of Plaisance, Haiti shot by Simpson and his colleagues. The footage contains events also depicted in the photograph collection including work coumbites, marketplace scenes, a wedding ceremony, a funeral, drumming and dancing at a social gathering, and a dancing demonstration. Included in this accession are 21 audiotapes recorded by Simpson and Joseph G. Moore during their fieldwork in Jamaica and Trinidad.

The Joseph G. Moore Collection: Jamaican Revival and Kumina, 1957-1958, accession No. 92.1.1 in the Smithsonian Institution Human Film Studies Archives contains related material to Simpson's study of Jamaican Revival Zion and Kumina. The collection contains film footage of Morant Bay and West Kingston, Jamaica shot in 1957. The footage was originally intended for the "Odyssey" program or possibly a short feature. Some of the it ended up being featured on the CBS program "Lamp Unto My Feet" which also includes interviews with Joseph G. Moore and George Eaton Simpson. There is over 10 hours of footage, and in 1992 Simpson, Smithsonian Institution Human Film Studies Archives Director John Homiak, and research associate Ken Bilby recorded approximately 10 hours of commentary about the footage. This collection also contains audio recordings made in 1993 of a discussion between Simpson, Homiak, and Bilby concerning the relation of Jamaican Revival with Rastafari.

Sound recordings by Simpson held in the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections in the Folkways Records Collection and the Moses and Frances Asch Collection.

Oberlin College has a manuscript collection of George Eaton Simpson's papers (RG 30/64) that document Simpson's research and academic work.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Anthropoligical Archives by George E. Simpson in 1992.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.

The negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice to access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Dwellings  Search this
Spiritual Baptist -- Trinidad and Tobago  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Revivals  Search this
Rastafari movement  Search this
Voodooism  Search this
Schools  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Markets  Search this
Dance  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Cooking  Search this
Drummers (Musicians)  Search this
Christian sects  Search this
Religion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Lantern slides
Citation:
Photo Lot 93-14, George Eaton Simpson photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.93-14
See more items in:
George Eaton Simpson photographs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32ecd25e2-dd4c-4949-bc7d-18089b72a92d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-93-14
Online Media:

Sàngó in Africa and the African diaspora / edited by Joel E. Tishken, Tóyìn Fálọlá, and Akíntúndé Akínyẹmí

Author:
Tishken, Joel E. 1971-  Search this
Falola, Toyin  Search this
Akínyẹmí, Akíntúndé  Search this
Subject:
Shango (Yoruba deity)  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 365 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Aufsatzsammlung
Place:
Afrika
Amerika
Westafrika
Yoruba
Date:
2009
©2009
Topic:
Orisha religion  Search this
Religion  Search this
Afro-Brazilian cults  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Yoruba (African people)--Religion  Search this
Xango  Search this
Orischa  Search this
Götter  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_950026

Chango y muntu : elementos de un mito continental

Author:
Vunda, Zola ni  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Type:
Articles
Place:
Brazil
Date:
1993
Topic:
African diaspora--Religion  Search this
Mythology, Yoruba  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Religion  Search this
African influences  Search this
Call number:
DT1 .C962
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_495453

Two Yoruba brass pillars

Author:
Morton-Williams, Peter  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Type:
Articles
Date:
1995
Topic:
Yoruba brass verandah posts  Search this
Yoruba verandah posts  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Yoruba iconography  Search this
Yoruba equestrian statues  Search this
Call number:
N1 .A258
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_499010

The shango cult in Trinidad

Author:
Simpson, George Eaton 1904-  Search this
Physical description:
140 p. illus. 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1965
Topic:
Orisha religion)  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_767095

Sango shrine figure with bowl : Yoruba, Nigeria, early 20th century

Author:
Lawal, Babatunde 1942-  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Subject:
Shango (Yoruba deity)  Search this
Type:
Articles
Art
Date:
1996
Topic:
Orisha religion)  Search this
Yoruba female figures (Representations)  Search this
Call number:
N7380 .A245 1996
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_832689

The Òṣogbo connection : transnational identities, modernity and world view of Yoruba Americans in Sheldon, South Carolina and Alachua County, Florida / by Ajani Ade Ofunniyin

Author:
Ofunniyin, Ade  Search this
Physical description:
282 pages : illustrations (some color)
Type:
Manuscripts
Place:
South Carolina
Oyotunji African Village
Florida
Alachua County
Oyotunji African Village (S.C.)
Oshogbo (Nigeria)
Nigeria
Oshogbo
Date:
2008
Topic:
Yoruba Americans--Religion  Search this
Yoruba Americans--Rites and ceremonies  Search this
African Americans--Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Ifa (Religion)  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1028983

Yoruba traditions & African American religious nationalism / Tracey E. Hucks ; foreword by Charles H. Long

Title:
Yoruba traditions and African American religious nationalism
Author:
Hucks, Tracey E. 1965-  Search this
Subject:
Adefunmi, Oseijeman 1928-2005  Search this
Physical description:
xxxiv, 438 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Oyotunji African Village (S.C.)
Date:
2012
Topic:
Orisha religion--History  Search this
African Americans--Religion--History  Search this
Black nationalism--History  Search this
History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1028927

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