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Maureen Yancey Oral History Interview

Created by:
National Museum of African American History and Culture, American, founded 2003  Search this
Recorded by:
Patrick Telepictures, Inc., American  Search this
Interview of:
Maureen Yancey, American, born 1949  Search this
Interviewed by:
Timothy Anne Burnside, American  Search this
Subject of:
J Dilla, American, 1974 - 2006  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
Duration (2016.129.14.1a): 60.35 min.
Duration (2016.129.14.2a): 59.8 min.
92.32 GB
Type:
video recordings
oral histories
digital media - born digital
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
August 10, 2016
Topic:
African American  Search this
Hip-hop (Music)  Search this
Museums  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.129.14.1a-.2a
Restrictions & Rights:
© Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
The Collection Donor Oral History Project
Classification:
Media Arts-Film and Video
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5e6894f8e-d477-4660-82b3-a7f9cd68b845
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.129.14.1a-.2a

Cheryl Bailey Solomon Oral History Interview

Created by:
National Museum of African American History and Culture, American, founded 2003  Search this
Recorded by:
Patrick Telepictures, Inc., American  Search this
Interview of:
Cheryl Bailey Solomon, American, born 1959  Search this
Interviewed by:
Deborah Tulani Salahu-Din, American  Search this
Subject of:
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, American, founded 1913  Search this
Coppin State University, American, founded 1900  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
Duration (2016.129.10.1a): 35.57 min.
Duration (2016.129.10.2a): 35.03 min.
53.03 GB
Type:
video recordings
oral histories
digital media - born digital
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Baltimore, Maryland, United States, North and Central America
Date:
July 27, 2016
Topic:
African American  Search this
Education  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Museums  Search this
Sororities  Search this
Women  Search this
Women's organizations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.129.10.1a-.2a
Restrictions & Rights:
© Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
The Collection Donor Oral History Project
Classification:
Media Arts-Film and Video
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd572ff5a6d-1cd2-4376-baf8-d97d490ca4e0
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.129.10.1a-.2a

MS 2009-15 May Mayko Ebihara oral history interviews with anthropologists

Creator:
Ebihara, May, 1934-2005  Search this
Interviewee:
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Conklin, Harold C., 1926-2016  Search this
Davenport, William  Search this
Griffin, James B. (James Bennett), 1905-1997  Search this
Foster, George McClelland, 1913-  Search this
Hanks, Jane Richardson, 1908-2014  Search this
Hanks, L. M.  Search this
Heizer, Robert F. (Robert Fleming), 1915-1979  Search this
Hockett, Charles Francis  Search this
Kirsch, Thomas G.  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Lounsbury, Floyd Glenn  Search this
Mandelbaum, David G.  Search this
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Meggitt, Mervyn J., 1924-  Search this
Miller, Robert J., 1923-1994  Search this
Miller, Beatrice Diamond, 1919-  Search this
Miner, Horace M.  Search this
Murdock, George Peter, 1897-1985  Search this
Murphy, Robert  Search this
Murra, John V. (John Victor), 1916-2006  Search this
Posposil, Leopold  Search this
Rouse, Irving, 1913-2006  Search this
Sharp, Lauriston  Search this
Shils, Edward, 1910-1995  Search this
Smith, Robert J.  Search this
Names:
Columbia University. Department of Anthropology  Search this
University of Chicago. Department of Anthropology  Search this
University of Michigan. Department of Anthropology  Search this
University of Pennsylvania. Department of Anthropology  Search this
French, David H. (David Heath), 1918-  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Stern, Theodore, 1917-  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (document box and 34 sound cassettes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Date:
circa 1959-1986
Scope and Contents:
May Mayko Ebihara's oral history interviews with Conrad Arensberg (3/7/84); Harold Conklin (1/26/82); William Davenport (8/19/82); James B. Griffin (10/7/81); Jane Richardson Hanks (8/6/82); Lucien M. Hanks (8/7/82); Robert Heizer and George Foster (10/2/74); Charles Hocket (8/25/81); Thomas Kirsch (8/25/81); Alfred Kroeber, et al. on Sapir (dub 5/11/1959); Floyd Lounsbury (1/27/82); David Mandelbaum (11/9/78); Margaret Mead (12/8/66); Mervyn Meggitt; Robert and Beatrice Miller (7/29/86); Horace Miner (10/7/81); George P. Murdock (8/20/82); Robert Murphy (10/17/80); John V. Murra (8/24/81); Leopold Pospisil (1/28/82); Irving Rouse (1/27/82); Lauriston Sharp (5/6/82); Edward Shils (11/19/83); Robert J. Smith (8/26/81). Also includes typewritten transcripts for some of the above, as well as for interviews with Theodore Stern and David H. French. The collection also contains notes on anthropology departments at Columbia University, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, and University of Pennsylvania.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2009-15
Other Archival Materials:
May Ebihara's Reed College bachelor's thesis (1955), "An Ethnohistorical Study of the Shoshoni Indians of the Northern Basin," was received with the collection and transferred to the John Wesley Powell Library of Anthropology.
Topic:
Anthropology -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Manuscript 2009-15, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2009-15
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37fb11cf4-b333-4377-8d02-e495b97ec03c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2009-15

Rev. H. Rhett James papers

Creator:
James, H. Rhett, Rev.  Search this
Names:
Connally, John Bowden, 1917-1993  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
James, H. Rhett, Rev.  Search this
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973  Search this
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963  Search this
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968  Search this
Taylor, Hobart, 1920-  Search this
Extent:
1.18 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color photographs
Newsletters
Audiocassettes
Books
Photographic prints
Oral histories (document genres)
Awards
Signatures (names)
Videocassettes
Resumes
Ephemera
Invitations
Correspondence
Clippings
Place:
Dallas (Tex.)
Date:
circa 1961-2004
Summary:
The collection, which measures 1.18 linear feet and dates from circa 1961-2004, documents the personal life and professional activities of Rev. H. Rhett James. The collection is comprised of awards, photographs, books, newspaper clippings, correspondence, invitations, newsletters, oral histories, resumes, audio- and videocassettes, and ephemera.
Scope and Contents note:
The Reverend H. Rhett James papers, which date from 1961 to 2004, document the personal and professional life of Reverend H. Rhett James. Very notable are the letters and correspondence between Reverend H. Rhett James and the United States of America President, Lyndon B. Johnson, and his cabinet. The papers include an oral history, a C.V., letters and correspondence, awards, black-and-white photographs, books, clippings. color photographs, ephemera, invitations, newsletters, photographic prints, signatures, audio cassettes, and videocassettes.
Arrangement note:
The collection is organized into four series: Series 1, Biographical, Series 2, Correspondence, Series 3, Writings, Series 4, Sound Recordings, and Series 5, Photogrpahs. One box contains Series 1, 2, and 3. Box 2 contains Series 3, and Box 4 contains Series 5.

Series 1, Biographical, 1961-2004, is comprised of a typed oral history interview with Dr. H. Rhett James, on December 21, 2002, for the Dallas Public Library's Oral History Project (Box 1/Folder 1), a typed C.V. (Box 1/Folder 2), and other biographical information in the form of newsletters, booklets, certificates, visitor passes, and card invitations.

Series 2, Correspondence, 1962-1999, is arranged alphabetically by correspondent's last name. It is comprised of typed correspondence and letters on various political and community issues. Members of Lyndon b. Johnson's administration figure prominently in this series. The miscellaneous folders contain reproduced correspondence and letters from the Lyndon B. Johnson museum. A set of original envelopes are at the end of folder 15.

Series 3, Writings, 1972, 1992, 1997, is comprised of two books and a NAACP position paper on Dallas Public Schools by Reverend H. Rhett James. The books are titled, The Audacity to Survive and Stamp your own Passport.

Series 4, Sound Recordings, 1972, 1975, 1981, undated, is comprised of 60 audio cassettes in a box. Three notable cassettes in the box contain Jesse Jackson sermons on Civil Rights, "Silver" Rights, social justice, the black church's role in Black Amerca, and religion's role in America. A majority of the tapes are sermons by H. Rhett James on mind consciousness, spiritual regeneration, empowerment, the Gospel, civil rights, social justice, and ecomonic betterment.

Series 5, Photographs, is comprised of autographed photographs by political personage, family photographs, and other photographs including H. Rhett James with prominent figures, notably one with Martin Luther King Jr. Autographed photographs include Lyndon B Johnson, Benjamin Hoover, ans Hubert Humphrey.
Biographical/Historical note:
Reverend H. Rhett James was an ardent pastor,African-American educator, and community activist, who played a role in Dallas and the larger Texas community during the Civil Rights era.

Reverend H. Rhett James (1928-2004) was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on December 1, 1928. He received his early education in the public schools of Topeka, Kansas, Nashville, Tennessee and San Antonio, Texas, he enrolled at Virginia Union University, Richomond Virginia. Upon graduation (Bachelor's 1950), he accepted a teaching position in San Antonio, and became the first African American to receive the Masters of Education Degree from Our Lady of the Lake College (1951).

Returning to his Alma Mater, Virginia Union, he taught in the Department of Education and Psychology and received his Masters of Divinty Degree (1958). Moving to Dallas to accept the pastorate of New Hope Baptist church, he enrolled in the Brite College, T.C.U. and became the first African American to receive the Masters of Theology Degree (1961). He rceived his Ph.D. degree in Urban Administration frm the University of Texas at Arlingotn (1981). He served as pastor of New Hope Baptist church until his retirement in 1986.

As a political and community activist, he headed scores of local organizations working for desegregation and human rights causes. He headed the N.A.A.C.P through severe local desegregation and human rights causes; founder and twelve year Board President of the Dallas O.I.C. (Opportunities Industrialization Center); the first black president of the Dallas War on Poverty (DCCAC); founding Board member of the Dallas Urban League and Board and Budget committee member for the Dallas United Way, ACLU, Southern Historical Association, UNCF and YMCA boards.

Rverend H. Rhett James died on March 14, 2004. He left one daughter and three sons.
Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Education  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Discrimination in employment  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
School integration  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color photographs
Newsletters
Audiocassettes
Books
Photographic prints
Oral histories (document genres)
Awards
Signatures (names)
Videocassettes
Resumes
Ephemera
Invitations
Correspondence
Clippings
Citation:
Rev. H. Rhett James papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Gregory James.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-037
See more items in:
Rev. H. Rhett James papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7200cd434-ea37-4d76-b744-e1be6eebb74a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-037

Legacy Keepers: Interview with Georgette Seabrooke Powell

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Seabrooke, Georgette, 1916-2011  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Charleston (S.C.)
New York (N.Y.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, artist Georgette Seabrooke Powell talks about her extended family, who owned businesses in Charleston, South Carolina, where she was born in 1916. Her family moved to New York City when Powell was six; she describes living in a tenement building, her time as a student at Washington Irving High School and later Cooper Union, and her experiences during the Harlem Renaissance. Powell talks about a few of her paintings, particularly her early work, and the WPA's Federal Art Project, including the mural "Recreation in Harlem." After moving to Washington, D.C., Powell becomes an art therapist and obtains a degree from Howard University. Powell also talks about Operation Heritage, Art in the Park, and P.S. 6. She describes her encounters with racism as a child and then later with her artwork; and explains her greatest accomplishment - raising her family.
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Racism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of Georgette Seabrooke Powell, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000919
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79b61fc66-4c89-402b-8878-be05e4866cfd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref1

Legacy Keepers: Interview with William Langford

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Langford, William Bernard  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, William Langford talks about his early childhood, teenage years, military career, postal service career, and retirement. Langford was raised by his grandmother, who instilled respect of all people in him. He describes his experiences with racism, including negative experiences with police and acceptance of racism/segregation. He talks about his experiences in the Army Air Force, particularly his time stationed in Japan, and his thoughts on Pearl Harbor. Langford talks about his many years as a letter carrier for the US Postal Service in Washington, D.C.; he delivered mail to John F. Kennedy. He expresses his thoughts on music, specifically jazz, go-go, and rap; the Civil Rights Movement; and the Negro League. Langford also talks about his marriage, his surrogate daughter Judy, and the role religion plays in his life.
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Racism  Search this
Armed Forces  Search this
Postal service  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of William Langford, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000920
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa738d68b87-4348-43ee-8fa3-6175b7244a25
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref2

Legacy Keepers: Interview with Louise Daniel Hutchinson

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, historian Louise Daniel Hutchinson explains she learned the value of education from her parents, community activism from her mother, and citizenship from her teacher Dr. Paul Phillips Cook at Miner Teacher's College. Born in Maryland, grew up in a family of nine, and raised Catholic, Hutchinson experienced history as happened through attending segregated churches and segregated schools; and witnessing the Brown versus Board of Education arguments in-person. She describes her perspective on living in Texas while attending Prairie View A&M University; and her experience working with Dorothy Porter Wesley when she was a student at Howard University. She talks about the visionaries she knew or met including Mary McLeod Bethune, Nannie Helen Burroughs; and her other sources of inspirations, including Anna Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. Hutchinson describes her experiences working for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Washington, D.C., National Portrait Gallery, Frederick Douglass Home for the National Park Service, and the Anacostia Museum. She also talks about the books she wrote about the exhibitions on Out of Africa and Anna J. Cooper, exhibitions she curated - Harlem Renaissance and The Frederick Douglass Years , and researching and writing about her family's history.
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Education  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of Louise Daniel Hutchinson, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000921
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa755861a0b-0aab-477e-9be2-7bf688b624cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref3

Legacy Keepers: Interview with Jeannine Clark

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Clark, Jeannine Smith, 1928-  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Jeannine Clark, a fifth-generation Washingtonian, talks about her family and growing up in Washington, D.C.; her religious upbringing; her time as a student at Banneker Junior High School; as a student and later a teacher at Dunbar High School; going to the movie theater on U Street; and studying German and African studies at Howard University. She describes her work with the World Council of Churches to help rebuild Nuremberg, Germany; tenure as a regent at the Smithsonian Institution; contribution to the African Exhibit Hall in the Museum of Natural History; the founding of the Cultural Education Committee; and her work with the Smithsonian's Folklife Festival. She speaks of meeting her husband - Dr. Charles Clark; what makes a successful marriage; balancing a family and a career; the importance of family; and the importance of raising one's own children. She explains African American families today lack commitment to family. She also talks about her love of education; and the role of Howard University and other historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs).
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Education  Search this
Teachers  Search this
African American teachers  Search this
Schools  Search this
African American schools  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of Jeannine Clark, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000922
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa763a44fd3-aaf0-4381-8b1a-f51b2753aa28
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref4

Legacy Keepers: Interview with Charles H. Clark

Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Clark, Charles Howell  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Visionary Leadership Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
West Virginia
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2003
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Charles H. Clark, born in Charleston, West Virginia, talks about segregation in West Virginia as "more by accommodation rather than by law." He speaks of his well-educated parents who value education, and his siblings who all attended medical school. His family traveled a lot and the Great Depression did not much affect them. Clark found school easy, skipping several grades, and ultimately attending Howard University medical school. He talks about his work for the Navy and Public Health Service; the Old Freedman's Hospital; labor union as a surgical consultant; and his own surgical practice. Clark also speaks of the introduction of the Medicare/Medicaid bill under Johnson; the differences between integrated hospitals and segregated hospitals; changes he witnessed in the medical field over his 50-year career, particularly health care financing and modern technology; ethics - medical and general; how health care of African Americans has changed from his childhood to the present; and integration which has caused African Americans to spread out and disconnect. Clark also describes how he met his wife - Jeannine Clark, and talks about his children and grandchildren.
Interview. Part of the National Visionary Leadership Project 2003. Dated 20030604.
Biographical / Historical:
Co-founded in 2001 by Camille O. Cosby, Ed.D. and Renee Poussaint, The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, unites generations to create tomorrow's leaders by recording, preserving, and distributing through various media, the wisdom of extraordinary African American elders - Visionaries - who have shaped American history. National Visionary Leadership Project 2003 collection contains five videotaped oral history interviews conducted in partnership with the National Visionary Leadership Project and the Anacostia Community Museum's Education Department in 2003. Interviewees include Georgette Seabrooke Powell, William Langford, Louise Daniel Hutchinson, Jeannine Clark, and Charles Clark. Full transcripts of the interviews are available for reference in the archive.
General:
Title transcribed from cover page of the video recording's transcript.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Medical care  Search this
Physicians  Search this
African American physicians  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Legacy Keepers: Interview of Charles H. Clark, National Visionary Leadership Project 2003, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-005, Item ACMA AV000923
See more items in:
National Visionary Leadership Project 2003
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ed7935ab-0cd2-41bd-ac76-493c65bbbe3f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-005-ref5

Anne Valk Papers

Creator:
Valk, Anne M., 1964-  Search this
Names:
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Reagon, Bernice Johnson, 1942-  Search this
Extent:
3.75 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Culture:
African American women  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Oral histories (document genres)
Newsletters
Audio cassettes
Correspondence
Newspapers
Date:
bulk 1964-1997
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Anne Valk— a specialist in oral history, public history, and the social history of the 20th-century United States measure 3.75 linear feet and date from 1964 to 1997. The collection contains oral history interviews and documents acquired or created by Dr. Valk during her extensive research of key figures in D.C. community activism for her book, Radical Sisters: Second-Wave Feminism and Black Liberation in Washington D.C. (University of Illinois Press, 2010).

Research files and ephemera from the following people, organizations, and publications are represented in the collection: Josephine Butler (DC Statehood Party; Adams Morgan Organization), Etta Horn (Southeast Neighborhood House's Band of Angels; National Welfare Rights Organization), Dorothy Burlage (Southeast Neighborhood House), Betty Garman (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), Judy Richardson (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), Bernice Reagon (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), Marcia Sprinkle (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), Juanita Weaver (Quest), LaValleJones (Rape Crisis Center), Loretta Ross (Rape Crisis Center, National Black United Front, National Organization of Women), Peggy Cleveland (The Bridge), Joan Biren (DC Women's Liberation Movement), Cathy Wilkerson (SDS, Weather Underground), Tina Smith (SNCC), Off Our Backs newspaper, and Congress Of Racial Equality (CORE), among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Anne Valk (1964- ) is a specialist in oral history, public history, and the social history of the 20th-century United States. Dr. Valk received a M.A. from Mount Holyoke College and a PhD in history from Duke University in 1996. Professor Valk has written extensively in the areas of women's history, history of feminism, and oral history. She teaches public history at the Graduate Center at City University of New York (CUNY) and is the director of the Center for Media and Learning/American Social History Project.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
The Anne Valk papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
Feminism  Search this
Activism  Search this
Women  Search this
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Housing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Newsletters -- 1960-1970
Audio cassettes -- 20th century
Correspondence
Newspapers
Citation:
Anne Valk papers, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Dr. Anne Valk.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-114
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e83e8566-9fba-41a4-989a-58300f2e2900
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-114

William "Cat" Anderson Collection

Creator:
Anderson, William "Cat", 1916-1981 (musician)  Search this
Names:
Benny Carter All Stars  Search this
Cat Anderson Quintet  Search this
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Lionel Hampton Orchestra  Search this
Mingus Quintet  Search this
Bechet, Sidney (musician)  Search this
Calloway, Cab, 1907-  Search this
Carter, Benny, 1907-2003  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Fitzgerald, Ella, 1917-1996  Search this
Hampton, Lionel  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
Humphrey, Muriel  Search this
Johnson, Lucy Bird  Search this
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973  Search this
Tatum, Art, 1910-1956  Search this
Webster, Ben  Search this
Extent:
5 Cubic feet (12 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Transcripts
Oral histories (document genres)
Oral history
Phonograph records
Photographs
Recordings
Interviews
Clippings
Audiotapes
Awards
Audiocassettes
Articles
Date:
1940-1981
bulk 1963-1977
Scope and Contents note:
Primarily audiotapes, sheet music, and photographic images. Also: correspondence, newspaper clippings, magazine articles, itineraries, awards, and ephemera.,Of particular interest are recordings or photographic images, including the personalities listed below, and President and Mrs. Tubman of Liberia; also, two interviews and three recordings of Cat Anderson as guest with various university and college jazz bands.
Arrangement:
Collection is divided into four series.

Series 1: Music

Series 2: Original tapes and recordings

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Miscellaneous
Biographical/Historical note:
Cat Anderson (Sept 12, 1916 - April 29, 1981) was one of the premier trumpet players of the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Known for his effortless high notes, he was a strong section leader and a great soloist whose style exhibited humor and precision. He grew up in Jenkins= Orphanage in Charleston, SC, received basic music training there, and participated in many of their famous student ensembles. He formed and played with the Cotton Pickers, a group of orphanage teens while still a young man. Before joining Ellington in 1944, he played in several big bands, including Claude Hopkins and Lionel Hampton. Anderson left the Ellington organization from 1947 through 1949 again to lead his own group. From 1959 to1961 and after 1971 Anderson free lanced, working with the Ellington orchestra intermittently. He died in 1981 after receiving honors from the US Air Force, the Prix du Disque de Jazz, and the City of Los Angeles.
Related Archival Materials:
Related artifacts include: awards, plaques, mutes, trumpet mouth pieces, and the Jon Williams/Cat Anderson simulator in the Division of Cultural and Community Life (now Division of Cultural and Community Life). See accession: 1998.3074.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Museum of American History in January 1998, by Dorothy Anderson, Cat Anderson's widow. It was acquired through negotiations with her, her brother, Mr. John Coffey and her nephew, Andrew Brazington. The materials were picked up from Mr. John Coffey of upper N.W. Washington, DC on January 21, 1998.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Master tapes not available to researchers.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright status of items varies. Signed copies of releases on file.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Acoustics and physics  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Piano and synthesizer music  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Synthesizer music  Search this
Electric engineering -- 1980-2000  Search this
Band musicians  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Jazz musicians -- United States  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts -- Music -- 20th century
Transcripts
Oral histories (document genres)
Oral history
Phonograph records
Photographs -- 20th century
Recordings
Interviews
Interviews -- 1950-2000
Clippings -- 20th century
Audiotapes -- 1940-1980
Awards
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Articles -- 1940-1980
Citation:
William "Cat" Anderson Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0630
See more items in:
William "Cat" Anderson Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep891a9a0e4-7c4f-4956-b81e-6d65c57e1f29
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0630
Online Media:

Doris Adelaide Derby Oral History Interview

Created by:
Civil Rights History Project, American, founded 2009  Search this
Interview of:
Dr. Doris Derby, American, 1939 - 2022  Search this
Interviewed by:
Joseph Mosnier Ph. D.  Search this
Subject of:
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
NAACP Youth Council, American, founded 1936  Search this
Hunter College, American, founded 1870  Search this
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, American, 1960 - 1970s  Search this
Free Southern Theater, American, 1963 - 1980  Search this
Head Start Program, American, founded 1965  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
Duration: 1 hr., 51 min., 5 sec.
Total: 188.48 GB
Type:
video recordings
oral histories
digital media - born digital
Place collected:
Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Bronx, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Albany, Dougherty County, Georgia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
April 26, 2011
Topic:
African American  Search this
American South  Search this
Art  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Children  Search this
Civil Rights  Search this
Dance  Search this
Education  Search this
Religion  Search this
Social reform  Search this
Suffrage  Search this
Theatre  Search this
U.S. History, 1961-1969  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in partnership with the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress
Object number:
2011.174.8.1a-h
Restrictions & Rights:
© Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture and The American Folklife Center, Library of Congress
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
Civil Rights History Project
Classification:
Media Arts-Film and Video
Movement:
Civil Rights Movement
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5eff16b98-26cc-4ea1-9af5-fc1b07836175
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.174.8.1a-h

Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot
12 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Transcripts
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997. The interviewees include: Doris Harris, Conroy Butler, Mary Hawkins, Christine Gray, Blondell Mason, Mary Washington, Ruth Smith, and Wiliam Bourne. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce.
Biographical / Historical:
African Americans have been an integral part of Southern's Maryland's proud commerical fishing industry. Nowhere has their contribution been more prominent than in the seaford houses along the Patuxent River. Until most recentely, in Calvert and other neighboring counties, the function of shucking oysters and clams was almost exlusively performed by African Americans. Black oyster and clam workers have brought dignity, skill, and a strong sense of community to a job that industry outsiders often consider "dirty work."
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Citation:
Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dd51f36f-b5d5-4c51-a500-732e4ca1ebe8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-007-28
Online Media:

Behind the Apron Interview with Mary Washington

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Mary Washington talks about her family and growing up in Huntingtown, Maryland; and her experience working as a clam shucker at the Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland) for eleven years.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005255
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Mary Washington, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005254
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa787a09bb7-4d73-4e56-8312-b71af0c5302d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref1

Behind the Apron Interview with Blondell Mason

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Blondell Mason talks about growing up in Baltimore City and then Calvert County, his children, farming, and shucking oysters. Mason describes his experiences working as an oyster shucker for approximately 30 years at the Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland). Mason was one of the fastest oyster shuckers at the seafood house. In addition to discussing why he enjoyed working as an oyster shucker, he describes the changes over the years in the oyster shucking industry, including the changing demographics of the industry's workers. Mason also talks about a man who tried to form an oyster union to negotiate wages. Both parts one and two of the interview contain the same overall content, but different details.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. Dated 19960417 and 19970417 (transcribed from transcripts).
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005260
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Blondell Mason, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005259
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa752321ba6-411f-4cbb-adf6-abfbd60b6cbe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref2
Online Media:

Behind the Apron Interview with Christine Gray

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
circa 1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Christine Gray speaks of her experience working as a clam shucker at the Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland). In addition to describing her enjoyment for the job, Gray talks about some of the fastest shuckers and changes in the clam shucking industry, including the changing demographics of the employees working at Warren Denton Seafood House.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Christine Gray, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005263
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bcb1895c-7ddd-4e26-99fa-7b4e2c99205d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref3

Behind the Apron Interview with Mary Dawkins

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
circa 1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Mary Dawkins talks about growing up and being raised by her grandparents in Lusbee, Maryland. She talks about her enjoyment as a clam and oyster shucker and her ability to earn money to send her children to college. Prior to working for Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland), Dawkins worked as cook for Parrens and as a shucker for Lores, which went out of business. Dawkins describes her experience working as a clam and oyster shucker in detail. She explains the changes in the oyster, clam, and crab industries, particularly the oysters and crabs are smaller and not as plentiful, and the diminished African American workforce. She talks about working with Mexicans and the changing demographics of the employees working at Warren Denton Seafood House.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Mary Dawkins, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005256
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b1437d84-fafd-4d0c-a9ef-bbe47207343d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref4

Behind the Apron Interview with Doris Harris

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
May 12, 1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Doris Harris talks about growing up in Lusbee, Maryland (Calvert County) with her nine siblings, and her parents' jobs (tobacco farming and housekeeping). Harris explains her work as a clam shucker at Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland) and the difference between shucking clams and shucking oysters. She also describes her enjoyment for the job, the experience of women oyster workers, and changes in the clam shucking industry, particularly the diminished African American workforce. Both interviews - May 9, 1996 and May 12, 1997 - cover the same topics. The May 12 interview contains a bit more detail.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. Dated 19960509 and 19970512 (transcribed from transcripts).
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005258
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Doris Harris, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005257
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa769e51682-7837-4441-b23d-ee21bdf73378
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref5
Online Media:

Behind the Apron Interview with Ruth Smith

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Ruth Smith describes her experience working as an oyster shucker for 23 years at the Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland). She spoke of the fastest oyster shuckers at the seafood house, her participation in oyster shucking competitions, and the changes in the oyster shucking industry. Smith also talked about her family and growing up in Calvert County, Maryland.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. One interview is dated 19970530 (transcribed from transcripts) and the other one is undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005262
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Ruth Smith, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005261
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b4d195b2-1ab6-40c2-b880-1702d541d717
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref6

Behind the Apron Interview with Conroy Butler

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Place:
Maryland
United States
Date:
April 29, 1997
Scope and Contents:
Through an oral history interview, Conroy Franklin Butler talks about his experience working as an oyster shucker at the Warren Denton Seafood House (Calvert County, Maryland) for 27 years. In addition to describing his enjoyment for the job, Butler speaks of some of the changes in the oyster shucking industry.
Interview. Part of Behind the Apron oral history project. Dated 19970429 (transcribed from transcripts).
Biographical / Historical:
Behind the Apron oral history project documents the experiences of Black oyster and clam workers in Southern Maryland. The interviews explore issues such as: the connection between land and water, between farming and the fishing industry; the communal spirit and camaraderie amongst oyster workers; the experience of women oyster workers; and the changes in the oyster packing industry resulting in a diminshed African American workforce. The audio interviews were conducted by Shelia Montague Parker in 1997.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
Oyster industry  Search this
Clam industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Interviews
Citation:
Behind the Apron Interview with Conroy Butler, Behind the Apron oral history project, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-007.28, Item ACMA AV005264
See more items in:
Behind the Apron: The History, Life, and Hidden Achievements of Southern Maryland's Black Oyster and Clam Workers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7369c1008-b490-41e4-a1af-f0debd966052
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-007-28-ref7

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