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Aleš Hrdlička papers

Creator:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Correspondent:
American Association of Physical Anthropologists  Search this
Names:
American Journal of Physical Anthropology  Search this
Army Medical Museum (U.S.)  Search this
Hyde Exploring Expedition (1902-1903)  Search this
Institute of Population  Search this
International Congress of Americanists  Search this
Panama-California Exposition (1915 : San Diego, Calif.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology. Division of Physical Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
206.71 Linear feet (294 boxes, 138 folders, 9 rolled items, and 4 folios)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Saint Lawrence Island (Alaska) -- Archaeology
Australia
Alaska -- Archaeology
Mexico -- Anthropology
Florida -- Archaeology
Egypt -- Archaeology
Czechoslovakia
Peru -- Physical anthropology
Kodiak Island (Alaska)
Date:
1875-1966
bulk 1903-1943
Summary:
The papers of Aleš Hrdlička, curator in the Division of Physical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, United States National Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, offer considerable insight into the development of physical anthropology in the first half of this century. The papers include honors bestowed on Hrdlička, autobiographical notes, correspondence with many of the leading anthropologists of the day, anthropometric and osteometric measurements and observations (forming most of the collection), extensive photographs of Hrdlička's field work, manuscripts, research materials, and "My Journeys" (essentially a diary Hrdlička kept of his field work). In addition, there is material of a personal nature. The papers date from 1875 to 1966, but the bulk of the materials date from 1903 to 1943, the time of Hrdlička's career at the USNM.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of both professional and personal materials. The professional material includes honors bestowed on Hrdlička, autobiographical notes, correspondence with many of the leading anthropologists of the day, anthropometric and osteometric measurements and observations (forming most of the collection), extensive photographs of Hrdlička's field work, manuscripts, research materials, and "My Journeys" (essentially a diary Hrdlička kept of his field work). The personal material primarily consists of correspondence with his first wife (Marie Dieudonnée Strickler) and other family members, but there are also financial records. The papers date from 1875 to 1966, but the bulk of the materials date from 1903 to 1943, the time of Hrdlička's career at the United States National Museum of the Smithsonian Institution. Hrdlička investigated all major questions confronting physical anthropologists of his day (the fossil record of early humans, the arrival of humans in the Americas, human variation, evolution, and eugenics) and made valuable contributions in all these areas. Hrdlička's interests in the establishment of physical anthropology as a distinct and important field, the welfare of the Czech people, early hominids, and variation within the human species are all documented in the collection as are the services he performed for various United States government agencies. He pursued field studies in many different parts of the world, but there are relatively few field notes as such among his papers. There is instead the edited journal "My Journeys," photographs, and physical anthropological forms. There is also relatively little material on his administrative involvement in the USNM. There is no material from Hrdlička's time at the Pathological Institution of the New York State Hospitals; after he resigned, fire destroyed the anthropological records Hrdlička collected as a member of the staff. There are materials in the collection which contradict, or at least complicate, many long-held criticisms of Hrdlička, particularly claims that he was racist and opposed feminist ideas. The collection contains materials of interest to genetic research, including anthropometric measurements, hair clippings and fingerprints.

There are a few items in the collection which are dated earlier than the collection's date span. These are publication dates, and the folders containing the items have been dated accordingly, but they have not affected the dates of the series or collection. There are also a few items which are dated after Hrdlička's death. These dates reflect the fact that the collection was added to by the Department of Physical Anthropology after Hrdlička's death and have been taken into account when formulating dates for the series and collection.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 37 series:

(1) Miscellaneous Personal Papers, 1875-1940

(2) Early Personal Correspondence, 1883-1919

(3) Correspondence, 1885-1953

(4) News Clippings and Printed Matter, 1893-1953

(5) Financial Papers, 1910-1943

(6) Journeys to the Southwestern United States and Mexican Indians, 1898-1919

(7) Journeys to the Dakota, Chippewa, Kickapoo, and Shawnee, 1916-1917

(8) Florida Survey, 1918, 1918-1927

(9) Alaska Archeological Expeditions, 1912-1938 (bulk 1926-1938)

(10) Panama-California Exposition Expeditions, 1912-1914

(11) Journey to Egypt, Europe, and Russia, 1908-1909

(12) Journey to South America, 1910, 1910-1912

(13) Journey to the Far East, 1920, 1900-1930

(14) Journey to Australia, Java, India, South Africa, and Europe, 1924-1925

(15) Anthropometric Measurements of Indians Taken at the United States National Museum, 1904-1905, most undated

(16) Bone Studies, 1893-1929, most undated

(17) Old Americans, 1914-1930

(18) Children Who Run on All Fours, 1928-1936

(19) Early Man Studies, 1906-1930

(20) European Ethnic History, 1908-1938

(21) Miscellaneous Research Notes, 1887-1930

(22) Manuscripts of Writings, 1901-1944, most undated

(23) Writings by Other Authors, 1877-1942

(24) Anthropometry, undated

(25) "From My Journeys", 1898-1938

(26) -- American Journal of Physical Anthropology -- , 1918-1931

(27) American Association of Physical Anthropologists, 1924-1931

(28) International Congress of Americanists, 1900-1928

(29) Institute of Population, 1942

(30) Department of Anthropology, 1914-1943

(31) Lecture Notes, 1920-1932

(32) Maps and Charts, 1900-1932

(33) Miscellany, 1895-1954

(34) Index Cards, 1899-1948

(35) Bibliographic Index, undated

(36) Physical Anthropology Folios, undated

(37) Photographs, 1887-1944
Biographical Note:
Aleš Hrdlička was born in Bohemia in 1869 and came to America when he was thirteen. As a young man, he was trained in medicine at New York's Eclectic Medical College and the New York Homeopathic Medical College, receiving degrees from each. His first professional work was as a private practitioner, but he gave that up in 1894 when he joined the staff of the New York State Hospital for the Insane at Middletown. There, in addition to other duties, he began studies of the physical characteristics of inmates. This set in motion developments that would eventually lead him to become one of the world's most prominent anthropologists who has sometimes been referred to as "the founder of physical anthropology in America."

In 1896, in preparation for a research appointment with the Department of Anthropology in the Pathological Institute of the New York State Hospitals, Hrdlička went to Paris and studied with Leon Manouvrier. After his return to America, he worked for a short period with the Pathological Institute and came into contact with G.S. Huntington of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. Hrdlička arranged and studied Huntington's large collection of skeletal material, thus gaining knowledge of a well-documented collection representing largely normal persons of European ancestry. He came to the attention of Frederic Ward Putnam, of the American Museum of Natural History, who arranged for his first anthropological field studies.

It was thus that Hrdlička became a member of the Hyde Expeditions to the American Southwest and northern Mexico. In 1898, he traveled to Mexico with Carl Lumholtz to study the Tarahumaras, Huichols, and neighboring tribes. In subsequent years, he returned to Mexico and the Southwest alone and studied physical characteristics and medical conditions of several American Indian tribes. With this experience and examinations of the Trenton and Lansing skeletal material for Putnam, Hrdlička came fully into the world of anthropology. In 1903, he was appointed head of the newly formed Division of Physical Anthropology in the United States National Museum.

While in his position at the Smithsonian, Hrdlička returned to the Southwest for studies of Pima and Apache children in 1905 and, in the following year, traveled to Florida to examine allegedly ancient remains of man. In 1908, he worked among a number of Indian tribes, including the Menominee, Oglala Dakota, Quinailt, Hupa, and Mohave, in a study of tuberculosis among them. In 1909, he traveled to Egypt with an expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in order to study living Egyptians and to examine remains of Egypt's past population. The following year took him to Argentina, Peru, and Mexico. In the first of these, he again examined allegedly ancient remains of man. In Peru, he made a large collection of skeletal material near Trujillo, at Pachamac, and in the Chicama Valley.

From 1912-1914, Hrdlicka undertook a physical anthropological exhibit for the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego and, for this, traveled to eastern Siberia, Mongolia, Peru, and Florida. He also examined fossil remains of man in Europe and directed field work of other anthropologists in South and East Africa, St. Lawrence Island in Alaska, the Philippines, eastern Siberia, and the Ukraine. In 1915, for the Department of Justice, he assessed the racial makeup of Chippewas on the Leech Lake and White Earth reservations in Minnesota and also studied Dakota Indians. In 1917, his field work was directed toward white American families with longtime residence in the United States. In 1918, he carried out a survey of ancient sites in eastern Florida for the Bureau of American Ethnology. In 1920, he traveled to Hawaii, Japan, Korea, and Manchuria in connection with an appointment to lecture at the Peking Union Medical College. As director of the American School for Prehistoric Studies in France, he again studied fossil remains of man in Europe in 1922 and 1923. In 1925, he carried out work in India, Ceylon, Java, Australia, South Africa, and Europe. In 1927, he was again in Europe to deliver the Huxley Memorial Lecture before the Royal Anthropological Society in Great Britain. Between 1929 and 1938, he traveled frequently to Alaska to carry on an anthropological survey. In 1939, he traveled to Russia and Siberia.

Beginning with much of the skeletal collection of the Army Medical Museum, which had been transferred to the Smithsonian in 1898 before he was appointed there, Hrdlička amassed a bone collection that included, among many other specimens, the Huntington collection, casts of fossil remains of man, and a large and diverse North American collection. He also gathered a large collection of human brains. Over three hundred publications resulted from his study of this material, his field work, and his study of specimens in other museums. In addition, he was involved in many other activities. For United States government agencies, he provided services ranging from examinations of human remains for law enforcement officials to providing information and opinions concerning national origins and traits that were needed to interpret laws and form foreign policy. During World War II, he also advised government officials on policies to be pursued with certain national groups following the war.

In 1918, Hrdlička founded the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and remained its editor until 1942. In 1928, he was the major force behind the organization of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and served as its president from 1928 to 1932. He was also president of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1907, the American Anthroplogical Association from 1925 to 1927, and the Washington Academy of Sciences from 1928 to 1929. He was chairman of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1918 and secretary of the Committee on Anthropology of the National Research Council in 1917. From the 1920s to the 1940s Hrdlicka was a member of the American Eugenics Society and prepared exhibits for various eugenics congresses. In addition, Hrdlička was a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. He represented the Smithsonian at several international gatherings of scholars, including meetings of the International Congress of Americanists.

Chronology

1869 March 29 -- Alois Ferdinand Hrdlička (Aleš Hrdlička) born in Humpolec, Bohemia

1882 September -- Emigrated to New York City

1888 -- While stricken with typhoid, met M. Rosenbleuth, a physician who arranged for Hrdlička to enroll at the Eclectic Medical College of New York City

1892 -- Enrolled in the New York Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital Published first article, "Scheme of Examination (Medical)," Publications of the Eclectic Medical College Graduated first in his class from the Eclectic Medical College

1894 -- Graduated first from his class from the Homeopathic Medical College Became research intern at the State Homeopathic Hospital for the Insane in Middletown, New York, where he began his studies in physical anthropology Passed state board examination (allopathic)

1895 -- Joined staff of the Pathological Institute of the New York State Hospitals as associate in anthropology

1896 -- Studied anthropology under Leon Manouvrier in Paris

1896 August 6 -- Married Marie Stickler (Dieudonnée)

1898 March-July(?) -- Accompanied Carl Lumholtz on his expedition to northern Mexico, sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), and visited the Tarahumara, Huichol, and Tepecan Indians

1899 Spring -- Resigned from the Pathological Institute to take charge of physical and medical anthropological research on the Hyde Expeditions of the AMNH to the southwestern United States

1899 August -- Hyde expedition for the AMNH to Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, to excavate the site of Pueblo Bonito and to conduct somatological surveys among the Indians; visited Grand Gulch caves in southern Utah; included visits to the Navahos and southern Utes

1900 -- Hyde expedition for the AMNH to New Mexico, Arizona, and southern Colorado to conduct somatological surveys among the Indians; included visits to the Apaches, Yumas, and Pueblo Indians

1902 January-September -- Hyde expeditions for AMNH to southwestern Arizona, New Mexico, and northern Mexico to conduct somatological surveys; included visits to the Tepecanos, Papagos, Opatas, Pimas, Yaquis, Mayos, Huichols, Otomis, Tepehuanes, Maricopas, Yumas, Yavapais, Paiutes, Walapais, and Havasupais

1902 October-December -- Hyde expedition for the AMNH to Mexico for Hrdlička to complete his somatological investigations; included visits to the Tepehuanes, Coras, Huichols, "Nahuas," "Aztecs," and Tarascans

1903 May 1 -- Became assistant curator in charge of the new Division of Physical Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, at the United States National Museum, Smithsonian Institution

1905 -- Expedition under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology to Arizona and New Mexico to complete the observations on the tribes of this region; Hrdlička especially studied Apache and Pima Indian children

1906 February -- Expedition to western Florida to investigate remains of alleged ancient man

1907 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1908 -- Expedition to Indian schools and reservations in Wisconsin, Washington, California, Arizona, and South Dakota to study tuberculosis for a report to the International Congress of Tuberculosis

1908 December - 1909 May -- Traveled to Egypt, Greece, Turkey, Hungary, Bohemia, Russia, Poland, and Germany to examine human skeletal remains from an excavation in Egypt by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and to study peoples of the Near East

1910 March 28 -- Promoted to curator in the Division of Physical Anthropology

1910 April-September -- Attended the 17th International Congress of Americanists in Buenos Aires and Mexico City Traveled to Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and Panama

1912 -- Planned and directed seven expeditions for the physical anthropology exhibit at the Panama-California Exposition held at San Diego in 1915; expeditions included Hrdlička to Siberia and Mongolia and later to Peru; Riley D. Moore to St. Lawrence Island, Alaska; Philip Newton to the Philippine Islands; Vojtech Suk to Africa; Stanislaw Poniatowski to eastern Siberia; Kazimir Stolyhwo to the Birusa caves in Siberia and to the Ukraine; and Jindřich Matiegka to Bohemia

1912 May-Summer -- Traveled to London to attend 18th International Congress of Americanists Traveled to Siberia and Mongolia for the Panama-California Exposition

1912 September -- Traveled to Geneva for the 14th International Congress of Prehistoric Anthropology and Archaeology

1913 January-April -- Expedition to Peru as part the effort for the Panama-California Exposition

1914 November 18 - 1915 January 18 -- Attended Panama-California Exposition

1915 May -- Research for the Department of Justice at the White Earth and Leech Lake reservations in Minnesota to determine non-Indian mixture among Chippewas

1915 December -- Served as General Secretary for the 19th International Congress of Americanists held in Washington

1916 Fall -- Traveled to Florida to examine remains of supposed ancient man

1917 March-July -- Served as Secretary on the Committee on Anthropology of the National Research Council

1917 Summer -- "Old American" research at Yale University, Harvard University, and the University of Virginia and in Tennessee

1917 August -- Sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, traveled to Oklahoma to visit the Shawnee Agency in eastern Oklahoma and the Kickapoo Indians in McCloud to search for adequate samples of pure blood Indians

1918 -- Elected to the American Philosophical Society Served as Chairman of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Founded the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and became its long-time editor Surveyed prehistoric sites on the southwest coast of Florida

1918 October 8 -- Death of his wife Marie

1920 -- Anthropometry published by the Wistar Institute Elected an honorary fellow of the Royal Anthropological Society of Great Britain

1920 Summer -- Married Mina (Vilemina) Mansfield

1920 January-May -- Visited Japan, Korea, Manchuria, northern China, Mongolia, and Hawaii Lectured at Peking Union Medical College in China

1920 Fall -- Visited Minnesota Chippewa (at the White Earth Reservation?) to help the Department of Justice setter the question of mixed and pure bloods among the Chippewa

1921 -- Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

1922 -- Visited Spain, France, Germany, Moravia, and England Awarded honorary Sc.D. degree from the University of Prague Chairman of the American delegation to the 20th International Congress of Americanists in Rio de Janiero

1923 -- Served three and one-half months as Director of the American School in France for Prehistoric Studies Visited England, Holland, Belgium, France, Germany, Bohemia, Austria, Croatia, and Italy

1925 -- The Old Americans published by Williams and Wilkins Co.

1925 March-October -- Traveled to Australia, Java, India, South Africa, and Europe on a trip sponsored by the Buffalo [New York] Society of Natural Science to obtain cranial measurements of Australian aborigines and Tasmanians, to investigate the Rhodesian Man site in South Africa, to survey the field of early man, and to collect data to support his hypothesis about the peopling of the Earth

1925-1926 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1926 -- Awarded honorary Sc.D. degree from University of Brno and D.Nat.Sc. degree from Brunn University

1926 May-September -- First fieldwork in Alaska: reconnaissance down the Yukon River to its mouth, around the Bering Sea and through the Bering Strait along the Alaskan coast to Point Barrow

1927 -- Received Huxley Memorial Medal and gave Huxley Lecture on "the Neanderthal Phase of Man" before the Royal Anthropological Society of Great Britain

1928 -- Helped found the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA)

1928-1929 -- President of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1928-1932 -- Served as first president of the AAPA

1929 -- Fieldwork in Alaska: surveyed the Yukon River from Tanana to its mouth, to St. Lawrence and the Diomede Islands, to Cape Prince of Wales, up to Point Barrow and back to Unalaska Awarded honorary Sc.D. degree from Charles University, Prague

1930 -- Published The Skeletal Remains of Early Man, Vol. 83 Smithsonian Miscellaneous collections Published "Anthropological Survey in Alaska," Forty-sixth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 21-374

1930 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: surveyed the Kuskokwim River from Bethel down river to Apogak and up river to Stony River

1931 -- Children Who Run on All Fours published by McGraw-Hill Book Co.

1931 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: excavated at Our (Jones) point site, trial excavations at Chief's Point and other sites, and a survey of Kodiak Island

1932 -- Kober Foundation lecturer of Georgetown University

1932 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: excavated at Our (Jones) Point site, trial excavations at Chief's Point and other sites, and a survey of Kodiak Island

1934 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: excavated at Our (Jones) Point site and surveyed Cooks Inlet sites and the mainland opposite the Our Point site

1935 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: excavated at Our (Jones) Point site

1936 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: excavated at Our (Jones) Point site and surveyed the Dutch Harbor caves, some of the Aleutian Islands, and the mummy cave on Kagamil Island

1937 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: surveyed the Aleutian Islands and Commander Islands

1938 Summer -- Fieldwork in Alaska: surveyed the Aleutian Islands, Dutch Harbor caves, and Commander Islands

1939 April 4 -- Testimonial dinner given by the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in honor of his 70th birthday

1939 April-June -- Recuperated in London hospital after suffering a coronary occlusion

1942 March 31 -- Retired from curatorship at United States National Museum, becoming an associate in anthropology

1942 December -- Resigned as editor of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology

1943 -- Alaska Diary published by Cattell Press

1943 September 5 -- Died of heart attack

1944 -- Anthropology of Kodiak Island published by Wistar Institute

1945 -- The Aleutian and Commander Islands and Their Inhabitants published by Wistar Institute

1969 -- Tenth Anthropological Congress of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences dedicated to Hrdlička in the 100th anniversary year of his birth

Selected Bibliography

1908 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Physiological and Medical Observations Among the Indians of Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Bulletin 34, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1908.

1912 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Early Man in South America. Bulletin 52, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1912.

1919 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Physical Anthropology: Its Scope and Aims. Philadelphia: The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, 1919.

1920 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Anthropometry. Philadelphia: The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, 1920.

1925 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. The Old Americans. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins Co., 1925.

1930 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. The Skeletal Remains of Early Man. Vol. 83, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. City of Washington: The Smithsonian Institution, 1930. Hrdlička, Aleš. Anthropological Survey in Alaska. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1930.

1931 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Children Who Run on All Fours, and Other Animal-like Behaviors in the Human Child. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1931.

1943 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Alaska Diary, 1926-1931. Lancaster, PA: The Jacques Cattell Press, 1943.

1944 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. Anthropology of Kodiak Island. Philadelphia: The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, 1944.

1945 -- Hrdlička, Aleš. The Aleutian and Commander Islands and Their Inhabitants. Philadelphia: The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, 1945.
Related Materials:
Additional material in the National Anthropological Archives relating to Aleš Hrdlička can be found in the papers of William Louis Abbott, Henry Bascom Collins, Herbert William Krieger, and Frank Spencer; records of the American Anthropological Association, Bureau of American Ethnology, Department of Anthropology of the United States National Museum (National Museum of Natural History), Science Service, Anthropological Society of Washington, and the United States Army Medical Museum (anatomical section, records relating to specimens transferred to the Smithsonian Institution); and glass negatives of Indians collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution illustrations.

Additional related photographs can be found in Photo Lot 8, Division of Physical Anthropology collection; Photo Lot 9, Photographs of Indians for the Panama-California Exposition, San Diego; Photo Lot 24, Bureau of American Ethnology, United States National Museum photographs of American Indians; Photo Lot 70, Department of Anthropology portrait file; Photo Lot 78, Miscellaneous negatives; Photo Lot 97, Division of Ethnology collection ("USNM" Collection); Photo Lot 73-26B, Aleš Hrdlička photographs relating to the Panama-California Exhibition; Photo Lot 73-26G, Miscellany; Photo Lot 77-48, Group portraits of International Congress; Photo Lot 79-38, Division of World Archeology collection; Photo Lot 83-41, Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of human bones; and Photo Lot 92-46, Anthropology lantern slides.

Related films can be found in the Human Studies Film Archive under the accession numbers HSFA 1982.2.1, 1982.2.2, 1986.12.1, and 2015.13.1.

Hrdlička's extensive collection of reprints is maintained in the Division of Physical Anthropology.

Frank Spencer's doctoral dissertation "Aleš Hrdlička, M.D., 1869-1943: A Chronicle of the Life and Work of an American Physical Anthropologist" (1979) is the only book length biography of Hrdlička. The Frank Spencer papers, 1836-1999, are available at the NAA and contain original correspondence between Hrdlička and his first wife, Marie Strickler; his childhood report card from 1869; copies of family photos obtained from Lucy Miller, Hrdlička's niece; and an audio recording of Hrdlička speaking at Wistar Institute.

Further material may be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The University of Alaska Anchorage holds diaries relating to Hrdlička's Expeditions to Alaska in 1936, 1937, and 1938 in the Alan G. May papers. The finding aid for this collection is avialable online at https://archives.consortiumlibrary.org/collections/specialcollections/hmc-0690/ and a trascription of May's diaries from the expeditions is available online at https://scholarworks.alaska.edu/handle/11122/11850
Provenance:
Hrdlička bequeathed his papers to the Smithsonian Institution. The Division of Physical Anthropology maintained them until they were deposited in the National Anthropological Archives in the 1960s. Some papers have come into the collection since then, most recently in 2018. These new accretions came to the collection through Donald Ortner, David Hunt, T. Dale Stewart, the Department of Anthropology, and the University of Alaska.
Restrictions:
The Aleš Hrdlička papers are open for research.

Access to the Aleš Hrdlička papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Human evolution  Search this
Physical anthropology  Search this
Children -- Physical anthropology  Search this
anthropometry  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Fossil hominids  Search this
Citation:
Aleš Hrdlička papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1974-31
See more items in:
Aleš Hrdlička papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1974-31
Online Media:

Fragments Of Polychrome Textile With Polychrome Braid

Donor Name:
Harry M. Trowbridge  Search this
Site Name:
Craig Mound  Search this
Maximum Length - Object 1:
ca. 10 cm
Maximum Width - Object 1:
ca. 8 cm
Fiber Width Object 1:
ca. 0.7 cm
Length - Object 2:
ca. 10 cm
Width - Object 2:
ca. 6 cm
Culture:
Prehistoric  Search this
Object Type:
Cloth
Place:
Spiro, Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States, North America
Accession Date:
1958
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Accession Number:
228126
USNM Number:
A423374-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/35b0e10b9-700b-4a73-8dce-1a310504682f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8175922
Online Media:

Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers

Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Extent:
28 Linear feet (65 document boxes, 1 box of oversize materials, 1 box of ephemera, 1 shoebox of index cards, 1 map drawer)
Culture:
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Native American  Search this
American Indian -- Education  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota
Date:
1914, 1932-1949, 1952-2003 (bulk dates, 1945-2003).
Summary:
The Beatrice Medicine papers, 1913-2003 (bulk 1945-2003), document the professional life of Dr. Beatrice "Bea" Medicine (1923-2005), a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, anthropologist, scholar, educator, and Native rights activist. The collection also contains material collected by or given to Medicine to further her research and activism interests. Medicine, whose Lakota name was Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman," focused her research on a variety of topics affecting the Native American community: 1) mental health, 2) women's issues, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs of Native Americans, and 6) Children and identity issues. The collection represents Medicine's work as an educator for universities and colleges in the United States and in Canada, for which she taught Native American Studies courses. Additionally, because of the large amount of research material and Medicine's correspondence with elected U.S. officials and Native American leaders, and records from Medicine's involvement in Native American organizations, the collection serves to represent issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, and reflects what Native American leaders and organizations did to navigate and mitigate those issues. Collection materials include correspondence; committee, conference, and teaching material; ephemera; manuscripts and poetry; maps; notes; periodicals; photographs; training material; and transcripts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Beatrice Medicine reflect Medicine's interests as an academic and an activist, and contain correspondence, committee, conference, and teaching material, ephemera, manuscripts and poetry, maps, notes, periodicals, photographs, and training material (see series scope notes for further details on contents). The majority of the material is printed matter that Medicine collected, with less of her own work included. Taken together, the collection reflects issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, as well as the network of Native American leaders and organizations that navigated these issues. Student papers, letters of recommendation, evaluations, and documents containing personally identifiable information are restricted.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into 24 series:

Series 1: Native American Culture and History, 1954-1962, 1967-1975, 1978-1989, 1991-1997, 1999-2002

Series 2: Appropriations, Economics, and Labor, 1955, circa 1970-1980, 1988, 1993, circa 1995-2000

Series 3: Archaeology, 1935-1950, 1952-1973, 1987-1995

Series 4: Native American Artists, Authors, Crafts, Film, and Poets, 1951-1969, 1972-2002

Series 5: Census, Demographic, and Poll Data, 1974, 1984-1986

Series 6: Civil Rights, 1972, 1980, 1983-1997

Series 7: Committee Material: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes, and Memos, 1985-1995

Series 8: Conference Material, 1955-1962, 1965, 1968-1974, 1976-2002

Series 9: Correspondence, 1952, 1959, 1962, 1966-2000

Series 10: Education: Native American Institutions and Teaching Material, 1948-2002

Series 11: Ephemera: Campaign, Pow-Wow, and Other Event Buttons, and Calendars, 1973, 1976, circa 1980-2000

Series 12: Health: Alcohol and Drug Addiction and Recovery, Disabilities, Healthcare, Mental Health, Nutrition, and Wellness, 1955, 1965, 1969-1999, 2004

Series 13: Historic Preservation, 1942, 1956, 1960-1969, 1979, circa 1985-1998

Series 14: Invitations, 1966-1979, 1982, 1991-2002

Series 15: Linguistics: Native American Languages, 1961, 1963, 1975, 1978-1981, 1987-1995

Series 16: Manuscripts, 1964-2003

Series 17: Maps, 1982-1991

Series 18: Museum Material: Native American Museums, Exhibit Preparation, and the National Museum of the American Indian, 1949, 1962, circa 1976-1998

Series 19: Oversized Material, 1962, circa 1965-1996, 1999

Series 20: Published material: Journals, Magazines, Monographs, and Newsletters, 1914, 1932, 1944, 1946-1947, 1952-2003

Series 21: Reports, 1947-1949, 1956-1998

Series 22: Training Material, 1968, 1988-2000

Series 23: Women and Gender, 1962, 1965, circa 1970-1997

Series 24: Restricted Material, 1972, 1978, 1987-1999
Biographical / Historical:
A member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, Beatrice "Bea" Medicine—also known by her Lakota name Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman"—was born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota on August 1, 1923.

As a young adult, she studied at the South Dakota State University on the Laverne Noyes Scholarship, where she attained her B.A. in Anthropology in 1945. Between 1945 and 1951, Medicine worked a variety of teaching positions, including for three American Indian institutions (see Chronology for Medicine's complete work history). In 1951, Medicine went back to school and worked as a research assistant until she earned her master's degree in Sociology and Anthropology from Michigan State University in 1954. For the remainder of her life, Medicine served as faculty, visiting professor, and scholar-in-residence at thirty-one universities and colleges in the United States and Canada, teaching cultural and educational anthropology courses, as well as Native American Studies. As an educator, Medicine carried out her research on a variety of issues affecting Native American and First Nation communities, including: 1) mental health issues, 2) women's issues—professionalization, sterilization, socialization, and aging, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use and abuse, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs, and 6) socialization of children and identity needs. Medicine's research in American Indian women's and children's issues, as well as her research in gender identity among the LGBT community was among the first to document the narratives of the members of these groups.

In 1974, Medicine testified alongside her cousin, Vine Deloria, Jr., as an expert witness in the Wounded Knee trial (United States v. Banks and Means). Following this, Medicine returned to school to pursue her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology, which she completed in 1983 at the University of Wisconsin. With her experience as a researcher, educator, activist, and Lakota woman, medicine sought to create more opportunities for multicultural and bilingual education for minority students, especially those of Native American descent. Such education, she believed, provided students a means to preserve and legitimize their own cultural identity, debase negative stereotyes, and be recognized as individuals who are capable of academic and economic achievement.

Medicine was an active member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and pursued her educational agenda further through the establishment of the Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions (CAPMI) (1987-1995), which brought anthropologists out of retirement to teach at minority institutions. (See Chronology for a complete list of organizations and committees in which Medicine was involved.) The program was short-lived but provided a space for minority students to confront a field that historically misrepresented them, reclaim their narratives and languages, and instigate positive change as potential future anthropologists.

Medicine officially retired on August 1, 1989, but continued to be active in AAA and was honored many times for her contributions to the field of anthropology. Some of her recognitions include the Distinguished Service Award from AAA (1991) and the Bronislaw Malinowski Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology (1996). One of Medicine's highest honors, however, was serving as the Sacred Pipe Woman at the 1977 Sun Dance. Medicine continued her research into retirement, and went on to publish her first book in 2001, Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings. Medicine died in Bismarck, North Dakota on December 19, 2005. Medicine's final work, Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux was published posthumously in 2006. In honor of her life's work and dedication to education, the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) created the Bea Medicine Award, a scholarship travel grant for students to attend the Annual Meeting of the SfAA.

Chronology: Beatrice Medicine

1923 August 1 -- Beatrice Medicine (also known by her Lakota name, Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman") is born on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in Wakpala, South Dakota.

1941-1945 -- Receives scholarship: Laverne Noyes Scholarship, South Dakota State University

1945 -- Receives Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology, South Dakota State University.

1945-1946 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Haskell Indian Institute (B.I.A.)

1947-1948 -- Health Education Lecturer, Michigan Tuberculosis Association

1948-1949 -- Teacher, Santo Domingo Pueblo, United Pueblos Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico

1949-1950 -- Teacher, Navajo Adult Beginner's Program, Albuquerque Indian School

1950-1951 -- Teacher, Home Economics, Flandreau Indian School

1950-1954 -- Fellowship: Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs Fellowships

1951-1954 -- Research Assistant, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University

1953-1954 -- Fellowship: John Hay Whitney Foundation Fellowship

1954 -- Receives Master of Arts, Sociology and Anthropology, Michigan State University. Fellowship: American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship

1954- -- Charter Member, American Indian Women's Service League

1955-1958 -- Teaching and Research Assistant, University of Washington

1956 -- Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1960 -- Mentioned as "Who's Who Among American Indians"

circa 1960 -- Alpha Kappa Delta, Sociology Hononary Phi Upsilon Omicron, Home Economic Honorary

1960-1963 -- Lecturer, Anthropology, University of British Columbia

1960-1964 -- Board of Directors, Native Urban Indian Centers in Vancouver, British Columbia and Calgary, Alberta

1963-1964 -- Lecturer/Sociology and Teacher/Counselor, Mount Royal College, Indian Affairs Branch Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Research Grant

1965 -- Lecturer, Social Science, Michigan State University

1966 -- Psychiatric Social Worker, Provincial Guidance Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

1966-1967 -- Receives grant: Career Development Grant, National Institute of Mental Health

1966- -- Member, National Congress of American Indians (Education Issues)

1967 -- Receives grant: Ethnological Research Grant, National Museum of Canada

1967-1968 -- Lecturer, Sociology and Anthropology, University of Montana

1968 -- Teacher, "Cultural Enrichment Program," Standing Rock Indian Reservation, South Dakota Cited in "The Role of Racial Minorities in the United States," Seattle, Washington

1968 March -- Speaker: "The Pow-Wow as a Social Factor in the Northern Plains Ceremonialism," Montana Academy of Sciences

1968 May -- Speaker: "Patterns and Periphery of Plains Indian Pow-Wows," Central States Anthropological Society

1968 June -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," Canadian Sociology and Anthropological Association, Calgary, Alberta

1968 August -- Speaker: "Magic Among the Stoney Indians," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German Speaker: "The Dynamics of a Dakota Indian Giveaway," International Congress of Americanists, Stuttgart, German

1968-1969 -- Director, American Indian Research, Oral History Project and Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of South Dakota

1968-1970 -- Consultant, Text Book Evaluation Committee, American Indians United

1969 -- Assistant Professor, Teacher Corps, University of Nebraska

1969 September -- Speaker: "The Red Man Yesterday," Governor's Interstate Indian Council, Wichita, Kansas

1969 December -- Speaker: "The Native American in Modern Society," Northwestern State College

1969-1970 -- Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University Speaker: "The Indian in Institutions of Higher Learning," Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1969-1975 -- Member, Editorial Board, American Indian Historical Society

1970 -- Mentioned for second time as "Who's Who Among American Indians" Steering Committee Member, Indian Ecumenical Convocation of North America Member, Planning Committee Indian Alcoholism and Drug Use

1970 August -- Speaker: "The Role of the White Indian Expert," 2nd Annual Conference, National Indian Education Association

1970 October -- Speaker: "The Ethnographic Study of Indian Women," Annual Convention, American Ethnohistorical Soceity

1970 November -- Speaker: "The Anthropologists as the Indian's Image Maker," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "The Anthropologist and Ethnic Studies Programs," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1970-1971 -- Associate Professor, Anthropology, San Francisco State University Member, Mayor's Committee on the Status of Women, San Francisco, California

1971 -- Member, Native American Scholars Board, Steering and Selection, American Indian Historical Society

1971 May -- Speaker: "Ethnic Studies and Native Americans," National Education Association

1971-1973 -- Pre-Doctoral Lecturer, Anthropology, University of Washington Consultant, American Indian Heritage Program

1972 -- Honored in "Potlatch" ceremony by Makah Tribal people at the National Indian Education Conference for contributions to Indian education Receives grant: American Council of Learned Societies Travel Grant, Americanist Annual Meeting, Rome, Italy Curriculum Advisor, Lakota Higher Education Center, Prine Ridge, South Dakota

1972 March -- Speaker: "Warrior Women Societies," Northwest Anthropological Conference

1972 April -- Chairperson and Speaker: "Racism and Ethnic Relations," Society for Applied Anthropology

1972 June -- Chairperson, Native American Studies Symposium, International Congress of Americanists, Mexico

1972 August -- Speaker: "Warrior Women of the Plains," International Congress of Americanists, Rome, Italy

1972 November -- Speaker: "Native Americans in the Modern World," Southwest Minnesota State College

1973 -- Expert Witness, Yvonne Wanro Trial, Spokane, Washington Member, Organization of American States, First Congress of Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico Speaker: "Self-Direction in Sioux Education," American Anthropological Association Speaker: "North American Native Women: The Aspirations and Their Associations," presented as a Delegate to the Inter-American Commission on Indigenous Women, Chiapas, Mexico

1973-1974 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Native American Studies Program, Dartmouth College

1973-1976 -- Member, Committee on Minorities in Anthropology, American Anthropological Association

1973- -- Consultant, Human Services Department, Sinte Gleska Community College

1974 -- Expert Witness, Wounded Knee Trial, Lincoln, Nebraska Speaker: "Indian Women's Roles: Traditional and Contemporary," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1974-1975 -- Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Colorado College

1975-1976 -- Visiting Associate Professor, Anthropology, Stanford University

1975-1977 -- Member, Steering Committee, Council of Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association

1976 -- Visiting Professor, Educational Anthropology, University of New Brunswick Expert Witness, Topsky Eagle Feathers Trial, Pocatello, Idaho Panelist, White House Conference on Ethnic Studies, Washington, D.C.

1977 -- Expert Witness, Greybull Grandchildren Custody Case, Portland, Oregon American Indian representative to the World Conference on Indigenous People, Geneva, Switzerland Honor: Outstanding Alumna, South Dakota State University

1977 August 18 -- Medicine serves as Sacred Pipe Woman at the Sun Dance, Green Grass, South Dakota

1977-1980 -- Education Consultant, National Congress of American Indians, Washington, D.C.

1978 -- Cited in the Directory of Significant 20th Century American Minority Women, Gaylord Professional Publications Biographical Sketch in "Moving Forward" of the Bookmark Reading Program, Third Edition

1978 August -- Speaker: "Issues in the Professionalization of Native American Women," Annual Meeting, American Psychological Association

1978-1982 -- Advanced Opportunity Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 -- Visiting Professor, Department of Education Policy Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

1979 August -- Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters, Northern Michigan University Speaker: "The Dakota Indian Memorial Feast: Reservation and Urban Manifestations," International Congress of Americanists, Lima, Peru

1980 -- Member, Nominations Committee, American Anthropological Association Biographical Sketch in "Native American Indian Personalities, Historical and Contemporary," Dansville, New York: The Instructor Publications, Inc.

1981 -- Visiting Professor, Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Washington-Seattle Speaker: "Linguistically Marginated: The Transformation of Dominated Speech Varieties," American Anthropological Association

1982 -- School of Social and Behavioral Science Academic Planning, California State University Speaker: "Policy Decisions: Federal Regulations and American Indian Identity Issues," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1982-1983 -- Anthropology Department Curriculum Committee, California State University

1982-1985 -- Associate Professor of Anthropology, Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Indian Studies, California State University Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Program in American Studies Program, California State University

1982- -- President, Assembly of California Indian Women

1983 -- Receives Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology, University of Wisconsin Expert Witness, Fortunate Eagle Trial, Reno, Nevada Award: Outstanding Woman of Color, National Institute of Women of Color, Washingtonton, D.C. (for anthropological contributions) Award: Outstanding Minority Researcher, American Educational Research Association Publishes book with Patricia Albers: The Hidden Half: Indian Women of the Northern Plains Honor: Significant Academic Book (The Hidden Half), Choice, Association of Colleges and Research Libraries, American Library Association

1983-1984 -- Student Affirmative Action Coordinating Council, California State University

1983-1986 -- Member, Executive Board, Southwest Anthropological Association Member, Governing Board, Common Cause

1984 -- Member, Advisory Board of National Research for Handicapped Native Americans, North Arizona University Scholarly Publications Award Selection Committee, California State University Award: Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University Speaker: Field Work Methods: "Ties That Bond," Committee on the Status of Women in Anthropology," Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association Speaker: "Career Patterns of American Indian Women," Council of Education and Anthropology, Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association

1984 November -- Faculty Award for Meritorious Service, California State University

1984-1985 -- Participant, Chancellor's Office Grant to "Cross-Cultural Perspectives in the Social Sciences," California State University

1985 November -- Speaker: Conference on "The Native American: His Arts, His Culture, and His History," West Virginia State College

1985-1986 -- Board of Directors, Naechi Institute on Alcohol and Drug Education

1985-1988 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology and Director, Native Centre, University of Calgary

1985-1989 -- Member, Malinowski Awards Committee, Society for Applied Anthropology

1987 -- Honor: Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, University of Michigan

1987-1995 -- Member, Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association

1988 August 1 -- Medicine officially retires.

1989 -- Volunteer (Committee of Anthropologists in Primarily Minority Institutions, American Anthropological Association), Standing Rock College Honor (twice): Outstanding Minority Professorship Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks Visiting Professor, Wayne State University.

1990 -- Honor: "Outstanding Contributions for the promotion of sex equity in Education," Illinois State Board of Education Honor: Outstanding Lakota Woman, Standing Rock College

1991 -- Honor: Distinguished Service Award, American Anthropological Association. Medicine was the first American Indian to receive this award.

1991 -- Visiting Professor, Saskatchewan Indian Federal College Visiting Professor, Colorado College Visiting Professor, Anthropology, Humboldt State University

1992 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Women's Studies, University of Toronto

1993 -- Visiting Professor, Rural Sociology, South Dakota State University Award: Distinguished Native American Alumna Award, South Dakota State University

1993-1994 December -- Research Co-ordinator, Women's Perspectives, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples

1994- -- Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta

1995 -- Scholar in Residence, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul Visiting Scholar, Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia Award: Ohana Award, Multi-Cultural Counseling Excellence, American Association of Counselors

1996 -- Award: Bronislaw Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology. Buckman Professor, Department of Human Ecology, University of Minnesota

circa 1997- -- Associate Professor of Anthropology Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, California State University

2001 -- Publishes book: Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings.

2005 -- Award: George and Louise Spindler Award, Council on Anthropology and Education, American Anthropological Association.

2005 December 19 -- Medicine dies during emergency surgery in Bismarck, North Dakota.

2006 -- Book: Drinking and Sobriety Among the Lakota Sioux is published posthumously.

2008 -- The Society for Applied Anthropology creates the Bea Medicine Award.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Beatrice Medicine between 1997 and 2003, and by Ted Garner in 2006.
Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Alcohol  Search this
Gender imagery  Search this
Discrimination  Search this
Linguistics -- Research -- United States  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Lakota Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.1997-05
See more items in:
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1997-05

Papers by David A. Baerreis, Joan E. Freeman, and James V. Wright on Eastern Oklahoma Excavation Site and the "Spiro Ceremonial Complex"

Collection Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Container:
Box 9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
bulk 1957-1958
Collection Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers / Series 3: Archaeology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1997-05-ref221

"Analysis of the Radioactive Properties of Bone Specimens from the Smith Site, Delaware County, Oklahoma" by Lewis R. Binford

Collection Creator:
Medicine, Beatrice  Search this
Container:
Box 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1960
Collection Restrictions:
Materials relating to student grades, letters of recommendation, and evaluations have been restricted.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Beatrice Medicine papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers
Guide to the Beatrice Medicine papers / Series 3: Archaeology
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1997-05-ref247

Pictures of Record, Inc. photograph collection of Late Caddo culture

Collector:
Pictures of Record, Inc.  Search this
Photographer:
Arkansas Archeological Survey  Search this
Names:
Soule, William S. (William Stinson), 1836-1908  Search this
Extent:
70 Copy color slides
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy color slides
Photographs
Place:
Arkansas -- Antiquities
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Copies of images of Caddo Indians, structures, and artifacts and excavations of Caddo sites. The collection includes copies of 19th century photographs by William S. Soule and photographs of excavations by the Arkansas Archeological Survey, circa 1972.
Biographical/Historical note:
Pictures of Record, Inc. publishes scholarly annotated images, largely for use in teaching. The set on "Late Caddo Culture (Caddo III-V)" was annotated by Frank F. Schambach and Ann M. Early of the Arkansas Archeological Survey. According to Schambach and Early, "In 1200, the Caddo on the southwest edge of the Eastern woodland not only retained, but elaborated disappearing Mississippian traits. Temple mounds were in use in 1692 and the great ceramic tradition reached a peak around 1700."
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot R86-18
Reproduction Note:
Copy slides made by Pictures of Record, Inc., copyright 1985.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs of Caddo Indians by William Soule can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4659, Photo Lot 3912, and Photo Lot 24.
Additional photographs of Caddo Indians can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 25, Photo Lot 76, MS 4558, MS 3302, MS 4659, and the BAE historical negatives.
Caddo artifacts can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accessions 001317, 257511, 113605, E432918-0, 374095, and 358176.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Copy slides in this collection that represent photographs not held by the National Anthropological Archives are for reference only.
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot R86-18, Pictures of Record, Inc. photograph collection of Late Caddo culture, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.R86-18
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-r86-18

Joseph R. Caldwell photographs of archeological excavations in Chatham County, Georgia

Creator:
Caldwell, Joseph R.  Search this
Names:
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
Extent:
163 Copy negatives
191 Negatives (nitrate)
20 Prints (silver gelatin)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy negatives
Negatives
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Chatham County (Ga.)
Georgia -- Antiquities
Date:
circa 1940
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs documenting excavations in Chatham County, Georgia. There are images of scenery, dig sites, WPA workers, and pottery sherds and skeletal remains found during excavations at the Irene site, Bilbo site (CH 4), Walthour site (CH 11), Deptford (CH4), CH2 and CH8.
Biographical/Historical note:
Joseph Ralston Caldwell (1916-1973) was an archeologist best known for conducting Works Projects Administration (WPA) excavations in Chatham county, Georgia, circa 1937-1941. Caldwell then served as scientific aide to the National Museum's Director of Anthropology (1943-1945) and as an archeologist for the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys (1946-1949). In 1957, he received a doctorate in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. From 1963 to 1964, Caldwell was a Fulbright professor of Archaeology at the University of Tehran and a professor of Anthropology at the Medical School of the National University of Iran. In 1967, he became a professor of Anthropology and Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at the University of Georgia.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-3
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs by Caldwell can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 81K.
Correspondence from Caldwell and records relating to the Bilbo, Deptford, and other sites, can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Antonio Waring's papers.
Records, notes, and correspondence by Caldwell can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Department of Anthropology Personnel Files 1911-1994, Frank Maryl Setzler's papers, and the River Basin Surveys Records.
Joseph Caldwell's footage of River Basin Survey Work in Wagoner County, Oklahoma, can be found in the Human Studies Film Archives in HSFA 91.19.1
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advance notice for viewing. Copy negatives available for reference.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 87-3, Joseph R. Caldwell photographs of archeological excavations in Chatham County, Georgia, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-3
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-3

Portraits of anthropologists

Depicted:
American Association for the Advancement of Science  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
United States De Soto Expedition Commission  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Bond, Q. M.  Search this
Cammerer, Arno B.  Search this
Cushing, Frank Hamilton, 1857-1900  Search this
Davis, E. H. (Edwin Hamilton), 1811-1888  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Drucker, Philip, 1911-1982  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Geary, James A.  Search this
Goode, G. Brown (George Brown), 1851-1896  Search this
Hale, Horatio, 1817-1896  Search this
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Henshaw, Henry W. (Henry Wetherbee), 1850-1930  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Holmes, William Henry, 1846-1933  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Judd, Neil Merton, 1887-1976  Search this
Knez, Eugene I. (Eugene Irving), 1916-2010  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Le Plongeon, Augustus, 1826-1908  Search this
Mason, Otis T., 1838-1908  Search this
Matthews, Washington, 1843-1905  Search this
McGee, W J, 1853-1912  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Morgan, Lewis Henry, 1818-1881  Search this
Pilling, James Constantine, 1846-1895  Search this
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Rink, Signe  Search this
Roberts, Frank H. H. (Frank Harold Hanna), 1897-1966  Search this
Royce, Charles C., 1845-1923  Search this
Stephenson, Robert L. (Robert Lloyd), 1919-  Search this
Stevenson, James, 1840-1888  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Steward, Julian Haynes, 1902-1972  Search this
Struever, Stuart  Search this
Swan, James G., 1818-1900  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Upham, E. P. (Edwin Porter), 1845-1918  Search this
Washburn, Wilcomb E.  Search this
Willey, Gordon R. (Gordon Randolph), 1913-2002  Search this
Photographer:
Bachrach & Brother  Search this
Blackstone Studios  Search this
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
Bailey, Vernon Orlando  Search this
Dana (of New York)  Search this
Garrett, Gene  Search this
Gilbert, C. W.  Search this
Gill, De Lancey, 1859-1940  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Kemethy, Kets  Search this
Koby, Paul  Search this
McDonough, David  Search this
Parker, Charles  Search this
Phillips, H. C.  Search this
Rice (of Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Shuck, J. A.  Search this
Names:
Geological Survey (U.S.)  Search this
Artist:
Nicholson, Grace, -1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (photogravure)
8 Prints (halftone (including one newspaper clipping))
124 Prints (circa, silver gelatin, albumen, and platinum)
50 Copy prints (circa)
3 copper printing plates
1 Color print
1 Print (wood engraving)
3 Copy negatives (glass)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Copy prints
Color prints
Copy negatives
Photographs
Date:
circa 1860s-1970
Scope and Contents note:
This collection is an artificial collection of photographs, copper plates, and a few notes, all of which depict or relate to anthropologists, many of which were associated with the Bureau of American Ethnology.

Included are portraits of Franz Boas, Q. M. Bond, Arno B. Cammerer, Frank Hamilton Cushing, Edwin Hamilton Davis, J. Woodbridge Davis, Frances Densmore, James Owen Dorsey, Philip Drucker, Jesse Walter Fewkes (including photographs of his home by Frances Densmore), Albert Samuel Gatschet, James A. Geary, De Lancey W. Gill, George Brown Goode, Horatio Hale, Henry Wetherbee Henshaw, John Napoleon Brinton Hewitt, John K. Hillers, William Henry Holmes, William Henry Jackson, Eugene Irving Knez, Alfred Louis Kroeber, Pere Albert Lacomb, Augustus Le Plongeon, James Mooney, Lewis Henry Morgan, Carl Oschsicanes, James Constantine Pilling, John Wesley Powell, Frau Signe Rink, Frank Harold Hanna Roberts, Jr., Charles C. Royce, Robert Lloyd Stephenson, James Stevenson, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, Julian Haynes Steward, Steward Struever, James Gilchrist Swan, John Reed Swanton, Edwin P. Upham, Wilcomb E. Washburn, and Gordon Randolph Willey. Groups depicted include the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology, 1936; the De Soto Commission; officers of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1885; a 1920 expedition group to Hawikuk; staff of the Great Lakes Division, United States Geological Survey, in Salt Lake City, 1882; a group at Moundville, Alabama, 1932; the University of Nebraska archeological field party, 1920; the Pecos conference, 1927; John Wesley Powell with Wild Hank, Kentucky Mountain Bill, and Jesus Aloiso; and the United States Geological Survey staff, ca. 1894.

Among photographers represented are Vernon Orlando Bailey, Blackston Studios of New York, Dana of New York, Frances Densmore, Gene Garrett, C. W. Gilbert, De Lancey W. Gill, John K. Hillers, William H. Jackson, Kets Kemethy, Paul Koby, David McDonough, H. C. Phillips, Rice of Washington, D. C., and J. A. Shuck of El Reno, Oklahoma.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 33
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Four photographs with negatives by Matilda Coxe Stevenson have been relocated to Photo Lot 23.
This collection includes photographs that have been removed from other collections in the National Anthropological Archives, including MS 4970, MS 4851, MS 4780, MS 4250, MS 4751, MS 4516, MS 4860, MS 4695, MS 4970, and MS 4558.
See others in:
Portraits of anthropologists, 1860s-1960s
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Copy prints of original photographs held by the American Philosophical Society, National Geographic Society, and National Archives cannot be copied. Copies may be obtained from these repositories.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 33, Portraits of anthropologists, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.33
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-33

Fletcher to La Flesche

Collection Creator:
La Flesche, Francis, 1857-1932  Search this
Fletcher, Alice C. (Alice Cunningham), 1838-1923  Search this
Container:
Box 5A
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1895, 1899, 1905
Collection Restrictions:
The Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers are open for research.

Access to the Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4558 Alice Cunningham Fletcher and Francis La Flesche papers
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National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
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William C. Sturtevant papers

Topic:
Handbook of North American Indians
Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Six Nations  Search this
Extent:
220 Linear feet (The total extent of the collection is 191.41 linear feet (consisting of 473 document boxes and 2 record boxes) plus 254 sound recordings, 94 computer disks, 42 card file boxes, 85 oversize folders, 9 rolled items, 18 binder boxes, and 3 oversize boxes. Of the total extent, 4.79 linear feet (14 boxes) are restricted.)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Date:
1952-2007
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and other professional activities. The collection is comprised of books, sound recordings, research and field notes, realia, artifacts, clippings, microfilm, negatives, slides, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, memorandums, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, and bibliographies.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and his involvement in various professional activities. The collection is comprised of research and field notes, sound recordings, realia, clippings, negatives, slides, prints, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, memorandums, conference papers and meeting notes, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, bibliographies, student files such as class notes and papers from Sturtevant's years as an anthropology student, teaching materials including lecture notes and exams, daily planners, passports, military records, artwork including prints and lithographs, maps, and computer files.

The materials in this collection document Sturtevant's career as a preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, university professor, his role as General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, and his contributions to the field of Anthropology. From his early work with the Seminole Indians of Florida to his forays into Burma, and his decades-long study of how Native Americans have been depicted in artistic and popular culture, Sturtevant's diverse intellectual interests are represented in his research files. A copious note taker, Sturtevant captured his observations and opinions of everything from meetings with colleagues to museum exhibits. Sturtevant's commitment to the anthropological profession can be found in the notes and programs of the many conferences, symposiums, and lecture series he attended and at which he presented. He also held numerous leadership positions in various professional associations and sat on the board of directors/trustees for several cultural organizations including Survival International and the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation. Sturtevant was respected for his vast knowledge of indigenous peoples and he received a voluminous amount of correspondence from colleagues who often included copies of their papers and grant proposals. He kept many of these works, which, it appears he used as reference material. Sturtevant's own work is reflected in his writings; he published over 200 scholarly papers, articles, and books.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 14 series: 1. Correspondence, 1951-2008; 2. Research Files, 1851, 1860s, 1880s, 1890, 1939-2006; 3. Writings, 1952-2006; 4. Professional Activities, 1952-2006; 5. Smithsonian, 1954-2008; 6. Handbook of North American Indians, 1971-2007; 7. Biographical Files, 1933-2007; 8. Student Files, 1944-1985; 9. Subject Files, 1902-2002; 10. Photographs, 1927-2004; 11. Artwork, 1699-1998; 12. Maps, 1949-1975; 13. Sound Recordings, 1950-2000; 14. Computer Files, 1987-2006.
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007), preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, and university professor, was best known for his contributions to Seminole ethnology, as curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and for his work as the general editor of the Handbook of North American Indians.

Sturtevant's passion for studying Native peoples began at a young age. In third grade "after a class on American Indians, he asked his father what kind of people study Indians, and his father replied, 'Anthropologists.' Sturtevant decided then that he would make anthropology his career" (Merrill 11). After graduating with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949, Sturtevant went on to Yale University to complete his graduate work in anthropology. When it came time to decide on what area of North America he should focus his research, one of his faculty members at Yale, Irving Rouse, "suggested he consider the Seminoles of south Florida. By the end of his first fieldwork season, Sturtevant was convinced that the dearth of ethnographic information about these Seminoles and their status as one of the least acculturated of all North American Indian societies justified ethnographic research among them and offered the possibility of making an important contribution to North American ethnology" (Merrill 13). Sturtevant spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 conducting preliminary fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole and in 1952 he took up temporary residence at Big Cypress Reservation to undertake research for his dissertation, "The Mikasuki Seminole: Medical Beliefs and Practices." This work focused on Seminole medicine, but also included Sturtevant's analysis of Seminole worldview, religion, history, inter-ethnic relations, material culture, economy, kinship, language, and social organization.

In 1954, while he was finishing his dissertation, Sturtevant made the transition from student of anthropology to professional anthropologist. He was hired as an instructor in Yale's Anthropology Department and began his career in museum work as an assistant curator of anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. After receiving his PhD from Yale in 1955, Sturtevant moved on to the Smithsonian Institution, where he accepted a position as a research anthropologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). This position afforded Sturtevant the chance to continue to explore his many research interests in ways that a full time professorship or museum curatorship could not. Over the next ten years he studied the Catawba in South Carolina; the Seneca and Cayuga nations of the Iroquois League in New York, Oklahoma, and Ontario; continued his work with the Seminole; visited European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture; and spent a year in Burma. In 1963, Sturtevant and his wife, Theda Maw, the daughter of a prominent Burmese family, took their three young children to Burma so that they could visit with Maw's family. Sturtevant took this as an opportunity to branch out from his Native American research and spent the year visiting neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examining archival materials, studying the Burmese language, learning about Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, and taking photographs. He also collected 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian.

When Sturtevant returned from Burma, he found the BAE had been dissolved. In 1965, he was transferred from the now-defunct BAE to the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), where he became curator of North American Ethnology, a position he held for the next forty-two years. During his tenure at NMNH Sturtevant oversaw all the North American ethnology collections, planned exhibitions, served on committees, and sponsored interns and fellows. One of Sturtevant's primary duties at NMNH was serving as the General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, "a major multi-volume reference work summarizing anthropological, linguistic, and historical knowledge about native peoples north of Mexico" (Jackson). Each volume was designed to represent a geographic or topical area of Americanist study. As General Editor, Sturtevant selected volume editors, chapter authors, oversaw office staff, and proofread manuscripts over the course of production.

Besides focusing on the Handbook, much of Sturtevant's time was taken up by responsibilities he held outside the Institution. Sturtevant was extremely involved in professional anthropological associations and held many leadership positions. Fresh out of graduate school, he began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1957. He later became a member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society, served as book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist from 1962-1968, was a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums and was both vice president and president of the committee once it became the Council for Museum Anthropology, was on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives, served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation from 1976-1982 and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986, and sat on the Board of Directors of Survival International from 1982-1988. He was President of the American Society for Ethnohistory, the American Ethnological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropological Society of Washington. Sturtevant also taught classes at Johns Hopkins University as an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology, served as a consultant on exhibits at other museums, and reviewed manuscripts for scholarly publications.

Sturtevant remained active in the profession throughout his later years. After divorcing Theda Maw in 1986, he married Sally McLendon, a fellow anthropologist, in 1990 and they undertook several research projects together. Sturtevant was recognized for his dedication and contributions to the field of anthropology in 1996 when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Brown University, and in 2002 when his colleagues published a festschrift in his honor, Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant.

Sturtevant died on March 2, 2007 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, MD after suffering from emphysema.

Sources Consulted

Estrada, Louie. 2007. William C. Sturtevant; Expert on Indians. Washington Post, March 17. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/16/AR2007031602273.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Jackson, Jason Baird. 2007. William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007). http://museumanthropology.blogspot.com/2007/03/william-c-sturtevant-1926-2007.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Merrill, William L. 2002. William Curtis Sturtevant, Anthropologist. In Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant. William L. Merrill and Ives Goddard, eds. Pp. 11-36. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1926 -- Born July 26 in Morristown, NJ

1944 -- Entered the University of California at Berkeley as a second-semester freshman

1944 -- Attended summer school at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City where he took courses on Mexican archaeology and South American ethnology

1945 -- Drafted into the United States Navy

1946 -- Received an honorable discharge from the Navy with the rank of pharmacist's mate third class and returned to UC Berkeley

1947 -- Attended the University of New Mexico's summer field school in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

1949 -- January: Received his Bachelor's degree with honors in anthropology from UC Berkeley

1949 -- Began graduate studies at Yale University

1950-1951 -- Spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 in Florida conducting fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole

1951 -- Conducted his first research study of the Iroquois, a classification of Seneca musical instruments, their construction and use, with Harold Conklin

1952 -- May: Moved to Big Cypress Reservation in Florida to conduct research for his dissertation. He focused on Seminole medicine, but also collected physical anthropological data such as blood-type frequencies, handedness, and color blindness

1952 -- July 26: Married Theda Maw

1954 -- Hired by Yale University as an instructor in the Department of Anthropology and as an assistant curator of anthropology in the Yale Peabody Museum

1955 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1956 -- Joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) as a research anthropologist

1957 -- Began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1957 -- Traveled to Rock Hill, South Carolina to collect linguistic data from Sam Blue, the last member of the Catawba tribe to have maintained some proficiency in the Catawba language. While there, he made a small collection of Catawba pottery for the United States National Museum

1957-1958 -- Spent seven weeks continuing his research among the New York Seneca

1959 -- Returned to Florida to study Seminole ethnobotany. He also collected ethnographic materials, especially objects made for the tourist market, which he deposited in the United States National Museum

1959-1960 -- Member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society

1960 -- July and August: Visited 17 European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture

1961-1962 -- Spent the summers of these years conducting ethnographic fieldwork among the Seneca-Cayuga in Oklahoma

1962 -- October: Visited the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada to conduct fieldwork among the Seneca and Cayuga there

1962-1968 -- Book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist

1963 -- October: Spent the year in Burma; visited neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examined photographs in several archives, studied the Burmese language, and read extensively about the country's history and culture. Assembled notes on Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, took hundreds of photographs, and made a collection of 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian

1964 -- Visited Inle Lake in the Southern Shan States southeast of Mandalay, where he examined local approaches to artificial island agriculture

1964-1981 -- Became a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums, which became the Council for Museum Anthropology in 1974. Sturtevant was the Council's first vice president, serving two terms between 1974 and 1978, and was its president from 1978 to 1981

1965 -- Became curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History after the dissolution of the BAE

1965-1966 -- President of the American Society for Ethnohistory

1966 -- Named the editor of the Handbook of North American Indians

1967-1968 -- Fulbright scholar and lecturer at Oxford University's Institute of Social Anthropology

1969 -- Began serving on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives

1974-1989 -- Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

1976-1982 -- Served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986

1977 -- President of the American Ethnological Society

1980-1981 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1981 -- Spent part of the spring semester at the University of California Berkeley as a Regents Lecturer

1982-1988 -- Board of Directors of Survival International

1986 -- Divorced Theda Maw

1986-1987 -- Smithsonian Fellow at Oxford University's Worcester College

1990 -- Married Sally McLendon

1992 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1996 -- Awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters at Brown University

2007 -- Died March 2 in Rockville, MD
Related Materials:
Other materials relating to William C. Sturtevant at the National Anthropological Archives are included in the following collections:

Manuscript 4504

Manuscript 4595

Manuscript 4806

Manuscript 4821

Manuscript 4972

Manuscript 7045

Photo Lot 59

Photo Lot 79-51

Photo Lot 80-3

Photo Lot 81R

Photo Lot 86-68 (6)

Photo Lot 86-68 (7)

American Society for Ethnohistory records

Committee on Anthropological Research in Museum Records

Handbook of North American Indians records

Records of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History

Gordon Davis Gibson Papers, Sound Recordings

SPC Se Powhatan Confederacy Mattapony BAE No # 01790700

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913800

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913900

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04914000

Negative MNH 1530

Negative MNH 1530 B

Sturtevant is listed as a correspondent in the following NAA collections:

Administrative file, 1949-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

John Lawrence Angel Papers

James Henri Howard Papers

Donald Jayne Lehmer Papers

John Victor Murra Papers

Records of the Society for American Archaeology

Albert Clanton Spaulding Papers

Waldo Rudolph Wedel and Mildred Mott Wedel Papers

Copies of sound recordings made by William C. Sturtevant can be found at The California Language Archive at UC Berkeley in two collections, The William Sturtevant collection of Creek/Seminole sound recordings, which includes 31 minutes of Northern Muskogean linguistic field recordings from 1951, and The William Sturtevant collection of Mikasuki sound recordings, which includes 33 minutes of Mikasuki linguistic field recordings from 1951. Two sound tape reels of Seminole music Sturtevant recorded in Florida in 1951 can be found at Wesleyan University's World Music Archives. Folk songs on these recordings include "Scalping Sickness," "Bear Sickness with blowing," "Bear sickness without blowing," "Lullaby," "Feather Dance," "Snake Dance," and "Crazy Dance." Performers include Josie Billie, Lee Cypress, Harvey Jumper, Boy Jim, Charlie (Johnny?) Cypress, Little Tiger Tail, Billy Ossiola, and Charlie Billy Boy.
Separated Materials:
One video tape, "Seminole History and Tradition", was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Series 2.2, Tukabahchee Plate: Glass negative of spectrogram from FBI (Box 135), removed for storage with other glass plate negatives.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History.
Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
History  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-24
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-24
Online Media:

James Henri Howard Papers

Correspondent:
Woolworth, Alan R.  Search this
Weslager, C.A.  Search this
Witthoft, John, 1921-1993  Search this
Swauger, James Lee  Search this
Turnbull, Colin  Search this
Horn, Frances L.  Search this
Garcia, Louis  Search this
Fogelson, Raymond D.  Search this
Hodge, William  Search this
Hayink, J.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Ervin, Sam J. Jr  Search this
Feraca, Stephen E., 1934-  Search this
Feest, Christian F.  Search this
Cree, Charlie  Search this
Davis, Edward Mott  Search this
De Busk, Charles R.  Search this
Iadarola, Angelo  Search this
Brasser, Ted J.  Search this
Bunge, Gene  Search this
Cavendish, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
DeMallie, Raymond  Search this
Blake, Leonard W.  Search this
Dean, Nora Thompson  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Smith, John L.  Search this
Swanton, John Robert  Search this
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Peterson, John H.  Search this
Paredes, J. Anthony, 1939- (James Anthony)  Search this
Schleisser, Karl H.  Search this
Reed, Nelson A.  Search this
Medford, Claude W.  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Opler, Morris Edward  Search this
Nettl, Bruno, 1930-  Search this
Kraft, Herbert C.  Search this
Johnson, Michael G.  Search this
Lindsey-Levine, Victoria  Search this
Kurath, Gertrude  Search this
Adams, Richard N. (Richard Newbold), 1924-  Search this
Allen, James H.  Search this
Barksdale, Mary Lee  Search this
Battise, Jack  Search this
Creator:
Howard, James H., 1925-1982 (James Henri)  Search this
Names:
Lone Star Steel Company  Search this
Extent:
10.25 Linear feet
Culture:
Seminole  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Chickasaw  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Yanktonnai Nakota (Yankton Sioux)  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Euchee (Yuchi)  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Oto  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Oklahoma -- Archeology
Date:
1824-1992
bulk 1950-1982
Summary:
To a considerable degree, the James H. Howard papers consist of manuscript copies of articles, book, speeches, and reviews that document his professional work in anthropology, ethnology, ethnohistory, archeology, linguistics, musicology, and folklore between 1950 and 1982. Among these are a few unpublished items. Notes are relatively scant, there being somewhat appreciable materials for the Chippewa, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Omaha, Ponca, Seminole, and Shawnee. The chief field materials represented in the collection are sound recordings and photographs, but many of the latter are yet to be unidentified. A series of color photographs of Indian artifacts in folders are mostly identified and represent the extensive American Indian Cultural collection of costumes and artifacts that Howard acquired and created. Other documents include copies of papers and other research materials of colleagues. There is very little original material related to archeological work in the collection and that which is present concerns contract work for the Lone State Steel Company.
Scope and Contents:
The James Henri Howard papers document his research and professional activities from 1949-1982 and primarily deal with his work as an anthropologist, archeologist, and ethnologist, studying Native American languages & cultures. The collection consists of Series 1 correspondence; Series 2 writings and research, which consists of subject files (language and culture research materials), manuscripts, research proposals, Indian claim case materials, Howard's publications, publications of others, and bibliographical materials; Series 3 sound recordings of Native American music and dance; Series 4 photographs; and Series 5 drawings and artwork.

Howard was also a linguist, musicologist, and folklorist, as well as an informed and able practitioner in the fields of dance and handicrafts. His notable books include Choctaw Music and Dance; Oklahoma Seminoles: Medicines, Magic, and Religion; and Shawnee! The Ceremonialism of a Native American Tribe and its Cultural Backround.

Some materials are oversize, specifcially these three Winter Count items: 1. a Dakota Winter Count made of cloth in 1953 at the request of James H. Howard, 2. a drawing of British Museum Winter Count on 4 sheets of paper, and 3. Photographs of a Winter Count.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 5 series: Series 1. Correspondence, 1960-1982, undated; Series 2. Writings and Research, 1824-1992; Series 3. Sound Recordings, 1960-1979; Series 4. Photographs, 1879-1985; Series 5. Drawings and Artwork, 1928-1982.
Chronology:
1925 -- James Henri Howard was born on September 10 in Redfield, South Dakota.

1949 -- Received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Nebraska.

1950 -- Received his Master of Arts from the University of Nebraska and began a prolific record of publishing.

1950-1953 -- Began his first professional employment as an archaeologist and preparator at the North Dakota State Historical Museum in Bismarck.

1955-1957 -- Was a museum lecturer at the Kansas City (Missouri) Museum.

1957 -- James H. Howard received his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. Joined the staff of the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys in the summer.

1957-1963 -- Taught anthropology at the University of North Dakota.

1962 -- Chief archeologist at the Fortress of Louisberg Archeological Project in Nova Scotia.

1963-1968 -- Taught anthropology at the University of South Dakota; State Archeologist of South Dakota; Director of the W. H. Over Dakota Museum.

1963-1966 -- Director of the Institute of Indian Studies, University of South Dakota.

1968-1982 -- Associate professor of anthropology at Oklahoma State University at Stillwater (became a full professor in 1971).

1979 -- Consulted for exhibitions at the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

1982 -- Died October 1 after a brief illness.
Biographical/Historical note:
James H. Howard was trained in anthropology at the University of Nebraska (B.A., 1949; M.A., 1950) and the University of Michigan (Ph.D., 1957). In 1950-1953, he served as archeologist and preparator at the North Dakota State Historical Museum; and, in 1955-1957, he was on the staff of the Kansas City (Missouri) Museum. During the summer of 1957, he joined the staff of the Smithsonian's River Basin Surveys. Between 1957 and 1963, he taught anthropology at the Universtity of North Dakota. Between 1963 and 1968, he served in several capacities with the University of South Dakota including assistant and associate professor, director of the Institute of Indian Studies (1963-1966), and Director of the W.H. Over Museum (1963-1968). In 1968, he joined the Department of Sociology at Oklahoma State University, where he achieved the rank of professor in 1970. In 1979, he was a consultant for exhibitions at the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha, Nebraska.

Howard's abiding interest were the people of North America, whom he studied both as an ethnologist and archeologist. Between 1949 and 1982, he worked with the Ponca, Omaha, Yankton and Yaktonai Dakota, Yamasee, Plains Ojibwa (or Bungi), Delaware, Seneca-Cayuga, Prairie Potatwatomi of Kansas, Mississipi and Oklahoma Choctaw, Oklahoma Seminole, and Pawnee. His interest in these people varied from group to group. With some he carried out general culture studies; with other, special studies of such phenomena as ceremonies, art, dance, and music. For some, he was interest in environmental adaptation and land use, the latter particularly for the Pawnee, Yankton Dakota, Plains Ojibwa, Turtle Mountain Chippewa, and Ponca, for which he served as consultant and expert witness in suits brought before the United Stated Indian Claims Commisssion. A long-time museum man, Howard was also interested in items of Indian dress, articles associated with ceremonies, and other artifacts. He was "a thoroughgoing participant-observer and was a member of the Ponca Hethuska Society, a sharer in ceremonial activities of many Plains tribes, and a first-rate 'powwow man'." (American Anthropologist 1986, 88:692).

As an archeologist, Howard worked at Like-a-Fishhook Village in North Dakota, Spawn Mound and other sites in South Dakota, Gavin Point in Nebraska and South Dakota, Weston and Hogshooter sites in Oklahoma, and the Fortess of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia. He also conducted surveys for the Lone Star Steel Company in Haskall, Latimer, Le Flore and Pittsburg counties in Oklahoma.
Related Materials:
Howard's American Indian Cultural Collection of Costumes and Artifacts, that he acquired and created during his lifetime, is currently located at the Milwaukee Public Museum. In Boxes 19-21 of the James Henri Howard Papers, there are photographs with accompanying captions and descriptions in binders of his American Indian Cultural Collection of Costumes and Artifacts that his widow, Elfriede Heinze Howard, created in order to sell the collection to a museum.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James Henri Howard's wife, Elfriede Heinz Howard, in 1988-1990, 1992, & 1994.
Restrictions:
The James Henri Howard papers are open for research. Access to the James Henri Howard papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology -- United States  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Folklore -- American Indian  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Citation:
James Henri Howard Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1994-30
See more items in:
James Henri Howard Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1994-30
Online Media:

Manuscripts of Writings by Howard

Collection Correspondent:
Woolworth, Alan R.  Search this
Weslager, C.A.  Search this
Witthoft, John, 1921-1993  Search this
Swauger, James Lee  Search this
Turnbull, Colin  Search this
Horn, Frances L.  Search this
Garcia, Louis  Search this
Fogelson, Raymond D.  Search this
Hodge, William  Search this
Hayink, J.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Ervin, Sam J. Jr  Search this
Feraca, Stephen E., 1934-  Search this
Feest, Christian F.  Search this
Cree, Charlie  Search this
Davis, Edward Mott  Search this
De Busk, Charles R.  Search this
Iadarola, Angelo  Search this
Brasser, Ted J.  Search this
Bunge, Gene  Search this
Cavendish, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
DeMallie, Raymond  Search this
Blake, Leonard W.  Search this
Dean, Nora Thompson  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Smith, John L.  Search this
Swanton, John Robert  Search this
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Peterson, John H.  Search this
Paredes, J. Anthony, 1939- (James Anthony)  Search this
Schleisser, Karl H.  Search this
Reed, Nelson A.  Search this
Medford, Claude W.  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Opler, Morris Edward  Search this
Nettl, Bruno, 1930-  Search this
Kraft, Herbert C.  Search this
Johnson, Michael G.  Search this
Lindsey-Levine, Victoria  Search this
Kurath, Gertrude  Search this
Collection Creator:
Howard, James H., 1925-1982 (James Henri)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1951-1989
Scope and Contents:
Subseries 2.2 consists of manuscripts of Howard's work in archeology, including sites in Oklahoma, Nova Scotia, North Dakota, and South Dakota; anthropology and ethnology of some tribes of the Plains and Southeast; winter counts; book reviews that he wrote. It also contains manuscripts and materials he created when writing the books Choctaw Music and Dance and Shawnee! The Ceremonialism of a Native American Tribe and it Cultural Background.
Arrangement:
Subseries 2.2 is arranged alphabetically.
Collection Restrictions:
The James Henri Howard papers are open for research. Access to the James Henri Howard papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
James Henri Howard Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1994-30, Subseries 2.2
See more items in:
James Henri Howard Papers
James Henri Howard Papers / Series 2: Writings and Research
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1994-30-ref16

Virginia Drew Watson papers

Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Cole, J. David, 1941-  Search this
Extent:
8.13 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Brazil
Papua New Guinea
Mato Grosso (Brazil : State)
Papua New Guinea -- Social life and customs
Papua New Guinea -- Antiquities
Date:
1930-2001
Summary:
Virginia Drew Watson was a cultural anthropologist best known for her work in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Her papers attest to a variety of interests related to culture and culture change, drawing on resources both archaeological and ethnographic. This collection contains catalogs, correspondence, drawings, field notes, grant proposals, manuscripts, maps, photographs, publications, reports, and slides. The majority of the field work relates to her work in Papua New Guinea, both with her husband (James B. Watson) and with J. David Cole, but there are also materials related to her work in Brazil.
Scope and Contents:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers attest to a variety of interests related to culture and culture change, drawing on resources both archaeological and ethnographic. Her work could be conveniently separated into four areas: Brazil, Plains and Caddo Indians, Papua New Guinea ethnographic, and Papua New Guinea archaeology with Cole. This collection contains catalogs, correspondence, drawings, field notes, grant proposals, manuscripts, maps, photographs, publications, reports, and slides. Most of the correspondence is with colleagues doing related work in other museums or universities in the United States or Australia. A small part of the correspondence is with friends, including missionaries, who report relevant information of interest. The collection includes original field notes from Brazil, including notes from a lecture by Radcliffe-Brown in 1943. There are also original field notes from the Tairora, Agarabi, and Gadsup groups in Highland New Guinea. In addition, this collection includes a list of Watson's publications, a copy of most of them, and some reviews.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 5 series: (1) Correspondence, 1930s-2000; (2) Brazil, 1943-1955, 1966; (3) New Guinea, 1949-2000; (4) Manuscripts, 1939-2001; (5) Books/Monographs, 1942-1977, 1997; (6) Slides of PEHNG Archeological Sites, 1965-1973, undated
Biographical Note:
Virginia Drew Watson was born on June 17, 1918, in Tomah, Wisconsin. Her undergraduate work was completed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she received a PhB in Sociology (1940). She conducted graduate work for both AM (1943) and PhD (1965) degrees at the University of Chicago. She was a Fellow of both the American Anthropological Association and the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Virginia Watson's early work was in archaeology, but later she pursued both archaeology and socio-cultural anthropology. She married James B. Watson, a cultural anthropologist, in 1943. During that year they went to Brazil, where Virginia Watson's work was primarily ethnographic among the Cayua Indians of Mato Grosso. On the trip returning from the field to Sao Paulo the Watsons stopped at the archaeological site of Ciudad Real del Guayra. From 1944 to 1945 Watson worked in the Cultural Relations Department of the American Consulate General in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Watsons made two trips to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The first, 1954-1955, was funded by the Ford Foundation. Watson focused on socio-cultural aspects of the Tairora and Agarabi groups, and her work resulted in the 1965 publication of her dissertation, "Agarabi Female Roles and Family Structure, a study of socio-cultural change." The Watsons' second Papua New Guinea trip was in 1963-1964. It was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and focused on the Tairora and Gadsup groups. For Virginia Watson, the second trip was partly connected to archaeological work previously carried out by J. David Cole. Due to illness, he was unable to analyze the mass of material (25,000 objects) that he had collected. Watson analyzed the material and produced publications, one of which was in collaboration with Cole.

Virginia Watson often held one or more part-time positions. As a graduate student in 1942, she was a part-time Lecturer in the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. On returning from Brazil, the Watsons moved to Oklahoma University in Norman for one year. There, Watson supervised archeology students in sorting and putting in order the university collection of artifacts as well as directing them in the field. From 1948 to 1953 Watson was a Lecturer at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and she also directed students in field work. During the St. Louis years the Watsons spent two summers studying the Anglo-Spanish community in Colorado. From 1957 to 1963 she was a Lecturer at Seattle University and from 1961 to 1971 she was also an Occasional Lecturer at the University of Washington, Seattle. From 1969 to 1989 Watson held the position of Affiliate Curator at the Burke Museum, University of Washington. After she retired, Virginia Watson spent her winters in Florida and her summers in Boulder, Colorado.

Virginia Watson died in 2007.

Sources Consulted

Watson, Virgina Drew. "Curriculum vitae, 2001, For National Anthropological Archives." Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

"James Watson III." Bangor Daily News, December 10, 2009.

Chronology

1918 -- Born on June 17 in Tomah, Wisconsin

1940 -- Earned PhB in Sociology from University of Wisconsin-Madison

1942 -- Lecturer in archaeology at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago

1943 -- Earned AM from University of Chicago Married James B. Watson Field research of the Cayua Indians, Mato Grosso, Brazil

1944-1945 -- Worked in the Cultural Relations Department of the American Consulate General in Sao Paulo, Brazil

1947 -- Special Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma, Norman

1948-1953 -- Lecturer in anthropology and archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis

1949-1950 -- Field research of the Anglo-Spanish community, Del Norte, Colorado

1953-1955 -- First field research trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea

1957-1963 -- Lecturer in anthropology at Seattle University

1961-1971 -- Lecturer in anthropology at the University of Washington, Seattle

1963-1964 -- Second field research trip to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea

1965 -- Earned PhD from the University of Chicago Published dissertation: "Agarabi Female Roles and Family Structure, a study of socio-cultural change"

1969-1989 -- Affiliate Curator of Melanesian Archaeology at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington

2007 -- Died
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also has the papers of Virginia D. Watson's husband, James Bennett Watson.
Provenance:
Virginia Drew Watson donated her papers to the National Anthropological Archives in 2002.
Restrictions:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers are open for research.

Access to the Virginia Drew Watson papers requires and appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Citation:
Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2002-12
See more items in:
Virginia Drew Watson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2002-12

A report of archeological reconnaissance in the Canton Reservoir area, Blaine and Dewey counties, Oklahoma. 2 pages, 1 map

Collection Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Cole, J. David, 1941-  Search this
Container:
Box 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1947
Collection Restrictions:
The Virginia Drew Watson papers are open for research.

Access to the Virginia Drew Watson papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Virginia Drew Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Virginia Drew Watson papers
Virginia Drew Watson papers / Series 4: Manuscripts / 4.1: Unpublished Documents
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2002-12-ref165

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Extent:
2.1 Linear feet (Box 1-3, FC 23)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1883-1980
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains family correspondence and extensive professional letters from noted artists and art world figures including critics, writers, collectors, museums and other art institutions. Scattered letters from Pach can also be found here.

See Appendix for partial chronological list of letters from Series 2.
Arrangement note:
This series is arranged as two subseries.

2.1: Family Correspondence, 1883-1980

2.2. General Correspondence, 1903-1969
Appendix: Partial Chronological List of Letters from Series 2:
From J.B. Young [?], October 5, 1900: New York, N.Y. Eric Dell recovered from consumption; Terry also had it and was treated at an English sanitarium; entertained several actors; made a brief trip to the country. 2 pp., illustrated with drawing, "an interpretation of how you will look when you next visit New York."

From Franji Vaatsvoort, September 18, 1903: Haarlem, the Netherlands. Severe storm; received Pach's postcards. Picture postcard (Frans Hals, "Cordelia Voogt Claesd., vrouw van Nicolaes van der Meer"

From Theodore Roosevelt, Washington, D.C., March 5, 1904: President's autograph. Card with engraving of the White House.

From Frank R. Wadsworth, Chicago, Ill., [postmarked] March 2, 1905: Intends to go to Spain; advises Pach to write about art; recommends the Madrid gallery; discusses Chicago's new orchestra hall and the death of Thomas; opinions about the jury system; is sending pictures to Philadelphia, the one eastern city likely to accept them. 6 pp. + enclosures (silhouettes of monkey, 3 birds, and cat by a 10-year-old child).

From Luis E. de la Rochas, Madrid, Spain, December 24, 1905: thanks Pach for photographs of works of art; inquires about the progress of Pach's own painting; will send a picture of his latest painting, as he is interested in Pach's opinion; sends regards to Mr. Chase. 3 pp., in Spanish, illustrated with drawing of a bearded man.

From Edith Bell, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] December 24, 1905: Christmas greetings; thanks Pach for showing her the Goya sketch. 2 pp.

To Claude Monet, Giverny, France, June 3, 1906: advises that knowing how to use color is most important and should become a matter of habit; lists his palette. 1 p., in French, typescript copy.

From Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, N.Y., February 13, 1907: printed form letter with payment for "The Memoria of Velasquez."

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, [postmarked] April 24, 1907: mentions Kenzan picture Pach is interested in; thanks Pach for showing sketch to Henri, Ogihara's former teacher; lists some exhibitors in the Salon, with opinions of their work; thinks Rodin's work is great; he met Rodin at his studio. 4 pp. + 1 p. enclosure (note to Yamanaka & Co., New York, about Kenzan picture), in Japanese.

From Piet van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, May 11, 1907: likes portrait of Pach by Chase with its strong "Rembrandtic" shadow; reminisces about Chase; hopes to marry Annie in August. 4 pp.

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, September 2, 1907: is glad Pach is returning to Paris; is attending classes at Académie Julian; saw Henri in France recently. 3 pp.

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, [postmarked] September 10, 1907: wonders if and when Pach is returning to Paris. Postal card.

From Moriye Ogihara, Vitry-sur-Seine, France, [postmarked] September 12, 1907: urges Pach to visit after his stay in Italy. Picture postcard ("Reine d'Egypte en Isis--Bronze antique").

From [signature illegible], Director, The Royal House, Florence, Italy, October 5, 1907: the king grants permission to copy the Catherine de Medici portrait at the Pitti Palace. 1 p., in Italian.

From Claude Monet, Giverny, France, November 4, 1907: Monet will receive Pach this week on Wednesday or Thursday afternoon. 1 p., in French.

From Lelebuss, New York, N.Y., November 21, 1907: thanks Pach for birthday greetings; several friends are now married.

From Edith Bell, New York, N.Y., November 25, 1907: visited Henri and saw 40 canvases; describes Henri's new studio at 135 E. 40th St.; Lawson and Stevenson called at the studio while she was there; recalls Pach's description of visits to Monet and Ogihara; "it is my belief that Mr. Henri is afraid of George Bellows. He praises him so." 5 pp. + enclosure (photograph of a portrait by Edith Bell).

From Moriye Ogihara, Florence, Italy, December 25, 1907: Christmas greetings; discusses travels in Italy and art seen. 4 pp.

From Moriye Ogihara, Florence, Italy, December 26, 1907: has been to the Academy; praises Miss Frohberg. Picture postcard ("Firenze Lung' Arno Corsine").

To Alice Klauber from Walter Pach, Paris, France, January 3, 1908: he is looking at art; received a picture from her cousin; asks if she saw the article on Matisse he wrote for the Hearst paper. Picture postcard ("Frans Hals, La Bohemienne"), in Japanese, with English postscript.

From Moriye Ogihara, Arezzo, Italy, January 5, 1908: leaving for Assisi soon; stayed too long in Florence sightseeing with Magdalene. Picture postcard ("Arezzo, La Catte drale").

From Moriye Ogihara, Rome, Italy, [postmarked] January 14, 1908: staying at the same pensione as Frost. Picture postcard ("Torso di Belvedere di Dietro").

From Moriye Ogihara, Athens, Greece, January 22, 1908: discusses sightseeing in Greece and his trip through Italy; observations about Frost; "I appreciate Rodin very much since I have been in Italy"; offers to correct Pach's written Japanese.

From Gerda Stein, [place unknown], January 29, 1908: "Dearest love to Lena and best wishes for a very happy Birthday." Greeting card.

From Roger Marx, Editor, -- Gazette des Beaux-Arts -- , Paris, France, February 12, 1908: wants to publish a comprehensive study of the state of painting in the United States; must choose between original engravings and photographic reproductions for illustrations. 2 pp., in French.

From Moriye Ogihara, Cairo, Egypt, February 13, 1908: steamer has been delayed two days but he can continue to work. Picture postcard ("Ramesseum at Thebes").

From [Rais?], Paris, France, [postmarked] March 19, 1908: invites Pach to visit on Friday. 1 p., in French.

From William Merritt Chase, Florence, Italy, July 16, 1908: is leaving for Paris tomorrow; invites Pach to meet him at Caffe [sic] Du Paix that evening. 1 p.

From Helen R. Wilson, Furnes, Belgium, July 30, 1908: enumerates 13 highlights of her stay in Paris, including first view of a Cézanne painting. 4 pp.

From Senateur de la Sarthe, Paris, France, August 4, 1908: expression of sympathy. Note on business card, in French.

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Paris, France, November 5, 1908: is doing small paintings outdoors and in his hotel room; is reluctant to leave Paris but wants to visit Italy, too; went to the Autumn Salon 3 times and found the work of Matisse "very beautiful"; "I am inclined to consider it a very personal art rather than the part of a great movement considering Matisse the leader, and the art doctrines evolved by the Steins (damn nice people...)... are to me the most awful nonsense"; prefers Renoir to Cézanne; is impressed by Egyptian portraits in the Louvre; has completed about 36 panels. 3 pp.

From Olga [de?], Paris, France, December 24, 1908: has completed 3 portrait commissions; wants to see the Velasquez, which is said to be "splendid." Picture postcard ("Paris, Eglise Saint-Augustin"), in French.

From Piet van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, February 6, 1909: is looking for a new teaching position; their infant son is now healthier. 3 pp.

From Annie van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, March 13, 1909: thanks Pach for the brush and birthday greetings; invites him to the Netherlands; tells about their baby. 1 p., in Dutch.

From Piet van der Laan, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, March 15, 1909: discusses Shaw's -- Candida -- and -- Man and Superman -- ; is studying Nietzsche. 2 pp.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., May 29, 1909: discusses Pach's essay about him. 1 p.

From Moriye Ogihara, Tokyo, Japan, May 30, 1909: "Devil came into my mind and I am suffering and suffering"; Saito visited with news of Pach and pictures to exhibit at the Taiheiyo Art Association. Sequence of 5 picture postcards (1, "Wisteria"; 2. "Peony Blossoms at Yotsame"; 3. [bridge--title in Japanese]; 4. "Iris"; 5. "Peony Blossoms at Yotsame").

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., June 1 [10?], 1909: wishes to reschedule studio visit by Pach and Mr. Of. 2 pp.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] July 9, 1909: interested in Gauguin and how he compares with Degas. 1 p.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., December 6, 1909: saw the Cézanne painting in Boston and agrees it is beautiful, "conscientious and absolutely sincere"; has not heard recently From Davi[e]s, "one of the few very sympathetic friends I am fortunate to possess." 4 pp.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., April 8, 1910: sends clipping about Matisse; recommends article about the Venus de Milo. 1 p.

From K. Tohary, Tokyo, Japan, May 11, 1910: Moriye Ogihara died in Tokyo, April 22, following an attack of vomiting blood; Tohary plans to publish a book about him; requests that Pach send Ogihara's letters and any recollections he wants to contribute. Rice paper scroll.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., May 14, 1910: "I found your article on Matisse the most enlightening I have read so far." 1 p.

From Albert Pinkham Ryder, New York, N.Y., May 26, 1910: thanks Pach for "kindly interest" in his work. 1 p. + enclosure (reprint of a poem, "The Voice of the Forest").

From Henri Rouart, La Queue en Brie, France, September 17, 1910: sorry he was unavailable to welcome Pach and his friends. 1 p., in French.

From [unknown], New York, N.Y., [postmarked] October 5, 1910: empty envelope with no return address. Sketch of head on reverse.

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Mooresville, Ind., October 12, 1910: describes fellow passengers aboard ship; gives details of getting paintings through customs; advises Pach to start preparing necessary documents for bringing home his property. 5 pp. + enclosures (4 small etchings: 2 portraits, 2 landscapes).

From Charles Sheeler, Philadelphia, Pa., October 26, 1910: after a period of difficulty, his work shows progress; Schamberg thinks Sheeler's recent landscapes are "Cézanne like"; has had little opportunity to see the work of modern painters; hopes to go to New York for upcoming exhibitions at the Photo Secession Gallery, particularly Picasso, Cézanne, and Matisse; rejected by Macbeth last fall and by the Art Institute; a Chicago dealer wants to show his work, but friends there advise against involvement with that gallery. 6 pp.

From Julian Alden Weir, New York, N.Y., November 25, 1910: discusses his interest in etching, especially drypoint. 4 pp.

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Philadelphia, Pa., December 27, 1910: met Stieglitz and "was well satisfied with his attitude. He hasn't the intelligence of a Leo Stein but he is sincerely interested and is getting into a position where he could do one lots of good"; met Hartley; visited Henri's studio; Stieglitz and Henri think "I am too cock-sure of myself. If they only knew"; completed 20 to 25 pictures in the last year; sends photographs of some. 3 pp. + enclosures (7 photographs of Schamberg's work: 6 figures, 1 exhibition installation).

From Adolph Werner, New York, N.Y., December 21, 1910: is teaching less at the university now that he is the "President's lieutenant." 2 pp.

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Mooresville, Ind., January 3, 1911: discusses Davies' collection of Cézanne photographs; he and Hila were married; regrets that Pach was not named director of the museum in Indianapolis. 7 pp.

From Auguste Renoir, Cagnes, France, March 28, 1911: thanks Pach for allowing him to review the article before publication; wants the interview portion withheld because it seems critical of Saint-Saens and Pillet-Will and suggests posthumous publication; feels flattered by Pach's review. 4 pp., in French.

From Eugène Leroy, Paris, France, March 27, 1911: is happy to have been of service; the Association Philotechnique enjoys meeting foreigners who appreciate its teachings and will take home pleasant memories of France. Note on calling card, in French.

From Charles Loeser, Florence, Italy, April 28, 1911: exchanged 4 of his Cézanne paintings for a larger one From Vollard; Pach's German friend should contact Vollard immediately if she is interested in acquiring one; Denis Cochin traded a Cézanne for a Goya at Durand-Ruel. 8 pp.

From Auguste Rodin, Paris, France, June 1, 1911: is willing to meet with Pach to discuss Fujikawa's book on Ogihara. 2 pp., in French.

From E. D. Smyth, Côtes-du-Nord, France, August 31, 1911: will answer Pach's letter; apologizes for being fussy about the Stendahl etc." Picture postcard (Etables, Côtes-du-Nord, Les Grottoes.")

From E.D. Smyth, Côtes-du-Nord, France, September 5, 1911: is leaving soon for Saint-Malo; will return Pach's "Tuscan book" and send 2 others; recounts events of the summer; describes some hotel guests and the cottage where her family is staying; wants to see Daumier originals. 14 pp.

From Ruth A. Wilmot, Brooklyn, N.Y., October 7, 1911: is glad their misunderstanding is straightened out; someone on the boat unintentionally insulted her companion; homesick for Paris; working again; finds New York "invigorating." 5 pp.

From Joe Garvey, Alpine, N.J., November 21, 1911: is back From honeymoon; wants to go to Europe but first must sell property. 4 pp.

From Herman Reimers, Christiana, Norway, November 24, 1911: thanks Pach for the gift of an etching; will not be moving to Paris after all; was appointed director of political affairs at the ministry. 4 pp., in French.

From Tete, New York, N.Y., December 14, 1911: Christmas greetings; misses him; family news; has been in contact with Pach's parents. 4 pp., with sketches of busts on the envelope.

From Margherita Innocenti, Pensione Innocenti, Florence, Italy, December 22, 1911: thanks Pach for kind words about her and for recommending the pensione; 4 American women are there now. 3 pp., in Italian.

From Margherita Innocenti, Pensione Innocenti, Florence, Italy, February 9, 1912: -- Ladies -- . Will be happy to have friends of Pach stay at the pensione. 1 p., in Italian.

From E.D. Smyth, Florence, Italy, February 21, 1912: describes guests at Pensione Innocenti; met young Italian artist, Gino "Sensano or Sanseno [Severini]," who knows Stella and other mutual friends; recounts visits with Signorina A.B. and Mr. Loeser; returning by sea due to Helen's illness; will not see Pach again this trip. 6 pp.

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], April 15, 1912: note of dedication, 1 p. + 2 pp. enclosure (copy of "Chants d'Amour," a poem by Henry Marx), in French.

From E.D. Smyth, [place unknown], Ireland, April 27, 1912: "Have made half my notes From the cahier" and will send them to H.M. soon. Postal card.

From Eugène, Paris, France, [postmarked] April 26, 1912: will come on Sunday at 9:00; is happy that Pach was not expelled because now he can work in peace for a few more days. 1 p., in French.

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Davos, Switzerland, May 5, 1912: has eye problems that doctors cannot treat; Jack is recovering; plans to spend summer in the Black Forest and return to Davos for the winter; Pach writes well; finds it "refeshing to read really honest stuff"; is working on a book of caricatures. 8 pp.

From Fujikawa, Paris, France, June 4, 1912: saw Mr. Molissa and is interested in his work; Pach should express Fujikawa's thanks to Molissa; is going to Florence where he hopes to see Pach; requests photographs of any new work Pach completes. 3 pp. + 5 enclosures (brief thank you notes From M. Lernait, Tererco?, L. Lombard, Louis Varday, and Romanet), in French.

From Georges Speirer, Paris, France, June 6, 1912: heard From friends that Pach is in Florence. 2 pp., in French.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., June 19, 1912: discusses arrangements for payment and shipping of Cézanne painting; has found a buyer; Macbeth will handle customs; Macbeth will send Pach photographs of Rockwell Kent's pictures; will see Pach in Paris in October. 3 pp.

From [signature illegible (L.L.?)], Levallois, France, July 1, 1912: hopes Pach will spend the winter in Paris; is glad Pach is pleased with his paintings of Arezzo. 4 pp., in French.

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, July 19, 1912: thanks Pach for his letters; will send photographs taken at his country house; friends agree with Pach's assessment of Milan. 6 pp., in French.

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July [30?], 1912: is not surprised that Pach received a discouraging letter From Floury, who has requested another translator; Faure wants Pach to do the job. 4 pp., in French.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., October 2, 1912: Cézanne painting is now at Macbeth's; gives details of problems with customs; is unable to accompany Walt Kuhn in search of artists for the Armory Show; "the possibilities [of the Armory Show] loom tremendous yet so many can only see another opportunity of showing their work"; "you can do so much for Kuhn in every way and I also believe he has a really healthy outlook with considerable ability." 2 pp.

From Egisto Fabbri, Paris, France, November 28, 1912: declines Pach's invitation, due to illness. 1 p.

From G.A. Bourdelle, [place unknown], December 4, 1912: the Toussaint sculpture can be installed with or without a socle; declined to participate in the New York exhibition before realizing Pach was the organizer; keep the photograph of Toussaint's work. 3 pp., in French.

From [unknown], Gambier, Ohio, [postmarked] December 4, 1912: empty envelope with no return address.

From Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Paris, France, December 6, 1912: Two sculptures, -- Woman Kneeling -- and -- Large Torso -- , and 2 drawings are being sent to Pach for his exhibition. 1 p., in French.

From Henri Matisse, Tangier, Morocco, December 6, 1912: agrees to lend the 7 paintings requested for exhibition in New York; lists titles, insurance values, and indicates which are for sale; -- Le Luxe -- is fragile; no drawings are available; will ask Fénéon to loan as many paintings as possible. 2 pp., in French.

From Robert Henri, New York, N.Y., January 3, 1913: discusses photographs of Besnard's work; reminisces about discovering decorations by Besnard at the College of Pharmacie; compliments Pach's Winslow Homer article; "there is a growing state of expectancy about the 'armory' exhibition, and there is little doubt but that it will make a great stir, and do a great deal of good in a great variety of directions"; news of George Bellows, Guy Pène du Bois, Boss, Kent, Coleman, Sprinchorn, Sloan, Van Sloun, and Bohnen. 4 pp.

From Odilon Redon, [place unknown], France, January 6, 1913: he is flattered by Pach's article, which he believes will enhance his reputation in America; Pach should try to visit soon, as they plan to go south in a few days. 2 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, January 16, 1913: agrees with Pach that each generation of artists draws inspiration From undeveloped ideas found in the work of preceding generations; no French architectural style has emerged since the 18th century, confirming the idea that eras without defined aspirations produce no monuments; current politics and intellectual freedom presage hope for the 20th century; as Pach demonstrated, painting was the dominant 19th-century aesthetic, thus developments in other arts will come From painting; a new architecture is needed for modern life; in a time when money reigns supreme, artists should practice simplicity; machines are now a powerful presence in all of life. 4 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, [postmarked] January 24, 1913: his cousin has just finished a painting that Pach should see; invites Pach to dinner. 1 p., in French.

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, February 11, 1913: if he goes to England, he will contact Mr. Fry; wants to introduce a painter friend to the Steins; Pach is a rare friend and intellectual equal. 2 pp., in French.

From Jacqueline d'Argent, Chinon, France, March 1, 1913: has fond memories of their interesting conversations; present acquaintances are not intellectual and gossip too much; applied for a medical assignment in Algeria but is unsure about moving. 2 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, March 13, 1913: asks Pach to decide the price of the bronze; congratulations on the success of the exhibition. 3 pp., in French.

From Arthur B. Davies, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] April 5, 1913: borrowed works are being returned to Europe; Roman Bronze Co. could make a good cast of Brancusi's -- Mlle. Pogany -- owned by Belle Greene; "looking forward to a genuine recreation in Boston as to art interest"; doubts Chicago's appreciation, Mr. Eddy notwithstanding. 2 pp.

From Ary Le Bland, Paris, France, April 5, 1913: a copy of -- La Vie -- , featuring the information Pach provided about Redon, is being sent; asks Pach to write about art trends in America for -- La Vie -- and publicize the magazine. Postal card, in French.

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, April 13, 1913: congratulates and thanks Pach for promoting the acceptance of modern art; extends appreciation to Davies and Kuhn. 3 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, [place unknown], France, April 18, 1913: received Pach's letter and check; the Duchamp brothers are embarrassed by their success and do not talk about it; wishes Gleizes were having his share of it; asks how the other artists fared; a commission agency requested cubist paintings for America; worried that cubism is becoming a commodity; the 4 copies of -- Noa, Noa -- he purchased at a good price have been shipped. 2 pp., in French.

From M. Lernait [Lemaitre?], Saigon, Indochina, May 25, 1913: thanks Pach for writing and for his friendship; the countryside near Saigon is beautiful; he misses Paris. 4 pp., in French.

From Jacques Villon, Versailles, France, June 19, 1913: thanks Pach for selling another painting; Salon d'Automne opens later than usual this year; Torrey called on him, Marcel, and Picabia; Raymond is going on vacation soon; sends regards to Davies and Kuhn. 4 pp., in French.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., June 25, 1913: is recovering From surgery; thanks Pach for sending postcards and showing interest in him. 3 pp.

From Jean Le Roy, Paris, France, [postmarked] July 1, 1913: comments on the success of Pach's exhibition; has a temporary job; finished college; might travel to Guinea; discusses his poetry published in -- Les Bandeaux d'Oro -- ; met de Verhaeren, whom he admires. 4 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, July 2, [1913?]: heard all about the American exhibition From his brothers; thanks Pach for "enthusiastically defending their work"; still awaiting payment; will spend August in England; Torrey called on them. 3 pp., in French.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., [postmarked] July 11, 1913: is recovering From his "hospital experience"; recounts trouble with studio lease; asks Pach to notify him of suitable space available in New York. 4 pp.

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, August 1, 1913: Pach is a kindred spirit; Pach's competence and ability to elicit appreciation for modern painting made the show a success. 2 pp., in French.

From F. Wentscher, [place unknown], Hungary, August 24, 1913: is painting out of doors; won't return to Paris until November. Postal card, with original illustration of horse-drawn carriage, in German.

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, August 25, 1913: is delighted with Americans' enthusiastic acceptance of French painting; current prices are ridiculous and scandalous; bought a great Delacroix at reasonable cost; complains about his editor; awaits word From Mr. Fry, to whom he has sent a Cézanne; will go to London in September; saw an interesting Matisse show but preferred Bonnard's exhibition; he sees Renoir frequently; finds it deeply moving to see Renoir make constant improvements in his work despite old age and sickness. 4 pp., in French.

From Jacqueline d'Argent, Blida, Algeria, September 8, 1913: is now practicing medicine in Blida; describes the scenery and local people; congratulates Pach on his marriage. 6 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, September 25, 1913: just received Pach's article and will comment on it in the next letter; thanks Pach for promoting his and friends' work; will see the Steins soon and try to learn more of the rumored American reaction against their ideas; the Salon d'Automne opening is delayed until November; Pach's mention of the Delaunay affair confirms rumors of discord; asks Pach to determine if and when unsold paintings and sculpture were returned. 2 pp., in French.

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Indianapolis, Ind., December 22, 1913: museum's schedule cannot accommodate Pach's exhibition; describes upcoming January show; the museum hopes to acquire a Davies painting; "the exhibition in Chicago (The International) did not strike me with overwhelming force, but I have enough respect for the opinions of Mr. Davies and yourself to admit that the fault may have been my own"; congratulations on engagement to Miss Frohberg. 7 pp. + 1 p. postscript from -- Hila Drake Wheeler -- wishing Pach and Miss Frohberg happiness.

From G. Villon, Paris, France, [1914]: congratulations on the birth of Pach's son; heard From her husband who is in the army; asks Pach's opinion of some drawings; is working with blind children in a hospital. 4 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, January 26, 1914: asks Pach to determine whether the owner of -- Muse Endormie -- wants the piece in marble; a reduced price is possible, but he must know soon; met Mrs. Stieglitz; asks Pach's advice about showing his marbles in New York. 4 pp., in French.

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, February 19, 1914: received the check; distressed to be participating in a show that may prove harmful to Pach's cause; asks Pach not to be hurt by his unwitting mistake. 4 pp., in French.

From Walter Arensberg, Boston, Mass., March 1, 1914: "The exhibition was tremendously fresh and fine"; compliments Pach's work. 1 p.

From Jean Le Roy, Paris, France, [postmarked] March 4, 1914: congratulations on Pach's marriage; encourages him to continue painting; news of Lombard and Clapp. 2 pp., in French.

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Saint-Malo, France, June 12, 1914: thanks Pach for reproducing his work in -- Century -- magazine; is returning home sooner than planned; Renoir's new work is "way ahead of his former landscapes." 3 pp.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Courbevoie, France, June 26, 1914: is impatient for news of a proposed project; Mrs. A. Roosevelt will be in touch with Pach; her work has shown progress; during the past year, modern art has begun to attract interest and generate discussion among some previously unreceptive people. 2 pp., in French.

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Paris, France, June 30, 1914: "Would love to meet Brancusi and Duchamp-Villon but damn it, I can't speak French." Picture postcard ("P. Cézanne, -- L'été -- fragment").

From Odilon Redon, Bièvres, France, July 10, 1914: if Pach organizes another exhibition, he wants to participate. 3 pp., in French.

From Joseph Stella, Venice, Italy, July 20, 1914: discusses his travels in Europe; Greece reminded him of Davies's pictures; no reply From the futurists in Milan; recounts a meeting with Walkowitz in Patrai, Greece. 5 pp.

From Alexandre Mercereau, Paris, France, [postmarked] July 30, 1914: can secure work by interesting artists for exhibition; inquires whether foreign works and jewelry are acceptable; he organized an international exhibition of cubism with an accompanying symposium in Prague; offers to lecture in the United States if Pach can find a way to pay for the trip; is sending information about an organization he founded; wants to establish an American branch; needs an American editor for his books; Brancusi's participation is essential. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, August 7, 1914: just received registered letter and invitations; continuing with exhibit plans is impossible, as all of their friends are mobilized; work of Gleizes, Villon, and Metzinger being exhibited in Berlin probably will be lost; a negative reply From Chapell ended long-held hopes; wholehearted thanks due to Pach for countless efforts and true friendship; the French are ready to die for peace and freedom; confident of the future, despite anxiety over friends now in danger. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France, August 26, 1914: war conditions make collaboration impossible; is serving as a paramedic; no bad news concerning anyone Pach knows. 2 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, September 11, 1914: will consult with friends about planning an exhibition in the United States; Gleizes is at Toul; Villon is with the British army at Rouen. 2 pp., in French.

From Albert Pinkham Ryder, New York, N.Y., September 13, 1914: is looking forward to having the Pachs and Mr. Wheeler visit his studio. 2 pp.

From Michael Stein, Agay, France, October 19, 1914: requests details about the exhibition Pach is organizing; Pach should tell Matisse "he must now look to America for a market for his art for some time to come"; "it is about time he [Matisse] were ranked among the accepted classics and bought freely." 3 pp.

From Jean Le Roy, Brest, France, [postmarked] November 10, 1914: plans to enlist soon; is worried about Kohler at the front. 4 pp., in French.

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, November 23, 1914: comments on the war and his painting; congratulates Pach on his New York exhibition. 1 p., in French.

From Piet van der Laan, Zutphen, the Netherlands, January 24 and February 8, 1915: Congratulations on the birth of Raymond; cannot visit Pach in Paris because of the war. 4 pp. + 3 pp. enclosure (copy of a poem by Dante), in Italian.

From Raoul Dufy, Le Havre, France, January 29, 1915: sent 2 copies of his Bestiarie; wants Pach to choose a drawing, watercolor, or Bestiarie as a gift of thanks; heard From Derain, Apollinaire, and Gleizes, all in the army; de la Fresnaye was wounded; asks if Basler, Brummer, and Kahnweiler are art dealers now that they have settled in New York; considers Basler an honest man. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Acheux, France, February 26, 1915: still in Saint-Germain where his wife continues her work at the military hospital; Villon spent the entire winter in the trenches but bears it well; glad Quinn bought Cat and Parrot; thinks Quinn should have the final versions in wood rather than cast reproductions and instructs Pach to discuss it with him; received Marcel's articles and reproductions; understands the change that has affected Pach's desire for new means of artistic expression. 2 pp., in French.

From Raoul Dufy, Le Havre, France, March 3, 1915: lists the 4 paintings he is sending; accepts and reiterates the payment schedule; Pach should select a painting for himself; will send some paintings on silk; promises to write about decorative art in his next letter. 4 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, March 12, [1915?]: received the Matisse catalog and remembers the goldfish painting; Villon is in good health and good spirits; is optimistic about prospects for peace by summer; after a family vacation in Rouen, he finished glass and other projects; Raymond is happy in Saint-Germain, where his wife is a hospital nurse; does Pach know if Delaunay is in America; wants to visit Brancusi; has no news of Picasso, Braque, or Derain. 4 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, April 2, [1915?]: is preparing for an exhibition; describes arrangements for sending Raymond's works to Pottier; 2 paintings, a drawing, and papers are being sent to Pach; reports on the work and conditions of Raymond, Rifemont-Dessaisner, and Villon; has decided to leave France and go to New York; wants to know when he should come and if securing employment as a librarian will be difficult; does not want his family to know of these plans for a while; includes price list for paintings. 3 pp., in French.

From Jacques Villon, Acheux, France, April 13, 1915: glad to learn that his paintings and engravings have sold; is looking forward to returning to normal life and working with greater intensity; being welcomed in New York should boost his self-confidence and provide some peace of mind regarding financial security; the matter of Dr. Stum's paintings cannot be settled until the war ends; is sending Pach engravings and drawings; a shipment of sketches made during the war can be published as documentaries; after being away From home for 8 months, he envies Pach's happy family life; emerging spring contrasts sharply with human evil. 3 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, April 27, [1915?]: is displeased by the reply received; understands that Pach misses Paris and the artist's life he led there; he is increasingly dissatisfied and the point is to leave Paris rather than to go to New York; asks help in finding a library job in New York so he will not have to depend on selling paintings; does not want his family to know yet. 7 pp., in French.

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, May 21, 1915: has decided to depart on June 5, despite family and sentimental reasons for rescheduling; spoke to Raymond about Arensberg's magazine; Mme. Picon probably has articles by Mercereau, Gleizes may have articles, and other friends could contribute poems and prose; has decided on a job for the duration of his stay in America, but it will prevent him From painting. 3 pp., in French

From Theodore Duret, Paris, France, May 22, 1915: hopes Pach's efforts at promoting the latest in modern art, especially Van Gogh and Lautrec, have been successful; has written a comprehensive book on Van Gogh, which is to be published when the war ends; asks if the Van Gogh painting he loaned to the exhibition has been sold. 4 pp., in French

From Alice Derain, Paris, France, May 28, 1915: thanks Pach for sending a check and for handling her affairs; the paintings From Mme. Lebas were not shipped because Derain is not satisfied with them and decided not to sell; some landscapes may be available soon because Derain has spare time and can try to work; a recent portrait of the couturier Monsieur Poiret may be his best painting yet. 2 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, Versailles, France, [postmarked] June 1, 1915: (1) Discusses works in progress that may be suitable for the exhibition Pach is organizing; the shipment will also include a ceramic plaque for Quinn; Quinn persists in asking about Rouault's military status; 6 times already he has been disqualified due to a weak heart; academies, medals, and awards are not about art; nature and other artists are more inspiring than unimaginative teachers. (2) Pach should keep a Rouault piece unless he prefers to select one when in France; his simplified ceramics are real faiences; his paintings are lighter and more fluid; his show after the war will include German types and landscape and religious paintings. (3) Perhaps Quinn will be interested in the paintings shipped; within the year, a larger selection of ceramics will be available for Quinn, but at the moment his focus is on painting. 4 pp. (3 separate notes), in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], France, June 12, 1915: describes his flower-decorated trench and the surrounding countryside; started a magazine called Les Imberbes with an editor and typographer friend; intends to send poems to Pach's American publication. 5 pp. + 1 p. enclosure (poem, "Printemps"), in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Boston, Mass., July 7, 1915: thanks Pach for Dufy's book; "tell Monsieur Dufy when you write him I felt more pleased than if I got a gold medal"; he and Charlie will leave soon for Maine. 4 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] July 28, 1915: inquires whether Pach received the palette he sent; spent the evening with Quinn, Gregg, and Kuhn; Gregg was likable and Kuhn fascinating; thinks Quinn could be supportive; Quinn was anxious to know if cubism has been killed by the war; once his English improves, he wants to convince Quinn to discard his ideas about the politics of art. 2 pp., in French

From Alice Derain, Paris, France, August 7, 1915: sends receipt for payment in full; her husband is in the service; Braque was seriously wounded; Doucet died; Picasso is in Paris; her husband hopes to meet Pach. 2 pp., in French

From Raoul Dufy, Paris, France, September 18, 1915: has received a payment toward Quinn's account; Quinn has purchased additional works; credits many sales to his association with Pach; is able to paint while in the military; after the war, he hopes the French can become better acquainted with American painters; is pleased to hear that Prendergast liked his gift; wants to see photographs of Prendergast's work; requests catalogs with reproductions of American furniture. 4 pp., in French

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, [place unknown], October 17, 1915: feels renewed interest in his work; continues his research; observations about the war; Villon has suffered and was awarded a Military Cross; requests news of Pach and mutual friends; Pach should determine Quinn's intentions. 3 pp., in French

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, November 20 and 29, 1915: is delighted by the prospect of an exhibition of French art; will do what he can to help obtain the Seurat painting for exhibition; thanks Pach for selecting his work for the exhibition at Bourgeois and agrees to send additional pieces; lists etchings sent to Miss Bryant via Pottier; the photographs showed great improvement in Pach's portraits; advises a warmer palette; will offer additional frank comments after seeing new pictures; is working hard and just finished an important painting, which already has been sold; is still recovering From bronchitis. 12 pp., in French

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], France, December 28, 1915: best wishes for the coming year. Postal card, in French

From Theodore Duret, Paris, France, December 29, 1915: read a favorable review of the Van Gogh exhibition; asks if Pach was able to sell Duret's Van Gogh still life; his book about Van Gogh will be printed after the war. 4 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, [place unknown], December 31, 1915: has been in Paris throughout the war; is teaching at the Lycée Ch. [ sic]; believes Germany wants to organize the world; explains his view of the causes of the war and predicts the outcome. 6 pp., in French

From Mary Socard, Paris, France, December 31, 1915: greetings and good wishes; believes the war will be followed by much misery and great changes. 2 pp., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], France, [postmarked] [?,?] 1916: his commanding officer knows Picasso, Marie Laurencin, and Derain; Lafitte was killed; wants news of Pach; thank the magazine Others if his poem "Spring" is accepted. 5 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, [place unknown], France, [undated] [1916?]: received the catalog and Pach's review with the reproduction of his painting; his grandchild is sick; they are going to the seashore; is working on an exhibit; thanks Pach for helping sell a painting; though in poor health, he may have to join the army; suggests an album of reproductions. 10 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, January 5, [1916]: he is assigned to the central atelier for camouflage; works with other artists, not all of whom share his outlook; has many ideas for new work; no news From Marcel or Picabia. 4 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, [place unknown], France, [postmarked] January 22, 1916: personally delivered the paintings to Pottier for shipment; worries that the large works will not have the style and the color of the small ones; wants to have his exhibition ready before going to Italy; has not seen Villon recently. 2 pp., in French

From Piet van der Laan, Zutphen, the Netherlands, February 7, 1916: thanks Pach for the "ex-libris"; he is busy translating a lengthy book on medieval Italy; discusses Dante. 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], February 10, 1916: speculates that an art form may develop From the war. 1 p., in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, New York, N.Y., March 23, 1916: confirms 5 titles for inclusion in the exhibition catalog; has a good photograph for Pach's book. 2 pp

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, April 2, 1916: remembers Pach as one of his best students; one of the many reasons for their friendship is Pach's love for France; quotes Descartes; compares the French ideal of liberty with the German interpretation; comments on French and German science. 4 pp., in French

From Ruth Wilmot, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] April 9, 1916: compliments Pach on the lectures he presented to her group; encloses payment. 2 pp

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, April 28, 1916: extends best wishes for the success of the exhibition; asks Pach not to reveal the extremely reduced price of the painting Arensberg bought; asks if Max Weber has a large gallery; wants to obtain sound recordings of typical exotic chants. 4 pp., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], [postmarked] May 8, 1916: thanks Pach for sending the Cézanne catalog; has been at the front for 13 months; Kohler is a decorated hero; Siegfried's fate is unknown; plans to publish his poems when next in Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, May 29, 1916: wants to have an exhibition in New York; has 30 or 35 paintings and 20 drawings representing several periods and can supply text for a lecture; recently published on Mallarmé and pictorial aesthetics; is presently writing another critical study; suggests Pach arrange for a show at Montross or Macbeth and specifies his usual terms; philosophical differences have caused him to part From the group of futurists Pach knows; still considers himself a futurist and will use the term because it helps the public grasp his ideas; no one, including Picasso, Derain, Dufy, and Metzinger, is making a profit From exhibitions. 4 pp., in French

From Mme. Victor Le Roy, Paris, France, May 30, 1916: belatedly acknowledges receipt of Jean's poems; [UNK] husband, Victor, died near Verdun; Jean may come home on leave. 1 p., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], [postmarked] June 2, 1916: thanks Pach for forwarding his poems to American publications; believes poets are well treated in the United States; uncle Victor died in the war; Carreau was wounded. 4 pp., in French

From Raoul Dufy, Paris, France, June 3, 1916: thanks Pach for writing an article defending the ideas of modern French art, which had come under attack by a young American critic; wants to know if there are opponents of French modern art in New York; exhibitions are returning to Paris; Quinn purchased -- The Yellow Hat -- ; is sending a thank-you gift and an etching. 1 p., in French

From Emil Gay, Watkins Glen, N.Y., June 12, 1916: enjoyed Pach's lectures. 6 pp

From E.D. Smyth, [place unknown], England, June 16, 1916: news of a mutual friend killed in the war; discusses Jean Le Roy. 4 pp

From Camille Redon, Cannes, France, [July 1916?]: Redon is recuperating in Cannes; asks for the return of their pictures, when feasible. 2 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, [place unknown], July 4, 1916: Redon is gravely ill with pulmonary congestion; the doctors are concerned. 1 p., in French

From Jacques Villon, Puteaux, France, [postmarked] July 12, 1916: Miss Bryant's purchase boosted his morale and was welcome financially; Marcel is delighted with America; speculates that Marcel may eventually settle in America. 3 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, Bièvres, France, August 6, 1916: Redon was buried several days ago; a gallery in the Petit Palais will be devoted to him and there will be an exhibition at the Beaux-Arts in the spring; reflects on the solitude and anonymity of many great artists during their lifetimes. 4 pp., in French

From Georges Rouault, Paris, France, [postmarked] August 14, 1916: Pach should return all paintings and drawings when he can; thanks Pach for his help; his wife and infant daughter are unwell; bought a new house; will be able to work when the family leaves Paris; received the item Pach sent him From Quinn much sooner than anticipated. 2 pp., in French

From Souza Cardoso, [place unknown], Portugal, [postmarked] September 25, 1916: comments on the picture shown on the card. Picture postcard (photograph of a woman and child in costume), in French

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, October 14, 1916: the information Pach sent about Bourgeois raises hopes for a good exhibition at his gallery; in reply to the question about a frame for the portrait of Arensberg, insists that modern paintings do not need frames, especially gold ones that contain a picture by stopping its extension; will look at Pach's paintings any time; Mrs. Havemeyer parted with the Ingres as a condition for another purchase; From photographs, gives his opinion of the authenticity and condition of 12 paintings. 11 pp., in French

From Henri Matisse, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France, November 6, 1916: sends description and opinion of a picture he omitted From a previous letter; art is selling well in Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Paul Signac, Saint-Tropez, France, November 18, 1916: illness prevents him from complying with Pach's request to select works for exhibition; suggests sources From which to borrow Seurat paintings. 3 pp., in French

From Florence Bing, New York, N.Y., [undated (1917)]: condolences on the death of Pach's mother. 1 p

From Albert Gabriel, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: "Accept my sincere sympathy." Note on calling card

From Leigh Hunt, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: "Heartfelt sympathy." Note on calling card

From Professor Adolph Werner, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: "Condolence." Note on calling card

From Ruth Wilmot, [place unknown], [undated (1917)]: condolences on the death of Pach's mother. 2 pp

From Mme. Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Compiègne, France, [postmarked] January 6, 1917: her husband is hospitalized with multiple ailments, including typhoid; condolences on the death of Pach's mother. 2 pp., in French

From Constantin Brancusi, Paris, France, January 19, 1917: thanks for check From Quinn; is pleased that he was satisfied with the sculptures, despite difficulty in assembly; plans to visit the United States after the war. 3 pp., in French

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, February 7, 1917: has written a preface explaining the ideas of the avant-garde; wants Pach to oversee the translation; asks that the three fragile pastels be framed inexpensively by Stieglitz. 2 pp., in French

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., March 30, 1917: thanks Pach for help in determining latest possible date to submit work for exhibition. Note on the reverse of printed announcement of a show of Hassam's etchings and drawings at Frederick Keppel & Co., November 16- December 2

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, April 28, 1917: expresses appreciation for the success of his exhibition; his paintings should be returned at a more favorable time; a longer version of his preface on modern art will appear in -- Le Mercure de France -- ; asks to be remembered to his friends and for news of sales and reviews of his show. 4 pp., in French

From [signature illegible], New York, NY., May 14, 1917

From [signature illegible], New York, NY., May 16, 1917

From Charles Sheeler, Philadelphia, PA., May 17, [1917?]

From Charles Cooper, New York, NY., May 19, 1917

From [signature illegible], [Vienna, Austria?], July 22, 1917

From Alexandre Mercereau, [place unknown (at the front)], July 26, 1917: is sending Pach a selection of his writings, which he hopes can be published in the United States; is anxious for a good translation; believes the book he just wrote is his best and is willing to offer it to an American publisher before it appears in France. 4 pp., in French

From Gino Severini, Paris, France, September 6, 1917: discusses work in progress; offers congratulations on the first Independents show; praises Pach's selfless efforts; authorizes use of any remaining works for other exhibitions; thanks Pach for arranging sales and sending reviews. 4 pp., in French

From [signature illegible], [place unknown], October 26, 1917

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], France, October 26, 1917: reminisces about good times together; has less desire to write poetry now; is learning German and Italian. 2 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, November 3, 1917: describes superb Renoirs seen in the Rue de la Boetie; hopes Pach's remarkable efforts on behalf of modern art will be fruitful; notes qualities needed for portrait and landscape painting. 4 pp., in French

From Louis Lombard, Ingolstadt, Germany, [postmarked] November 26, 1917: boredom and solitude are his routine; thanks Pach for gifts of books and tobacco; sends holiday greetings. Postal card, in French

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, December 8, 1917: if it remains unsold, Pach should keep the Redon painting until the war is over; American troops are arriving; she follows the exhibitions; likes Matisse; Mr. Quinn is behind in his payments. 4 pp., in French

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Madison, N.J., January 5, 1918: thanks Pach for condolences upon the death of his son; wants Pach to look at his son's work and consider writing an article. 4 pp

From Georges Rouault, Versailles, France, [postmarked] January 15, 1918: discusses titles of 2 pieces; general terms are more suitable titles for his subjects; Matisse was ridiculed by many because for a year he numbered all canvases; Rouault's albums will be numbered rather than titled; suggests framing and matting techniques for the double-sided piece; his new paintings won't need glass; he has always been lonely, but now is isolated as well; has a new daughter. 4 pp., in French

From Arthur Burdett Frost, [place unknown], February 1, 1918: thanks Pach for his interest in his son Arthur; offers a photograph of Arthur to illustrate Pach's forthcoming article. 4 pp

From Arthur Burdett Frost, [place unknown], [between February 1 and March 12, 1918]: thanks Pach for the manuscript; plans to send additional photographs of Arthur. 4 pp

From Arthur Burdett Frost, [place unknown], [between February 1 and March 12, 1918]: returning Pach's manuscript; requests a copy. 2 pp

From Alexandre Mercereau, Paris, France, [postmarked] February 9, 1918: thanks Pach for finding him a publisher; financial gain is secondary to having a publisher of good reputation who will provide proper translation; mentions Pach's frequent contact with Gleizes and Duchamp, who surely support his efforts on behalf of modern art; Vareze recommends Julio Gonzales's decorative work for Pach's exhibition; wants to help a friend sell a de Miranda painting. 2 pp., in French, + business card ("Alexandre Mercereau, Homme de Lettres, President de la Société Les Grandes Conférences") + 2 photographs (inscribed portrait of Mercereau taken at the front, June 1915, and portrait of Charles III and Maria-Ana by Carreño de Miranda)

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, February 20, 1918: letter of gratitude for Pach's friendship and efforts on behalf of modern art; discusses idealism, imagination, art, and the search for truth. 3 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 12, 1918: is sending copies of his last 3 books; thinks -- The Holy Face -- is his most important book; it is about war in general and includes personal experiences From the present war. 4 pp., in French

From Mme. Le Roy, Paris, France., May 19, 1918: Jean died while a prisoner of war. 3 pp., in French

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Cannes, France, May 20, 1918: is sending Quinn a drawing and photograph that relate to his rooster sculpture and show the original architectural setting for the piece; will send the script of a comedy written with a friend for performance at a military hospital, which Pach may translate and publish in America; glad that the rift between Pach and Marcel is mended; recently saw Matisse hard at work; Villon is in the army and has no time for work. 4 pp., in French

From Gaby Duchamp, [place unknown], France, May 23, 1918: thanks Pach for arranging sales to Quinn; her husband is well, doing research, and will resume his art when the war ends; Raymond is in the hospital in Cannes; there were interesting Matisse and Picasso exhibitions in Paris. 2 pp., in French

From French Army, [place unknown], July [?], 1918: confirms the death of Jean Le Roy on April 26; sends details of the battle, as Pach requested, and text of citation. 4 pp., in French

From Mme. Le Roy, Paris, France, August 19, 1918: thanks Pach for the touching gesture of dedicating his University of California course to Jean's memory; sends a copy of the citation Jean received the day he died. 3 pp., in French

From J. Van Gogh Bonger, Far Rockaway, N.Y., August 20, 1918: sons wrote of good times with Pach in Berkeley; they were in Honolulu and now should be in Japan; first volume of the "Letters" has been translated; discusses her brother's friendship with Redon. 4 pp

From Camille Redon, Bièvres, France, September 23, 1918: thanks Pach for lecturing on Redon and his work; has a full set of engravings and lithographs; litho stones were erased, but copper plates are at the museum in Amsterdam; plans to sell prints after the war and will offer Pach some he lacks; comments on arrival of American forces, with whom her son-in-law is an officer. 4 pp., in French

From Morton Livingston Schamberg, Philadelphia, Pa., September 30, 1918: belated thanks for the two Indian tiles; he and Sheeler readily agreed who should have which tile. 2 pp

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., October 8, 1918: is glad Pach is in California; anticipating the end of the war; tell Mme. Van Gogh he regrets not meeting her. 4 pp

From Mme. Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, October 11, 1918: Raymond died of uremia; she plans to return to work at the front; will send Raymond's design for a chess set; wonders if Quinn purchased the rooster drawing. 2 pp., in French

From Vincent Van Gogh Bonger, Kobe, Japan, October 27, 1918: "Best regards From Vincent." Picture postcard ("Joie de Vivre")

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], October 30, 1918: thanks Pach for sincere appreciation of The Holy Face; the book received mixed reviews; if there is an English edition, Pach should be the translator; agrees to contribute to the magazine; suggests an article on "America in the War"; the final volume of History of Art will not be published until after the war due to paper shortages; maybe Pach can obtain appropriate paper. 2 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, Paris, France, November 12, 1918: finally met with Pach's friend for a discussion of Pach's aesthetic preferences and the relationship between philosophy and art; read about Pach's University of California lectures; Paris is celebrating the end of the war. 7 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, November 13, 1918: Raymond died following a second operation; is determined not to leave Raymond's work unfinished. 2 pp., in French

From Marcel Duchamp, Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 15, [1918?]: as a close friend and admirer of Raymond, Pach must be grieving his death; although provincial, Buenos Aires is calm and conducive to work; brought notes for the glass and plans to continue drawings for it; Argentines are aware of cubism but do not understand it; is planning an exhibition for Buenos Aires in May or June; asks Pach to help H.M. Barzun, who will be contacting him about the show; outlines his schedule for the coming year; anticipates readjusting to peacetime. 3 pp., in French

From Jean Le Roy, [place unknown], [postmarked] December 15, 1918: thanks Pach for bringing his pamphlet to Arensberg's attention; discusses his interest in rhythm in poetry. 4 pp., in French

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., December 19, 1918: holiday greetings; compliments Pach's writing, specifically his latest article in the Dial; discusses the Dana prize awarded in Philadelphia to McComas. 5 pp

From the Butlers, New York, NY., [postmarked] December 23, 1918: Christmas card, "Victory Christmas"

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., January 3, 1919: Pach was misidentified as curator of Hindu art in American Art News; discusses taxes on art sales; still wants to sell his Cézanne lithograph and can reduce the price; asks if Arensberg would be interested in purchasing Un Descendant. 4 pp

From Mabel Torrance, New York, N.Y., January 12, 1919: just learned the classes will be discontinued. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 21, 1919: thanks Pach for efforts with American publishers on his behalf; before the war only Germany had a culture large enough to take immediate interest in his kind of intellectual endeavors; awaiting instructions From Johnson concerning the articles he is writing; comments on diplomats of the Entente and political matters; compliments -- Modern School -- ; is sending a brochure about a restored castle his brother is attempting to sell. 4 pp., in French

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., February 3, 1919: nude is on the way to Arensberg a day late; his wife will be very happy to sell Un Descendant; "I want the Russian experiment to be given a fair chance"; comments on "Russian 'refugees"'; thanks Pach for assistance in the "Arensberg matter." 7 pp

From Frederic C. Torrey, San Francisco, Calif., February 7, 1919: received Arensberg's check; painting was shipped late, with a lesser valuation, due to changes in regulations; discusses new tax bill. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 4, 1919: notes the poor reception of his book in France and the United States; discusses his current work; opinions of world politics. 4 pp., in French

From Maurice Socard, [place unknown], May 12, 1919: much disagreement about the terms of the peace treaty; feels that Germany must serve a term in purgatory. 3 pp., in French [filmed with the wrong envelope]

From Félix Fénéon, Paris, France, May 15, 1919: thanks Pach for selling -- Esquisse d'un Dimanche d'Eté a la Grande Jatte -- and for the check. 1 p., in French

From Marcel Duchamp, Buenos Aires, Argentina, June 6, 1919: regrets having abandoned plans for an exhibition there; Buenos Aires is ready for new art. 2 pp., in French

From Xavier Martinez, Piedmont, Calif., June 16, 1919: received Courbet, Society of Independent Artists, and Redon catalogs; congratulates Pach. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Ismael Smith, New York, N.Y., June 25, 1919: Margarita Cordoba From Cuba, representing the Independents, is sending a picture of la Mazantinita, a famous Spanish ballerina. 1 p., in Spanish, +8 pp. enclosure (11 designs for bookplates)

From Jacques Villon, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, June 26, 1919: thanks Pach for check, letter, and catalog; writes of his work plans for the coming year, when he expects to make up for lost time; comments favorably on Pach's painting; notes activities of his friends, including Gleizes, Picabia, and Marcel. 2 pp., in French

From Marion L. Chamberlain, Santa Barbara, Calif., August 10, 1919: she and Miss Phillips enjoyed Pach's lectures at the Berkeley Summer School; they purchased 2 Renoir lithographs From Mr. Torrey. 4 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, [postmarked] September 3, 1919: his friends and their lives seem little changed since the war; other than the work of his brother and Picabia, he sees little of artistic interest; will be in New York in December; saw Yvonne Duchamp-Villon. 3 pp., in French

From Charles Loeser, Florence, Italy, November 18, 1919: describes his house with its special music rooms; 6 Cézanne paintings hang in one room; has a drawing which he believes is by Velasquez; discusses art collecting; "I have always liked Leo Stein, so long as he talked to me on any matter other than art." 6 pp

From Sybil Kent Kane, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] November 26, 1919: thanks Pach for etchings of "my beloved Chapel." 1 p

From Pietro Brunelleschi, Florence, Italy, [postmarked] December 5, 1919: accepts Pach's invitation for the following day. Note on business card, in Italian

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Laon, France, January 4, 1920: looks forward to Pach's proposed visit to France; discusses widowhood, her new job in Laon, and the material difficulties of postwar existence; Marcel took Cézanne paintings with him to New York; will send a print of Le Coq. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 11, 1920: economic conditions preclude publication of his fourth volume at this time; saw Redon a month before he died, when he spoke of indifference to the opinions of others and concern with expressing himself; discusses the masterpieces in his personal collection, among them Redon, Delacroix, Daumier, and Van Gogh. 8 pp., in French

From Edgar L. Hewett, Archaeological Institute of America, San Diego, Calif., February 2, 1920: met with Sloan and Henri to make arrangements for the "Indian art exhibition"; thanks Pach for encouragement with the exhibition plan; compliments Pach's article in the Dial. 1 p

From Xavier Martinez, Piedmont, Calif., March 12, 1920: thanks for the Dial and the invitation; compliments Pach's article on American Indian art; thinks Pach writes just as well as he paints; is enthusiastic about plans for an American Indian exhibition. 2 pp., in Spanish, + enclosure (sketch of American Indian head)

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 20, 1920: is happy about what Pach tells him of Delacroix; he owns 3 works by Delacroix and considers him one of the greatest painters; paper shortages have delayed publication of volume 4; asks if Pach is willing to undertake more translation work; someone else has offered, but Pach is preferred; -- The Dance on Fire and Water -- is being sent for Pach's opinion; the book best condenses Faure's ideas on the aesthetic interpretation of history; like Pach, he organizes exhibits around topics. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 23, 1920: Pach must let him know right away if he can do the translation; discusses publishers' contracts; Faure will furnish all photographs for illustration at prewar prices; Pach's other Faure translations have drawn high praise. 2 pp., in French

From J. Metzinger, [place unknown], May 15, 1920: thanks Pach for the check and efforts on his behalf in New York; Pach should keep an unsold painting and dispose of the others as he wishes; people no longer laugh at cubism, but they don't yet understand it; despite war and the hard times that followed, cubism survives; offers his help if Pach wants to exhibit there. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 23, 1920: discusses the details of his 4-volume -- History of Art -- now being published; a copy of volume 1 is being sent to Pach. 2 pp., in French

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.M., June 9, 1920: began painting the week after arriving in Santa Fe; a Corpus Christi procession provided subject matter; had work accepted for the "Metropolitan Anniversary Ex."; comments on "Art and Craftsmanship" article in the Dial. 2 pp., illustrated with a drawing of Sloan in his studio

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 20, 1920: discusses the publication of his book, especially the quality and cost of illustrations for the English edition; judging any work of art requires distance in time and space. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], July 3, 1920: discusses costs for engraved plates and cheaper electrotype plates; asks Pach to select photographs of Peruvian and Mexican monuments, Mexican sculpture, and an American Indian decorated tent or other appropriate images for use in Mediaeval Art; this second volume will contain new illustrations of the art of India and Gothic art. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July 11, 1920: thanks Pach for writing an article about him; comments favorably on Pach's paintings; is considering adding a section on modernist painting, which would mention Pach, to the third edition of -- History of Modern Art -- . 2 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Puteaux, France, July 25, 1920: he recently read the notes found among Raymond's papers, but the haphazard and often obscure ideas would reveal nothing new to Pach; is sending pictures of the horse, some showing the prewar plaster version and others the beginning of the final verson; Raymond's experience in the cavalry made him an expert horseman, and many sketches of horses made during the war show he continued to think of the sculpture he had started; is also sending photographs of sketches, a bust of Professor Gosset, plans for a chess set, and other works; some of Raymond's notes pertain to the design of a surgical center; is certain that Raymond would have continued the research that led him From literal representation to mechanical aspects; thanks Pach for preserving the memory and work of the late artist. 5 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], August 1, 1920: is sending Pach several photographs and 2 drawings; gives installation instructions for Raymond Duchamp-Villon's last sculpture, Dr. Gosset, with sketches of front and side views of the piece [large portions illegible]. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, August 13, 1920: discusses illustrations for his book; Marcel Duchamp will not be included; mentions other artists he has omitted or included and the relative value assigned to each, perhaps mistakenly; discusses those classified as impressionists and neoimpressionists; mentions new directions in art, among them scientific ones. 8 pp., in French

From L.L. Kane, Long Lake, N.Y., August 26, 1920: Pach's pictures are "quite safe at 47th St. until your return"; he especially appreciates Mme. Derain, which hangs with 2 Copley portraits in the breakfast room. 4 pp

September 12, 1920: note indicating Samuel Ramos is with the Comision Mexicana de Cooperacion Intelectual

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 28, 1920: provides correct spellings for works of art, as requested; will send proof sheets of printed photographs with placement instructions; still waiting for the promised photographs of American Indian art. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 10, 1920: discusses in detail the illustrations for his book, their placement and captions; an article about cinema in the -- Freeman -- expresses ideas very close to his own; reflects on current politics. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 26, 1920: thanks Pach for the photographs; hopes instructions regarding illustrations and page-setting were received; requests a signed copy of the contract with -- Harpers -- ; is still thinking about writing an article for the -- Freeman -- ; is enclosing an advertising circular designed for his book and suggests something similar for the American edition. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 22, 1920: the photograph of Herculeum arrived; his editors are pleased; volume 4 will be ready in a few days and a copy will be sent to Pach; the American edition contains stupid mistakes; plans to write an article for the Freeman; will send Pach his article on cinema. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 17, 1921: describes his visit to London, emphasizing the British Museum; likes little of British art; considers Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, and Derain in the forefront of modern art; he appreciates Pach's opinions on art, even when in disagreement; because Pach is younger, his views are an excellent indicator of current taste. 4 pp., in French

From Piet van der Laan, Utrecht, the Netherlands, January 21, 1921: thanks for the bookplate Pach designed; compliments his article in the Freeman; is attempting to sell paintings by a young Dutch artist friend. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, February 3, 1921: hopes to rewrite volume 1, as he is unhappy with it; Spanish translation is delayed due to paper shortages; his brother's chateau is to be sold; wrote an article on Charlot. 3 pp., in French

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, February 11, 1921: discusses in detail the choice of lodgings available to the Pach family for their stay in Paris; Marcel can help Pach place the Gosset figure as he saw it assembled; instructs Pach to sell the Cézanne. 2 pp., in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, New York, N.Y., February 28, 1921: thanks Pach for introducing him and Charlie to Mr. and Mrs. Brummer; their work will be exhibited at Brummer's March 15-April 1; read Pach's article on Matisse; will try to see the exhibition. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 1, 1921: discusses changes to the title of his 4-volume -- History of Art -- ; volume 1 is being shipped to Pach soon; believes French academics slander France. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 4, 1921: Is still trying to find a place for the Pachs to stay; his own apartment will not be available until August; discusses the title of his book and asks Pach to write the introduction; the article on Charlot was not published. 2 pp., in French

From Clara La Follette, -- Freeman -- , New York, N.Y., [postmarked] March 7, 1921: sends letter received by the -- Freeman -- that she thinks will amuse Pach. 1 p., + 2 pp. enclosure (letter rubber stamped February 23, 1921 [date of receipt?] to Mr. Huebsch From Alfred Stieglitz, New York, N.Y. [of an exhibition review by Pach published in the -- Freeman -- ]: "Mr. Pach undoubtedly did his best--but I fear that the real significance of the work was beyond him.--I regret it")

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 14, 1921: will send proofs of Napoleon; desires advice From Pach concerning whether it should be translated; thinks the subject will be of interest in America. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], July 29, 1921: plans to meet Pach in Cahors; -- History of Art -- was chosen as one of the 10 best French books recommended to Americans by the Comité France-Amerique. 2 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, [postmarked] August 1, 1921: thanks Pach for translating an article about Redon; offers a Redon work to Mrs. Pach. 1 p., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 15, 1921: 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 16, 1921: has sent Pach his article on Charlot, which will be published soon by -- L'Esprit Nouveau -- ; discusses his work, including an article on cinema and -- Napoleon -- ; inquires about payment and translation rights for articles appearing in the -- Freeman -- . 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 16, 1921: the translation of his Charlot article must mention it is excerpted from -- L'Esprit Nouveau -- ; the French are boycotting American films, especially Charlie Chaplin's; compliments Pach's translations; -- History of Art -- has been an unexpected success; Napoleon promises to do well and is being serialized in -- Grande Revue -- ; he and Pach will divide the profits; may have found a convenient place for the Pachs to stay. 2 pp., in French

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Paris, France, April 20, 1921: offers to help Pach find lodging when he visits; asks if Quinn has received the sculpture. 1 p., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 29, 1921: unable to find a place for Pach to stay; -- History of Art -- is selling well; reprints and new volumes will require translation; asks if Pach could bring his daughter a statuette of Charlot to put on their car, as is now the fad. 2 pp., in French

From George Ferdinand Of, New York, N.Y., November 28, 1914: is anxious to see Pach and hear about his trip. Picture postcard ("Museé de Louvre.-- -- Les Baigneuses.-- -- Vernet.--LL").

From Jean Le Roy, Nièvre, France, [postmarked] December 29, 1914: wants Pach's opinion of his poems; is in the army; heard Pach is organizing an exhibition; asks for news of the Duchamp brothers. 4 pp., in French.

From Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France, January 19, 1915: advises patience until the world of art returns; a weak heart disqualified Marcel From military duty; congratulates Pach on the exhibition; is invited to San Francisco but doubts cubist works will be accepted; discusses prices of his medallions. 2 pp., in French.

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, [postmarked] August 1, 1921: thanks Pach for translating an article about Redon; offers a Redon work to Mrs. Pach. 1 p., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 15, 1921: 4 pp., in French

From Clara La Follette, Freeman, New York, N.Y., August 16, 1921: opinions of French government; comments on Faure's article on the cinema; urges Pach to send the article he mentioned; is looking for a studio. 4 pp

From Henri Matisse, Nice, France, September 7, 1921: agrees to Pach's terms concerning the Redon paintings, but there is no one available who is capable of separating the torn papers of -- Radiant Flower -- ; after 3 weeks of laziness, he is painting again and it is like starting over at the beginning. 2 pp., in French

From [Mme.] Duchamp-Villon, Puteaux, France, September 18, 1921: [Illegible]. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 29, 1921: 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 27, 1921: thanks Pach for checks received; discusses advantages and disadvantages of using a picture for promoting his works; his daughter is most disappointed that there are no more Charlot statuettes; asks Pach to sell lottery tickets for charity. 4 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, November 9, 1921: thanks Pach for catalog; photograph of "St. Francis at Brooklyn" reminds him of "the naive art of all the eccentric regions of Europe." 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, November 9, 1921: is glad to have met Mrs. Pach; Matisse engraving is not yet ready due to printing problems. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 13, 1921: discusses the details of his contract with -- Harpers -- , which he considers unjust; his father-in-law died; reports on the sick painter friend for whom the benefit raffle was held. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 28, 1921: if the misunderstanding concerning the -- Harpers -- contract is not corrected, it will be a disaster; their artist friend needs further surgery; hopes Pach can sell more tickets for the raffle, which will precede an exhibit in February or March; lists artists--among them Bonnard, Dufy, Matisse, Signac, and Braque--who have donated works for the raffle; regrets that his last book devoted so little space to Derain. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 19, 1921: thanks Pach for help in clearing up a misunderstanding with his American publisher; discusses his 4-volume work, including opinions of the layouts and illustrations of each; Pach should decide whether to attribute a painting to de Pietro or Sassetta; plans to write about Derain; an exhibition, organized for an artist friend in need, includes a lottery with contributions From Matisse, Derain, and Picasso; will send Pach 250 lottery tickets; announces the upcoming marriage of François, a talented decorator, and asks if work could be found for him in New York or if his projects could be reproduced in an American publication. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], December 23, 1921: received a letter From Briggs and praises the loyalty and honesty of American publishers; thanks Pach for perseverance in bringing to publication, in English translation, -- History of Art -- ; lottery tickets are being sent, many going to Mrs. Whitney; asks if Pach could help to interest American publisher Nelson in the collections of an expanding French publishing firm looking for capital; is sending -- Mediaeval Art -- and François' furnishing projects. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 31, 1921: considers volume 1 "our" -- History of Art -- out of gratitude for Pach's excellent translation; discusses the illustrations and general appearance of the book; -- Mediaeval Art -- and lottery tickets will be sent soon; has 2 paintings he wants Pach to sell in the United States, a Venetian school Crucifixion and a version of Gros's -- Murat a la Bataille d'Aboukir -- ; describes the paintings, discusses prices and Pach's commission. 3 pp., in French

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast. New York, N.Y., January 26, 1922: Discusses quality of reproductions for Shadowland; wants to assist, should Pach decide to write an article; compliments Pach's writing. 3 pp

From Maurice Brazil Prendergast, New York, N.Y., February 2, 1922: is returning Pach's manuscript; agrees with him about Cézanne; "I was much influenced by Pissarro but with water colors it was nature pure and simple that influence [ sic] me"; is impressed with -- Shadowland -- . 3 pp

From Leigh Hunt, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] February 23, 1922: congratulates Pach and the museum. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 21, 1922: is sending -- Renaissance Art -- , which completes the series; Pach should return the stubs of all sold lottery tickets; the Spanish artist for whom the lottery was organized is now recovering From surgery; complains of a dull artistic season, including a Salon des Indépendants devoid of interest; the best was a Matisse exhibit, along with Derain's and Picasso's latest work; increasingly poor leadership has him worried about the future of Europe; inquires about two articles he sent to the -- Freeman -- . 5 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 30, 1922: Americans have won 8 of the lottery prizes (most of them with Mrs. Whitney's tickets) consisting of 6 etchings and 2 paintings; what to do with the artworks is a problem in view of customs requirements. 2 pp., in French

From Camille Redon, Paris, France, April 7, 1922: mailed 2 etchings and 30 proofs made of each of Redon's copper engravings; the plates went to the Print Museum; thanks Pach for the beautiful etching and photographs he sent. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 10, 1922: received the -- Freeman -- article; just completed a response to the review of his book, which he prefers to send to the -- Dial -- rather than the -- Freeman -- ; wrote a new introduction to Greek Art for future editions; hopes Pach has sold paintings; thinks one of the paintings could pass as a fake for customs purposes. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris. France, April 11, 1922: the attribution of his Baron Gros is certain, but its condition is not perfect; discusses articles being translated by Pach; discusses the French language in Canada; he and Pach agree on important points; Pach is unfair to Bonnard, who eventually will be regarded as a minor master; Derain is a great painter who overshadows Matisse. 2 pp., in French, labeled "second letter" (enclosed with letter of April 10, 1922)

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 6, 1922: received the checks; is returning a signed contract for -- Cinéplastique -- and inquires about American customs concerning royalty payments; will mail books to Pach and pictures to Harper's; the lottery prizes are being sent; the Corots and Courbet at Rosenberg Gallery particularly impressed him; family news; dispair over current politics. 2 pp., in French

From Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Universidad Nacional de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico, May 31, 1922: discusses Pach's remuneration and class schedule for the summer session. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 17, 1922: regrets not being able to meet Pach in Mexico and wishes Rivera had invited him, too; will try to delay French publication of his article so the -- Dial -- can print it first; another piece on the aesthetics of machinism has already been published in France; finished a long chapter of -- The Spirit of the Forms -- and wants Harper's to consider it completed; after going to Vichy for his health, he will take a vacation; wants to know all about Pach's archaeological discovery in Mexico. 2 pp., in French

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.M., [postmarked] August 4, 1922: has a car for summer travels; the Henris are there; has been painting. 2 pp., illustrated with drawing of a car on a winding mountain road ("Climbing the Bahada [no exaggeration!]")

From L.L. Kane, Long Lake, N.Y., August 12, 1922: wants to read Pach's article in the Freeman; admires his ability to present lectures in other languages; describes his Adirondack camp. 2 pp

From Henri Matisse, Nice, France, September 2, 1922: mailed copies of all the engravings he made during the summer; asks Pach's advice on lowering the price of Redon's pastels; he is now back at work in Nice after 2 months in Paris. 2 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, Soissons, France, September 6, 1922: the estimate for publishing was higher than anticipated; asks Pach to intercede; inquires about Pach's trip to Mexico; news of various friends; discusses summer plans. 2 pp., in French

From Sybil Kent Kane, Long Lake, N.Y., September 7, 1922: thanks Pach for sending the picture of a jug; her book is about the life of Blessed Margaret Mary. 4 pp

From Suzanne La Follette, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] September 10, 1922: due to understaffing at the -- Freeman -- there was no art coverage during the summer; suggests Pach write a series of articles on Delacroix, Cézanne, Renoir, Redon, Van Gogh; opinions of Faure's second volume; news of Boardman Robinson; has changed her name back to Suzanne From Clara. 6 pp.

To Professor D. Ramon Mena From Walter Pach, Mexico City, Mexico, October 4, 1922: the mosaic mask discovered by Professor Aguierre and displayed in the National Museum is an object of great interest; it presents important problems to American antiquities experts and to those studying aesthetics; an important detail is the way in which material is handled; discusses fundamental difference in the work of the imitator and the mosaic mask; the technical question and expressive question are inseparable; appreciates the compliment of being asked his opinion. 3 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 22, 1922: received payment for photographs and book royalties; discusses Rivera's talent, disagreeing with Pach's view of his originality; Rivera has remarried; shares Pach's admiration for Mexican art; now that his article has appeared in the -- Dial -- , he has nothing further to publish in America other than History of Art; since Pach is now devoting more time to painting and etching, he will need to find Faure a new translator; asks Pach if chapters From The Spirit of the Forms and essays on great literary figures could appear in American publications; discusses some of his theories of art and the structural aspect of his own writings. 6 pp., in French

From Jean Charlot, [place unknown], Mexico, November 5, 1922: Pach's article appeared in -- Mexico Moderno -- ; Orozco will be exhibiting watercolors; the fresco Accion del Artes is almost finished; is becoming interested in religious painting. 4 pp., in French

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, December 7, 1922: thanks Pach for his valuable friendship; the Mexican Independents, now formally organized, are invited to show with the Society of Independents in New York; Orozco, Charlot, Revueltas, Figueiros, Leal, Alba, Cahero, Bolanos, Ugarte, Cano, Nahui, Ate, Rivera, and children will represent Mexico; discusses space needs and suggests possible hanging arrangements; needs to find a way to pay for transportation; please convey their appreciation to the Society; Pach should tell Miss Porter that although there was a mix-up in communications, Rivera is still interested in the small exposition. 4 pp., in Spanish

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, December 21, 1922: [Illegible]. 8 pp., in French

to Magda Pach From Gaby [Mme. Jacques Villon?], [place unknown], December 27, 1922: wishes the Pach family would visit them for several months; Villon is working hard, as always; except for a vacation in Brittany, they rarely go anywhere; engravings are time consuming but right now sell better than paintings; asks about Pach's stay in Mexico. 2 pp., in French

From Carlo Lemba, Florence, Italy., [?,?] 1923: thanks Pach for remembering him and for the very beautiful Rembrandt; requests a catalog or photograph. Picture postcard ("Firenze--Palazzo Vecchia--Il Cortile"), in Italian

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 21, 1923: thanks Pach for his translation; discusses modifications to be made in the first volume; details plans for future publications; lists illustrations for the last chapter of History of Art. 10 pp., in French

From José Vasconcelos, [place unknown], Mexico, February 23, 1923: received Pach's letter and sends appreciation for the international approach of his work. Telegram, in Spanish

From José Clemente Orozco, [place unknown], Mexico, February 27, 1923: introduces his friend, Mexican poet José Juan Tablada; friendship with Tablada would be a great satisfaction to Pach; Tablada could courier Mexican works From the Independents exhibition when he returns home; they learned much about contemporary art From Pach's lecture series; when he returns to Mexico, Pach can expect an affectionate welcome. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 4, 1923: at last, publication of -- Mediaeval Art -- has been announced; the definitive edition of his work is currently in progress; discusses new prefaces for all 5 volumes; rewrote the last chapter of volume 4, which does not mention Bonnard but expands discussion of Matisse, Picasso, and Derain, whom he considers the greatest contemporary painter. 2 pp., in French

From Secretario de Educacíon Publica, [place unknown], Mexico, March 14, 1923: José Vasconselos thanks Pach for his efforts on behalf of Mexican painters in this year's Independent Artists Salon. 1 p., in Spanish

From Jean Charlot, [place unknown], Mexico, [postmarked] March 31, 1923: was happy to receive Pach's illustrated article about Seurat; the enclosed flier rebuts another slanderous article about the exhibit; the catalog reproduction of the painting Pach started in Mexico was recognized by everyone; Diego called it more Mexican than their own contributions; Diego finished his first panel for the ministry frescoes; Diego's brother-in-law executed a successful encaustic mural in Guadalajara; Diego sends thanks to Pach, but cannot write because he works From 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m.--without eating--which is hard on his aides who must do likewise. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 24, 1923: an American definitive edition is under consideration; will send Pach copies of work by Spain's best artist since Goya; still thinks Derain is the best painter; Matisse's exhibition lacks humanity; discusses European political problems. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 10, 1923: is now writing a book about the mechanism regulating the life cycles of societies; did not see all the exhibits because he is now drawn more to social psychology, which helps him understand painting; life takes precedence over painting; his article was misunderstood in America and France by supporters and opponents alike; painting, no longer the dominant art form as it was in the previous century, is being overtaken by cinema; assures Pach of his friendship and trust; understands that his ideas provoke resistance even among the best of friends. 6 pp., in French

From Suzanne La Follette, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] June 23, 1923: thanks Pach for article; sends proofs of first article; was advised not to go to Germany; will visit England, France, and Italy. 4 pp

From J. Van Gogh Bonger, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, June 27, 1923: read that the Pachs were cited as among the best of the Independents; the pictures are back, and she is glad they were exhibited in the United States; is anxious to publish Van Gogh's letters in English; opinions of Meier-Graefe's book; opinions of recent articles in the -- Times -- and the -- Freeman -- ; "What I never forgive Meyer-Greafe [ sic] is his suggestion that Theo, after his marriage could not provide for Vincent any longer"; is sending a Van Gogh drawing to Pach in appreciation for his help. 3 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, July 3, 1923: introduces Covarrubias; on behalf of the group, thanks Pach and the Independents in New York; Pach's Mexican street scene showed intimate and strong character; hopes for even better representation next year; describes current projects of several Mexican artists; Covarrubias has photographs of murals in progress. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Lewis Mumford, Brooklyn, N.Y., July 5, 1923: congratulates Pach on Modern Art; "it is far and away the best piece of criticism we've had in America, to my knowledge." 1 p

From Alfred Stieglitz, Lake George, N.Y., July 21, 1923: he and O'Keeffe are enjoying Pach's translation of Faure; Stieglitz has read it in the original; O'Keeffe doesn't know French. 1 p

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], October 8, 1923: if Harper's cannot locate the photograph Faure sent of a Picasso painting, Pach should select a substitute; requests assistance in coilecting a fee owed by a publisher; complains about the usual reluctance of museums to accept paintings; suggests that Boston or the Barnes Foundation might be interested in the Gros, Delacroix, and Venetian school paintings he wants to sell; -- History of Art -- will be translated into Spanish and possibly German; hopes for more contacts with the United States. 2 pp., in French

From J. Van Gogh Bonger, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, October 18, 1923: could not find anyone to deliver the drawing to Pach, so she mailed it; is working on an exhibition to be held in London; Zigrosser visited. 1 p., negative photostat

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 1, 1923: has mailed the photographs Pach requested; believes he has told Pach of all the proposals received From America and still awaits answers relating to some; Waldo Frank visited; found Miss La Follette most congenial; the package of photographs also contains a small drawing as a memento of their collaboration. 2 pp., in French

From Ariella Brunelleschi, Florence, Italy, [postmarked] December 12, 1923: her entire family sends thanks; best wishes for a good trip. Picture postcard ("Firenze--Galleria Uffizi La Nativita de Gesu dett.--Van Der Goes Ugo"), in Italian

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], December 25, 1923: is delighted to learn that Pach has resumed painting and wants to see a photograph of his portrait of Magda; the common desire to travel west is a distraction, as is his penchant for making etchings rather than painting; has problems with his engraving of a Cézanne and will do a Laurencin next; complains of difficulties painting; is mailing the edited first proofs of the book on Raymond; Yvonne is gone; he missed seeing Miss La Follette; Rosenberg is in New York; paintings are hard to sell; New Year's greetings to the Pach family. Postscript From Gaby expresses her own best wishes and those of Marcel; she hopes to see them in Puteaux the following year. 5 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 24, 1924: approves of the way in which Pach used his Renoir to illustrate an article; still trying to sell the Gros painting abroad; the Venetian painting was shipped today, and he awaits Pach's impression of it; Faure is convinced the landscape, most likely of Toledo, and at least one figure were painted by El Greco in his youth; awaits photographs of Pach's paintings and etchings; is delighted to learn of Pach's lecture series in Kansas, which includes one on Faure's fourth volume. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 31, 1924: praises solidity, intelligent composition, and exceptional synthetic quality of Pach's portrait of his son; the portrait of Pach's wife is less successful; praises the harmony in Pach's mythological painting but its composition is less than perfect; Pach shows great progress; is sending a photograph of a first-class Corot that is for sale; discusses the price and how they would share the profit. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, February 6, 1924: read Pach's article in -- Harper's -- "with interest, with zest and with envy." 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, March 2, 1924: received photographs of Pach's paintings; praises the balance and harmony in Magda's portrait, but expresses reservations concerning the portrait of Raymond; unable to send photographs of his own work because he was too busy finishing the Cézanne engraving that will be exhibited at Bernheim's to raise funds for a monument to Cézanne; has mixed feelings about the direction of his own painting and leans more toward nature; a proof of Pach's foreword is ready; the book on Raymond will be out soon; some of Raymond's letters were edited so as not to appear to be soliciting sympathy. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 10, 1924: has just received notification that volume 4 was published and will convey his opinion after seeing it; thanks Pach for intelligent publicity; discusses corrections to be made in the next edition; asks Pach to persuade the publisher to make an American edition that conforms to the French one; the Corot was sold; everyone seems to be buying and selling paintings; Faure sold From his own collection pieces he no longer likes in order to buy a house; he buys what he can at low cost, notably Corot and Courbet landscapes and a drawing by Cézanne; Pach should try to influence the gallery to sell Faure's painting quickly because the money is needed for home repairs; wrote an article on contemporary art trends for the Dial. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 11, 1924: the news contained in Pach's cable frees him From current financial worries; he is sending the painting immediately and warns Pach about mislabeling on the back of the picture; insists that Pach take a substantial commission; though it makes him sad to part with the painting, he now can provide a secure future for his family. 2 pp., in French

From Suzanne La Follette, Plymouth, England, March 11, 1924: the voyage has been "rough and dull." 2 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 19, 1924: received the fourth volume in translation and finds the illustrations much better than those in the first 3 volumes; expresses gratitute to Pach; is sending a gift of a Rodin etching; just saw Derain and is certain the artist is evolving, despite his somewhat disoriented state; Matisse's last exhibit was disappointing and lacked human qualities. 2 pp., in French

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Pasadena, Calif., March 30, 1924: thanks Pach for his exhibition idea; cannot participate because he has no suitable work available; "I used to be very careless about my original drawings"; Jack moved to California for health reasons; Jack paints desert landscapes that sell well. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 1, 1924: the Gros painting has been in transit for 3 weeks; deplores the exchange rate and discusses Pach's commission; is pleased that Pach will be the translator for -- The Gods -- and hopes he will do -- The Spirit of the Forms -- , even though this work will take him away From painting; wants to see Pach's pamphlet on Seurat, whom he likes more and more; Faure has added to his collection paintings by Corot, Courbet, Delacroix, Bonnington, and others he discovered in the attic of a secondhand shop; Miss La Follette visited; asks Pach to inquire about the fate of his Shakespeare essay. 4 pp., in French

From Jacques Villon, [place unknown], France, April 6, 1924: agrees wholeheartedly to the proposed exchange; thanks Pach for a check; wants him to accept, as a gift, any Villon painting still in Pach's hands; will follow Pach's instructions concerning the book; is painting but cannot find himself in that medium; his next engraving will be a Rousseau. 2 pp., in French

From E.H. Anderson, Director, New York Public Library, New York, N.Y., April 9, 1924: acknowledges gift of etchings. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 2, 1924: sends a check for Pach's commission on the sale of the Murat painting; is glad Pach liked his gift of a Rodin etching; discusses changes to volume 3 and wonders why a particular reproduction was omitted From the American edition; -- The Spirit of the Forms -- is still under revision, and he has been busy writing -- Cervantes -- ; like Pach, he admires Matisse's lithographs but feels uneasy about the virtuoso element apparent in his annual painting exhibits; Despiau's portraits are more and more admirable; met Braque, whose work now interests him more; since Braque has renounced cubism, only Picasso remains; Picasso's last noncubist exhibit was curious and somewhat disturbing. 2 pp., in French

From Leigh Mitchell Hodges, Doylestown, Pa., May 4, 1924: sends sonnet inspired by a Pach etching. 1 p. + enclosure ("Sonnet--To Walter Pach's etching of Miss M-----")

From Julius Meier-Graefe, Berlin, Germany, July 22, 1924: Pach is the first American to attempt and succeed at serious examination of art From Corot to the present; is sending a copy of volume 3 of -- Modern Art -- , which discusses some of the same issues addressed in Pach's book; believes cubism, expressionism, and impressionism to be manifestations of decadence; in his book, Pach failed to cite German contributions. 3 pp., in German

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, July 31, 1924: hopes to see Pach in Dordogne during August; the article on illustrious men he has known will need to be twice as long, so Pach should make arrangements; discusses a remarkable book about sport by his Frenchified Brazilian friend Braga and suggests a translation would be of interest to Americans; Braga wrote the most intelligent articles ever published about Faure in French and plans a history of world literature that would mirror -- History of Art -- . 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 2, 1924: Pach should tell Wells that Faure accepts the 5,000-word limitation; the article consists of a series of portraits of famous men and concludes with a sincere tribute to America. 1 p., in French

From Julius Meier-Graefe, Schlaghtensee, Germany, [postmarked] August 5, 1924: advises Pach not to judge the paintings of [von Marees?] on the basis of his early Dresden period, but look at the Munich work. Postal card, in German

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 11, 1924: read -- Masters of Modern Art -- ; "I wish I could give you the support you ask for. And I have found yr. book informing, stimulating, provoking and sincere. But I cannot even begin to see what you do in cubism"; advises Pach to choose writing over painting, as it is impossible to do both. 8 pp

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 24, 1924: regrets that Pach did not visit him; plans to go to Italy in September but hopes to see Pach in Paris afterward; hesitates to accept a long lecture tour in America. 2 pp., in French

From James Oppenheim, New York, N.Y., August 24, 1924: Gertrude is seriously ill; Oppenheim's son has faith in his work; Oppenheim's book was reviewed; is delighted with the book on Matisse. 2 pp

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, September 13, 1924: expresses his opinion of modern art and artists; "I did not mean what the Ku-Kluxers or Coolidgeites mean when they speak of the latest phenomena in painting as Bolshevik. But in a prophetic, devastatingly deep way that's what they are. And they may serve a kindred purpose, namely to bury the dead form. But they are undertakers, grave-diggers, and at best manure makers only. Artists they are not and Picasso not at all;" Pach "overestimates" Delacroix's ability as an artist. 4 pp

From John Gould Fletcher, London, England, October 7, 1924: thanks Pach for the book on Duchamp-Villon; compliments the "excellent" introduction; agrees that "Duchamp-Villon was the true descendant of the stonecutters of Chartres"; Faure's -- History of Art -- is "remarkable"; he is trying to publish a rebuttal to the concluding chapter; the -- Freeman -- failed. 3 pp

From Luz Pérez, [place unknown], Mexico, October 24, 1924: the book Pach sent is enchanting; congratulations on the success of the exhibition; best wishes for future success. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Arthur Burdett Frost, Pasadena, Calif., October 26, 1924: thanks for the brushes, which he will share with Jack; requests recommendations for directing Jack's art reading; Frost now reads mainly on palentology and natural history; if his eyesight permitted, he would paint his concept of earliest man; recalls a terrible summer spent in Rhode Island; contrasts California with the East; recalls the Dresden Gallery; Butler's stay in New York was a "dreadful experience." 5 pp

From Jacques Villon, Paris, France, October 27, 1924: just received Pach's book on painting and thinks his ideas about evolution of painting are admirable; has not yet seen the Salon d'Automne; sales were good, and even those opposed to abstract painting smiled. 3 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 1, 1924: has shipped a magnificent painting; is surprised that it is possible to sell paintings in America since the Paris art market is at a standstill; the last good show was the Renoir exhibit at Rosenberg's; books are not selling, and he could not find a publisher for his latest work; publishing houses are closing; prewar politicians and prewar methods are responsible for the disaster; the general economy and his personal situation are grim; melancholy family news. 4 pp., in French

From Henri Matisse, Nice, France, November 18 and December 5, 1924: his son, Pierre, is moving to New York; Pierre wants to work at a gallery specializing in modern art; he and the Steins agree this is a good plan; asks Pach to advise and assist Pierre, and he will request the same of Brummer; Michael Stein suggests Pach meet Pierre at the ship. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 1, 1924: is housebound after a small accident, and catching up with work; both the -- Dial -- and -- Harper's -- sent checks; comments on current exhibitions and sales; Pach is his closest American friend; wants to establish closer ties in the United States; France now depends upon American patronage; Mrs. Dillard is sending a Corot to Pach; she might be helpful to Brummer; sometimes she has Renoirs and Derains at reasonable prices. 2 pp., in French

From Xavier Martinez, Piedmont, Calif., December 3, 1924: compliments -- Masters of Modern Art -- and Pach's translation of Faure; disagrees with Faure's chapters on Greece and Mexico; Pach understands the art of Mexico; encloses 2 drawings of Indian madonnas. 1 p., partly in Spanish

From Lewis Mumford, Brooklyn, N.Y., December 15, 1924: thanks Pach for grasping the essence of his book; agrees with Duchamp-Villon's views on architecture. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], January 9, 1925: commiserates with Pach over his rejection by -- Harper's -- ; comments on subjects that appeal to editors of popular magazines; Pach should continue trying to sell the Corot; the owner also has paintings by Renoir and Derain and a Seurat drawing; inquires about the status of translations now at -- Harper's -- ; comments on the superiority of American cinema. 3 pp., in French

From Pedro Henríquez Ureña, La Plata, Argentina, January 13, 1925: hopes Pach will be interested in the work of his friend, Emilio Pettoniti, an advanced Argentine painter; asks where Pettoniti might exhibit in New York. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, January 13, 1925: requests photographs of the work Pach accomplished in France; wants news of Elie Faure; mentions several commissions he is now working on; comments on Charlot; has waited more than a year for word from Aleman; is considering going abroad when through with the Chapingo chapel. 3 pp., in Spanish

to Elie Faure From William H. Briggs, [place unknown], March 3, 1925: not financially feasible to bring out the definitive edition of -- History of Art -- for at least 3 years; wants -- The Spirit of the Forms -- to be volume 5; agrees to publish an English edition of -- The Spirit of the Forms -- and -- The Dance on Fire and Water -- ; -- The Constructors -- , -- The Holy Face -- , and future books are not to be offered to other publishers. 3 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, March 13, 1925: would send photographs of his work but in Mexico it takes too long to get prints; Pach's book fully deserves Faure's praise; Rivera finds Pach's paintings appealing; is grateful for the high esteem with which Pach wrote of his work; work on Chapingo chapel continues; despite serious financial problems, Charlot is constantly progressing; asks Pach's opinions and advice about a Spanish edition of his book; Ravenna Mosaic requested a sample piece of -- The Antilles -- . 7 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 28, 1925: is hurt not to have heard From Pach; Mr. Briggs wrote about translation and publication plans; wants Pach to translate -- The Spirit of the Forms -- ; thanks for getting his autobiography published in the -- Dial -- ; his friend, Mrs. Fougeirol, and daughter, will call on Pach; hopes Pach and Brummer can assist Mrs. Dillard with the sale of her Corot; the Gaugnat sale is unaffordable; Mrs. Dillard also has Renoirs to sell. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], March 29, 1925: is happy that Briggs wants to do the album and will talk to Crès about sales; thanks to Madame B. for the Corot; his version of Delacroix's journal will be published; compliments Pach's painting; asks Pach to speak to Harper's about not using the number of his last volume of -- History of Art -- so the public will buy it without having the earlier volumes. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 9, 1925: tells of his voyage to Marrakech; saw Fletcher; Pach will receive the Gaugnat sale catalog; Madame Gaugnat died 6 months after her husband, leaving their son harassed by dealers; a small Renoir may be available; asks Pach to intervene on his behalf with Harper's regarding income tax withholding; discusses Delacroix and impressionist exhibits; discusses the realism of Delacroix's Moroccan paintings. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 17, 1925: condolences on the death of Pach's father; is surprised by what Pach told him of the Corot; discusses a French landscape exhibit at the Petit Palais containing too many paintings; Corot reigns. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, May 18, 1925: received the album dedicated to Seurat; -- La Baignade -- and -- La Grande Jatte -- are masterpieces for the very reasons Pach cited: organization, articulation, and mass; comments on works by Matisse, Braque, Géricault, and others recently exhibited in Paris; purchased works by Corot, Delacroix, Courbet, Cézanne, and Renoir at reasonable prices; perhaps Pach could sell a large painting for Pequin; asks if -- Living Age -- will publish his essay on Shakespeare; volume 4 of -- History of Art -- will be out soon; mentions several of his articles accepted for publication; thanks Pach for his excellent translation; now realizes he was unjust to Redon and has made changes in the later edition. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 20, 1925: invites Pach to visit him in Dordogne during the summer; describes a Corot that should go to an American museum. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], May 30, 1925: gives instructions for translation revisions; bought 2 magnificent Derains; suggests that consignments be sent to Mrs. Payne Whitney; -- History of Art -- received mixed reviews. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], June 5, 1925: galleys are still incomplete as there are problems with illustrations and captions; his Baron Gros painting is at the French exhibit in Prague; will send a photograph later; asks Pach to help sell the Gros picture and a Daumier. 3 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July 11, 1925: complains about American and French taxes on royalties; price and quality didn't always coincide at the Gaugnat sale; Mrs. Fougeirol bought one of the best works, and another is being given to the Louvre by young Gaugnat; discusses prices at other recent sales; Matisse shares his opinion of the Gaugnat sale; the Decorative Arts Exhibition was the worst art event he ever saw; an impressive 19th-century French painting show at Bernheim's new galleries included Corot, Delacroix, and Cézanne; those who don't appreciate Delacroix are missing joy; asks Pach's opinion of a plan for a monthly publication about the arts in Paris; next year he will write a history of France. 4 pp., in French

From E.D. Smyth, Tangier, Morocco, July 29, 1925: Helen died last October; Mme. Le Roy died 2 years ago; "London is becoming alive to Cézanne"; saw a Cézanne show at Brown's Gallery. 5 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], August 11, 1925: asks if volume 3 has been published; thinks volume 4 is his best; hopes that the new prefaces added to each volume will make Pach like the whole work better; Rosenberg met with Mrs. Whitney; discusses the quality of reproductions in his book on Derain; describes John Lane's indirect attack on his chapter about English art; was not charmed by Blake; Constable is the only English painter he likes; look for his Shakespeare article in the -- Dial -- . 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 7, 1925: bought a house at Dordogne; volume 4 is still incomplete; lists photographs he will send soon; this may be a good time to sell his 2 paintings; discusses the sales commission; mentions favorable points of the Gros painting; the other painting may be harder to sell; is considering selling a Daumier and a Delacroix to help pay for his new house. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], September 9, 1925: promises to send the photographs for his book; even the best translation cannot be completely faithful to the original; discusses specific changes to be made; discusses a chapter on Europe being added to volume 4. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], September 21, 1925: is sending 5 photographs; 1 is for -- Harper's -- to include in volume 4, and the remainder are of works he hopes can be sold in the United States; needs money for his new house. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], September 26, 1925: is still waiting for a contract with Criterion; the painting consigned to Ehrich has not sold; maybe Pach could sell it or suggest another dealer; Pach should send instructions to Ehrich; -- Harper's -- will publish -- The Spirit of the Forms -- as volume 5; wants Pach to be the translator but will understand if he declines. 4 pp., in French

From F.P. Keppel, New York, N.Y., October 21, 1925: has received Pach's letter with proofs and suggestions. 1 p

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], October 22, 1925: has received volume 3 and congratulated Mr. Briggs; still thinks the plates should have been produced in France; bills for photographs remain unpaid; thanks Pach for his energy and perseverance; Spanish and German editions are planned; Knopf will publish an English edition of Napoleon; came close to selling the Daumier; comments on the condition of Marat by Gros; inquires about Pach's painting and the possibility of an exhibition in Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Jean Charlot, [place unknown], October 27, 1925: his present work is totally different From the 12 paintings being sent; Pach is one of the few friends abroad who might be interested; Pach should keep one for himself and try to sell the rest; is sending 4 photographs of recent work; he and Diego want to see reproductions of Pach's latest paintings; inventory of works being sent; had problems with his exhibition in Los Angeles. 4 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 21, 1925: there will be a delay in sending photographs; thanks Pach for introducing Miss La Follette; -- Harper's -- paid more than expected; Briggs reproached him for choosing Knopf to publish Napoleon. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 27, 1925: thanks Pach for introducing Speyer; congratulates Pach on his new job; likes Pach's engravings; wants Pach to translate The Spirit of the Forms; is sending another manuscript for which he hopes Pach can help find a publisher; he owns the picture incorrectly captioned in his last book and it is for sale. 4 pp., in French

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., January 7, 1926: she has written about her husband; is happy to be of service to Pach; can furnish more information. 1 p. + 3 pp. enclosure, (manuscripts by Susan M. Eakins of biographical notes on Thomas Eakins, including excerpts From letters to his father written while studying in France; list of paintings completed between 1870 and 1876; teaching methods; notes From Charles Bregler's transcript of Eakins's comments to students)

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 19, 1926: Mrs. Dillard sold his English painting to Mr. Speyer; introductions made by Pach facilitated the transaction; no one is to know Faure was the owner; since he cannot pay the duty if the piece at Ehrich is returned to France, Pach should keep it or put it in storage until later; asks if the Metropolitan might be interested in Mrs. Dillard's large Corot; content with Montaigne; still reworking -- The Spirit of the Forms; -- Soutine has become more important; believes Derain shows progress; Matisse's astonishing virtuosity continues to increase; saw admirable work by Picasso; Braque is a beautiful but monotonous painter; considers Charlie Chaplin the great man of America. 4 pp., in French

From Harold O. Voorhis, Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., February 23, 1926: confirms Pach's appointment as assistant professor of fine arts. 1 p

From Harold O. Voorhis, Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., March 5, 1926: received Pach's acceptance of faculty appointment. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 24, 1926: has seen Pach's friends; is looking forward to Pach's visit in the summer; he and his wife are caring for an African-Arab baby; The Spirit of the Forms is almost finished; gives instructions about selling the unfortunate Spanish painting; is sending a drawing as a gift; Mrs. Dillard needs a list of dealers and their specialties. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 22, 1926: is pleased to learn the Delacroix drawing was well received; believes Delacroix is becoming greater by the day; is not eager for further lecture tours; his latest book was ignored; foreigners understand him better than the French; regrets that Pach will not be able to visit him in Dordogne; discusses price of the crucifixion painting. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, June 8, 1926: goals for studying art of the past are aesthetic or humanistic; it is a "triumph" that Pach's "anti-Rotarian protest" was published in -- Harper's -- Magazine; "glad to hear yr. painting is taking on, altho' I deplore yr. giving to it the time you should dedicate to writing"; urges him to write about the Gardner collection. 12 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 9, 1926: hopes the Pachs will visit him in Paris before the end of July or in Dordogne later; their arrival is late for the painting season, but Tuileries Salon will be open; sold the Daumier in Germany; the profit paid for some home repairs and 2 small Renoir canvases; has a beautiful Cézanne drawing. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 10, 1926: the entire family is at Dordogne and sorry Pach cannot join them; discusses exchange rate; Briggs trusts Pach to translate -- The Spirit of the Forms -- , which will be volume 5 of -- History of Art -- ; asks Pach to consider undertaking the job. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 19, 1926: wishes there had been an opportunity for them to visit and have a serious talk during Pach's recent lecture tour; "I fear you will never take the place yr. gifts as a writer could lead you to if you cannot detach yr. self fr. painting itself. It is a pity. For critics are ever so much rarer." 4 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], Mexico, October 4, 1926: the package Lupe sent to the Pachs was lost when the boat capsized; wants copies of the magazine -- L'Amour de l'Art -- ; Derain's work is better; shares Pach's opinion of Picasso; wants to see Matisse's work; Faure will try to include more Rivera reproductions in the new edition; asks Pach to check on the status of Rudolf Tesch's project for Carnegie Corp.; requests the Charlot exhibition catalog. 4 pp., in Spanish

To Mrs. Pach From Lupe de Rivera, [place unknown], October 6, 1926: thanks for the baby sweater; her daughter, Guadalupe, called Pico, was tiny and ill at birth but now thrives. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 25, 1926: agrees that Mr. Brandt's Cézanne and Renoir are copies; comments on -- The Studio of Ingres -- ; discusses illustrations for -- The Spirit of the Forms -- ; compliments Pach's article on Mexican art; is going to Mexico for a vacation and needs advice on a budget; asks if Pach could sell a large horse painting by Gros in the United States. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], November 3, 1926: Mrs. Dillard has a Fragonard worthy of a museum or a fine collection; asks about hotel rates in New York City. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, November 12, 1926: is grateful that Pach will be translating -- The Spirit of the Forms; -- Pach should persuade Mr. Briggs to expedite the publisher's contract; saw Seurat's exhibition of more than 200 luminous drawings and a Bonnard show of rich and subtle still-lifes; 2 paintings by Matisse were highlights in an otherwise indifferent Salon d'Automne; Miss La Follette and her brother visited; the Baron Gros painting, which Mme. Dillard will handle, is a masterwork that the Metropolitan Museum [of Art] could be proud of; still believes in Soutine; would like to meet Barnes though a ruse might be needed. 4 pp., in French

From Suzanne La Follette, Choisy, France, November 19, 1926: visited Elie Faure and hopes to see him again; a review of her book will appear in -- Saturday Review -- . 6 pp

From Pedro Henriquez Ureña, Miramar, Argentina, January [?], 1927: Valovaciones cannot pay for contributions or translations; Pach should publish a translation of his book in the magazine so that Argentines will be familiar with him and his ideas. 2 pp

From Suzanne La Follette, [place unknown], January 9, 1927: the publisher is not promoting her book well; thinks Lewis Mumford is "gifted." 3 pp

From Suzanne La Follette, Paris, France, January 13, 1927: asks about resorts on the Mediterranean; Chester wrote enthusiastically of his travels in Italy. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, February 22, 1927: has had no reply From Mexico; "Art and Morals," which appeared in the Dial, should be retranslated; -- History of Art -- is being translated into Czech and possibly Japanese; artistic life in Paris is boring; Matisse is definitely the most tolerated; Soutine is not doing much; Pach should try to sell the Gros painting for Mrs. Dillard. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 8, 1927: a safe-deposit box was transferred, with difficulty, from Pach's name to his; saw a beautiful Renoir exhibition; prices are high and only Delacroix and Corot are affordable now; Derain should protect himself From dealers. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, March 29, 1927: Mr. Briggs received proofs of Pach's translation; discovered Siluster letters and will soon meet his aged widow and daughter, who may have more documents; no longer thinks of Mexico; is probably going to Egypt; they are unlikely to see one another this year; is disturbed that Pach failed to sell the Gros; museums prefer average paintings to fine sketches; suggests other places Pach might try to sell the painting; describes his newly acquired Theodore Rousseau landscape; reports on the Renoir exhibition at Bernheim's; painters in Paris seem more and more influenced by Renoir and less and less interested in Cézanne; Delacroix rises as Ingres falls. 4 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Fabriano, Italy, May 10, 1927: review of his book missed its "contribution... to a criticism that is based on a question of design"; invites Pach to consider this issue in a review. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], June 8, 1927: Delacroix is becoming popular; at the sale of the Bureau collection ordinary Daumier watercolors brought high prices and wonderful Corot drawings sold cheaply; is unhappy with the captions for the plates in his last edition; witnessed Lindbergh's landing. 4 pp., in French

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, June 24, 1927: announces his recent marriage; describes a Redon watercolor that Pach might sell to the Bings; Mrs. Bing expressed interest in the Brancusi bust now stored at Brummer, King, and Parker. 2 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, July 6, 1927: received the Delacroix book; he shares Pach's devotion to Delacroix, who is becoming fashionable in France; he may eventually acquire some Delacroix watercolors; a superb Géricault is on view at the Victor Hugo Museum; museums hang paintings poorly; Degas and Manet are idolized, while Cézanne and Renoir are just tolerated. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Stockholm, Sweden, July 25, 1927: Pach's review showed "intelligent and friendly comprehension"; "my Three Essays is an ironied and veiled attempt to demonstrate that there is a big part of the job that any well trained mediocrity can achieve"; "great artists like Antonello are not prophets but fulfillers of prophecy." 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, October 3, 1927: spent his vacation traveling in Provence; has abandoned a project that attracted amateur attention; intends to study Chagall; -- History of Art -- will be translated into Japanese. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, London, England, October 7, 1927: -- Harper's -- will ask Pach to write about the Gardner collection; urges him to accept the offer. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], December 19, 1927: Gagnon has reappeared; Faure purchased a Barye painting at a junk shop; agrees to write a preface to Pach's book. 4 pp., in French

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, February 7, 1928: Read Pach's review of his book in the -- Architectural Record -- ; "when you realize your incompetence for a job because of ignorance you had better keep out, because that very ignorance will prevent you From realizing how big a fool you are making of yourself." 1 p

From Elie Faure, [place unknown],1 April 22, 1928: Had a heart attack; is now working on a book about folk psychology; will lecture in Germany; museums prefer a perfect modern canvas to a masterpiece with slight damage; asks if Pach has tried to find a buyer for Christ; though his books sell, Faure has not prospered; describes several paintings in his collection; he may inherit Mme. Thelaphite's paintings; Mrs. Dillard has a Ribera for sale. 4 pp., in French

From [ signature illegible (Canaan L. Morris?)], Hartford, Conn., May 4, 1928: compliments Pach's lecture of the previous evening; critiques its structure. 2 pp

From Harold O. Voorhis, Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., June 15, 1928: confirms Pach's appointment as assistant professor of fine arts. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 11, 1928: is glad to be away From Paris; is very happy about the French translation of Ananias [large portions illegible]. 2 pp

From Jose Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., September 1, 1928: -- Form -- magazine deserves attention; offers to write to the editor on Pach's behalf; as Pach suggested, he met with Kraushaar, who didn't seem to like the revolutionary drawings but showed interest in the Art Center Exhibit paintings; speculates that Kraushaar found the Mexican pieces too strange; asks Pach to arrange another meeting; recommends García Maroto's article in -- Contemporaries -- about Rivera and his disgusting commercialism. 4 pp., in Spanish

From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., September 6, 1928: He and Mr. Owens will visit; the "animator" wants to deceive people of Pach's intelligence; the "animator's" treachery to art is disguised as a personal matter; García Maroto was deceived by the "animator"; lists founders of the Union of Painters and Sculptors who contributed ideas and skills while the "animator" contributed disloyalty; the "animator" claimed credit for a fresco technique developed by Siqueiros and Guerro; the "animator" killed Mexican mural painting and now interferes in all mural painting in Mexico; Maroto says the "animator" is stymied. 10 pp., in Spanish

From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., September 12, 1928: sends addresses of Jean Charlot and Gabriel Fernandez Ledema; Owens missed the train but hopes to meet Pach soon. 1 p., in Spanish

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 22, 1928: received Ananias, but cannot read it without a translator [large portions illegible]. 2 pp., in French

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., October 10, 1928: received his letter and book; "whether it is the desire to purchase or not, I am always pleased to show my husband's pictures"; wishes to keep the Rush pictures and studies in Philadelphia. 3 pp

From Arthur B. Springarn, New York, N.Y., November 1, 1928: thanks Pach for dedicating the book to him; best wishes for the volume's success. 1 p

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 14, 1928: five hundred dollars is a satisfactory amount for the manuscript. 1 p

From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y., November 16, 1928: the publisher sent a copy of Pach's wonderful book and requested his opinion; his response expressed enthusiasm and admiration. 2 pp., in Spanish, + 1 p. enclosure (copy of letter, November 14, 1928, to Ruth Raphael, Harper & Bros., From José Clemente Orozco, New York, N.Y.: endorsement of -- Ananias, or The False Artist -- by Walter Pach)

From Lee Simonson, Editor, Creative Art, New York, N.Y., December 18, 1928: thanks Pach for making changes to his Rivera article; his review of Pach's book is "extremely hard-hitting"; offers opportunity for rebuttal in the next issue; "let us keep the thing above personalities"; Alfred Stieglitz and Leo Stein support Simonson's views. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., January 8, 1929: will send chapters for revision; payment can be handled however Pach prefers. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, January 11, 1929: has not finished reading Pach's book because he is unusually busy; his wife is ill; had to put aside projects to complete a book on the Italian Renaissance; with the exception of Sargent, "official" American painters are not known in France; impressionism and its aftermath have not produced any positive result; would like to see Pach's paintings, not just photographs of them; compliments Pach's etchings; a new edition of his work is in preparation; there may be a Serb translation. 4 pp., in French

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., January 15, 1929: requests a month's extension for their translation work. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., February 14, 1929: chapter I and the introduction are being sent today. 1 p

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., March 18, 1929: describes working methods; explains problems in translating Faure's writing. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, April 1, 1929: when Pach visits they will look at art and go to Dordogne; discussed Pach's book with his publisher; recommends not using American examples other than Sargent and possibly Alexander and Frieseke in the French edition; will find an apartment for Pach; Miss Mary Morris has not yet called on him; requests books on the psychology of Americans. 2 pp., in French

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., May 12, 1929: translation work proceeds slowly; Van Wyck is in the hospital; she doesn't want it publicized. 2 pp

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., May 26, 1929: Van Wyck's health has not improved. 2 pp

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport, Conn., July 10, 1929: thanks Pach for his patience; Van Wyck is now in a private sanitarium; she continues to work on the translation. 1 p

From Eleanor S. Brooks, Westport Conn., August 28, 1929: is sending next chapter soon; Van Wyck's condition has not changed. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, August 28, 1929: his short review of Pach's book has been accepted for publication in the Dial. 2 pp., in French

From Eleanor S. Brooks, [place unknown], August 30, 1929: another chapter is ready. 1 p

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, September 13, 1929: went to Basque country with Soutine; had a good rest and thought about the psychology book he is writing; -- The Italian Renaissance -- appears to be a success; is anxious to see Pach's painting and hear about his time in Paris; hopes to interest Pach in Soutine; when working, Soutine hides like a dog gnawing a bone. 2 pp., in French

From Lewis Mumford, Long Island City, N.Y., October 23, 1929: recounts summer travels; is starting a book about the arts in America since 1870; asks for news of Van Wyck Brooks's condition and how Eleanor is coping; he worries about Eleanor's reaction to the proposal that he edit the Emerson book. 2 pp

From Harold M. Tovell, Toronto, Canada, October 25, 1929: "I do think that as a result of patience and education plus your lectures here, that the tide is turning in favor of our Toronto friends"; inquires about Marcel Duchamp; "the house here would be rather bare if it weren't for the Duchamp family. I hope you will tell him how greatly we prize their works." 4 pp

From Jacques Villon, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, November 23, 1929: Verne wrote on behalf of the Committee of the National Museums accepting Raymond's sculptures; sends text of the Committee's flattering letter; thanks Pach for his continued support of Raymond. 4 pp., in French

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., November 30, 1929: n -- Art in America -- , Pach confuses Horatio and Henry Oliver; Marie Sterner "has gotten together some of the worst things I have ever seen"; "verily art in America is run by old women! but most of them wear trousers." 2 pp

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, December 1, 1929: wants Pach to know the facts regarding his alleged endorsement of Clivette; "I supposed that Hellman was a gentleman and did not suspect a plant." 1 p

From Art Young, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] December 5, 1929: holiday greetings; news of James Opp [ sic], Springarn, Suzanne La Follette, and Glintenkamp; is working on a book and exhibition. 1 p. + 4 pp. enclosure (printed circular, undated, advertising books by Art Young, -- On My Way -- and -- Trees at Night -- , with excerpts from reviews and order form)

From Leo Stein, Paris, France 4218 265-267 [postmarked] January 8, 1930: "There is no artist that I value highly whom you do not also value but... you value many whom I don't"; diagram illustrates Stein's explanation of how their artistic tastes differ. 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Dordogne, France, March 12, 1930: Joubib's [?] awful reputation should be a comfort to Pach's friend who was so badly treated; plans to seek legal advice about suing De la Faille. 2 pp., in French

From Lewis Mumford, Long Island City, N.Y., March 12, 1930: is pleased with his lectures at Dartmouth College; his next book will be "a modern philosophy of life"; compliments Suzanne La Follette's book; he has an article in the first issue of the New Freeman; comments on policies and politics of the "Modern Museum." 4 pp

From Harold M. Tovell, [place unknown], May 16, 1930: "This is about the most perfect thing I have seen for a long time. A truly great work." Picture postcard ("Leonardo da Vinci Bronzlovas. Reiterfigur aus Bronze. Figure a cheval en bronze")

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., July 10, 1930: received Pach's picture postcard of a Millet portrait; the "exhibition of Homer, Ryder, and Eakins at the Modern Museum seems to have pleased universally." 1 p

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 22, 1930: "I would rather not see the entire output of a master," even Delacroix; after finishing "the lists of Italian Painters" he will revise Drawings of Florentine Painters; then he plans a book on "The Decline and Revival of Form in the Figure Arts." 8 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., September 25, 1930: continues to enjoy the postcards Pach sent, especially the Millet; has found the painting he wants; there will be an exhibition in New York City in December; her good friend Charles Bregler, a pupil of Eakins's, has restored several of the pictures. 2 pp

From Al [Bing?], New York, N.Y., October 19, 1930: "Museum accepts pictures." Telegram

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., October 21, 1930: received Barye copy and photos of Millet picture; details of upcoming Eakins show in New York City are uncertain; Charles Bregler has discovered retouching on some pictures; they will be cleaned before the exhibition; some may be placed behind glass to prevent future overpainting done in "ignorance"; enclosed sketch describes a study Eakins did while a student in Paris; wonders where other pieces from that period are, since he did many and returned with few. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., October 23, 1930: through oversight, Pach's watercolors were not presented at the October meeting; "I forsee no trouble in their reception. The modern style has not the bitter enemies it used to have." 1 p

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., November 9, 1930: saw a good exhibition of modern French art at Harriman Gallery and a "gem" at Knoedler; is enthusiastic about Villon's colors; subsequent visits to Brummer's confirmed that her collection is superior; Mr. Kraushaar likes Pach's work and promised to see more; "you are right when you say I cannot expect to compete with the hawks of picture dealers"; comments on Ananias; economic conditions depress Mr. Guggenheimer and may prevent them From traveling. 3 pp

From B. Stein, New York, N.Y., November 17, 1930: thanks Pach for his book; saw Villon's "smashing" show; Gretchen purchased The (Rose) Haulers; financial conditions in the United States are "depressing"; is sorry Pach is "impatient" with writing, as he is gifted; is glad Pach is enjoying painting in Paris; describes ideas about modern furniture, which she wants to buy. 5 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., December 1, 1930: "sympathetic" to Pach's "natural gratification at the Metropolitan's action;" Kraushaar will look at Pach's work in her apartment; mentions art seen at Reinhardt's and Brummer's galleries; received a letter From Villon. 2 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., December 12, 1930: Miss Pendleton took the painting Pach wants and will arrange delivery to him; Miss Pendleton would be a good subject to paint; holiday greetings. 1 p

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., December 17, 1930: saw Pach's drawings at Kraushaar's; saw work by Houdon at Anderson Galleries; Pach would enjoy Proust's remarks on music and art. 2 pp

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., January 2, 1931: opinions of Corot-Daumier show at the Modern; Tucker had an exhibition. 4 pp

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, [postmarked] January 19, 1931: discusses "analytic" and "non analytic" approaches to a "nonverifiable subject"; "don't regard this letter as an argument. I never argue about art, but simply attempt to explain an attitude." 5 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., January 25, 1931: thanks Pach for bringing Eakins's work to the attention of the Louvre; Charles Linford is a possible choice; "I would prefer to present a picture, rather than sell, so we will not worry about prices"; Riccardo Bertelli's new gallery on 56th is exhibiting Thomas Eakins and Samuel Murray; there is an Eakins show at Babcock Galleries; the national economic situation is too bad to expect painting sales; articles on Eakins mistakenly "report that the little seated figure of Thomas Eakins was his favorite attitude while painting"; pictures shown at Babcock were cleaned by Charles Bregler; glazing was recommended for protection From air pollution; Pach's choice of frame for his Eakins painting is "fine." 4 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., February 19, 1931: sends photographs of paintings available for presentation to the Louvre; her choice of the Hamilton portrait is supported by Samuel Murray, Mr. Cranmer, and David Wilson Jordan; the Barker and Wallace portraits are possibilities; her sister-in-law offers the portrait of Susan Eakins' father; sends photographs of Thomas Eakins dating From student days in Paris; she has not seen the Eakins exhibition in New York. 2 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., February 21, 1931: Bertelli sold John McClure Hamilton, not understanding that it might go to the Louvre; the Barker and Wallace portraits will not be sold. 1 p

From Morris Kantor, New York, N.Y., March 16, 1931: is busy making frames; saw Pach's exhibition at Kraushaar's; "Paris did you a lot of good because your work has changed.... It has more freedom and a better painting quality"; sympathizes with "Baylie's" misfortune; Kraushaar will give "Baylie" a show; Sloan arranged for him to teach at the League. 3 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., March 17, 1931: "The Museum is much beholden to you however the David matter turns out"; the decision reached at yesterday's meeting will be announced after the painting is unpacked; compliments Pach's show at Kraushaar's; comments on the installation and specific pieces; "as to the Eakins matter I should be honored to cooperate." 2 pp

From A.S. Baylinson, New York, N.Y., March 19, 1931: complimentary comments on Pach's show at Kraushaar's; is moving to a new, fireproof studio at 54 West 74th Street; "I will have the group work there with me evenings as before, and before long we shall forget the fire"; will teach at the Art Students League in the coming year. 2 pp

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1931: Pach's exhibition, which Hassam viewed twice, includes "the best things I have seen of yours"; spoke with John Sloan and Miss Kraushaar at the gallery; describes his etching of Helen Wells and promises to send a photograph of it. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., March 28, 1931: the painting arrived and is "even grander than I had imagined.... It will be one of the masterpieces here"; has been in contact with Mrs. Eakins; thanks Pach for his "beneficent labors." 3 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., March 28, 1931: Burroughs and Brummer were consulted in the search for photographs of Eakins paintings; lists sizes of paintings under consideration; J. Carroll Beckwith might interest the Louvre. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, New York, N.Y., March 31, 1931: "David Bought Hooray." Telegram + 1 p. enclosure (April 1, 1931 From Morgan & Cie., Paris, France: debit notice for collect telegram received From New York the previous day)

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., April 14, 1931: Museum is pleased with the David painting; thanks Pach for his role in the transaction; "waiting for the Eakins matter to crystallize"; wants the Pennsylvania Museum to offer Clara or The Bohemian; the Louvre should have an example of Eakins' "very best"; will propose the idea to Kimball. 2 pp

From Arthur B. Springarn, New York, N.Y., April 21, 1931: is "profoundly impressed" by Pach's exhibition; his work shows a new "lack of inhibition"; "I resent the conspiracy of silence of the critics tho' I suppose that is the price you pay for being the author of Ananias"; gives recommendations for Raymond's schooling. 6 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., May 3, 1931: "The Penn. Mus. Eakins project takes shape gradually"; Clara may be "suitable"; the "exchange" proposed is complicated and requires "committee actions"; maybe they could give Clara to the Louvre; Kimball will "come round." 3 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., May 11, 1931: sends copy of a letter From Fiske Kimball and a reproduction of Clara; upon seeing the painting again "my previous judgement was amply confirmed." 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (May 8, 1931, to Bryson Burroughs From Fiske Kimball, Director, Pennsylvania Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pa.: "I shall recommend to my Board that a gift be made to the Louvre"; instructs Burroughs to ask Guiffrey whether the Louvre will accept Clara; discusses framing and Eakins's ideas on the subject)

From Jean Guiffrey, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, June 2, 1931: thanks for the Eakins painting; when informed of the gift, his colleagues will be grateful. 1 p., in French

From Abby Greene (Aldrich) Rockefeller, Pocantico Hills, N.Y., June 10, 1931: purchased Pach's painting of anemone; thanks for "the trouble you have taken about the Géricault drawing." 3 pp

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, June 18, 1931: thanks Pach for his role as intermediary in the Louvre's acquisition of a Thomas Eakins painting. 1 p., in French

From Bryson Burroughs, [place illegible], France, June 24, 1931: Is arriving in Paris in July; wants to see David-Weill collection; "it is a great comfort the way the Eakins matter turned out and I am really glad to be out of its final arrangement"; is going to Milan to see the -- Très Belles Heures -- . 2 pp

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., June 27, 1931: Is pleased with the choice of painting for the Louvre; thanks Pach for his efforts. 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, aboard SS De Grasse, July 19, 1931: Guiffrey "is delighted about the Eakins and well appreciative of your efforts in regard to it"; Metropolitan Museum of Art may participate in the French exhibition in London next year; "a new era of liberalism and cooperation is about due with the passing of so many ancient trustees"; describes the excellent condition of the -- Très Belles Heures -- . 3 pp

From Caroline Pratt, Chilmark, Mass., August 14, 1931: Discusses Raymond's academic progress and challenges; gives recommendations for the future. 5 pp

From Elie Faure, Peking, China, October 7, 1931: Received a warm welcome in the United States; the end of his trip and the end of his life are darkened by catastrophe. Picture postcard ("Great Wall of China"), in French

From Beatrice [?], New York, N.Y., October 10, 1931: " Simone is ours." Telegram

From Elie Faure, Angkor, Cambodia, November 14, 1931: Expresses love for America and Americans; thinks the hope of the world is in the United States and also between the Urals and Vistula. Picture postcard ("Ruines D'Angkor"), in French

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., November 15, 1931: Etta Cone bought a Pach painting and is "enthusiastic" about Duchamp-Villon; "saw the Mouillots at Brummer's and I must confess to being very disappointed"; she "positively rejoice[s]" in her own piece by Duchamp-Villon; many praise Pach's work in her collection; art prices are down; news of various friends, especially musicians. 4 pp

From Jean Crotti, Paris, France, November 18, 1931: "I have always declined to write prefaces for contemporaries (the cases of Villon and Duchamp-Villon being exceptions which I intend shall remain exceptions); it is a job for a professional critic, and not for a man who is himself engaged in painting." 2 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., November 24, 1931: Gift of 2 etchings by Pach was received by the Museum. 2 pp

From Elie Faure, Colombo, Ceylon, November 25, 1931: Everyone says his wife and daughter were courageous and that helps him tolerate the loneliness; is anxious to see the Corot book, especially the reproductions; will continue writing for -- Petit Parisien -- ; now believes one must write for the masses. 2 pp., in French

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, December 22, 1931: Thanks Pach for his gift of an engraving of New York. 1 p., in French

From Al Bing, New York, N.Y., December 23, 1931: Socrates by David and the Havemeyer collection are now hanging at the Metropolitan; Whitney Museum, Frick Gallery, and the Modern Gallery will all be open when Pach returns; Coffin, "a man of great ability and sterling character," has been elected Museum president; is interested in the Bonaparte exhibition; asks Pach to help sell his Renoir. 12 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., January 9, 1932: Trustees will want more information about the Géricault picture; they trust printed sources over his opinions; is hopeful that Coffin can make "improvements"; though Pach is "eminently suited for Museum work," this is a poor time to enter the field. 2 pp

From Albert Morance, La Chef des Services Commerciause et Techniques, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, January 11, 1932: Is returning to Pach the contract concerning his engraving. 1 p. + 2 pp. printed form (Louvre Print Department acquisition form for The Telephone and Telegraph Building, New York, and rules for transfer of works to the Print Department), in French

From Leo Stein, Paris, France, [postmarked] January 12, 1932: Discusses "two questions that always arise in respect to art... (1) What qualities does one note in a work of art. (2) What value has that which one sees." 6 pp

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., January 18, 1932: Pach's stay in Morocco seems to have been beneficial; 1931 was a difficult year; hopeful for the future; "the Whitney has shaken the whole thing up and American shows past and present and I daresay future are everywhere"; "Rivera having a grand time in a pas de deux with Mrs. Rockefeller at the Museum of 'Foreign' Art." 3 pp

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, January 26, 1932: Thanks Pach for his role in the Louvre's acquisition of the Eakins painting; it arrived in good shape and was readily accepted; is still considering the Barye castings. 1 p., in French

From Leo Hartman, Harper's Magazine, New York, N.Y., February 1, 1932: The artists mentioned in Pach's article are too obscure for Harper's readers. 1 p

From Al Bing, New York, N.Y., February 7, 1932: Thanks Pach for helping him find a potential buyer for his Renoir; discusses the Furdson and Havemeyer collections at the Metropolitan; family news; is anxious for Pach's return. 7 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., February 8, 1932: "The Depression is not to be underestimated" and could change the social order; discusses colleges for Raymond; Life of Emerson and a volume of his essays reprinted From the Freeman will be out soon; the Prendergasts live nearby; "Charlie P. is surely a true primitive old master to whom only Vasari could do justice in the way of antecedents"; "I kept thinking as I read your book, what new books must logically follow From your mind"; suggests Pach write histories of art criticism and American art. 10 pp

From Henri Verne, Director, Louvre Museum, Paris, France, March 5, 1932: Because Barye's -- Apollon -- is a fragile plaster, the curator cannot risk making castings. 1 p., in French

From Childe Hassam, New York, N.Y., March 8, 1932: Has a print of Helen Wells for Pach; the Metropolitan Museum filmed him at work and play in East Hampton last summer; the Boston Museum commissioned a similar film of Benson. 3 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., March 25, 1932: Sent another payment for City of Mexico to Pach's bank; several people have shown interest in Simone; she and the Steins purchased work From Baylinson's Kraushaar show. 3 pp

From Bryson Burroughs, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., March 26, 1932: The Géricault is a "grand picture, but don't pin any faith on the taste of trustees"; Pach would find it frustrating to work within the museum's structure; is anxious to correspond or converse about Hubert and Jan Van Eyck. 2 pp

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., April 10, 1932: Congratulates Pach on his show and catalog; compliments the Morse exhibition at the Metropolitan; "the Whitney gallery has shaken up the attention of people to the present Americans." 2 pp

From D.T. Sieveking, Director, Antikensammlungen, Munich, Germany, April 27, 1932: Returns the completed questionnaire. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (questionnaire about Greek figure known as -- Naked Girl with Cap -- ), in German

From John Sloan, New York, N.Y., April 30, 1932: Recounts the politics of the League's presidential election that he lost; Schnakenberg will be an "inactive president"; when the Board turned down Geo. Grosz, Sloan resigned; Jonas Lie threatened to resign if Pach lectures there; Sloan will teach at Archipenko's school next season; Dolly is a manager for the touring Exhibition of Indian Tribal Arts; Baylinson supported Sloan in the "fight"; financial details of the Sixteenth Annual Independent Exhibition. 2 pp

From Charles Bourgeat, Galerie Dru, Paris, France., May 7, 1932: Received payment for Pach's exhibition there; cannot locate the Sisley and Pissarro photographs Pach sent; their aim to show fine and beautiful painting was accomplished with Pach's exhibition; difficult times account for compliments and no sales. 2 pp., in French

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., May 10, 1932: Her opinion of photography remains "good, but not art, and deadly after a certain length of time." 1 p

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., May 22, 1932: Hopes Pach's article, "Owning Pictures," will be published; the museum's rehung galleries present interesting new comparisons; asks his opinion of the Art Students League controversy; saw Baylinson at the Independent show; purchased a Baylinson drawing From Kraushaar. 3 pp

From the -- Atlantic Monthly -- , Boston, Mass., May 31, 1932: Pach's article is of limited interest to Atlantic Monthly readers. 1 p

From M.L. Allen, -- Harper's -- Magazine, New York, N.Y., June 2, 1932: Pach's article, "American Art in the Louvre," is not appropriate for a general audience. 1 p

From Gino Severini, Fribourg, Switzerland, June 16, 1932: His schedule will not permit another meeting before Pach's departure; the art market will improve; is interested in the prospect of a show at Brummer's; "decoration work" for Weyhe may end in September; thanks Pach for his help. 2 pp., in French

From P. Dubaut, Paris, France, July 19, 1932: Thanks Pach for sending clippings; the gallery behaved professionally but was not overly kind; was generally pleased with the show; is happy to know Pach. 2 pp., in French

From Alfred Vance Churchill, Rockport, Mass., July 25, 1932: Pach was the first to write of the Smith College Museum as "one of the choicest and best directed collections of art in America"; has received many commendations and is putting together extracts "for certain personal uses"; requests additional thoughts From Pach on the collection. 3 pp

From Alfred Vance Churchill, Rockport, Mass., July 25, 1932: Is trying to arrange a lecture for Pach at Smith College and perhaps at Mount Holyoke College; Jere Abbott will succeed him as museum director; thinks his retirement was forced on the trustees by Paul J. Sachs. 4 pp

From Nadine and Ad. Wuester, Paris, France, January 5, 1933: Pach is missed as their circle of friends diminishes; painted at the Côte d'Azur last summer; shows of Renoir and Delacroix were exceptions in a dull art season; Aubrey's gallery is now a junk shop; mentions auctions of the Strauss and Pacquemont collections; Goetz's Delacroix still-life was reattributed to Andrieux; a sketch said to be by Géricault appeared at the Hôtel Drouot; cheap reproductions are being passed off as Géricault watercolors. 5 pp., in German

From Elie Faure, Paris, France., January 7, 1933: France is declining; sends family news; Paul Morand gave his book a favorable review; inquires whether Pach has found work; there are fewer exhibits in Paris; good paintings are now seen only at the big sales such as Strauss. 2 pp., in French

From Marjorie Carpenter, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, January 9, 1933: Confirms lecture date at McMaster University. Telegram

From Gertrude Wolf, Executive Secretary, New York University, New York, N.Y., January 9, 1933: Requests syllabus for last 2 lectures of Pach's course and the examination questions. 1 p

From Susan Macdowell Eakins, Philadelphia, Pa., [postmarked] January 19, 1933: Informs Pach of prices of two Eakins portraits; many Eakins paintings were damaged by restorers; others are in "splendid condition" due to the efforts of Charles Bregler; comments on Mrs. Whitney's plans to aid painters. 1 p

From William Reinhold Valentiner, Director, Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Mich., February 9, 1933: Thanks the Pachs for a warm welcome; enjoyed seeing Pach's paintings and his personal collection; the picture signed Hogarth is not by the master; the signature on the Géricault drawing appears genuine. 2 pp., in German

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, June 20, 1933: Has been ill for 2 months; the French economy is poor, resulting in greatly reduced incomes; Rivera has been forbidden to make public speeches; a Chassériau exhibit is open; Joubin, who organized the current Renoir show, knows nothing about painting and villifies artists while they are alive but sanctifies them after they are dead; among the beautiful paintings in the exhibit is a portrait of Sisley and his wife. 6 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 23, 1933: Madame Siluster died; she had 4 Delacroix drawings of which Faure kept 2, gave 1 to François, and sent to Pach a portrait sketch of Madame Guizot; Pach should tell Rivera that Faure is upset that he did not translate Mon Périple; is enthusiastic about Rivera's paintings and frescoes and considers him a great illustrator; the chapter Faure sent was ignored, which is a disappointment as he hoped to interest an American editor; is depressed over the rejection of his collected essays; the Renoir exhibition is a disgrace to the memory of the artist, who is misunderstood and detested by the organizers of the show. 4 pp., in French. to Herbert Eustis Winlock From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y. 4218 481-483 November 12, 1933: Refers to previous discussion of the "Indian collection"; suggests a "single gallery of Indian art including Mexican, and adding, if desired, the other peoples whose work has a sufficient art value"; use art rather than anthropology as the criterion; "my idea is that the museum should accept the collection Mr. Sloan intends to offer as a gift From his association, or accept part of it as the nucleus of a gallery of the art of the so-called barbarous peoples." 3 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 9, 1933: A Courbet, which Faure believes is his most beautiful, is for sale; indicates price, size, and citation of a reproduction; inquires about the financial crisis in the United States; comments on economic problems, political events, and inertia of the French people; is writing a preface for Rosenberg's Renoir exhibit; asks about Pach's painting and printmaking; requests news of Rivera about whom he wrote an article; Harper's sent money and will reprint The Spirit of the Forms. 4 pp., in French

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, New York, N.Y., December 10, 1933: Saw the Cézanne exhibition twice; "as for Dr. Valentiner, of course I am all with Rivera.... No good can come out of anything as bad as the Hitler program." 2 pp

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Indianapolis, Ind., February 2, 1934: Discusses fellow board members of the Indianapolis Art Association and acquisitions; "modernization" was the response to declining school enrollment; 9 instructors, including Wheeler, were fired; describes life on the top of La Conte Mountain, Tenn., where he painted the previous fall; has mural and portrait commissions, "so long as I can make a living I don't care if I don't teach." 8 pp

From E.D. Smyth, Tangier, Morocco, September 19, 1934: Thanks Pach for sending a painting of Helen; is staying in Helen's house; Gertrude Stein's book about Alice Toklas is "an overwhelmingly cheeky work" that failed to mention Pach; news of mutual friends; reminiscences of visits with the Pachs; James McBey, a Scottish painter and etcher, has settled nearby. 3 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, October 17, 1934: Feels animosity toward Barr, whom he calls narrow-minded; will handle in his own way any resulting confrontation or unpleasantness; told Arensberg, owner of -- Un Descendant -- , not to lend to Barr; asks Pach to find an excuse for refusing Barr; Barr shall reap what he has sown; American collectors are now speculators; sends order forms for his new book. 5 pp., in French

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 4, 1934: The owners of the Courbet are impatient; asks if it has arrived in New York; suggests that a collector, Barnes, or the Metropolitan Museum of Art may be interested; his book is being ignored in France; if Pach has money, now is a good time to buy art; tells of works that are selling at reduced prices. 2 pp., in French

From Simonne Maubert, Paris, France, December 22, 1934: Miss Stein wrote with good news of Pach; posed for Miss Stein during the autumn and hopes for similar work next year. 2 pp. + picture postcard ("Palais de Fontainebleau, La Cour Ovale et le Baptistère"), in French

From A. Frohberg and Johanna, Dresden, Germany, December 31, 1934: Thanks Pach for letter and for holiday greetings; the news of Pach's selection for an important commission brings them great joy; news of a family friend who has made progress and overcome obstacles. 2 pp., in German

From Karl Lilienfield, New York, N.Y., May 13, 1935: Confirms the commission Pach will receive if he sells paintings for Alexander M. Bing. 1 p., in German

From Henri Focillon, New Haven, Conn., May 21, 1935: Thanks Pach for sending the fine article he wrote on -- La Patelliere -- , which he saw in Bucharest; when visiting the Politzers, he failed to recognize Pach's name, thus missing the opportunity to express his admiration and respect. 2 pp., in French

From Father [Frohberg] and Johanna, Dresden, Germany, July 2, 1935: Birthday greetings. Picture postcard ("Herzlichen Gluckwunsch zum Geburtstage"), in German

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, September 13, 1935: Opposes exhibitions such as the current one at the Petit Palais; is revising his work on drawings of Florentine painters; "foulness piled over Michelangelo by a lot of German animals, the worst of whom is a biped named Panofsky." 12 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, September 24, 1935: Asks about Pach's frescoes and requests photographs; discusses the dire economy and his own financial situation; believes the movement born of cubism is dead in France and explores this idea more fully in a preface he wrote for Brummer's upcoming Lipchitz exhibition; discusses an exhibition of Italian art and the poorly received article he wrote about it for L'Humanité; visited London, which seemed more alive than Paris; objects to glass on paintings at the National and the Wallace; has not heard From Rivera, possibly because Faure's article was not flattering enough. 4 pp., in French

From Clifton A. Wheeler, Indianapolis, Ind., October 20, 1935: Pach should notify the director of the John Herron Art Institute of his schedule and lecture fees; is teaching at a high school; the art school is now "purely Yale, Beaux Arts competition, and American Academy in Rome." 2 pp

From Edna Strasser, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, October 26, 1935: Called on friends of Pach, the Brinkman family of Haarlem; saw the portrait Pach painted of their brother in 1906. 3 pp

From Arthur Strasser, Seville, Spain, November 18, 1935: Recounts visit with Brinkmans in Haarlem; is impressed by the Prado, Rubens, and El Greco; at Pach's suggestion, they have attended several performances of gypsy music and dancing. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, [place unknown], November 29, 1935: Is enchanted by and praises the most successful part of Pach's triptych; discusses the economy and prospects for work in France; continues to be pessimistic about painting in France; architecture is what is needed now and cinema may become more important than painting; mentions a Flemish exhibition; congratulates Pach on his portrait of a young man, possibly Raymond; the critics who denounced what Faure wrote on the agony of painting now admit he was right. 4 pp., in French

From A. Frohberg and Johanna, Dresden, Germany, March 2, 1936: Belated birthday greetings; tell Magda everything has been done for Zittau [?]. Picture postcard (untitled), in German

From Gerda Stein, New York, N.Y., March 10, 1936: Thanks Pach for his friendship; "accept this simple expression of my appreciation for what you have given me and the earnest hope that it will bring you an answer to some of the problems that perplex you." 4 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, Ontario, Canada, August 4, 1936: Read his review in the -- Nation -- and wants to see the exhibition; the watercolor of Magda acquired by the Brooklyn Museum is one of Pach's best. 1 p

From Charles Bourgeat, Paris, France, August 21, 1936: The Seligmanns request a meeting about the Ingres paintings Bourgeat and Pach discussed earlier; sends 2 color reproductions of Cézanne paintings that Cézanne's son wants to sell; discusses prices and commissions; saw the Cézanne works now in the Orangerie; asks if Etta Cone might be interested; missed Bing's visit to Paris. 4 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Grusbach, Czechoslovakia, August 26, 1936: "You are one of the last surviving acquaintances who, in the study of art, have not gone over to irrelevant promiscuity"; discusses attribution of Goldman's Madonna; has begun writing "The Decline and Recovery of Form"; spent 6 weeks in Yugoslavia studying Roman remains and Byzantine frescoes. 4 pp

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, November 30, 1936: Read his article in the -- Virginia Quarterly -- ; he liked the photograph of Pach's fresco more than the article; tell Van Wyck Brooks he is welcome to visit when next in Florence; spent 5 weeks in Paris. 4 pp

From Elie Faure, Paris, France, December 28, 1936: Eight months ago Lizou married a man who died of cancer a few days later; his books are not selling well; History of Art is unavailable and financing cannot be found for a new edition; saw an exhibit of Bonnard and Vuillard; considers mural work the only important current painting; recounts a visit to Spain; Rivera was wounded in Mexico; Rivera's recent silence may be the result of Faure's article. 4 pp., in French

From Herbert Eustis Winlock, Director, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., February 13, 1937: Winthrop will not loan his collection. 1 p

From Allen Tucker, Castine, Maine, May 30, 1937: "I wonder if Museums and concerts haven't stopped rather than helped our creative efforts"; is glad to be back in America; wrote to Moe; "the foundation likes to bet on the unknown instead of helping anyone who has shown they HAVE ability and have done the work"; congratulates Pach on continuing to paint despite other responsibilities; sorry to hear Sloan is unwell. 1 p

From Ernestine Ludolf, Florence, Italy, June 22, 1937: Pach is "a good and faithful friend"; his kind words about Egisto are like "a flower of remembrance on his grave"; wants to give him a small painting by Egisto, showing a corner of the Montmartre studio where he and Pach first met. 6 pp

From Ida E. Guggenheimer, Paris, France, September 13, 1937: Attended a conference in Paris; visited the Fountain of the Innocents; made a thorough tour of the exhibition with Villon. 3 pp

From Marcel Duchamp, Paris, France, September 28, 1937: Would like to see his painting -- Sad Young Man on a Train -- join related paintings in California and believes Arensberg would agree; requests a photograph of the painting to reproduce in an album he is compiling. 2 pp., in French

From Allen Tucker, New York, N.Y., November 1, 1937: Thanks Pach for the Delacroix book; congratulations on "another great contribution to civilization"; completed a "pretty good summer's work" before his illness. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 18, 1937: Thanks Pach for the book on Delacroix; the introduction is "wholly satisfying." 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, New York, N.Y., November 23, 1937: Reads some of Delacroix each day; "I'm beginning to understand your feeling about him." Picture postcard ("Self Portrait by Francesco Goya. Frontispiece to Los Caprichos. Madrid, circa 1803")

From L. (Mme. Elie) Faure, Paris, France, November 30, 1937: Thanks Pach for writing to her; wants to carry out her husband's wishes to make his work publicly accessible; sends a list of Faure's unpublished articles; discusses financial matters relating to the Harper's contract. 4 pp., in French

From Royal Cortissoz, New York, N.Y., January 2, 1938: Thanks Pach for his book on Delacroix, "the work of an artist and man of letters." 3 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 2, 1938: "I'm glad to stand by that statement." Picture postcard ("Mountain landscape. Chinese, Ming Period, 15th century, after a design attributed to Ma Yiian (flourished 1190-1221)")

From Henry Watson Kent, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., November 3, 1938: Thanks Pach for the "kind letter about the Morgan exhibition." 1 p. (frame 589) and envelope

From Henry Watson Kent, New York, N.Y., November 8, 1938: Thanks Pach for the inscribed copy of his book; is proud to be associated with the book and to have Pach say kind things about him. 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 9 and 11, 1938: Read -- Queer Thing, Painting -- ; "I had better begin now by telling my few objections, in order to hand you later my full bouquet"; "you exaggerate the Villon connection"; "you exaggerate the ignorance of Italian art on the part of our forbears"; "you praise some collectors too highly," especially Morgan and John Quinn; "your memory of Yeats is suspect"; Pach has created a "permanent record and source-book" full of "wisdom." 14 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 15, 1938: Grants permission to quote From his previous letter; Pach's book is "tremendously important." 2 pp

From Kenneth Hayes Miller, New York, N.Y., November 15, 1938: Congratulations on -- Queer Thing, Painting -- ; the book has "permanent value." 1 p

From Louis Lombard, [place unknown], France, November 23, 1938: Thanks Pach for his letters; describes the horrors of life as a soldier; he reads Whitman to maintain good spirits. 4 pp., in French

From Henry Watson Kent, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., December 9, 1938: Advises Pach to distribute new cards to schools. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (suggested text for announcement of Pach's availability as a lecturer)

From W.S. Rusk, Wells College, Aurora-on-Cayuga, N.Y., December 21, 1938: "Thank you for the conference the other day in which we discussed the artist and the art critic." 1 p

From G. Masolle, Evian, France, December 31, 1938: Thanks Pach for the extract From his book, which she translated immediately; it showed perfect understanding of Jean's character; -- The Prisoners of the World -- is impossible to find; Jean Cocteau has not published Jean's first essays or poems. 2 pp., in French

From Ernestine Ludolf, Florence, Italy, February 20, 1939: Is "grateful" for the "lovely tribute" to her brother, Egisto Fabbri, that appeared in Queer Thing, Painting; she and her brother were students of J. Alden Weir; Pissarro advised them to study the Old Masters; details of the sale of 12 Cézanne paintings From Egisto's collection; sending a privately printed memoir of her brother; invites Pach to call on her and various relatives when he is in Florence. 4 pp

From Simonne Maubert, Paris, France, April 5, 1939: Thanks Pach for sending his book; she was happy to recognize herself in one of the chapters; her English is improving and one day she may be able to read the entire book. 4 pp., in French.

To Magdalene Pach From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., July 8, 1939: Is looking forward to the Pachs' visit. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., December 29, 1939: The book is a "glorious achievement... by far your best book"; it "brought back all my gratitude to you for all that you have taught me about art." 4 pp

From Daniel Gregory Mason, New York, N.Y., March 15, 1940: Thanks Pach for the "great pleasure and stimulus" of Ingres; "one grows to feel something of the affection, respect, and admiration for Ingres that you show the way to." 1 p

From Don F. Dickson, Director, Dickson Mound Museum, Lewistown, Ill., March 28, 1940: Sends photographs of pipes that Pach found interesting. 1 p. + enclosures (4 photographs of ceremonial pipes: "Front view of a human effigy tobacco pipe From the Great Temple Mound in Oklahoma, Ceremonial type"; "Front view. Ceremonial type"; "Side view. Ceremonial type"; and "Back view of human effigy tobacco pipe From the Great Temple Mound in Oklahoma, Ceremonial type")

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, March 30, 1940: Was interested in the Ohio mound builders in his youth; "my writing days are over I fear, for one thing I feel afraid I have nothing to say that would not sound commonplace"; "too much absorbed" in what is going on in this part of the world." 8 pp

From Ernestine Ludolf, Florence, Italy, April 18, 1940: Ingres is "splendid"; sympathizes with the "difficulties" Pach encountered when organizing the World's Fair art exhibition. 6 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Boothbay Harbor, Maine, September 2, 1940: Pach has found "the only paragraph in the whole book (which after a dozen rewritings) left me unsatisfied." Postal card

From G. Masolle, Evian, France, October 14, 1940: Is happy that Jean's memoirs are in Pach's hands; awaits English victory; the French are suffering, but she is confident the country will survive. 2 pp., in French

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., April 9, 1941: "We missed you at the John Sloan dinner"; he won't write any more about expatriates. 3 pp

From Alfred Vance Churchill, Northampton, Mass., April 21, 1941: Congratulations on Ingres; recalls Pach's help in acquiring important paintings for the Smith College Museum of Art. 3 pp

From Art Young, New York, N.Y., May 9, 1941: Congratulations on -- Masterpieces of Art -- . 1 p., illustrated with drawing of a stooped man walking with a cane

From Hugo Robus, New York, N.Y., June 13, 1941: Was pleased by Pach's letter praising his marble at the Museum of Modern Art; Alfred Barr was "delighted" by Pach's comments; there is also a Robus bronze at the Museum of Modern Art; "I never dated my work and so the actual year of production is a pretty hazy matter." 2 pp

From Ruth A. Wilmot, Oak Bluffs, Mass., [postmarked] August 2, 1941: She and Donald are enjoying their vacation. Picture postcard ("Yacht Club and Harbor, Edgartown, Mass.")

From Kenneth Hayes Miller, New York, N.Y., August 7, 1941: Comments on paintings From the Louvre shown at the M[etropolitan] M[useum of Art]; he doesn't enjoy the country as Pach seems to. 2 pp

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, August 30, 1941: "I believe the entire Mississippi basin to its utmost reaches was flooded with Aztec influences"; requests photograph of a piece Pach mentioned seeing in Columbus, Ohio; "French art will rise again"; recalls his first acquaintance with Poussin's work. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., September 4, 1941: "I am reacting against this whole conception of 'mankind' as 'rabble' "; his new book will expound on this. 2 pp

From Charles Cunningham, Assistant Curator of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., September 11, 1941: Requests additional information about Pach's Delacroix painting; shares information on works in the collection of George Reinhardt, Winterthur, and the Metropolitan. 2 pp

From Charles Cunningham, Assistant Curator of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., October 15, 1941: Sends summary of information compiled when cataloging the Museum's version of Delacroix's -- Christ on the Sea of Genesareth -- . 1 p. + 4 pp. enclosure (notes on 6 versions of the painting)

From William Mills Ivins, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] January 27, 1942: Thanks for his "warm approval of the Bulletin article." 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Norwalk, Conn., [postmarked] February 3, 1942: Thanks for sending the brochure about Quidor. Picture postcard ("The Dance of Death. The Ploughman Woodcut by Hans Holbein the Younger. German, 1497-1543")

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., [postmarked] February 19, 1942: Thanks for the Quidor catalog; saw the show yesterday; "he's really a discovery." Picture postcard ("Saint George and the Dragon. Woodcut by Lucas Cranach the Elder. German, 1472-1553")

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., [postmarked] February 27, 1942: "What you say about the book makes me regret all the more that it has to be postponed." Picture postcard ("Rembrandt, Dutch, 1606-1669. Portrait of the Artist"), with annotation by Pach: "Book on American Art proposed to the American Philosophical Society."

From Fred M. Stein and Arthur Strasser, New York, N.Y., March 21, 1942: In "recognition of what you have meant to the [Schilling] Fund... [we] take great pleasure in sending you the enclosed." 2 pp

From M.M. Pochapin, Music Appreciation Record Corporation, New York, N.Y., May 6, 1942: Please sign and return a copy of the agreement. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (May 6, 1942, From M.M. Pochapin, New York, N.Y. Pach has been selected a Judge for the "Art Appreciation Movement. In this capacity you are to pass on the true value of paintings submitted.").

to Magdalene Pach From M.M. Pochapin, Managing Director, Art Appreciation Movement, New York, N.Y., May 13, 1942: Requests that she read the organization's pamphlet about the Art Appreciation Movement and complete the "lengthy Qualification Form"; "great artists will make their paintings available at these small Public Service prices." 2 pp

From M.I. Block, Art Appreciation Movement, New York, N.Y., May 27, 1942: Receipt for 5 oil paintings consigned. 1 p

From Reginald Poland, Director, Fine Arts Gallery, San Diego, Calif., 5 June 25, 1942: "We realize increasingly that, in the Caravaggio, we have a magnificent work of art"; "we have just acquired a glorious Titian Madonna, painted about 1514-- very strongly Giorgionesque." 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., [postmarked] July 8, 1942: "What happens to them [artists] when they are 'above' politics? Don't they in the end lead themselves to the politics that destroy them?" Postal card + clipping ("Guest Artists," Time)

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., July 15, 1942: "I won't agree with you about artists and politics"; "a certain breadth of interests and sympathy does not drain one's energy." 2 pp

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., July 17, 1942: Discusses insurance and storage arrangements for Pach's property while he is in Mexico. 2 pp

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., July 17, 1942: Agrees to publish his article on Ingres. 1 p

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., July 20, 1942: Sends "lost policy releases" and policy numbers. 1 p

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., August 4, 1942: Pach's article on Ingres will appear in the October issue. 1 p

From Gilbert R. Gabriel, Schneider-Gabriel Galleries, Inc., New York, N.Y., August 10, 1942: "Your article on the Ingres is a masterpiece"; discusses the price of a painting of Trinity Church. 2 pp. + enclosures (12 business cards and 4 handwriten notes containing names, addresses, and telephone numbers of Mexican acquaintances)

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., August 19, 1942: Pach's piece on Ingres will be the lead article; accepts his proposal for an article on the "Mexican primitive Bustos." 1 p

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., September 3, 1942: Discusses overpayment of insurance premium. 1 p. + 4 enclosures (3 invoices and inventory of artwork in storage). [postmarked September 3, 1942] From John Strasser, New York, N.Y. 4218 703-705 September 4, 1942: Discusses "early Hispano-Mexican" Madonna; "Rosenberg has an attractive show." 3 pp

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.Mex., September 8, 1942: Is home From the hospital; his exhibition was in Chicago, Denver, and Santa Fe, and will go to Albuquerque next and then Fort Worth; received "enthusiastic notices"; sold 2 pieces. 2 pp

From Jacob M. Heimann, Beverly Hills, Calif., September 14, 1942: "I greatly appreciate the idea of making an exhibition in Mexico"; inquires about lighting and dimensions of the galleries; "the lack of interest and the ignorance as far as art is concerned here, is unbelievable." 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (lists of numbers)

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., September 18, 1942: "Considering risk expenses at present offer seven and half percent for next three years." 1 p

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., September 21, 1942: Expenses will be high; recommends he establish a relationship with Mizracchi [ sic] before arriving in New York; show him some "really valuable" paintings as well as "less expensive works on the sale of which we may really count"; suggests a selection of "object d'art" From A la Vieille Russie; November is the best time for an exhibition in Mexico. 3 pp

From John Strasser, New York, N.Y., September 25, 1942: Pyramid of the Sun, as it appears in the photograph, is "dazzling"; discusses his search for a job. 2 pp

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., September 29, 1942: Proposed exhibition may receive the cooperation of the president of Mexico and the king of Rumania; "we must and shall have a first class show"; mentions several works he intends to include. 1 p

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., October 5, 1942: The editor of Cuadernos must insert a notice stating the article was written for publication in Art in America and appears simultaneously in translation. 1 p

From M.M. Pochapin, President, Art Movement, Inc., New York, N.Y., October 8, 1942: Is deciding whether to continue the Art Movement; Marsh resigned; "my enthusiasm has never waned"; Sloan remains involved; plans to market paintings through department stores; work by Walter and Magda Pach is being shown in Philadelphia and Atlanta. 2 pp

From Diego Rivera, [place unknown], October 13, 1942: He and the editors extend thanks and enclose payment. 1 p., in Spanish

From Adrian Bourcart, [place unknown], Mexico, October 21, 1942: Had the pleasure of attending Pach's lectures on art; requests clarification of true art versus false art and live art versus dead art. 4 pp., in French

From Robert Lebel, New York, N.Y., October 22, 1942: Saw Misrachi; likes [filmed twice] Pach's idea for an exhibit in Mexico; Marcel Duchamp and André Breton organized a surrealist exhibition; Guggenheim was inaugurated with an ingenious exhibition; the Dutch show at Duveen's is successful; Rosenberg has a Léger show and is preparing a Cézanne exhibit; Rosenberg is interested in Marsden Hartley; Chagall, now an official member of the surrealist group, is exhibiting at Pierre Matisse; Goetz may exhibit Paul Klee. 1 p., in French

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., October 22, 1942: "I was delighted with your article on Bustos"; "unless the article appears in Art in America prior to publication elsewhere, we cannot print it." 2 pp

From John Strasser, New York, N.Y., November 13, 1942: Comments on Mexico painted by Velasco. 2 pp

From Marjorie D. Mathias, College Art Association of America, New York, N.Y., November 14, 1942: The State University at Bowling Green, Ohio, has inquired about engaging Pach for a lecture. 1 p

From Henry Allen Moe, Committee for Inter-American Artistic and Intellectual Relations, New York, N.Y., November 16, 1942: "We want our grantees to be able to do what they ought to do and live as they ought to live"; Pach should let them know his anticipated expenses and how much time he needs in Mexico. 1 p

From Carlos Merida, Denton, Tex., [postmarked] November 16, 1942: Air time was insufficient to broadcast Pach's full text: note inscribed on Section of Plastic Arts, Department of Fine Arts, Secretary of Public Education, "No. 202 Radio Bulletin for Saturday, November 21, 1942" (transcript of a feature story on José Hermenegildo Bustos abstracted From an article by Walter Pach). 4 pp., in Spanish

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., November 18, 1942: With the help of Eleanor and Kenyon, he has managed to read some of the Cuadernos Americanos Pach sent; "I like immensely its tone and elevated feeling"; "I envy your meetings with Diego Rivera, who has always seemed to me a very great painter"; is "shocked" that Lionello Venturi and William G. Constable don't share his opinion of Rivera; a "complicated family problem" keeps them From traveling; is working on -- The Age of Washington Irving -- . 4 pp

From Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International Education, New York, N.Y., November 30, 1942: Is glad that Pach's lectures were well received; hopes Pach can remain in Mexico. 1 p

From Alfonso Reyes, Colegio de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico, December 3, 1942: He is honored by Van Wyck Brooks's words and wants to correspond with him. 1 p., in Spanish

From Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International Education, New York, N.Y., December 7, 1942: Is "delighted to learn that Pach will receive a grant through Mr. Moe and 'his Committee.' " 1 p

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., December 8, 1942: "Just returned From Johns Hopkins Hospital." Telegram

From José Clemente Orozco, [place unknown], December 10, 1942: Modern art in Mexico faces a powerful reaction that aims to end 20 years of academic work; looks forward to visiting Pach soon. 1 p., in Spanish

From Henry Allen Moe, New York, N.Y., December 11, 1942: "Your letter received but no word From the university." Telegram

From A.S. Baylinson, New York, N.Y., December 18, 1942: He and Constant were rejected by the jury of the "so called Victory exhibition"; reports the death of Michael Rosenthal. 2 pp

From George Constant, New York, N.Y., December 20, 1942: Is glad that Pach, a "fine painter," now has time to paint; the Artists for Victory exhibition at the Metropolitan is "lousy." 2 pp

From Henry Allen Moe, Committee for Inter-American Artistic and Intellectual Relations, New York, N.Y., December 21, 1942: Confirms that Pach is to receive a grant; a final report is due upon return. 1 p. + 2 enclosures (1 sheet of figures titled "Mex--New York" and copy of 1 p. letter to Rodulfo Brito Foucher, Rector, National University of Mexico, From Henry Allen Moe, New York, N.Y., announcing grant to the University for Pach's lectures)

From Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Buenos Aires, Argentina 4218 764-765 December 22, 1942: Sent photographs of the work of Attilio Rossi; Argentine critic, Julio Rinaldini, will send books. 1 p

From Lasar Kipnis, New York, N.Y., December 29, 1942: Asks Pach to write an article on new acquisitions by Mr. Poland's Museum; wants Pach lecture in San Diego; when a new catalog of the permanent collection is published, "we are sure the work will be entrusted to you." 2 pp

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., December 29, 1942: Robert Montenegro's book impressed him; hopes Montenegro will write on Estrada for Art in America; requests Pach's help in arranging it. 1 p

From Harry Miller Lydenberg, [place unknown], Mexico, December 29, 1942: Discusses origin of the phrase "biblia a-biblia." 1 p

From Marcel Duchamp, New York, N.Y., January 3, 1943: Fearing visa problems, he has decided not to go to Mexico; made several "suitcases"; the opening at Peggy's gallery was a big success; plans a surrealist show with Schiaparelli and Breton; Reynolds, just arrived in Madrid, requested that Pach extend greetings to Frida and Diego. 2 pp., in French

From Arthur Strasser, New York, N.Y., January 7, 1943: Congratulations on receiving a grant; "it is not to the Schilling Fund but to you personally, Walter, that our gift to the Metropolitan was the beginning of the belated recognition of Flannagan's genius"; Fred Stein would appreciate suggestions for the Schilling Fund award. 2 pp

From John Rewald, Weyhe Gallery, New York, N.Y., January 13, 1943: Is glad Pach liked his article on Bonnard; will send Pach a copy of his new book on Seurat. 2 pp., with postscript From Laura Canade: New York Public Library has purchased Pach's Self-Portrait

From John Strasser, New York, N.Y., January 16, 1943: "People who might have enjoyed the 'Victory' show 25 or 30 years back now unanimously dislike that accumulation of junk"; "read of your and Rivera's project for spreading Flannagan's reputation." 3 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, New York, N.Y., January 17, 1943: Saw Jacques Villon's "grand portrait" of Pach at the "Modern Museum." Picture postcard ("Illuminated initial From a South Italian ms. Valerius Maximus written about 1450")

From M.L. Stafford, American Consul, American Embassy, Mexico, January 22, 1943: Pach's registration of American citizenship was approved. 1 p

From Harry Miller Lydenberg, Biblioteca Benjamin Franklin, [place unknown], Mexico, January 23, 1943: Is sending a check in appreciation of the time and interest Pach contributed to their exhibition; wants to publish Pach's tribute to Bustos. 1 p

From Stephen Duggan, Director, Institute of International Education, New York, N.Y., February 3, 1943: Pach's observation about Mexican education interested him; he is "well informed concerning the anti-American attitude" in Mexico. 1 p

From Jean Lipman, Editor, -- Art in America -- , Cannondale, Conn., February 15, 1943: Thanks Pach for arranging to have Fernando Gambo write an article on Estrada; Pach's writings have stimulated interest in Mexican art; his review will not be published due to "paper restrictions." 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, New York, N.Y., March 9, 1943: Has "rediscovered" New York by living in the city temporarily; "I am especially happy to have got to know some of the new young writers"; wants more news of Diego Rivera. 3 pp

From Robert Lebel, New York, N.Y., March 15, 1943: Agrees with Pach that the Metropolitan's La Victoire exhibit resembles a Paris Salon of 30 years ago with the addition of a few abstract pieces; an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Armory Show is possible; saw one of Pach's paintings at the Art Students League; Pierre Matisse exhibited his father's work; Matta and Miro made Pierre Matisse's last show, "Art and the War," interesting; the Mexican Room at the Museum of Natural History is being reorganized; recommends Charles Sterling's Gazette des Beaux-Arts article on French primitives; asks if Pach has seen VVV, the review headed by André Breton; no longer wishes to be involved in art sales. 2 pp., in French

From Georges Wildenstein, Director, Gazette des Beaux-Arts, [filmed twice] New York, N.Y., March 26, 1943: Wants to publish Pach's article; hopes he will agree to some minor changes. 1 p., in French

From Lyman Bryson, Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion, New York, N.Y., March 26, 1943: Requests comments on a paper by Professor William Scott, Randolph-Macon Women's College. 1 p. + 2 pp. enclosure ("Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion, Reply to Questionnaire of December 7, 1942 by Walter Pach")

From Paul J. Sachs, Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., April 8, 1943: Grenville L. Winthrop collection has been bequeathed to the Fogg Museum; wartime conditions have caused universities to curtail their art departments; "it is extremely important that able and understanding North Americans, such as yourself... should be our cultural ambassadors in Latin America"; suggests summer programs in the United States where Pach might teach; tells Pach to add his name to the speakers list maintained by the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. 2 pp

From William N. Eisendrath Jr., Chairman, Exhibition Committee, Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago, Ill., April 26, 1943: Requests assistance in selecting works for a Rivera retrospective planned for February 1944. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (list of works by Rivera, "suggested by Mrs. Goodspeed, April 26, 1943," with notes by Walter Pach)

From Annette B. Cottrell, Director, Speakers Service Section, Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., April 28, 1943: Thanks Pach for his "interest in inter-American affairs and desire to collaborate with the work of this office as a speaker." 1 p

From Robert Chester Smith, Director, Hispanic Foundation, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., April 30, 1943: Considers Pach "an historic figure, one of the first to call attention to the development of Mexican art"; this is not the right time for Pach's proposed publications and translations. 1 p

From Harry Miller Lydenberg, [place unknown], Mexico, May 8, 1943: Pach's "review of the Low study on the place of the Museum in our world today" is "admirable"; politically or economically motivated explanations of art will "fail"; he is less "pessimistic" than Pach on the role of public funding; public libraries are a good example. 2 pp

From Annette B. Cottrell, Director, Speakers Service Section, Coordinater of Inter-American Affairs, Washington, D.C., May 25, 1943: Pach will be included among the organization's available speakers. 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., May 28, 1943: El Hijo Prodigo and Cuadernos are "typographically delightful"; wishes he knew Spanish; would like to be able to contribute articles to Mexican periodicals; John Sloan is reported to be "very frail." 4 pp

From William N. Eisendrath Jr., Chairman, Exhibition Committee, Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago, Ill., June 4, 1943: Need to figure costs for Rivera exhibition before continuing negotiations for loans; Pach must supply further information. 1 p. + 2 pp. enclosure ("List of Rivera Paintings," June 3, 1943)

From Elias Lieberman, Associate Superintendent, Board of Education of the City of New York, Brooklyn, N.Y., June 7, 1943: Pach will be granted a "substitute license" to teach Spanish in the New York public schools. 1 p

From Raymond B. Humphrey, Director, Brown, Crosby & Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., June 18, 1943: Instructions for renewing war damage and fire insurance policies. 1 p

From James A. Porter, Washington, D.C., June 19, 1943: Thanks Pach for the "remarkable" introduction and subtitle suggestions for his book. 1 p.

to Maurice Block, Curator, Henry E. Huntington Art Gallery, San Marino, Calif., From Marjorie S. (Mrs. A.R.) Waybur, Kingsley Art Club, Sacramento, Calif.,June 20, 1943: Inquires about Pach's availability to lecture. 2 pp

From Ignacio Marquina, National Institute of Archaeology and History, Mexico City, Mexico., June 26, 1943: Gives Pach permission to export the 5 archaeological objects specified on the list attached. 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (copy of form completed by Pach), in Spanish

From Frederick Lewis Allen, -- Harper's -- Magazine, New York, N.Y., August 27, 1943: Rejects 2 articles, "The Negro's Place" and "Your Ancestors of the Soil." 2 pp

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.Mex., August 31, 1943: Is recovering From surgery; feeling better, but still unable to travel. 1 p

From Charles A. Thompson, Department of State, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1943: Dr. Moe will contact Pach about writing a book, in Spanish, about "art resources of the United States." 1 p

From Ernst E. Clad, New York, N.Y., September 9, 1943: Outlines Pach's finances; advises specific investments. 3 pp. + 1 p. enclosure (copy of September 9, 1943 letter From Walter Pach to H.C. Wainwright & Co. authorizing sale of stocks)

From Laurence Duggan, Adviser on Political Relations, Department of State, Washington, D.C., September 17, 1943: Cannot assist with funding or promise to purchase his book; Dr. Moe is attempting to finance the project; "I think the preparation of the book would be a far more useful contribution to inter-American understanding than your acting as an unofficial Mexican cultural representative in the United States." 1 p

From René d'Harnoncourt, United States Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Washington, D.C., September 29, 1943: Read "Ancestors of the Soil" and was "impressed by the strength and depth of its argument"; "widest dissemination of this theme could be one of the strongest factors in building up Inter-American relations." 1 p

From Charles A. Thompson, Department of State, Washington, D.C. October 4, 1943: Is returning "Ancestors of the Soil"; "Mr. d'Harnoncourt expresses great interest." 1 p

From Eugenio de Anzorena, Secretary, Mexican Embassy, Washington, D.C., October 7, 1943: Brought Pach's letter to the attention of the minister; returns the enclosures. 1 p. + enclosures (letter, June 9, 1943, to Ezequiel Padella, Secretary of Exterior Relations, From Iñes Amor, Francesco Orozco Muñoz, Eduardo Villaseñor, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Alfonso Noriega Jr., and Octavio G. Barreda, Mexico: endorses Pach as a representative of Mexican culture, 5 pp., in Spanish; and letter, June 28, 1943, to Iñes Amor, Francesco Orozco Muñoz, Eduardo Villaseñor, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Alfonso Noriega Jr., and Octavio G. Barreda, From Ezequiel Padella, Mexico: recommendation of Pach, 1 p., in Spanish)

To Springmeier Shipping Co from J.O. Ellis, New York, N.Y., October 14, 1943: Notification of claim for items missing From shipment of Pach's possessions. 2 pp

From Houston Peterson, Head, Division of Social Philosophy, Cooper Union, New York, N.Y., October 15, 1943: Pach is "definitely on our list of favored speakers" for the second semester. 1 p. + enclosure (brochure for "Cooper Union Forum, first half 1943-1944")

From John Sloan, Santa Fe, N.Mex., December 30, 1943: Went out to his old house, "Sinagua," which reminds him of Dolly; still recuperating From surgery; needs to clean up his Chelsea studio; it is unlikely he can get to New York; read Pach's article on the "Eight"; the name was invented by an Evening Sun writer; "the 'chosen' of Robert Henri we were, not at all a mutual admiration group as I recall the time." 3 pp

From Art Young, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] December 30, 1943: New Year's greetings. Picture postcard ("28th Issue--Art Young's Annual Hello")

From Donald Carlisle Greason, Deerfield, Mass., April 8, 1944: The enclosed letter was sent in a "weak moment"; "is it not time you took up the mightier sword again; or have your ideas changed?" 1 p. + 1 p. enclosure (letter, April 6, 1944, to Hugo Gellert and Gentlemen of the [Exhibition and Competition] Committee, Artists for Victory, Inc., From Donald Carlisle Greason, Deerfield, Mass.: declines invitation to participate in the Artists for Victory exhibition; "I shyly deplore this undignified business of artists thumbing rides of the troop trains, of Patriotism for Publicity--and prizes!"; "did not Pach write the obituary of this [prizes] in his Ananias?")

From Henry Watson Kent, New York, N.Y., November 30, 1944: Hopes his notes on Pach's manuscript will be of use and interest. 1 p. + 7 pp. enclosure (notes, comments, and suggestions relating to Pach's manuscript)

From Ernst E. Clad, New York, N.Y., December 11, 1944: Information about Pach's 1944 taxes. 1 p. + enclosures (completed "Form for Computing Capital Gains and Losses," 1 p., and printed instructions, 5 pp.)

From George Ferdinand Of, [place unknown] Read both of Pach's articles and is returning one; "you must take me to see that charming Miss Roger's paintings."

From George Ferdinand Of, [place unknown], December 28, 1944: Read both of Pach's articles and is returning one; "you must take me to see that charming Miss Roger's paintings." Picture postcard ("'Chapeau de Faille' by Rubens")

From Donald Carlisle Greason, Deerfield, Mass., February 9, 1945: "I thought my annual letter of 'regrets' to the 'Artists for Defeat' might amuse you"; quotes remarks by Sinclair Lewis made when declining the Pulitzer Prize. 1 p

From Rufus E. Clement, Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga., April 11, 1945: Sends photographs taken at the "art show"; mentions recent reviews of their exhibition. 1 p. + 2 photographs (Pach viewing the exhibition, and Pach speaking in the gallery)

From Viking Press, New York, N.Y., April 30, 1945: Royalty statement for Masters of Modern Art. 1 p

From Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, N.Y., June 30, 1945: Royalty statement for Ingres and -- Queer Thing, Painting -- . 1 p

From Jacques Lipchitz, Paris, France, July 31, 1945: [Illegible due to show-through]. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, November 29, 1945: May continue work begun several years earlier on "Aesthetics and History"; working on "Decline and Recovery in the Figure Arts"; when in "hiding" he kept a diary, which he may publish. 2 pp

From Fred M. Stein and Arthur Strasser, Trustees of the Schilling Fund, New York, N.Y., February 8, 1946: Thank Pach for his work on behalf of the Schilling Fund; offer him a salary to continue as an adviser. 1 p., with annotation by Pach (on reverse), February 10, 1946, draft letter of acceptance, 1 p

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., June 23, 1946: Eleanor's leg had to be amputated; they will move to an apartment in New York in October. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Westport, Conn., August 26, 1946: "Eleanor's condition has taken a serious turn for the worse, and I fear it is only a question now of a very few weeks." 1 p

From Jacques Lipchitz, Paris, France, November 19, 1946: New York trip was postponed; describes a wonderful exhibit at Delacroix's studio; occasionally sees Jacques Villon, who has a painting in the Salon d'Automne. 2 pp., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, January 10, 1947: Pach's son and daughter-in-law visited him; publishers are not interested in his diary; Aesthetics and History will have to go to a university press. 2 pp

From Irma L. Richter, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1947: Is returning Pach's copy of ABC on Painting by Severini; "I wonder whether you have tried to follow his advice regarding technique." 1 p

From James Daugherty, Westport, Conn. [postmarked, March April 22, 1947]: Saw Pach's exhibition at Laurel Gallery; "your work has grown simpler and broader and more unified." 1 p

From Octavio G. Barreda, [place unknown], Mexico, October 9, 1947: Thought of Pach when visiting galleries in Italy and Paris; Paris, Rome, and Florence seem to have recovered From the war, but it wasn't the same without the old faces; in both art and literature it is the end of an era; young artists and writers do not know their message; family news; will visit New York and Havana. 4 pp., in Spanish

From Kurt Wolff, Pantheon Books, New York, N.Y., November 5, 1947: Asks Pach to accept all changes made by the editor. 1 p

From Kurt Wolff, Pantheon Books, New York, N.Y., December 4, 1947: Needs to clarify certain points; Pach must bear the cost of retyping. 1 p

From Kurt Wolff, Pantheon Books, New York, N.Y., January 29, 1948: The final pages of his manuscript must be condensed. 1 p.

To Kurt Wolff From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y., January 30, 1948: They never discussed, nor did he authorize, changes to the final pages of his book. 1 p

From Henry Watson Kent, New York, N.Y., February 21, 1948: Remarks on Pach's complimentary statement about him. 1 p

From Margarita Nelkin, Paris, France, September 1, 1948: Has heard From Pach through letters to Mlle. Burchardt; thanks Pach for supporting Spanish Republicans; is going to Rome for the Congres Interparlementaire and then to Brussels and Amsterdam to give a conference on Mexican art; in November she will leave for Mexico. 1 p., in French

From George Ferdinand Of, New York, N.Y., September 5, 1948: Thanks Pach for bringing pictures of his collection and explaining it personally; Pach has "persuaded" him to paint again. 3 pp

From Francis Hackett, Bethel, Conn., November 8, 1948: Pach is one of the "Old Guard"; his book, -- American Rainbow -- , will include "a lot in it about John Quinn"; his wife recently published a volume on Swedenborg. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Cornwell, Conn., December 2, 1948: Thanks for the inscribed copy of his "enchanting" new book; glad Pach met Francis Hackett. 3 pp

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., February 1, 1949: Royalty statement. 1 p

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., July 1, 1949: Royalty statement. 1 p

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., August 1, 1949: Royalty statement for The Art Museum in America. 1 p

From Anne Chase (Mrs. Arthur White) Sullivan, Glen Head, N.Y., November 3, 1949: Pach's lecture was "just right as a preliminary to the exhibition"; her father would have approved. 2 pp

From Mary Socard, Paris, France, December 13, 1949: Pach's young friend is making good progress learning French; discusses the student's appreciation of art and philosophy. 4 pp., in French

From Jimmy Stern, New York, N.Y., December 23, 1949: Even with "favorable 'press'," his book has not sold well; is "discouraged"; appreciated Pach's note. 1 p

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., February 1, 1950: Royalty statement. 1 p

From François Puaux, Acting Consul General of France, New York, N.Y., March 7, 1950: Congratulates Pach on being awarded the cross of Chevalier of the Legion of Honor "for the services you have always rendered to the French cause." 1 p

to John Collier From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y., March 11, 1950: Hopes Professor Collier will want the thoughts expressed in Pach's manuscript "given to a wider audience." 1 p., annotated with reply, May 30, 1950: "This has been good reading for me!"

From Meyer Schapiro, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] March 27, 1950: "Comments on the first draft of W. P., Renoir." 3 pp

to Meyer Schapiro From Walter Pach, New York, N.Y., March 27, 1950: Responses to "Comments on the first draft of W.P., Renoir." 4 pp. draft + 4 pp. final copy

From Charles E. Slatkin, Art Book Guild of America, Inc., New York, N.Y., March 28, 1950: Invites Pach to become a member of the Art Book Guild's Advisory Board. 1 p

From Charles E. Slatkin, Art Book Guild of America, Inc., New York, N.Y., April 17, 1950: Acknowledges Pach's acceptance of appointment to the Advisory Board. 1 p

From Atlantic Monthly Company, Boston, Mass., April 20, 1950: "Assignment of Copyright" to Atlantic Monthly Corporation of Pach's article, "Art Must Be Modern." 1 p

From W.G. Constable, Department of Paintings, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., May 30, 1950: Thanks Pach for assistance in securing the Portrait of Madame Villchelis for the museum; agrees that attribution to Gros is most likely; reports the death of Ned Holmes. 2 pp

From Mary Socard, Paris, France, June 20, 1950: The young student has left; he would have benefited From a longer stay but at least had an introduction to European culture; sympathizes with Pach's disappointment over having his prologue replaced by an analysis of painting construction. 3 pp., in French

From Pantheon Books, Inc., New York, N.Y., August 1, 1950: Royalty statement for -- The Art Museum in America -- . 2 pp

From Nanny (Mrs. Sigmund) Pollitzer, New York, N.Y., November 8, 1950: Sorry to learn of Magda's illness. 2 pp

From Nanny (Mrs. Sigmund) Pollitzer, New York, N.Y., November 11, 1950: Extends her sympathy; will try to attend the service. 2 pp

From Eufrosia A.W. Tucker, New York, N.Y., November 11, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 2 pp

From Sarah d'Harnoncourt, New York, N.Y., November 13, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p

From Edith R. Abbot, New York, N.Y., November 13, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 2 pp

From Fanny and Ralph Ellison, New York, N.Y., November 14, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p

From Robert L. Duffus, Westport, Conn., November 15, 1950: Sympathy on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p

From Roland Balay, New York, N.Y., November 20, 1950: Offers condolences on the death of Mrs. Pach. 1 p., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, September 23, 1951: Congratulates Pach on his recent marriage. 2 pp

From Mutual Benefit Health and Accident Association, New York, N.Y., [postmarked] November 23, 1951: "Official Receipt for Premium Due." Postal card

From [signature illegible], Athens, Greece, December 24, 1951: Carouzos will select photographs of the subjects that interest Pach; wants to see photographs of Pach's latest paintings. 4 pp

From Jacques Lipchitz, New York, N.Y., January 12, 1952: Pach is right that endings offer new beginnings; predicts that Pach will resume work soon. 1 p., in French

From Rufino Tamayo, [place unknown], Mexico, January 22, 1952: Appreciates Pach's stimulating critique; expects to spend the next year on a mural for the Palace of Fine Arts; congratulates Pach on his marriage. 2 pp., in Spanish

From Bernard Berenson, Ischia, Italy, May 29, 1952: "My indignation over distorted, abstract, non-representational art is that it can lead nowhere." 2 pp

From George Ferdinand Of, [place unknown], June 19, 1952: The Schilling Fund award is an "honor" he wishes to decline without offending anyone. Picture postcard ("Cézanne. 'Urtiel des Paris'")

From U.S. Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service, New York, N.Y., August 8, 1952: "Adjustment of tax liability" and audit for calendar year 1950. 1 p. + enclosures (1 p. "Statement of Income Tax Due," and 4 pp. report)

From Bernard Berenson, [place illegible], September 23, 1952: Agrees with most of Pach's letter to the New York Times; "feeling for art is of the few and understanding for even fewer." 2 pp

From André Masson, Aix-en-Provence, France, May 2, 1953: Was considering canceling his New York exhibit before receiving Pach's encouraging and kind letter; hopes they will meet. 1 p., in French

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, March 17, 1954: Comments on Pach's "poem to Greek art"; is working on a new edition of Italian Paintings; sends an article he wrote on Picasso. 2 pp

From George Ferdinand Of, Rome, Italy. Is in Rome; heading for Naples, [undated (prior to April 18, 1954)]: Picture postcard ("Roma-Foro Romano, veduto del Campidoglio")

From George Ferdinand Of, Padua, Italy, April 18, 1954: Saw Giottos; visited Ravenna, Naples, and Pompeii. Picture postcard ("Padova-Monumento al Generale Gattamelata")

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, April 25, 1954: He still does not accept the Metropolitan Museum's Madonna as an Antonello; "I remain an optimist" that culture will once again become "genial, creative and human." 2 pp

From Hendrik Willem van Loon, Riverside, Conn., [1955]: He is much better; they have a house near the water where friends are welcome. 1 p., in Dutch

From Bernard Berenson, Florence, Italy, April 21, 1955: "I agree with all you write about the present state of art appreciation"; read the book about Sloan by Van Wyck Brooks; not impressed by Sloan's work; wonders how much Pach influenced Brooks. 2 pp

From William Mills Ivins, Woodbury, Conn., July 17, 1955: Was disappointed to have missed a visit by Pach and Brooks; is living a solitary and quiet life. 2 pp

From Jacques Lipchitz, Beach Haven, N.J., August 7, 1955: After reading Pach's article, he wants to read the book; he no longer appreciates Maillol's sculpture; discusses Renoir's strong judgments of other artists; although Epstein has reached a dead end in Paris, he is a good artist. 3 pp., in French

From Jacques Lipchitz, Beach Haven, N.J., August 15, 1955: Thanks Pach for sending Epstein's book; considers Epstein a good portrait painter but not such a good sculptor; discusses his theory that Jews need to assert their identity. 1 p., in French

From Alfred Russell, Paris, France, September 27, 1955: Thanks Pach for the award; the modern Italian painters he once admired no longer interest him; he finds the sculptors a "revelation"; his exhibition drew "brutal and barbaric insults"; Paris is "the pivot of the universe." 2 pp

From Hendrik Willem van Loon, Riverside, Conn., October 17, [1955?]: "My sincere congratulations upon having finished these miles of paint." 1 p., with illustrated envelope (sailboats) + illustrated card (landscape with windmills)

From Carl Sandburg, Flat Rock, N.C., March 27, 1956: "Values" Pach's letter and plans to affix it to his copy of Faure's History of Art. 1 p

From Germain Seligman, New York, N.Y., April 15, 1957: Ingres's -- Study for the Iliad -- is in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Toronto. 1 p. + enclosures (2 pp. description of -- Study for the Iliad -- [Apotheosis of Homer], photograph of -- Study for the Iliad -- , and 2 pp. [photocopies] From Exposition Ingres catalog, 1921)

From Martin Baldwin, Director, Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, April 16, 1957: The gallery is conducting further research on Study for the Iliad; will share information when it becomes available. 1 p

From Lewis Mumford, Paris, France, April 27, 1957: Has reviewed his correspondence since 1920; Pach's letters are "real treasures" to be saved for historians; being in Paris made him recall Pach's "friendliness and hospitality in 1932"; has rediscovered Ingres now that his taste is mature. 2 pp

From Van Wyck Brooks, Bridgewater, Conn., January 4, 1958: Will study Howells' letters at the Harvard library; recommends novels by Howells. 2 pp

From Hans Christian, Rome, Italy, April 7, 1958: Is visiting Raymond and Ruth in Rome. Picture postcard ("Roma--Arco di Constantino"), in German
Collection Restrictions:
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Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Walter Pach papers, 1857-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pachwalt2, Series 2
See more items in:
Walter Pach papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-pachwalt2-ref33

Chronological Name and Subject Files

Collection Creator:
Hitchcock, Henry-Russell, 1903-1987  Search this
Extent:
21.9 Linear feet (Boxes 1-22)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1919-1987
Scope and Contents note:
Files consist of Henry-Russell Hitchcock's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to academic research, teaching, curatorial interests, and professional associations. Subject files are comprised mainly of correspondence and printed material, with a small number of photographs that mostly relate to exhibitions and writings. After 1932, copies of Hitchcock's outgoing letters are almost always included, making the files from 1932-1987 almost complete.

The correspondence includes large numbers of letters from prominent architectural historians, architects, artists, preservationists, museum directors and curators. Also included is correspondence with students, friends, relatives, publishers, and representatives of organizations and institutions.

Among the correspondents of note are: Bernard Berenson, Eugene Berman, Leonid Berman, Lyonel Feininger, Brendan Gill, Robert Goldwater, George Howe, Lincoln Kirstein, J. J. P. Oud, Erwin Panofsky, Kingsley Porter, Paul J. Sachs, R. M. Schindler, Theodore Sizer, E. Baldwin Smith, Peter van der Meulen Smith, James Soby, Victor Spark, Harold Sterner, John Summerson, Virgil Thomson, Paul Vanderbilt, Theo Van Doesburg, Helmut von Erffa, and Gordon Washburn. Other important correspondents represented in a decade or more of correspondence include: Jere Abbott, Winslow Ames, Everett A. (Chick) Austin, Alfred H. Barr, Agnes Rindge Claflin, John Coddington, Walter Cook, John Coolidge, Henry (Harry) Sayles Francis, George Heard Hamilton, Ada Louise Huxtable, Philip C. Johnson, William Jordy, George N. Kates, Edgar Kauffmann, Jr., Richard Krautheimer, Phyllis W. Lehmann, Thomas J. McCormick, Agnes Mongan, Lewis Mumford, Nikolaus Pevsner, A. Kinglsey Porter, Willebald Sauerlander, Vincent Scully, Helen Searing, James Thrall Soby, Dorothy Stroud, John Summerson, Virgil Thomson, Emily Tremaine, Paul Vanderbilt, Rudolph Wittkower, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

See Appendix for a list of individuals, organizations, and subjects in Series 2
Arrangement note:
Files are arranged with a single alphabet for each year.
Appendix: Individuals, Organizations, and Subjects in Series 2:
Below is an index to individuals, institutions, organizations, and a small number of subject files, found in Series 2: Alphabetical Files. The index indicates the name and the alphabet year(s) in which each can be found.

Hitchcock did not follow strict alphabetical schema when organizing his files and filing eccentricities for the letters D, M, N, and V are explained below. The original arrangement has been left in place due to the difficulties and time involved in re-arranging the material within multiple alphabets.

Note on filing order for D's: Names beginning with the prefix "de" (e.g. De Cordova) are all filed before names beginning with the letters "de" e.g. Deerfield Academy.

Note on filing order for M's: Names beginning with the prefix "Mac" and "Mc" are all filed after names beginning with Ma. They are interfiled according to the first and subsequent letters following the prefix e.g. McIntyre, Mackay, McKean, MacLaren.

Note on filing order for N's: Proper names beginning with the word "new" (e.g. New American Library) are all filed before names incorporating the syllable "new" e.g. Newark Public Library.

Note on filing order for V's: Names beginning with the prefix "van" (e.g. Van Derpool) are all filed before names beginning with the syllable "van" e.g. Vancouver Hotel.

Aaron, Dan (1967)

Abbott, Etheldred (1946)

Abbott, Jere (1927, 1928, 1945-1947, 1949-1950, 1952-1955, 1958, 1968, 1982-1984, undated)

Abby, Elwina (1928)

Abraham, C. P. (1946)

Abrams, Al (1979)

Abrams, Inc. (1969, 1977-1978)

Abrams, Robert (1976)

Abramson, Louis Allen (1948, 1949)

Academy of Political Science (1952)

Achilles, Mrs. Theodore (1955)

Ackerman, James S. (1948, 1952-1955, 1960, 1964, 1966)

Ackworth, Angus (1945)

Adams, Anthony (1960)

Adams, Florence B. (1948)

Adams, Frances S. (1965)

Adams, Frederick (1949)

Adams, Henry (1974)

Adams, Nicholas (1976-1978)

Adams, Philip R. (1952)

Addis, Reid M. (1974-1975)

Addison Gallery of American Art (1953-1954)

Addison, John (1982, 1984)

Adler, David (1928)

Agtmaal, J. G. van (1958)

African Studies, International Congress of (1978)

Ahda Artzt Gallery (1964)

Air Ministry (1946)

Aitken, Dott and Son (1946-1947)

Akron (1948)

Alabama Polytechnic Institute (1955)

Aladdin Office Services (1957)

Albany Institute of History and Art (1966, 1969)

Albers, Joseph (1946)

Albrecht, Otto (1927)

Albright Art Gallery (1947)

Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1962)

Aldrich, Frances T. (1948)

Alexander, Robert L. (1951, 1956-1958, 1960-1961, 1963-1965, 1967-1968, 1975-1977, 1986)

Alexander, Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Allen (1958)

Alexander, William (1968)

Alfa (1958)

Alfieri, Bruno (1959, 1964-1965, 1968-1969)

Alfonsin, Anthony (1983)

Alford, John (1946, 1955)

Alford, Roberta (1961)

Alinari (1958)

Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Eliot D. (1953)

Allen, F. P. (1961)

Allen, W.G. Russell (1945, 1947, 1952-1953, 1956)

Allen and Unvin, Ltd. (1978, 1980)

Allert de Lange, C. V. (1956)

Allison, George E. (1948)

Allstate Insurance (1948)

Altree, Guy (1975)

Altschul, Frank (1952)

Alumnae Association [Smith College] (1952) ( -- see also -- : Smith College Alumnae Association)

Ambassadeurs Club (1946)

America-Italy Society (1958)

American Academy in Rome (1950, 1958-1959, 1983)

American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1953-1954, 1957-1958, 1961-1963, 1965, 1970, 1973, 1976, 1981)

American Antiquarian Society (1935, 1939, 1947, 1952, 1955)

American Architectural Books (1937, 1945, 1961)

American Association for State and Local History (1963)

American Association of Architectural Bibliographers (1958-1959, 1961, 1963-1964, 1966, 1970)

American Association of Museums (1952, 1955, 1962)

American Association of Schools of Architecture (1982)

American Association of University Professors (1948, 1981-1982)

American Association of University Women (1948, 1958)

American Automobile Association (1962)

American Collector -- (1947)

American Committee on Renaissance Studies (1954)

American Council of Learned Societies (1950, 1961, 1963, 1980)

American Embassy, London (1962)

American Express (1952, 1955)

American Federation of Arts (1942, 1947-1948, 1952, 1955, 1958, 1962, 1974)

American Friends Service Committee (1951)

American Historical Association (1942)

American Historical Review -- (1943, 1952)

American Institute of Architects (1942, 1945, 1948, 1950, 1952-1955, 1957, 1959, 1961-1962, 1964, 1969-1970, 1972-1973, 1978, 1980)

American Institute of Planners (1945)

American Life Foundation (1972)

American Museum in Britain (1961)

American National Theatre and Academy (1952)

American Peoples Encyclopedia -- (1953)

American Philosophical Society (1943)

American Quarterly -- (1949, 1952-1953, 1955)

American Science and History Preservation Society (1981)

American Scholar -- (1948, 1982)

American Society of Architectural Historians (1945-1947)

American Society of Planners and Architects (1946)

American State Capitols Research Project, Victorian Society in America ( -- see -- : Victorian Society in America, American State Capitols Research Project)

American Studies Association (1976)

American Unitarian Association (1941)

Amery, Colin (1982)

Ames, Eleanor D. (1968)

Ames, Winslow (1942, 1945-1947, 1950-1957, 1965, 1967-1968, 1970, 1976, 1978-1979, 1981)

Ames, Winslow and Anna (1973)

Amherst College (1967)

Amsterdam (1963)

Amulree, Basil (1946-1947, 1952)

Ancient Monuments Society (1957)

Anderson (1951)

Anderson and Castle, Ltd. (1959)

Anderson, Arthur J. (1955)

Anderson, P. G. (1946, 1955, 1958)

Anderson, Paul R. (1946)

Anderson Photographers (1952)

Anderson, Stanford (1979)

Andrews, Edward (1959)

Andrews, George F. (1959-1960)

Andrews, Wayne (1945, 1947, 1956, 1958, 1961-1964, 1968-1970, 1982)

Annan and Sons (1936, 1954, 1956, 1958)

Anson, Peter F. (1953, 1955)

Antheil Booksellers (1969)

Antiques (1981)

Antunes, Paulo (1958)

Appalachian Mountain Club (1946)

Appel, R. G. (1965)

Appleman, Philip (1957)

Appleton, William Sumner (1946)

Arango, Jorge (1955)

Archaeological Institute of America (1928, 1950, 1952-1955)

Archaeology -- (1952)

Archer, John (1964, 1976)

Architect and Building News -- (1949)

Architects Discussion Group (1966)

Architects for Peace (1982)

Architects Journal -- (1956)

Architects Yearbook -- (1946, 1955-1956)

Architectura -- (1969, 1971-1972)

Architectural Association (1946, 1956, 1962)

Architectural Design -- (1951, 1956-1957, 1967, 1978)

Architectural Digest -- (1980)

Architectural Forum -- (1945, 1954-1955, 1957, 1964, 1966-1969)

Architectural Heritage -- (1968)

Architectural History -- (1966)

Architectural History Association, Inc. (1976)

Architectural History Foundation, Inc. (1978-1987)

Architectural League of New York (1950, 1962, 1974-1975)

Architectural Press (1945-1951, 1954-1958, 1964, 1968, 1982)

Architectural Quarterly -- (1968)

Architectural Record -- (1928, 1936, 1937, 1946, 1948, 1950-1952, 1954-1959, 1963, 1966, 1969, 1976, undated)

Architectural Review -- (1927, 1945-1969, 1977, 1982-1983)

Architecture and Building (1959-1960)

Architecture Association (1950-1951, 1955, 1959)

Architecture Club (1952, 1956, 1958-1959, 1965)

Architecture Collaborative (1957)

Architecture: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries -- (Pelican History of Art series) (1962-1968)

The Architecture of H. H. Richardson and His Times -- [reprint] (1961-1962)

Architecture Plus -- (1974)

Architektoniki -- (1959)

Archives Centrales Iconographiques d'Art National (1958)

Archives Centrales Photographiques (1956)

Archives of American Art (1960-1961)

Archon Books (1967, 1979)

Arcschavir, A. (1959)

Arizona State University (1960, 1962, 1969)

ARK (1955-1956)

Arkitektens Forlag (1962)

Arlington, Margaret (1962)

Armitage, Mrs. G. W. (1951)

Armitage, Merle (1956)

Armour, John (1954)

Arnasson, H. Harvard (1956)

Arnold, Frederic K. (1948, 1955)

Arnot Art Gallery Association (1958-1959)

Art and Technics -- (1950-1951)

Art Association of Indianapolis (1947)

Art Bulletin -- (1940-1941, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1950-1951, 1953, 1955-1961, 1966- 1967, 1969)

Art Gallery of Ontario (1970)

Art Gallery of Toronto (1950) (see also: Toronto, Art Gallery of)

Arthur, Eric (1956)

Artigas, Francisco (1955)

Art in America -- (1947, 1955-1960)

Art Institute of Chicago (1951, 1956, 1978, 1983) (see also: Burnham Library;

Chicago, Art Institute of; Ryerson and Burnham Libraries)

Art Journal -- (1977)

Art News -- (1948, 1953-1955, 1959, 1967)

Art Nouveau Exhibition (1960)

Art Quarterly -- (1953-1971)

Art Reference Bureau (1958, 1967, 1970-1971)

Arts -- (1928, 1963)

Arts and Architecture -- (1956)

Arts Club of Chicago ( -- see -- : Chicago, Arts Club of)

Arts Council of Great Britain (1955-1956, 1968)

Arts Review -- (1962)

Asam Brothers (1965)

Ash, Carla Caccamise (1978)

Ashton, Leigh (1953)

Asia (1928)

Askew, Constance (1945, 1947, undated)

Askew, Constance and R. Kirk (1941, 1948, 1961)

Askew, Pamela (1977)

Askew, R. Kirk (1950-1952, 1963)

Aslin, Elizabeth (1956, 1958, 1960, 1962-1964, 1968-1970, 1972-1974, 1979-1981, 1984-1985)

Association of Art Museum Directors (1952)

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (1949, 1954)

Atelier -- (1951)

Athenaeum of Philadelphia (1969-1970, 1977-1978, 1980-1981, 1983, 1985)

Atkin, William Wilson (1958)

Atkinson, Fello (1950-1959, 1961-1967, 1969, 1971-1973, 1977-1978, 1980, 1982)

Atkinson, G. A. (1961, 1969)

Atkinson, George (1955)

Atomic Energy Commission of Canada ( -- see -- : Canada, Atomic Energy Commission of)

Auden, W. H. (1952-1953)

Aufsberg, Lala (1958, 1965-1967, 1971-1972)

Aurora Zanichelli (1955)

Austin, A. Everett [Chick] (1953, 1957, 1984)

Austin, A. Everett [Chick] and Helen (1952)

Austin Art Center (1965) ( -- see also -- : Trinity College)

Austin, David (1966)

Austin, Helen (1948, 1950, 1956, 1958, 1960, 1965-1968, 1970, 1973, 1986, undated)

Austin, Mollie (1961)

Austin, Sarah G. (1979)

Australian Journal of Art (1978)

Authors Club (1962)

Auzas, Pierre-Marie (1965-1967, 1979-1980)

Avenue -- (1985)

Avery, Elizabeth P. (l950)

Avery Library, Columbia University (1951, 1973-1974, 1977, 1981) (see also: Columbia University)

Avery, Peter (1965)

Avery Study Center, Columbia University (1982) ( -- see also -- : Columbia University)

Avis Rent-a-Car (1961)

Azelle, Robert (1955)

"B. 1955" (2 pocket calendars) (1955)

Bacon, Leonard Lee (1970)

Bacon, Mardges (1984)

Baga, Khalid (1979)

Baggage Declaration (1945)

Bailey, James and Gordon, Inc. (1957-1962, 1964)

Bailey's Studio (1946)

Baker (1957)

Baker, Joseph (1960)

Baker, Roger (1953)

Bakewell, Hester Adams (1970)

Baldinger, Wallace S. (1949)

Baldwin, Deborah (1985)

Baldwin, Raymond E. (1945)

Baldwin, Susan (1976)

Ball, Mr. and Mrs. William Burnham (undated)

Ballard, Mary (1974)

Ballman, Lucille (1949)

Balmoral Castle (1952, 1954)

Baltimore City Museum (1952) (see also: Peale Museum)

Baltimore Museum of Art (1948)

Baltimore Sun -- (1968) ( -- see also -- : Sun) (1968)

Banham, Reyner (Peter) (1956, 1959, 1961-1962, 1972-1973)

Banham, Reyner (Peter) and Mary (1958)

Banker, Douglas (1977)

Banking (1965-1966, 1970-1971)

Bannister, Turpin C. (1941, 1943-1945, 1947, 1950-1952, 1954-1956, 1958, undated)

Bantam Books (1962)

Bar, D. D. (1969)

Barbarosa, Jorge de Castro (1957)

Barber, Leila (1966)

Barclay, Jo (1953)

Barclay's Bank (1945-1948, 1950, 1952-1955, 1957-1958, 1960-1961, 1972)

Bardwell, Helen H. (1955)

Barley, M. W. (1952)

Barman, Christian (1951)

Barnard College (1954-1957, 1965)

Barnes, Anthony (1952)

Barnes, Charles D. (1968)

Barnes, Cynthia (1962)

Barnes, Henry (1952)

Barnlund, Mr. and Mrs. D. C. (1949)

Barnstone, Howard (1953, 1958, 1960-1961)

Baron, Docteur Lucien (1927)

Barr, Alfred H. (1928, 1930-1932, 1937, 1945, 1954, 1973, 1981, undated)

Barr, Marga (Daisy) (1957, 1959, 1961, 1978, 1983, 1985, undated)

Barrall, Xavier (1976)

Barrand, H. (1955)

Barrett, John (1956)

Barsee, L. (1976)

Barton, Eleanor (1949, 1955-1956, 1959, 1965)

Baskin, Leonard and Lisa (1969)

Batsford, Ltd. (1941, 1948-1953, 1955-1957)

Battle, Governor (1955)

Bauch, K. (1966)

Bauer, A. (1928)

Bauer, Catherine (1940)

Bauhaus Archiv (1963)

Baumann, Christopher (1946)

Baume, Henry B. (1956-1957)

Bayer, Adolf (1963)

Bayer, Herbert (1954)

Bayer, Julia (1945, 1952)

Bayley, J. B. (1946, 1952)

Bayley, John (1953)

Bayley, Stephen (1974)

Beardall Fenton and Co. (1969)

Beatty, C. J. P. (1962)

Beck, Andy (1976)

Beck, Haig (1979)

Beckwith (1964)

Bedenkapp, John (1952-1956, 1959)

Beeton, M. (1946)

Beggs, Thomas (1946)

Belding, Ann (1950-1951)

Bell, Herbert C. F. (1946, 1948-1949, 1957-1958)

Bell, Janet M. (1952)

Bellotto (1960)

Belluschi (1954-1956)

Beloit College (1945)

Belz, Carl (1972)

Benda, E. (1931)

Bender, Angela (1966)

Bendixson, T.M.P. (1961)

Benero, Herbert W. (1955)

Benes, Miroslava (1975)

Benesch, Otto (1946, 1956)

Benesch, Otto and Eva (1947, 1959)

Bennett, Gordon C. (1946)

Bennett Books (1950)

Bennett, Richard M. (1939)

Bennett, Mrs. Roger Williams (1962)

Bennington College (1953, 1957)

Benson, Elizabeth (1962)

Benson, John Howard (1952-1954)

Benson, Robert Alan (1968)

Benton, Charlotte (1978)

Benton, Tim (1974)

Berenson, Bernard (1931)

Bergdoll, Barry (1979-1982, 1984)

Berger, Maurice (1978)

Bergeron, Claude (1967)

Berlin (1956, 1964, 1975)

Berlin, Technische Universitat (1966)

Berman, Eugene (Genya) (1931-1932, 1945, 1969)

Berman, Leonide (1931, undated)

Bermudez, Luis (1955)

Bernett, Dick (1950)

Bernett, F. A. (1959, 1963-1965, 1968)

Bernett, Frederick (1961)

Bernett, P. A. (1967)

Bernier, Rosamond (1955)

Berrill, Maurice (1958, 1958)

Berry-Hill Galleries (1971, 1981)

Betjeman, John (1946, 1952, 1956)

Bett, Regina (1966-1967)

Bevan, Roger (1978)

Beyer, Klaus G. (1970-1971)

Bialostocki, Jan (1968, 1970-1971, 1973, 1985)

Bicknell, Minnette (1975)

Bicknell, Peter (1965)

Biederman, Charles (1978)

Bielfeld Kunsthalle (1968-1970, 1973-1975, 1985) ( -- see also -- : Kunsthalle Bielfeld)

Biennale (1959-1960)

Bier, Julius (1953)

Bildarchiv -- (1956)

Billcliff, Roger (1971)

Bills, Paid (1965-1970)

Binet, Ann (1955)

Birkhams, Martin (1960)

Birmingham Public Library (1946)

Birrell, J. P. (1963)

Birthday (1978, 1980, 1983, 1985)

Bischoff, Ralph F. (1946)

Bissell, Elaine (1951)

Bixley, Grace (1954)

Blach, Peter (1939)

Blackheath Society (1955)

Blackman, Audrey (1962-1963)

Blake, Sarah (1966)

Blanch, M. (1958)

Blanckenhagen, Peter H. von (1979)

Blau, Eve M. (1978-1984)

Bletter, Rosemarie (1981-1982)

Bliss, Eleanor (1945, 1947-1953, 1959-1960, 1963, 1967, 1972, 1974-1975, 1978, 1981, undated)

Bliss, Robert (1963)

Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woods (1958)

Bloch, Stella Rubenstein (undated)

Blond, Anthony (1962)

Bloom, Florence and William (1964-1965)

Blue Cross/Blue Shield (1963, 1982, 1985) ( -- see also -- : Medicare/Blue Shield)

Blume, Marcia (1960-1961)

Blunt, Anthony (1946)

Blyth, R. Henderson (1947-1948)

Boardman, Jane Carrott (1969)

Boas, George (1954)

Boase, T.S.R. (1957)

Bobbs Merrill Co. (1966, 1968, 1971)

Bober, Harry (1955, 1957)

Bodine, Thomas R. (1973)

Boggs, Jean (1952, 1957, 1960, 1962)

Bohan, Peter J. (1957, 1963)

Bohdan, Carol (1971)

Boissonnas (1927)

Bollingen Foundation, Inc. (1956, 1960)

Bolschwig, Otto A. (1927) ( -- see also -- : Van Bolschwig, Otto A.)

Bolton and Fairhead, Ltd. (1946-1947)

Bond van Nederlandsche Architecten (1956)

Bonet Gari, Luis (1972-1973)

Bonn (1963-1964)

Bony, Jean (1956)

Bonython, John (1966)

Book Land (1963)

Boothby, Norman B. (1952)

Booziotis, Bill (1959)

Borgenecht Gallery (1961)

Borges, Max (1956)

Born, Ernest (1952)

Bornecque, Jacques-Henry (1955)

Borowski and Co. (1970)

Boschma, C. (1963)

Bose, Konrad (1953-1954)

Boston Albany Railroad (1963)

Boston Architecture Center (1949, 1966)

Boston Arts Festival (1954)

Boston Athenaeum (1950-1951)

Boston College (1975)

Boston, Municipal Court of (1966)

Boston, Museum of Fine Arts (1945, 1947-1950, 1967, 1969, 1975, 1982) ( -- see also -- : Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Boston Public Library (1955)

Boston Redevelopment Authority (1964, 1967)

Boston Society of Independent Artists (1950)

Boston University (1954, 1963, 1968)

Botz, H. (1969)

Bourgeois, Victor (1953)

Boutmy, P. de (1956)

Bouton, Margaret (1949)

Bouverie, David Pleydell (1945, 1950, 1952-1953, 1955, 1965, 1972-1973, 1975) ( -- see also -- : Pleydell-Bouverie, David)

Bowdin College (1973-1974)

Bowen, Carroll G. (1960)

Bowler, Fairchild (1955)

Boyd, Robin (1966)

Boyden, Mary (1952)

Boyer, Christine (1983)

Boyle, Michael (1970)

Brackett, Jeffrey R. (1935)

Bradley, John (1957)

Bradley, Prentice (1954)

Bramm, Vincent (1974)

Brandeis University (1961)

Brandl, Ernest H. (1946-1947, 1959-1961)

Brandon, Harvey (1970, 1981)

Brandon-Jones, John (1955-1956, 1960)

Branner, Robert (1964-1966)

Brasher, Louise Tharaud (1979)

Braxton, Anne (1968)

Brazil (1957)

Braziller, George (1959-1961, 1966, 1972)

Brena, Francisco (Paco) (1982-1983)

Brendel, Otto J. (1950)

Brentano Books (1941, 1946)

Brett, Lionel (1953, 1955)

Bretter, Ernest (1955)

Brewer, Charles (1961)

Brewer, Gussie (1946)

Brewer, Helen (1959)

Brewer, Joseph (1928, 1935-1938, 1940-1941, 1944-1961, 1964, 1967, 1969, 1971-1973, 1984)

Brewer, Warren and Putnam, Inc. (1932)

Brewster, E. W. (1946)

Brewster, Margaret F. (1946)

Briggs, Rose T. (1947, 1949-1954, 1963-1964, 1973, 1978, 1981)

Bright, William E. (1959)

Brighton Corp. (1958)

Brion-Guerry, L. (1971)

Bristol Society of Architects (1951)

Bristol, University of (1963, 1965-1967)

Britannica Encyclopedia (1953) ( -- see also -- : -- Encyclopedia Britannica -- )

British Book Center (1951-1952)

British Broadcasting Corporation (1955, 1969, 1974-1975)

British Committee for the Interchange of Teachers (1951-1952, 1955)

British Council (1960)

British Council in the Netherlands (1952)

British Information Services (1945, 1951)

British Ministry of War Transport (1945, undated)

British Museum (1950)

Britton, Coby (1972)

Broadfoot, Winston (1976-1977)

Brockhaus Fine Arts (1974)

Brocklebank, Mr. and Mrs. Charles (1986)

Brocklebank, Marcia Early (Mrs. Charles) (1966, 1973, 1977-1978)

Brockunier, S. H. (1952)

Broderick, Mosette Glaser (1974-1977, 1979-1981, 1985-1986)

Brodrick, Peter (1949-1957, undated)

Brokaw, Chloe (1961)

Brooklyn Museum (1945, 1963, 1967, 1977)

Brooks, H. Allen (1953, 1956, 1958-1983)

Brotz, Howard (1963-1964, 1966, 1979)

Brown, Betty (1960)

Brown, Charles H. (1958, 1962)

Brown, Donald H. (1955-1956)

Brown, Eric (1949)

Brown, Blanche (1972)

Brown, Elizabeth Miles (1977)

Brown, Mrs. Leonard M. (1967)

Brown, Margaret (1949, 1951)

Brown, Milton W. (1957, 1976)

Brown, Robert (1970, 1974-1975)

Brown, Theodore (1956)

Brown University (1982)

Brown, William E. (1955)

Browne, Mrs. Douglas (1952)

Brownstone Revival Committee of New York City (1969-1970)

Bruccoli, Matthew (1965)

Brun, Jean-Pierre (1973)

Brunet, Peirre (1956)

Brunner, Bob (1962)

Brussels (1972)

Bryan, John Albury (1970)

Bryan, Polly (1959)

Bryant, Helen P. (1962)

Bryn Mawr College (1973-1974)

Bucarelli, Palma (1965)

Bucher, Francois (1960)

Buchholz Gallery (1948)

Buchman, Joan (1968)

Buck, Robert L. (1982)

Buckley, Charles E. (1964, 1971)

Buckman, Louise (1950)

Buddensieg, Tilmann (1978)

Buell, Irwin A. (1948)

Buffalo Academy of Fine Arts (1939, 1982)

Buffalo Architectural Guidebook (1979, 1981-1982)

Building Design (1974)

Building Magazine (1951)

Built in the U.S.A. (1952)

Bull, Harry (1946)

Bulloch, O. M. (1956)

Bulloche, J. E. (1955)

Bullock (1978)

Bulloz (1958)

Bunce, John (1954)

Bunce, Nellie (1955, 1959, 1968, 1973, 1979-1980, 1986)

Bunschaft, Gordon (1956)

Bunting, Bainbridge (1967)

Burchard, John Ely (1947, 1951-1952, 1956, 1962)

Burden, William A. M. (1955)

Burdon-Muller, Rowland (1948-1952)

Burg, Hermann and Margaret (1946)

Burg, John (1958)

Burke, Anne (1962-1964, 1967-1970, undated)

Burke, Joseph (1954-1958)

Burnham, Alan (1942, 1937, 1956-1957, 1970)

Burnham, Frances B. ( 1953)

Burnham Library, Art Institute of Chicago (1945, 1971) ( -- see also -- : Ryerson and Burnham Libraries; Art Institute of Chicago; Chicago, Art Institute of)

Burns, Howard (1968)

Burns, John (1952, 1983)

Burroughs, T.H.B. (1967)

Burton, Christopher (1963)

Burton, Emily (1952)

Burton, Michael (1953, 1956)

Bush, Lucile (1965)

Bush, Martin H. (1963)

Bush-Brown, Albert (1952, 1956-1958, 1977)

Bush-Brown, Harold (1954, 1965)

Butler, Jeanne F. (1972)

Butler, L. D. (1967)

Butler, Ruth (1957)

Butterfield, Victor (1945, 1947)

Butterick, George F. (1978)

Cabral, Edward (1980)

Cadbury-Brown, John (1955)

Cadbury-Brown, H. T. (Jim) (1956, 1958)

Cahill, Fred V. (1957)

Cahn, Elizabeth (1977)

Calder, Sandy (1938, 1955-1956)

Caldwell, Ian (1975-1976)

Calendars (see: B.1955)

California (1965)

California Institute of Technology (1948-1949)

California Palace of the Legion of Honor (1950)

California, San Jose State University (1979)

California, University of (1951-1952, 1961, 1964, 1966-1967, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1980)

Callisen, Sterling A. (1941)

Callisen, Sterling A. and Sally (1945)

Cambridge [Mass.] Historical Society (1967)

Cambridge University (1962, 1964, 1966)

Campagnie Francaise d'Aeronautiques (1956)

Campanella, Gaspare (1970)

Campbell, Colin G. (1978)

Campbell, Malcolm (1975)

Canada, Atomic Energy Commission of (1973)

Canada Council (1971)

Canada, National Archives of (1956)

Canada, National Gallery of (1926, 1960)

Canada, Royal Architectural Institute of (1960)

Canfield, Abigail and Cass (1975)

Canner and Co. (1949)

Caples, Sara Elizabeth (1969-1970)

Car (European) (1965)

Car (1966)

Cardiff Public Library (1946)

Carey, Jane F. (1973)

Carey T. (1973)

Carlhian, Jean Paul (1952-1953, 1966, 1971, 1973)

Carling, E .B. (1947-1948)

Carlisle, Anna (1956)

Carlson, Ralph (1979)

Carnegie Book Shop (1952)

Carnegie Institute (1955, 1985)

Carnegie Institute of Technology (1947, 1954)

Carpenter, G. R. (1946)

Carpenters Company of Philadelphia (1973)

Carr, Gerald (1968)

Carre Gallerie (1947-1949)

Carrington, Robert (1953, 1970)

Carroll, Martha 1975

Carrott, Richard G. (1955-1956, 1959-1963, 1965, 1967-1969, 1971-1979, 1981-1986)

Carter, Amon E. (1960)

Carter Foundation (1961)

Carter, Lady Bonham (1956)

Carter, Edward C. (Bobby) (1926, 1944-1948, 1960)

Carter, Ernestine (1947, 1952, 1962-1963, 1968, 1978-1979, 1983) ( -- see also -- : Carter, John and Ernestine)

Carter, Gwendolyn (1952)

Carter, John 1941, (1946, 1948, 1952, 1954, 1959)

Carter, John and Ernestine (1936, 1945) ( -- see also -- : Carter, Ernestine)

Carter, Norman F. (1952, 1954, 1959)

Casabella-Continuita (1961, 1965)

Casanelles, Enric (1959)

Cascieri, Arcangelo (1954)

Case Western Reserve University (1972-1973)

Cassidy, Victor M. (1974)

Cassilly, Carolyn (1974)

Casson, Hugh (1948, 1955)

Cassy, Edmund J. (1964)

Cast Iron Architecture, Friends of (1970, 1973-1974)

Castano Galleries (1963)

Castro, Dicken (1955-1957, 1960-1961)

Catholic University of America (1963)

Catlin, Stanton L. (1952, 1956)

Catsoulis, Evangelos (1981, 1983)

Causey, Andrew (1983)

Cavanagh, Tom R. (1949)

Cement and Concrete Association (1954)

Center for Inter-American Relations (1969)

Central Corporate Library (1960)

Central Council for the Care of Churches (1955)

Central National Bank of Middletown (1946)

Central Office of Information (1955-1956)

Centrum (1963)

Century Association (1972-1973, 1975-1977, 1979-1980, 1982, 1984)

Cetto, Max L. (1960)

Chafee, D. S. (1984)

Chafee, Richard (1969, 1974, 1976-1978)

Chalfont, Randolph (1962-1963)

Chambers Encyclopedia -- (1946-1949, 1954, 1961-1963)

Chapin, Betty (1981)

Chapin, Betty and Schuyler G. (1975, 1982)

Chapman, Edward (1952-1953)

Chapman, Rosamund (1957)

Charette (1963)

Charney, W. Mick (1977)

Chattey, Paul W. (1983)

Cheek, Leslie (1946-1948, 1953, 1984)

Cheek, Richard (1978-1979)

Chelmsford and District Chapter, Society of Architects (1962)

Cheltham, Charles (1962, 1964)

Chermayeff, Serge (1939, 1946-1948, 1950, 1954)

Chernow, Barbara (1982)

Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Co. (1948)

Chevojon Freres (1956, 1958)

Chicago Architectural Landmarks, Commission on (1964)

Chicago Architectural Photographing Co. (1956, 1958, 1966)

Chicago, Art Institute of (1937, 1944, 1945, 1951, 1960, 1978) ( -- see also -- : Art Institute of Chicago; Burnham Library Ryerson; Burnham Libraries)

Chicago, Arts Club of (1951-1952)

Chicago Committee on Architectural Landmarks (1960)

Chicago Historical and Architectural Landmarks, Commission on (1969-1970, 1973, 1975)

Chicago School of Architecture Foundation (1967)

Chicago, University of (1947, 1953, 1957, 1961-1962, 1973, 1986) ( -- see also -- : University of Chicago)

Chickering, A. H. (1954)

Childs, Charles D. (1951-1952, 1955)

Childs, Maurice F. (1952, 1955)

Chittenden, A. J. (1947)

Christian Science Monitor -- (1948)

Christiansen, Erwin O. (1946)

Christmas Cards (1952, 1983, undated)

Church, Robert M. (1951-1952, 1954-1955)

Churchill, Agnes (1948)

Cincinnati (1969)

Cincinnati Art Museum (1955-1956, 1960-1961)

Cincinnati Astronomical Society (1935)

Cincinnati Modern Art Society (1948)

Cincinnati, University of (1966)

Cistercian Order (1958)

City Art Museum of St. Louis ( -- see -- : St. Louis, City Art Museum of)

City University of New York (1970, 1974-1976, 1978)

City [of Springfield, Mass.] Library Association (1954)

Ciucci, Giorgio (1970)

Claflin, Agnes Rindge (1948-1949, 1952, 1956, 1959, 1961, 1966, 1973, 1977-1978) ( -- see also -- : Rindge, Agnes)

Clapp, Verner W. (1953)

Clark Art Institute (1973, 1986)

Clark, G. R. (1946)

Clark, James (1973)

Clark, Orton Loring (1952)

Clark, Robert J. (1960, 1963-1971, 1974-1975, 1980)

Clark, Ronald W. (1956)

Clark, Susan (1975)

Clark, Willene B. (1976)

Clarke, M. L. (1962)

Clarke, Marian (1947-1948, 1950)

Clarke, Peter (1946)

Clausen, Meredith (1987)

Clayton, B. D. (1971-1972)

Clayton, Barry (1965)

Clerehan, Neil (1953)

Clews, Mrs. Henry (1955)

Clifton-Raymond Associates (1968)

Clifton-Taylor, Alec (1984)

Clinton [Conn.] Historical Society (1947)

Close, Elizabeth (1960)

Clough, R. T. (1959)

Club of Odd Volumes (1948-1950, 1952-1957, 1961-1965, 1968-1970)

Cochrane, Alexander S. (1947, 1951-1954)

Cochrane, Alexander and Cally (1950)

Cochrane, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. (1953)

Cochrane, Eric (1964)

Cochrane, Eric and Lydia (1956, 1983, 1985)

Cochrane, Lydia (1955, 1959, 1960-1963, 1965, 1967, 1970-1971, 1975, 1977-1978, 1980-1982, 1984, 1986)

Coddington, John (1945-1949, 1951, 1956-1957, 1959, 1961-1962, 1968-1970, 1977, undated)

Coe, Bill (1958)

Coe, R. E. (Ted) (1962)

Coe, Ralph T. (1953, 1955, 1974)

Coffin, David R. (1965, 1968, 1973)

Cogswell, Dorothy (1951, 1959, 1962)

Cohen, Alfred (1946)

Cohen, Joan L. (1954-1957, 1960, 1963-1965)

Cohn, David N. (1984)

Cohn, Suzanne (1968)

Colby College (1968)

Cole, Dorothy (1958)

Cole, Harry (1957)

Coletti, Joseph (1961)

Coletti, Paul (1957)

Colgate University (1976, 1978)

Colibris Editora Ltda. (1962, 1964-1965, 1967)

Colin, Mrs. Ralph F. ( 1955)

Collaborazione Culturale, Instituto per la (1962)

College Art Association (1940, 1946-1953, 1955-1959, 1961-1964, 1966, 1969-1971, 1973-1979)

Colliers Encyclopedia -- (1947-1949, 1958-1959)

Collins, Cecil (1956)

Collins, Colin (1955)

Collins, Elizabeth (1959)

Collins, George R. (1960-1961, 1964, 1968, 1975-1976, 1979, 1983)

Collins, Peter (1964-1965, 1967-1968)

Colonial Travel Bureau (1955)

Columbia Historical Society (1982)

Columbia University 1937, 1939-1941, 1945, 1947-1948, 1954-1956, 1958-1959, 1961, 1964-1969, 1971, 1973-1977, 1979-1983, 1985-1986 ( -- see also -- : Avery Library; Avery Study Center, Columbia University)

Columbia University, Temple Hoyle Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture (1984)

Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts (1948-1949)

Colvin, Howard M. (1959)

Colwell, Miriam (1976)

Combs, Tom (1975)

Comite Francais D'Historie de L'Art (1967)

Commercial Credit Corporation (1947)

Committee for the Centennial Exhibition of New England Architecture (1957)

Committee for the Preservation of Architectural Records (1979)

Committee on Education and Labor, U. S. Congress (1954)

Committee on Government and Art (see: Government and Art, Committee on)

Community Arts Center (1945)

Community Chest (1958)

Comparative Studies in Society and History -- (1958)

Conant, Kenneth G. (1946-1947, 1952, 1973)

Concrete Quarterly -- (1955)

Condit, Carl W. (1963)

Condolence Letters [on death of mother] (1952)

Conference Board of Associated Research Councils (1948, 1951)

Congress on the History of Art, Twentieth International (1960-1961)

Conlon, Kathleen M. (1969)

Connaissance des Artes -- (1959)

Connecticut Automobile Assigned Risk Plan (1946-1947)

Connecticut College (1938-1942, 1944, 1947, 1953, 1956, 1963, undated)

Connecticut Commission on the Arts (1968)

Connecticut, Department of Agriculture (1937)

Connecticut State Department of Consumer Protection (1986)

Connecticut, State of (1946, 1948)

Connecticut, University of (1952, 1963)

Connecticut Valley Historical Museum (1954)

Connors, Joseph (1984)

Constable, Olivia (1955)

Constable, W. G. (1952-1953)

Constantine, Mildred (1952, 1955, 1960-1961, 1963)

Contemporary Authors -- (1978)

Cook, R. V. ( 1946)

Cook, Ruth (1952, 1956)

Cook, Mrs. Sidney (1950)

Cook, Thomas (1956-1957)

Cook, Walter (1946-1947, 1949-1956, 1958)

Cooke, Howard Lester (1954-1955)

Cookson, Beatrice (1970)

Coolidge, Harold (1956)

Coolidge, John (1939-1941, 1944-1945, 1950-1951, 1953-1956, 1958, 1960-1962, 1966, 1968, 1973-1974, 1976, 1978-1979, 1983, undated)

Coolidge, John and Polly (1947-1949, 1969, 1977)

Coolidge, Polly (1952)

Cooper (1952)

Cooper, Douglas (1947, 1953, 1960)

Cooper-Hewitt Museum (1972-1973, 1975, 1979-1980, 1983)

Cooper Union (1946-1948, 1955, 1964-1965, 1968)

Copp, Philip (1979)

Copplestone, Lewin (1972)

Corcoran, Desmond (1981)

Corcoran, G. S. (1946)

Corcoran, Gerald (1952)

Cordes, Paul (1945)

Cordingley, Alan (1957, 1961)

Cordingly, Ann (1975)

Corke, Jean (1962)

Corkran, W. S. (1954-1955)

Cornell University (1946, 1964-1966, 1969, 1976)

Corning Glass Center (1952)

Cortetti, John (1952)

Costabel, Jorge (1956)

Costopoulos, Dorothy (1973-1975)

Cott, Perry B. (1946, 1949)

Country Life -- (1952-1954, 1956, 1958, 1962-1963)

Courtauld Institute of Art (1966)

Court House (1979)

Courtright, Margot (1978)

Covell, William King (1936, 1946, 1948-1952, 1958, 1962-1963, 1965, 1968)

Coventry Architecture and Planning Department (1955)

Cowdrey, Mary Bartlett (1951, 1952-1955, 1958-1965, 1968, 1973-1974)

Cowin, Ruth (1962)

Cowles, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner (1975)

Cowles, William S. (1952)

Cowling, Francis B. (1949-1950)

Cox, Harvey (1970)

Cox, Trenchard (1952, 1956)

Cox, Warren (1957)

Craig, Maurice James (1949)

Cranbrook Academy and Museum of Art (1982, 1984)

Crandall, Robert T. (1959)

Crane, Alexander (1949, 1951)

Crane, Tom (1980)

Crapanzano, Frank (1947)

Craven, Wayne (1962)

Crawford, Martha (1958)

Creative Art (1928)

Creese, Walter (1945, 1950-1954, 1956, 1960-1962, 1968-1969)

Criticism (1961)

Crivelli Galleria (1960)

Crook, Joseph Mordaunt (1975, 1981, 1983)

Crosby, Sumner (1951-1952, 1958-1959)

Crowe, R. N. (1956)

Crowell Co. (1967)

Crowell, Frederick (1962-1963)

Crystal Palace (1954)

Cubitt, James (1952, 1966)

Cucci, Ditta (1966)

Culpepper, Ralph (1966)

Cultural Center, New York (1974)

Cummings, Abbott Lowell (1947, 1951, 1956, 1964)

Cunard Lines (1949, 1973, 1976)

Cunill, Titit (1973, 1974)

Cunningham, Charles C. (1945, 1947-1948, 1957, 1962, 1964, undated)

Cunningham, Charles C. and Priscilla (1958, 1961, 1968)

Cunningham, E. (1963)

Cunningham, Priscilla (1959-1960, 1973) ( -- see also -- :

Cunningham, Charles C. and Priscilla)

Curjel, Hans (1952)

Curtis, L. P. (1952)

Curtis, Louis (1967)

Custom Shop (1946, 1953)

Customs 1947, (1948, 1952, 1958-1959)

Cutting, Gloria P. (1950)

Czech, Hermann (1969)

Dabrowski, Magdalena (1973)

Da Capo Press, Inc. (1974, 1976)

Dahl, Curtis (1975, 1978)

D'Amato, Alfonse M. (1986)

Dame, Bernard L. (1949)

Dane, William J. (1955, 1957)

Danes, Gibson (1947-1958, 1961, 1966, 1972)

Danish Architectural Press (1962)

Dannatt, Trevor (1952-1953, 1955)

D'Arcy Galleries (1961)

Dark, Frank (1955-1958, 1964)

Darmstadt, Technische Hochschule (1966)

Darr, William (1956)

Dartmouth College (1937, 1947, 1968, 1978)

Darwin, Dana (1957)

Dauber and Pine (1951, 1958, 1966)

Davidson, Eugene (1952)

Davidson, L. (1955)

Davidson, Rita 1947

Davidson, W. F. (1952)

Davies, Jane B. (1957, 1969)

Davies, Turner and Co. (1946-1947)

Davis (1959)

Davis, Dotsie (1984) ( -- see also -- : Davis, Samuel R. and Dotsie)

Davis, E. Holden (1969)

Davis, Elizabeth H. (1953)

Davis, Howland S. (1948)

Davis, Laura (1945)

Davis, Lavinia (1961)

Davis, Philip and Helen (1927)

Davis, Richard S. (1950, 1952, 1954-1955, 1957, 1959)

Davis, Robert G. (1954)

Davis, Robert Tyler (1948, 1950)

Davis, Rodman (1983)

Davis, Samuel R. (1969-1973, 1976, 1978-1979, 1981)

Davis, Samuel R. and Dotsie (1983) ( -- see also -- : Davis, Dotsie)

Davis, Wendell (1945-1946, 1949, 1953-1955, 1958)

Davis, William (1946, 1955)

Davison, George W. (1945)

Davison, Robert (1947)

Davy Car Hire (1953-1954, 1958)

Dawes, Horace (1946)

Dawes House (1954)

Dawson, Tom (1952-1953)

Dayton Art Institute (1953)

De Cordova and Dana Museum and Park (1949)

De Graaff, Jan (1940)

De Long, David (1973, 1979-1981, 1983-1984, 1986-1987)

De Mare, Eric (1956)

De Sales, Xavier (1956)

De Vaughan, Carol (1969)

De Witt, Dennis (1976)

De Witt, Mrs. Vergil B. (1947)

De Zurko, Edward R.(1951-1954, 1956-1957, 1959)

De la Faille, C. A. Baart (1952)

Dean, Margaret (1951, 1953-1954)

Dearstyne, Howard (1958-1959, 1972, 1974)

Deere and Co. (1965)

Deerfield Academy (1966)

Deerfield Village (1959)

Delafield, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Livingston (1962, 1965)

Delafield, Lawrence (1965)

Delafono, John (1952, 1955)

Delahoyd, Mary (1971)

Delaney, Beauford (1961)

Delaware, University of (1957, 1961, 1967, 1970, 1976)

Delftsch Bouwkundig Studenten Gezelschap (1963)

Delhaye, Jean (1960)

Dema, S. J. (1951)

Demithorne, Janet (1952)

Democrat Chronicle -- , Rochester, N.Y. (1936)

Dendy, William (1975)

Dening, C.F.W. (1946)

Department [Smith College Art Department] (1956) ( -- see also -- : Smith College)

Department of State (1952) ( -- see also -- : State Department; United States Department of State)

Des Grange, Jane (1960)

Deshmukh, C. D. (1965)

Design -- (1957)

Detroit Institute of Arts (1945, 1959)

Deul, C. A. (1956)

Deutsch-Amerikanisches Institut (1963)

Deutsche Bank (1965, 1967)

Deutscher Kunstverlag CMBH (1969, 1971)

Devinoy, Pierre (1948, 1952, 1956)

Dewald, Ernest (1951)

Di Blasi, Louise (1962)

Dick Travel Agency (1945, 1947-1949)

Dickey, John M. (1973)

Dickson, Harold E. (1951-1952, 1956)

Dictionary of American Biography -- (1955)

Dictionary of the Arts -- (1942)

Dillon, James L. (1956)

Dillon, Joan (1955)

Dinan Associates (1982)

Dingwall, Ronald J. (1947)

Dinnerstein, Lois (1961)

Dipsas Booksellers (1950)

Directory of American Scholars -- (1963)

Dix, George (1950)

Dodd, Mrs. Dexter (1961)

Dodd, E. Merrick 1961

Dodd, Eugene M. (1964-1965)

Dodd, Lamar (1956)

Dodd, Maurice (1946-1948)

Dodge Corp. (1954)

Doesberg, Theo V. (1930)

Dole, Philip (1962)

Dolker (1956)

Doll and Richards (1952)

Domitilla, O.S.B. (1969)

Donaldson, James R. (1970)

Donaldson, Norman V. (1952)

Donnell, Courtney G. (1972, 1974, 1980-1981)

Donnelly, Marian C. (1982)

Donnisfes, Sam (1975)

Dooley, William G. (1947)

Dorbey, Margaret (1957)

Dorfles, Gillo (1956)

Dormoy, Marie (1956)

Dorner, Alexander (1938-1939, 1942, 1952, 1954, undated)

Dorner, Lydia (1953)

Dorsch, George T. (1971-1972)

D'Orsi, Juliana (1955)

D'Orsi, Michael (1953)

Doubleday and Co. (1955, 1957)

Douglass Brokerage Corp. (1970)

Douglass College (1957)

Dovell, Peter (1954)

Dover Publications (1962-1963, 1969)

Dow, Mrs. Frank E. (1952-1954)

Dow, George (1946)

Dow, Marian (1950)

Downing, Antoinette F. (1949)

Downing, George E. (1961)

Downing, Mrs. George E. (1970)

Downs, Arthur Channing (1972, 1974)

Downtown Gallery (1945)

Dows, Olin (1941)

Doyle Stationery (1965-1968, 1972)

Drake Hotel (1950)

Drake, Lindsey (1946-1947, 1953)

Drake, Stuart (1979)

Drap, Al (1971)

Drawing Society (1965, 1967-1968, 1971, 1973-1975, 1977)

Drew, Jane (1946-1949, 1955, 1961)

Drew, Ralph (1953)

Drew-Bear, Lotte (1966)

Drew-Bear, Mrs. Robert (1951)

Drexler, Arthur (1956-1959, 1962, 1964, 1974, 1987)

Driscoll, Mrs. Philip (1963, 1964)

Dublin (1963)

Dublin Tour (1959)

Duell, Sloan and Pearce (1941, 1943-1945, 1947-1953, 1955, 1959-1961)

Duemling, Bob (1951-1955, 1957-1958)

Duhart, Emilio (1954-1955, 1960)

Duke University (1962, 1975)

Duncan, Hugh Dalsiel (1960)

Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art (1962)

Duncan, William (1978)

Duncan, Winston (1979)

Dunham, Elizabeth W. (1954)

Dunlap Society (1976-1977)

Dunn, Esther (1950, 1954)

Dunn, Helen (1979)

Dunnell, Mrs. W. W. (1946)

Dupres, Eddie (1938)

Durand, Patricia (1956)

Durham University, School of Architecture (1960)

Durlacher Brothers (1949, 1951-1952, 1963)

Dusenberg, Elsbeth (1955)

Dutch Gables Book [ -- Netherlandish Scrolled Gables... -- ] (1977-1979)

Dutchess County Department of Planning (1968)

Dutton and Co. (1965)

Early, James (1964)

Early, Marcia A. (1962-1963)

Early Victorian Architecture in Britain -- ( -- see -- : Victorian Paperback)

East Side Communities, Association of (1976)

East Sixty-Second Street Association (1970-1972, 1976, 1979)

Eastbourne Public Libraries and Museum (1946)

Eastman, L. R. (1960)

Eaton, Leonard K. (1960, 1968, 1970-1973)

Ebert, Elizabeth Roberts (1942, 1947)

Eccles Public Library (1962)

Ecole des Arts Decoratifs (1956)

Edgell, G. H. (1953)

Ediciones 3 (1962)

Edinburgh Architectural Association (1956)

Edinburgh, British Council in (1946)

Edinburgh, City of (1946)

Edmunds, Sheila (1962-1965)

Educational Broadcasting Co. (1963)

Edwards, David J. (1954)

Edwards, Folke (1954)

Edwards, Francis, Ltd. (1946)

Edwards, Jared (1971, 1973-1974)

Egan, Patricia (1961-1962)

Egbert, Donald (1945, 1951, 1953, 1956, 1959)

Eggers, Henry L. (1948)

Eidelberg, Martin (1969)

Eisenberg, Marvin (1966)

Eisenhower, Milton (1952)

Eisenman, Alvin (1952, 1954)

Eisenman, Peter (1964, 1976)

Eisler, Benita (1976)

Eisler, Colin (1964, 1975)

Electa Editrice (1968, 1976, 1980)

Electric Co. (1954)

Elek, Paul (1945, 1957-1958, 1968, 1970)

Elkington, Mary (1955-1958)

Elkington, Robert (1960)

Ellis, Connie (1969)

Ellis, Donald G. (1952)

Ellum, Wendy (1956)

Ellison, Clifford (1964)

Elmer, Maud V. (1958, 1962)

Elmhurst, Dorothy (1937)

Emery, Ruth (1950-1951, 1954, 1956-1957, 1960-1961, 1968, 1975, 1981)

Emil, Allan D. (1954)

Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. Donn (1947)

Employers Liability Insurance (1940, 1943)

Enciclopedia del l'Arte -- (1958)

Enciclopedia Italiana -- (1954)

Encyclopedia Britannica -- (1955, 1957-1959, 1970-1971) ( -- see also -- : Britannica Encyclopedia)

Encyclopedia of World Art -- (1958, 1961-1964, 1966)

Encyclopedia Universale Del l'Arte -- (1969)

Encyclopedia Universalis -- (1981)

Enggass, Robert (1961, 1963)

England, Robert (1968)

Engle Lecture (1965)

Engles, Charles (1948)

Epler, Robert (1966)

Erickson, John David (1948)

Ernst, Barbara (1979)

Ervin, John (1959, 1961)

Esherick, Joseph (1954)

Esposito, Joseph (1977-1978, 1980)

Essex Institute (1956, 1977)

Estrada, Rauel (1956)

Etherington, Edward (1968)

Etlin, Richard A. (1981)

Eton College Arts Society (1969)

Europe (1969, 1977)

Evans (1965)

Evans, Allan (1968)

Evans, David J. (1945)

Evans, James and Barbara (1952)

Evans, Janice (1974)

Evans, John (1950)

Evans, Kathleen Horne (1961)

Evans, Lydia (1945, 1968)

Evans, Rosamund (1945, 1954-1958)

Evershed, Emily (1966)

Ewart, Joy (1959)

Experiment (1963)

Ezequelle, Betty J. (1972)

Faber and Faber, Ltd. (1945, 1956)

Fahertyand Swartwood, Inc. (1970)

Fairbanks, G. (1946)

Fairbanks, Jonathan (1960, 1969, 1971-1976, 1980)

Fairhurst, P. G. (1955-1956)

Farleigh Dickinson University (1974)

Faison, S. Lane (1952-1955, 1962-1963, 1969, 1973-1974)

Fanelli, Giovanni (1969)

Farley, Margaret (1949)

Farnsworth, Edith B. (1951-1952)

Farnsworth, John (1952-1953)

Farthing, Cecil (1956, 1959)

Fast-Wengenmayer, Annemarie (1973)

Faulkner, Jean and Winthrop W. (1956)

Faulkner, Winthrop W. (1961)

Feddersen, Phil A. (1951)

Feder, Kathy S. (1972)

Feesender, De Witt H. (1953)

Fehm, Sherwood A. (1969)

Feinberg, Barry (1957, 1960)

Feingold, Jessica (1946)

Feininger, Lyonel (1930)

Feld, Stuart (1969)

Feriday, Peter (1964)

Ferry, Hawkins 1945

Ferry, W. H. (1947)

Fiat (1959)

Fickert Insurance (1965, 1970)

Fielden F. (1956, 1966)

Fife Memorial Fund (1951-1952)

Fifth Avenue Playhouse Group, Inc. (1928)

Film sur l'art (1957)

Fine Arts Agents (1946)

Finkel, Kenneth (1974)

Finsbury, Metropolitan Borough of (1946)

Fire Alarm Maintenance Co. (1957)

First National Bank of Northampton (1952)

First Presbyterian Church, Baltimore (1939)

Fischer Fine Arts, Ltd. (1972)

Fischer, H. R. (1962-1963)

Fischer, Wend (1974)

Fischer, Wolfgang (1973, 1980-1981)

Fisher, Howard T. (1930, 1957, 1976)

Fisher, Jutto (1962)

Fishl, Leslie (1960)

Fisker, Kay (1947-1953, 1956, 1960-1961)

Fitch, James Marston (1959, 1969, 1972, 1974, 1980)

Fitz-Gerald, Charles (1951, 1959)

Fitz-Gerald, Helen Louise (1963, 1966-1967, 1969, 1972, 1978)

Fitz-Gerald, Norman (1959)

Fitzgerald, D.V.J. (1971)

Fitzwilliam Museum (1951)

Flamm, Roy (1951)

Flanders, Ralph E. (1950, 1953)

Fleetwood-Hedreth, Peter (1970)

Fleming and Co. (1957)

Fleming, John (1963, 1965, 1969)

Fletcher Co. (1954)

Fletcher, J. S. (1924)

Fletcher, Norman (1951, 1953-1954, 1956-1957)

Flexner, James (1950)

Flint, C. (1966)

Florida State University (1949)

Florida, University of (1962)

Floyd, Margaret Henderson (1981)

Fodera, Leonardo (1960-1961)

Foeder, Barton (1950)

Fogel, Seymour (1952)

Fogg Art Museum (1945, 1948-1949, 1965, 1969, 1974, 1977)

Foley, Charles H. (1955)

Foley, J. B. (1963)

Foley, May E. (1955)

Fondersmith, John (1977)

Foote, E. J. (1975)

Forbes, Astrid and Kip (1975)

Forbes, John Douglas (1950, 1952, 1957-1958, 1962-1964)

Force, Juliana (1946)

Ford, Anne (1967)

Ford, Charles (1946)

Ford, Edith (1952-1953)

Ford, Edsel (1936)

Ford Foundation (1964)

Forman, Henry Chandlee (1957)

Forstman (1970)

Forstman, Theodore (1969)

Fort Wayne 1973

Forum Magazine -- (1950, 1957-1959)

Foster, Kathleen A. (1981)

Foster, Philip (1971-1975, 1978, 1986)

Foto Hutter (1966)

Foto Van Ojen (1958)

Foulkes, William George (1971-1972, 1978, 1986)

Fourth Avenue Booksellers (1983)

Foyle Ltd. (1947)

Franc, Helen (1947, 1951, 1953-1954, 1963, 1977, undated)

Francastle, Pierre (1956)

Francis, Dennis Steadman (1978)

Francis, Francis C. (1928)

Francis Henry (Harry) Sayles (1925-1932, 1945-1948, 1952-1953, 1955, 1959, 1961, 1963-1964, 1967-1970, 1972-1973, 1977-1981, 1983, undated)

Frank, Edward (1964-1965)

Frankbauser, Mary (1966)

Frankenstein, Alfred (1951)

Frankenstein, Mrs. Victor S. (1950)

Franklin, Cecil A. (1961)

Franklin, Danny (1975)

Franklin Institute (1963)

Franklin Square Subscription Agency (1965)

Franzen, Ulrich (1962)

Frary, I. T. (1957)

Frazer, Alfred (1957)

Fredericks, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall (1952)

Free Library of Philadelphia ( -- see -- : Philadelphia, Free Library of)

Freedman, Harry S. (1952)

Freeman, Donald (1972, 1976)

Freeman, Harrison B. (1937)

Freeman, Judy (1951)

Freer Gallery (1950)

Fregna, Roberto (1962)

Freiburg (1964)

Freidrich, Reinhard (1964)

French Line (1970)

French Railways, Ltd. (1956)

Frick Art Reference Library 1954

Friedman, B. H. (1962)

Friedman, Lee M. (1945)

Friedsam, M. (1926)

Friends of the Upper East Side Historic District (1986)

Frost, Eunice E. (1945, 1950, 1952, 1955)

Fry, E. Maxwell (1948)

Fuchs-Greven (1960)

Fulbright Fellowship (1951, 1959)

Funk and Wagnall's Encyclopedia -- (1957)

Furniture (1968)

Furry, C. I. (1941)

Futagawa, Yukio (1974)

Gaddis, Eugene R. (1982-1984, 1986)

Gagarin, Judy (1970)

Gallum, Barbie (1952)

Gale Research Co. (1964)

Galecki, Marta McBride (1977)

Games, Stephen (1983)

Gardner, Jean McClintock (1983)

Garfield, Leslie J. (1970, 1973, 1978, 1980-1981, 1984)

Garland, Peter (1958)

Garland, Peter and Mary (undated)

Garland Publishing, Inc. (1975-1977, 1979-1980, 1983-1984)

Garvan, Anthony N. B. (1948, 1955-1956)

Garvan, John (1952)

Garzanti, Aldo (1966)

Gaston, Godfrey (1952)

Gaudi, Amigos de (1956)

Gaudi Exhibition (1957-1958)

Gaunt, William (1952)

Gaus, John M. (1948)

Gayle, Margot (1971-1972, 1983-1984)

Gazette des Beaux-Arts -- (1953-1954, 1956)

Geary, Ronald (1952-1953)

Gebhard, David (1953, 1966, 1970, 1973-1974, 1977, 1981)

Gebhardt (1956)

Geddes, Robert L. (1974, 1981)

Geer, Ronald (1952)

Gehring, P. (1954)

Gelfand, Morris (1947)

Gelotte, Ernest N. (1954)

Gemeente Helversum, Publik Werken (1927)

General Adjustment Bureau (1951)

Georgia Institute of Technology (1949-1951, 1953-1954, 1962)

Georgia, University of (1975)

Gered Antiques, Ltd. (1959)

German Renaissance Architecture -- (1972, 1978-1982)

Germantown Historical Society (1972)

Gerold, William (1962-1966)

Gersheim, Helmut (1946, 1953, 1958)

Gerson, H. (1956, 1958)

Geske, Norman (1952, 1963-1964)

Gettier, Astrid E. (1966)

Getty Trust 1985

Gibb-Smith, C. H. (1954-1955)

Gibson, Cynthia (1970)

Giella, Barbara (1978-1979, 1986)

Giese, Delius [Fritz] (1948-1949)

Gift (1956) ( -- see also -- : Wesleyan University)

Gilbert, Creighton (1952, 1969, 1972-1975)

Gilchrist, Agnes (1945, 1951-1952, 1954-1957, 1961, 1968-1969)

Gilchrist, Brenda (1951-1953, 1957)

Gilkerson, Ann (1977)

Gill, Brendan (1970, 1972-1973, 1978, 1980, 1986)

Gilman's Old Books, Inc. (1947)

Girauden Photographic (1956)

Girourd, Mark (1961, 1975, 1983)

Gisser, Leon (1948)

Gittes, Lois Severini (1977)

Glaeser, Ludwig (1978, 1984)

Glasgow (1966)

Glasgow School of Architecture Club (1962)

Glasgow, University of (1967, 1972-1973)

Glaubiga, Merel (1977)

Gleason Brothers (1954)

Glick, William J. (1966)

Gobel, Laura (1965)

Goding, Stowell C. (1951)

Goeschel, Nancy (1969-1970, 1977-1978, 1980)

Goff, Bruce (1948)

Goldberg, Gary (1966)

Goldfinger (1955)

Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Co. (1946)

Goldsmith's Hall (1961-1962)

Goldstein, Malcolm (1979)

Goldstein, Stanley James (1954)

Goldthwaite, Richard A. (1970)

Goldwater, Robert (1965)

Gomes, Peter S. (1979)

Gomme, Andor (1963)

Goodall, Donald (1948-1950)

Goodall, John (1948, 1952)

Goodfellow, Gavin (1958)

Goodhue, H. Shippen (1953-1956, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1981-1982)

Goodhue, H. Shippen and Lydia (1973-1974)

Goodiery, Susan (1951)

Goodman, R. (1971)

Goodrich, Lloyd (1947-1949, 1951)

Goodspeed's Book Shop (1950-1951)

Goodwin, Genevive (1965)

Goodwin, Germaine (1958)

Goodwin, J. L. (1955)

Goodwin, James (1966)

Goodwin, Julie (1979)

Goodwin, Lubi (1974)

Goodwin, Philip (1939, 1945, 1947)

Gorbaty, Norman (1953-1954)

Gordon, David A. (1977)

Gordon, Douglas H. (1948, 1952-1953, 1966, 1971)

Gordon, Rae and Righter Travel (1965-1968)

Gorski, Taderisz A. (1953)

Gould, Cecil (1959)

Gouverneur, Elizabeth (1974)

Government and Art, Committee on (1950-1951, 1953, 1957)

Gowan, James (1962)

Gowans, Alan (1956, 1959-1960, 1962-1963, 1969)

Graduate Students (1956)

Grady, James (1956-1961, 1963-1964, 1966-1969)

Graeffe, Arnold Didier (1947)

Graf, Otto (1963)

Graham, F. Lanier (1970)

Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts (1961, 1973, 1978-1979, 1982)

Graham, Fred (1956)

Graham, John A. (1945)

Graham, Roy F. (1977)

Grannard, Harold (1928)

Grant, Leland (1975-1982, 1984)

Graves, Michael (1967)

Gray, Basil (1961)

Gray, Christopher (1977-1978, 1982)

Gray, Nicolete (1958)

Graybill, Sam (1951-1953, 1957)

Greater London Council (1985)

Greek Embassy (1958)

Green, E.R.R. (1962)

Green, J. Wilder (1951-1959, 1961-1962, 1977, 1981)

Green, Priscilla (1952, 1957)

Green, Samuel (1939, 1945, 1947, 1950-1958, 1960, 1962-1966, 1971, 1977)

Green, Samuel and Bunnie (1948)

Greenberg, Allan (1979, 1981)

Greenthal, Kathryn T. (1977, 1980)

Gregg Press Ltd. (1968-1969, 1972)

Gregory, E. C. (1947)

Grennard, Paul (1928)

Grey Art Gallery, New York University (1981)

Greystone Corp. (1962)

Grierson, Margaret (1952)

Griffiths, Peter Noyes and Lady (1956)

Grimes, Tammy (1972-1975, 1977-1979, 1981-1982, 1984)

Grinberg-Vinavert, Georges (1951)

Grippe, Peter (1952)

Grolier Club (1952, 1970-1973)

Grolier Encyclopedia -- (1961-1963)

Gropius House (1986)

Gropius, Walter (1947, 1950, 1952)

Grosser, Maurice (1951-1952, 1977, 1986)

Grove, Elsa Butler (1955)

Grow, Lawrence (1975)

Grube, Max (1968)

Gruen, Victor (1960)

Guevara, Max and Elisa (1959)

Guggenheim, Barbara 1976

Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1945-1955, 1959-1961, 1963-1965, 1972, 1975-1982)

Guild for Religious Architecture (1969, 1971-1972)

Guildford, Glenn (1949-1950, 1958-1959)

Guildhall (1984)

Guilloton, Michael A. (1954, 1957)

Guinness, Desmond (1967)

Gundermann, Leo (1964)

Gunther, Nancy (1959)

Gutheim, Frederick (Fritz) (1946-1947, 1952, 1958-1959, 1965, 1969)

Gutman, John (1956)

Guy, James (1949)

Guy, Rice and Davis (1936, 1938, 1941-1942)

Guys, Gilbert (1928)

Haber, Francine (1965-1966)

Hack, Garrett (1969)

Hacker (1966)

Hacker Art Books (1971-1972)

Hadzi, Molly (1954, 1956, 1966)

Hadzi, Molly and Dmitri (1955, 1961, 1963)

Haessler, George (1978)

Hager, Louise (1956, 1966)

Hajer, Gerhard (1966)

Hale, William F. (1982)

Hall, J. A. (1946)

Hall, Louise (1948, 1951, 1954)

Hallmark, Donald Parker (1969)

Hallsborough Gallery (1965)

Hambright, Mrs. Joseph (1966)

Hamburg (1956)

Hammill and Barker (1947)

Hamilton, Charles E. (1969)

Hamilton, George Heard (1945-1950, 1954-1957, 1959-1960, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1980)

Hamilton, George Heard and Polly (1953)

Hamilton, Janet (1948)

Hamilton, Polly (undated)

Hamlin, Talbot F. (1945-1947, 1950, 1956)

Hamlyn, Paul (1963-1965, 1967)

Hammer, Karl (1969)

Hammond, Caffy (1958, 1961-1963, 1966-1968, 1973-1974)

Hammond, John (1968-1969)

Hammond, Walter (1954)

Hampshire Bookshop (1949-1952, 1960)

Hanks, David (1977, 1979)

Hanna, A. J. (1954)

Hannary, John (1973)

Hansen, Mr. and Mrs. Preben (1956)

Hanson, Bernard (1964)

Harbron, G. Dudley (1946-1949)

Harcourt, Brace and Co. (1933)

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. (1971-1974, 1976-1977, 1979)

Harday, Jorge A. Ferrari (1969)

Hardenberg (1924)

Harling, Robert (1970)

Harnell and Co. (1967)

Harper Brothers (1955)

Harper's Magazine -- (1945)

Harrington, Elaine (1985)

Harrington, Richard (1958)

Harris Catalog (1968)

Harris, Eileen (1973)

Harris, Hamilton (1953)

Harris, John (1960-1965, 1967-1971, 1973, 1977, 1979-1980, 1983)

Harris, John and Eileen (1974)

Harris, Karsten (1972)

Harris, Margaret (1972)

Harris, Paul S. (1951)

Harris, Roger (1961)

Harris, Tom (1946)

Harris, Upham and Co. (1955)

Harrison, M. (1946)

Harrison, Wallace K. (1953)

Hartford (1964, 1972)

Hartford, Huntington (1963)

Hartford Magazine -- (1974)

Hartman, William E. (1962)

Hartneck, Timothy W. (1979)

Hartt, Frederick (1956, 1960-1961)

Harvard Architecture Review -- (1978)

Harvard Club (1963)

Harvard Fund (1947)

Harvard Magazin -- e (1978-1979, 1982-1983)

Harvard University (1923-1924, 1927-1928, 1939, 1942, 1946-1951, 1953-1958, 1961, 1965-1967, 1973-1974, 1976-1979, 1981-1982)

Harvey, Katharine (1970, 1976)

Harvey and Lewis (1945)

Hasbrouck, W. R. (1961, 1963-1964, 1969)

Hasbrouck, William (1967)

Haskell, Arthur C. (1955)

Haskell, Douglas (1945, 1951-1952, 1954-1955, 1958)

Haskell, Henry C. (1946)

Haskell, Rosamund (1966)

Hasler, Charles (1962)

Hasselmann, Dorothy S. (1945)

Hatch, J. D. (1948-1949)

Hatchards Booksellers (1963-1964)

Hatje, Gerd (1959-1965, 1980)

Hattis, Phyllis (1966)

Hauf, Harold (1951)

Haupt, Otto (1963)

Hausen, Marika (1965-1966)

Haverkamp-Bergman, Egbert (1971, 1973)

Havinden, Ashley (1948, 1952, 1961)

Havinden, Margaret 1946, 1953

Havinden, Margaret and Ashley (1950)

Hawksmoor Committee (1962)

Hawthorne Books (1979)

Haydon, Harold (1961)

Hayes, Bartlett (1954)

Hayes, Marian (1954-1955, 1959, 1962, 1968, 1970)

Heath and Co. (1961)

Heaton, E. W. (1959)

Hecht, Jean (1956)

Hecht, Lynn S. (1962-1964, 1966)

Heckel, Louise (1960)

Hecksher, Morrison (1970, 1973-1974)

Hedge, Alice Payne (1948, 1953-1954, 1956, undated)

Hedge, E. Russell (1959-1963)

Hedge, Henry R. (1954, 1956-1958)

Hedge, Mrs. Henry R. (1953)

Hedge, Mrs. William R. (1947, 1953)

Hedrich, E. T. (1956)

Hedrich, J. O. (1969)

Heil, Bernard (1958)

Heilkamp, Detlef (1971)

Heimsath, Clovis B. (1952)

Heine, Georgette (1970)

Heintzelman, Arthur W. (1956)

Heinz, Thomas A. (1978-1981)

Heinzel, Brigitte (1967, 1969)

Heiser, Bruce E. (1953-1954)

Heisner, Beverly F. (1967)

Held, Mr. and Mrs. Julius (1965)

Heleniak, Kathryn Moore (1975)

Helm, Francis and Mary (1948)

Hemmenway, Mary (1948-1950, 1954)

Henderson, Pat Milne (1957, 1964) ( -- see also -- : Milne-Henderson, Pat)

Henderson, M. (1958)

Hendricks, Gordon (1967)

Henley, Helen B. (1941)

Hennessey, William J. (1975-1977)

Hennings, John (1955)

Henry (1973)

Henry, Anne Wythe (1972, 1975)

Henry, Barklie [Buzz] (1959)

Hentrich, Helmut (1957, 1959-1960, 1963-1976, 1978-1981, 1985)

Hentschel, Walter (1969)

Herald Tribune -- (1945)

Herbert, Gilbert (1970)

Herget, John T. (1960)

Hergert, Elizabeth (1963)

Heron, Patrick (1952-1954, 1956, 1979)

Herrmann, George (1960)

Herschman, Judith (1979)

Hersey, George L. (1959-1963, 1967-1968, 1971-1972, 1975

Hershberger, Howard (1960, 1961, 1963)

Herve, Lucien (1956-1957)

Herzog, Marion Rawles (1967, 1970)

Hesketh, Peter Fleetwood (1969)

Hesse (1956)

Hessler, Herman (1971)

Heyl, Bernard (1959-1963)

Hibbard, Don J. (1976)

Hibbard, Howard (1962, 1968)

Highest, Gilbert (1954)

Hill, Draper (1960)

Hill, Frederick and May (1968)

Hill, Oliver (1946, 1949, 1955)

Hiner, Walter (1946)

Hines, Thomas S. (1967, 1972, 1981)

Hirschl and Adler Galleries (1968)

Historic American Buildings Survey (1973)

Historical Society of Pennsylvania ( -- see -- : Pennsylvania, Historical Society of) -- History News -- (1963)

Hitchcock, Alice Davis [mother, Mrs. Henry Russell] (1925, 1940, 1942-1943, 1946-1950)

Hitchcock, Mr. and Mrs. Carl (1955)

Hitchcock, Charles D. (1940, 1971)

Hitchcock, Harriet (1963)

Hitchcock, Dr. and Mrs. Henry Russell [parents] (1928-1929, undated)

Hitchcock, June (1979-1980)

Hitchcock, Mrs. Peter S. (1964)

Hoag, John D. (1952, 1955-1956, 1959, 1961-1965, 1967-1968, 1970-1971, 1976)

Hochman, Elaine S. (1973, 1976)

Hodge, Alan (1957)

Hodge, Philip G. (1951)

Hodgkinson, Ianthe (1966)

Hofer, Philip (1945-1947, 1949, 1951-1952, 1959, 1961, 1968)

Hoffman, Donald L. (1964, 1969-1970, 1978)

Hoffmann, Werner (1956)

Hofstra College (1952)

Hogan, Austin (1940)

Hojer, Gerhard (1967, 1970, 1973)

Holcomb, Donald M. 1956

Holderbaum, James (1962, 1964, 1966, 1968)

Holdet, L. A. (1946)

Holdin, Harrison (1976)

Holiday Inn (1972)

Holland (1964, 1967)

Holland-America Line (1958, 1971)

Holman, William G. (1981)

Holmegaards Glasvaerk (1960)

Holmes, J. P. (1953)

Holser, Clifford B. (1952)

Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972)

Holzbog, Tom (1967)

Homolka, Larry J. (1965-1967)

Hooker, Arthur (1952)

Honour, Hugh (1966)

Hood, Graham (1971)

Hooker, John (1953)

Hooper, S. C. (1954)

Hoover, Donald (1952)

Hoover, Kathleen O'Donnell (1948-1949, 1951)

Hope, Henry R. (1943, 1945-1950, 1954, 1957, 1959, 1962)

Hopping, D.M.C. (1955-1956)

Hordczak, Theodore (1956)

Horn, Estelle (1950)

Horn, Milton (1946, 1949, 1951-1952)

Horn, Walter (1958)

Horne, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard S. (1955)

Hornsey, Borough of (1946)

Horsburgh, Patrick (1952-1955)

Horta Committee (1960)

Hosken, Franziska Porges (1963)

Hotel Grande Bretagne (1961)

Hotel Inghilterra (1961)

Housend, Brian (1956)

House Beautiful -- (1928)

Housing (1945)

Houston (1959, 1967)

Houston, University of (1953-1954)

Howard, Charles (1956)

Howard, Tom (1945)

Howard University (1961-1962)

Howarth, Thomas (1953-1957, 1959-1960, 1962-1963, 1966)

Howe, George (1945, 1949, 1951, 1953)

Howe, Hester (1954, 1956)

Howe, Lawrence (1955)

Howe, Mrs. Lawrence (1945)

Howe, Stewart S. (1954)

Howe, Thomas C. (1953, 1954)

Howlett, D. Roger (1965)

Howland, Richard H. (1952-1954, 1959, 1961)

Hoyle, Henry D. (1969)

Hoyt, Deming (1960)

Hoyt, Natalie (1947, 1949-1951, 1956, 1959, 1963)

Hoyt, Nelly (1968)

Hubbard, L. Kent (1937)

Hubbard, R. J. (1959)

Hubbard, Ray (1978)

Hubbard, Russell (1949)

Huber, Erna (1963-1964, 1966, 1970-1971)

Huber, Erna and Charlie (1983)

Hudnut, Claire (1948)

Hudnut, Helen (1947-1948)

Hudnut, Joseph (1945, 1951)

Hudson River Conservancy Society, Inc. (1945)

Huemer, Frances (1955)

Huff, William S. (1958, 1965)

Hughenden Manor (1950)

Hughes, Richard (1953-1954)

Hughes, Talmadge C. (1945)

[Hugnet?], Georges (undated)

Hulst, Roger d' (1973)

Hulton Press (1957)

Hundertmark, Dieter (1960)

Hunn, Robert (1970)

Hunter, Anna C. (1955)

Hunter, Bob (1954)

Huntington, C. (1955)

Huntington, Constant (1952)

Huntington, David C. (1961, 1963-1965, 1967-1968, 1971)

Huntington, J. D. (1951)

Huntington, James L. (1954-1955, 1957-1959, 1963-1965)

Huntington, John (1955)

Huntington, Trudy (1952)

Huse, Norbert (1975)

Hussey, Alfred R. (1949)

Hussey, Mary (1954, 1962)

Huxley Brothers (1951, 1954)

Huxtable, Ada Louise (1947, 1950, 1957-1958, 1961-1962, 1969, 1971, 1982-1983)

Hyams, N. (1948)

Hyde Hall, Inc., Friends of (1965)

Hyman, Isabelle (1977)

Iber, Howard John (1972, 1974)

Illinois Institute of Technology (1950, 1954)

Illinois, University of (1947, 1949, 1965, 1979)

Ilmanen, William (1954, 1956)

Imperial Institute (1956)

Inaya, Beata (1956)

In the Nature of Materials -- (1968-1969) ( -- see also -- : Wright, Frank Lloyd)

Income Tax (1956-1957, 1972)

India International Center (1964-1965)

Indiana University (1948, 1953, 1966)

Indiana, University of (1945, 1961)

Indianapolis, Art Association of (1948)

Information Agency, U.S. (1955)

Information Service, U.S. (1961)

Inghilterra Hotel (1960)

Inglis, F. C. (1954)

Ingraham, David (1941)

Ingraham, Henry A. (1945, 1947)

Innendekoration (1963)

Inspector of Foreign Dividends (1956)

Inscoe, Eva Jane (1983)

Institute for Advanced Studies (1963)

Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (1975)

Institute of Contemporary Art (1948-1949, 1953-1954, 1956, 1961, 1963-1964, 1976)

Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (1949, 1956-1957, 1960, 1967) ( -- see also -- : New York University)

Institute of International Education (1955)

Institute of Landscape Architects (1952)

Instituto di Storia dell'Arte (1961)

Instituto Italiano di Cultura (1958)

Instituto per la Collaborazione Culturale (1965) ( -- see also -- : Collaborazione Culturale, Instituto per la)

Insurance (1970)

Insurance Company of America (1963)

Intercultural Publications, Inc. (1953)

International Architecture Students Conference (1949)

International Congress of African Studies (see: African Studies, International Congress of)

International Encyclopedia of Architecture, Engineering, and Urban Planning -- (1976-1977)

International Design Conference (1955)

International Information Administration (1952)

International Publications, Inc. (1954)

International Union of Architects, Sixth Congress (1960)

International University of Art (1970)

Ireland, Royal Institute of Architects of (1962)

Irving, Robert Grant (1968)

Irvy, Benjamin (1981)

Isham, Gyles (1954)

Isis -- (1961, 1964)

Isley, Natelle (1956)

Italian Institute (1956)

Ivins, William M. (1936)

Jack, William A. Park (1936)

Jackson, Esther (1953)

Jacobi, Frank (1952)

Jacobs Antiques (1948-1949)

Jacobs, Robert A. (1965)

Jacobs, Stephen (1966)

Jacobus, John [Jake] (1957-1962, 1964-1966, 1969-1971, 1980-1981)

Jacobus, John [Jake] and Marion (1963)

Jaffe, Michael (1952-1956, 1958-1964, 1966, 1968, 1973, 1977, 1986)

Jaffe, Ronald (1952)

James, Evan (1946)

James, George (1952)

James, Philip (1952, 1958)

Jamieson, K. I. (1953)

Janis Gallery (1949)

Janis, Sidney (1950)

Jansen, Dick (1953-1954, 1961-1962)

Jansen, Dick and Ellen (1955)

Janson, H. W. (1959-1962, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1983)

Janson, Peter (1978, 1982)

Jarrett, James (1958-1959, 1981)

Jeannert, Marie-Louise (1982)

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (1947)

Jemma, Manuela (1965)

Jenkins, Frank I. (1955-1956, 1958, 1960-1961, 1964-1967)

Jennings, Nancy Gillespie (1970)

Jerome Hotel (1955)

Jerome, T. T. (1947)

Jersey City, N. J. (1981)

Jewell, Jim (1953, 1956)

Joedicke, Jurgen (1963)

Johanneson, Eric (1969)

John, Dorothy (1954)

Johns Hopkins University (1952, 1965, 1967-1971, 1973-1975)

Johnson Art Collection (1926-1927)

Johnson, Buffie (1948)

Johnson, Donald Leslie (1977)

Johnson Gallery, Museum of Modern Art (1984)

Johnson, J. R. (1969)

Johnson, J. Stewart (1968, 1976)

Johnson, James R. (1946-1951, 1953-1954, 1958-1959, 1966, 1978, 1983)

Johnson, Laura (1945)

Johnson, Margaret (1952)

Johnson, Peter 1977, 1979

Johnson, Philip C. (1934, 1945-1967, 1969, 1973, 1975, 1978-1979, 1981-1983, undated) ( -- see also -- : -- Nineteenth Century American Architects -- [with Philip Johnson])

Johnson Reprint Corp. (1973)

Johnson, Robert H. (1947)

Johnson, Thomas (1973)

Johnson, W. (1958)

Johnson, Wendell (1961-1966, 1973, 1980, 1982-1984)

Johnson-Marshall, Percy and April (1960) ( -- see also -- : Marshall, Percy Johnson)

Johnsson, Ulf C. (1965)

Johnston, Norman (1952)

Jonals Co. (1958)

Jones, Cranston (1958)

Jones, Douglas (1966)

Jones, Ernest (1957-1958)

Jones, Mrs. Fred (1941)

Jones, Howard M. (1958-1959)

Jones, Martin R. (1956-1959, 1962)

Jones, Ralph (1958)

Jones Real Estate (1970)

Jones, Robert 1959

Jones, Ronald F. (1946)

Jordy, William (1950-1962, 1964, 1968-1970, 1972-1973, 1976, 1978, 1981, 1983, undated)

Joselit, David (1981)

Journal of the History of Ideas -- (1955)

Joyce, Henry (1980)

Judkins, Winthrop (1971)

Judson (1978)

Judson, H. Richard (1965)

Jules, Mervin (1962-1963, 1965, 1970)

Kahn, Albert (1945-1946)

Kahn, Charles (1978)

Kahn, David M. (1975)

Kahn, Louis I. (1960)

Kahn, Moritz (1938)

Kaiga Bunka Chuokyoku (1954)

Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (1961)

Kalec, Donald Gordon (1974-1976)

Kallman, G. M. (1948)

Kallman, Gerhard (1969)

Kamys, Walter (1957, 1962)

Kane, Amanda (1962)

Kansas City Star -- (1964)

Kansas State College (1955)

Kapp, Helen (1956)

Kantor, Sibyl (1980, 1982)

Kardan, Sel (1985)

Karl-Ernst-Osthaus-Museum (1956)

Karlsruhe (1956, 1963)

Karner, L. C. (1959)

Karolik, Maxim (1952)

Karpel, Bernard (1969)

Karpinski, Caroline (1970)

Karshner, Joseph H. (1957)

Kates, George N. (1923, 1926-1928, 1930, 1945, 1948-1949, 1956, undated)

Katz, Ruth B. (1953)

Katzenellenbogen, Mrs. Adolph (1950)

Kaufman, Emil (1953)

Kaufmann, Edgar, Jr. (1942, 1944, 1947, 1952, 1960-1963, 1968, 1970, 1974-1978, 1981-1984, 1986)

Kauter, Mat (1947)

Keacer (1961)

Kearns, G. W. (1953)

Keating, Mary (1978)

Keefe, John W. (1970)

Keefe and Keefe 1985

Keener, John P. (1947-1948)

Keeney, Barbara (1955)

Keiiti, Taira (1962)

Keiser, George C. (1929, 1945, 1947, 1953, 1956)

Keisern, George C. and Nancy (1948, 1951-1952, 1955)

Keiser, Nancy (1957, 1962, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1979, 1983)

Keith, Lucy (1953)

Kelley, Charles H. (1979)

Kelly, Burnham (1953-1954, 1964)

Kennedy, Clarence (1972)

Kennedy Fund (1963) ( -- see also -- : Smith College)

Kennedy, John F. (1953)

Kennedy, Robert W. (1949-1950)

Kennedy, Roger G. (1967)

Kennedy, Ruth L. (1955-1956, 1958, 1961-1968, undated)

Kentucky Engineer -- (1955)

Kentucky, University of (1969)

Kenyon Corn Meal Co. (1959)

Kepes, George (1948)

Kermacy, Martin S. (1956)

Kerr, Chester (1951-1952)

Kersting, A. F. (1971)

Kestenbaum, Joy M. (1979, 1984-1985)

Ketchum, Phillips (1949)

Kettell, Russell (1954)

Keyes, Margaret (1975)

Kidney, Walter C. (1957, 1972-1973, 1983)

Kihlstedt, Folke T. (1971, 1974, 1980)

Killian, Tom (1983)

Kimball, Fiske (1938, 1953-1955)

Kinehardt, Sibley (1968)

King and Chusman Insurance (1948)

King, A. Rowden (1952)

King, Anthony (1962-1963)

King, May Abigail (1968)

Kings College (1962)

Kingston School of Art (1961)

Kingzett, Richard (1961)

Kirstein, Coco (1928)

Kirstein, Lincoln (1928-1929, 1945, undated)

Kissin, Meredith (1973)

Kitchen (1960-1961)

Kizar, John (1979)

Klapper, Paul (1947)

Kleinbauer, Eugene (1962)

Klemm, Heinz (1964)

Klinger, Timothy C. (1973)

Knoedler and Co. (1951, 1955, 1968-1970)

Knorre, Eckhard van (1971, 1973)

Knowledge Publications (1966)

Knowlton, John H. (1974)

Knox, Brian (1981)

Knox, Bruce (1972)

Knoxville (1978)

Koch, Carl (1947)

Koch, Edward (1983)

Koch, Robert (1958-1959)

Kochen (undated)

Koenig, Philip (1951)

Kohn, Geraldine (1961)

Koike, Shinji (1951-1952, 1955)

Kolper, Fred (1956)

Kommer, Bjorn (1964)

Konsthistorisk Tidskrift (1937)

Kootz, Samuel (1948)

Kopcke, Guenter (1976)

Korn, Thomas H. (1952)

Kornegay, Bill (1961, 1963, 1969-1970, 1974, 1982-1983)

Kornwolf, James D. (1977-1979)

Kostof, Spero (1976)

Kowsky, Francis (1978-1981)

Kozlow, Robert D. (1951-1954, 1957)

Kramer, Ellen (1950-1955, 1957-1958, 1960-1961, 1964, 1967-1969, 1971-1972, 1975)

Kramer, Estel Thea (1976)

Krautheimer, Richard (1945, 1947, 1950, 1952, 1957, 1961, 1963, 1965-1967, 1969, 1971, 1982)

Krautheimer, Richard and Trude (1952)

Kredler, Jack (1927)

Kremer, Eugene (1965, 1967)

Kremers, David Edward (1974)

Krinsky, Carol Herselle (1981)

Krom, Martha (1980)

Kruft, Hanno-Walter 1984

Kubler, George A. (1945-1946, 1949-1950, 1954-1957)

Kuhn, Ethel (1964)

Kultermann, Udo (1965)

Kunhardt, Mr. and Mrs. (undated)

Kunin, Jack Henry (1969)

Kunstakedmiets Bibliotek (1956)

Kunsthalle Bielfeld (1983) ( -- see also -- : Bielfeld Kunsthalle)

Kunstwerk -- (1957)

Kwan, Michael (1972, 1975, 1977)

Labo, Mario (1961)

Lacoste, Gerald (1956)

La Farge, Henry A. (1950, 1955)

Lain, Alan K. (1946, 1977)

Lamb, Deborah (1951)

Lamb, Robert J. (1976)

Lambert, Jean (1963-1966)

Lambert, Phyllis (1974-1976, 1982, 1984)

Lambert, R. J. (1960-1961)

Lambert, Sam (1955)

Lambs, S. R. (1952)

Lamont, Corliss (1953)

Lamont, Ruth (1960)

Lancashire Society of Architects 1(962)

Lancaster, Clay (1951-1953)

Lancaster, Margaret (1949-1950)

Land, Terre (1955)

Landau, Sarah (1974-1986)

Landesamt fur Denkmalpfleg Nord-Rhein-Westfalen (1956)

Landmarks Conservancy, New York (1977, 1983)

Landmarks Preservation Commission, City of New York (1970-1971, 1973, 1975, 1982, 1985)

Landmarks Preservation Foundation, New York (1985)

Landor, Walter (1940)

Landy, Jacob (1957-1959, 1961-1963, 1966, 1970)

Lane, Barbara Miller (1976-1977)

Lane, Gilman (1941)

Lane, Stephen (1948)

Lang, S. (1956)

Lang, Samuel (1970)

Langenskiold, Eric (1960)

Langrock Co. (1949-1950)

Langsam, Walter E. (1966, 1968-1969)

Langston, Jane (1978)

Lanmon, Lorraine (1974)

Larkin, Oliver (Pete) (1946-1947, 1949, 1951-1952, undated)

Larkin, Oliver (Pete) and Ruth (1950)

Larsen, Susan (1972)

Lasdun, Denys (1940, 1954, 1958-1959, 1961-1962)

Laskin (1981)

Laskin, Myron (1974)

Laskin, R. (1964-1965)

Lasko, Peter (1982)

Lasko, Viola (1955)

Laubs, E. R. (1953)

Lauder, Standish (1963, 1966)

Laughlin, Clarence J. (1955)

Laughlin, James (1953)

Launder, Victor (1950)

Laurent, Marge and Paul (1950)

Law, Graham C. (1949-1951)

Lawrence, Leslie (1943, 1945)

Lazzaro, G. di San (1967)

Lebold, Joan (1954-1955)

Lebovich, Bill (1977)

Leconte, Andre (1958)

Le Corbusier (1936)

Ledermann, P. (1958)

Lee, Antoinette Josephine [Toni] (1975, 1982)

Lee House (1948)

Lee, Renselaer (1947)

Lee, Sherman (1959)

Leeb, Mr. and Mrs. Brian P. (1954)

Leeds (1946)

Leeds Architecture Students Association (1955)

Leeper, John Palmer (1957)

Leeuwen, Tom von (1974-1975, 1977)

Lefevre Gallery (1982)

Legge, Christopher (1953)

Lehman, Arnold (1970)

Lehmann, Karl (1952-1953)

Lehmann, Karl and Phyllis (1955-1956)

Lehmann, Phyllis W. (1949, 1951-1952, 1956, 1959-1960, 1965, 1968-1969, 1973, 1978, 1981)

Lehmbruck, Manfred (1964)

Leib, Norbert (1967)

Leibner, Gernard (1973)

Leibowitz, Herbert (1976)

Leicester, University of (1963, 1966-1968, 1970)

Leided, Rykstuniversiteit te (1966)

Leigh, Roger ( 1955)

Lemon, Sally (1954-1955, 1957)

Lenn, Lottie H. (1951)

Leonard, A. O. (1951)

Leonard, J. C. (1957)

Lerski, Hanna (1978)

Lescaze, William E. (1928, 1937, undated)

Levassor (1956)

Lever House (1983)

Lever, Jill 1986

Levine, Neil (1972, 1976-1977, 1983)

Levine, Seymour J. (1951)

Levion, Sally (1954)

Levy, Julien, Gallery (1946)

Levy, S. Dean (1973, 1982)

Lewine, Milton (1967)

Lewis, David (1946)

Lewis, Mrs. David (1945)

Lewis, Lesley (1946, 1952)

Lewis, Stanley T. (1952)

Lewis, Virginia 1958

Lewis, Wilmarth Sheldon (1948-1952, 1954, 1963)

Li, Sue Yung (1956)

Library (1968-1969)

Library Company of Philadelphia ( -- see -- : Philadelphia,

Library Company of)

Library of Congress (1940-1942, 1944, 1947)

Lichebeelden Institute (1956-1958)

Licht, Fred (1963)

Liddell, Janet (1953)

Lieb, Norbert (1971-1973)

Liebert, Herman (1947, 1951)

Lieberthal, Mary (1976)

Lienhardt, Robert C. (1963)

Life Magazine -- (1945-1946)

Lilliput Magazine -- (1947)

Limerick, Jeff (1974)

Lincoln, Alfred W. (1961)

Lincoln, Dick (1959)

Lindekee, Mary Proal (1951)

Lindley, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel (1955)

Lindsay, G. Carroll (1955)

Lindsay, Ian G. (1957)

Lindsay, Joan R. (1949)

Line, Ralph Marlow (1953)

Linn, Janet Denithorne (1970)

Lipman, Jean (1971)

Lipman, Jonathan (1980)

Lipstadt, Helene Rebecca (1976)

Lisker, Albert (1953)

Lisker and Lisker (1954)

Liskowski, Bohdan (1961)

Lissam, Simon (1965)

Little and Ives Co. (1960)

Little, Bertram (1960)

Little, Sidney W. (1953-1955)

Liverpool School of Architecture (1949, 1958, 1962-1963)

Liverpool University Architecture Society (1955)

Locchead, Kenneth (1952)

Locke, Margaret E. (1949)

Lockwood-Matthews Mansion (1973)

Lo Curzio, Massimo (1965)

Lodge, Henry Cabot (1950)

Lodge, Sprucewold (1954)

Loeb, Hermann (1946)

Loeb, John (1974-1976, 1983)

Loftstrom, Edward V. (1963)

Logan, Ann M. (1955)

London (1963)

Long Island Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of (1969)

Long, Susie (1949)

Longhi, David (1959, 1974)

Look Magazine -- (1962)

Lord Travel Agency (1952, 1954)

Loren, Erle (1955)

Los Angeles (1972)

Los Angeles County Museum (1955, 1958)

Lotus (1964, 1970)

Louisiana State University (1955, 1958)

Louisville, J. B. Speed Art Museum (1952)

Louisville, University of (1975)

Louw, H. J. (1977)

Love, Iris (1965)

Lowd, Dana (1951)

Lowe, David (1951-1954, 1975)

Lowe, John (1955)

Lowell, Isabel (1923)

Lowenthal, Esther (1961, 1964, 1968-1969)

Lowenthal, Helen (1951-1952, 1955-1956)

Lowry, Bates (1966, 1972)

Lubbock, Jules (1980)

Lubetkin, Bertholde (1936, 1945-1946, undated)

Lucas, Clive (1974)

Lucas, Jannette (1948, 1950-1952)

Luckhurst, K. W. (1951, 1955-1956)

Luginbuhl, Viola (1962)

Lukas, Gabriel (1969)

Lukomski, George (1956)

Luman, Thomas (1938)

Lunn Travel (1962)

Lurcat, Andre (1928, 1930, undated)

Luty, Alan (1963)

Luzuriaga, Carlos (1949)

Lym, G. R. (1978)

Lyman Allen Museum (1942, 1947, 1949, 1958)

Lyman, Charles (1965)

Lyman, Dwight C. (1955, 1973)

Lynes, Russell (1973)

Maas and Co. (1962)

Maas, John (1957, 1966, 1969-1971)

McAndrew, John (1940, 1945, 1949, 1953, 1957, 1969, 1978, 1981)

McArthur, Shirley (1985)

McAuley, Theodora (1962)

McBreen (1949)

McBride, Henry (1947)

McCall's Magazine -- (1946)

McCallum, Ian (1956, 1958-1959, 1963-1964)

McCay, Mrs. A. B. (1948)

McComb, Arthur (1945)

McCormick, Margaret (1978)

McCormick, Thomas J. (1948-1987, undated)

McCosher, Delphina (1964)

McCoubrey, John W. (1967)

McCoy, Esther (1956, 1960)

McCray, Porter (1956, 1969)

McCullough, Jane Fiske (1966, 1968)

McDonald (1978)

McDonald, Thoreau (1949)

McDonald, William L. (1955, 1963, 1982-1983)

MacDougall, Elisabeth B. (1980)

McGehee, Mary (1955)

McGraw Hill Co. (1957, 1959,-1966)

McGuire, Diane Kostial (1963)

McGuire, William (1972)

McIlhenny, Henry P. (1955, 1971)

McIntyre, Ruth A. (1962)

Mackay Brothers and Co. (1947)

Mackay, David (1965-1966)

Mackay-Smith, Alexander (1952-1953, 1962) ( -- see also -- : Smith, Alexander Mackay)

McKean, A. G. (1953)

McKenna, Rosalie Thorne (Rollie) (1949-1958)

McKibbin, David (1949, 1956, 1959, 1961)

McKinley (1956)

McKinley, Hazel G. (1964, 1979, 1981)

Mackintosh Society (1963-1964)

McLanathan, Richard B. K. (1958)

MacLaren, Alistair (1960, 1962-1964, 1966, 1968, 1970)

McMillan Co. (1953)

Macmillan Encyclopedia of Architects -- (1980, 1982)

Macmillan Publishers, Ltd. (1984)

McNair, Andrew (1975)

McNamara, Ellen 1974, 1976

Macomber, C. Clark (1951)

Macomber, Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. (1955)

Macomber, Gail (1953)

McQuade, Walter (1960)

McReynolds, George (1952)

Magazine of Art -- (1947-1953)

Magaziner, Henry J. (1971-1973)

Magee, John J. (1970)

Magill, Peter (1951, 1955)

Magruder, Charles (1957)

Mahard, Francis M. (1968)

Maher, Billy (undated)

Maher, James T. (1981)

Maher, William P. (1938)

Maison du Libre (1951)

Manchester Society of Architects, Student Association (1955)

Mancini, Lillian (1951)

Mancoff, Debra (1978)

Mandell, Mrs. M. Hussey (1952)

Mandell, Richard (1968)

Mandelsohn, Louise (1955)

Mang, Karl (1974)

Manitoba, University of (1958-1959)

Manning, Eileen (1952)

Mansell Collection (1956-1958)

Manson, Grant (1941, 1952, 1957-1958)

Manuzio (1962)

Maple and Co. (1946)

Mar, Arxiu (1958)

Marcus, Stanley (1962)

Marden, Philip S. (1951)

Marder, Tom (1979-1981)

Marenco, Vittoria (1964)

Mark, Edward L. (1966-1967)

Markowitz, Arnold (1970)

Mark Twain Memorial (1966-1970, 1975, 1977)

Marlborough Fine Arts Ltd. (1962)

Marlor, Clark S. (1969)

Marmo (1962)

Marquis, Alice (1986)

Marquis Co. (1947- 1948)

Marr, Harriet (1952)

Marre, Robert de La (1927)

Marsanas, Luis (1963-1964)

Marshall, Percy Johnson (1959, 1963) ( -- see also -- : Johnson-Marshall, Percy)

Martienssen, Heather (1962)

Martin, J. L. (1946-1947, 1952)

Martin, J. R. (1965)

Martin, Leslie (1954, 1957, 1959, 1962-1963)

Martin, Thomas P. (1947)

Martindale, Katharine (1960)

Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting (1978)

Maryland Historical Society (1957)

Maryland State Library (1939)

Marzoli, Carla C. (1954, 1956, 1958, 1964, 1968)

Mas, Arxiu (1956)

Masheck, Joseph (1970, 1973, 1977)

Mason, Clark (1963-1964)

Mason, Francis S. (1961-1965, 1967, 1979)

Mason, Howard (1962)

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of (1952, 1954)

Massachusetts Hospital Service, Inc. (1954)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1946-1952, 1954, 1958, 1962-1963, 1965-1973, 1975-1981)

Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Assigned Risk Pool (1955)

Massachusetts Review -- (1969)

Massachusetts State Association of Architects (1954, 1957)

Massachusetts Turnpike Authority (1959)

Massachusetts, University of (1951, 1969)

Massey, James C. (1963, 1966)

Matheson, Donald W. (1980)

Matheson, Martin (1966)

Mattingly, Garrett (1946)

Maufe, Edward (1960)

Maunoury, Jean (1948)

Maxant, Harriett (1967)

Maxon, John (1961)

Maxtone-Graham, John (1974)

Maxwell, Clifford (1975, 1977, 1981)

Maxwell Mansion (1971)

May, John S. (1955)

Mayer, Grace M. (1953)

Mayflower Descendants, Society of (1944-1945, 1947-1950, 1952, 1954, 1956, 1959, 1963, 1966-1968, 1970, 1973-1975)

Mayher, Phil (1952)

Mayne, Jonathan (1962)

Mead, Katherine (1964, 1967)

Medicare/Blue Shield (1971-1972, 1985) ( -- see also -- : Blue Cross/Blue Shield)

Meehan, Patrick J. (1984)

Meeks, Carroll (1944-1966, undated)

Meigs, Walter (1954)

Meijburn, Herm. van der Kloot (1927)

Meiss, Millard (1952, 1960, 1962- 1963)

Melbourne, University of (1958)

Mellon, Tom (1962)

Mellquist, Jerome (1955-1956, 1958)

Mendelsohn, Eric (1953)

Mendelsohn, Frances (1959)

Mendenhall (1964)

Menges, Axel (1986)

Meredith Press (1962)

Meriden Gravure Co. (1960)

Merkel, Jayne (1967)

Merrill, David O. (1960)

Mesevery, Robert (1956)

Metcalf Printing (1973)

Metcalf, Priscilla (1956-1957, 1962-1963, 1966-1968, 1977)

Metropolitan Museum of Art (1951, 1968-1970, 1972-1973, 1979-1980, 1982)

Meyer, B. A. (1946)

Meyer, Charles (1961)

Miami, University of (1972)

Michalski, Thomas (1976)

Michigan, University of (1928, 1947-1948, 1965-1966, 1970)

Microcard Committee (1951)

Microcard Foundation (1948)

Middlesex Hospital (1938, 1941, 1945)

Middlesex School Alumni Bulletin -- (1952)

Middleton, Robin (1956-1961, 1963-1967, 1969, 1971-1972, 1978)

Middletown Press (1945)

Mies van der Rohe (1947)

Miles, H. (1961)

Miles, Hamish (1965, 1966)

Miles, James (1946)

Miles, Jean (1960)

Millar, John F. (1980-1983)

Millar, Olive (1952)

Millech, Knud (1930, 1956)

Miller Co. (1945, 1947-1952, 1955)

Miller, Dorothy (1961)

Miller, Herman (1963)

Miller, Janet (1978)

Miller, Meredith (1958-1959)

Miller, R. Craig (1973-1978, 1981-1984, 1986)

Miller, Mrs. Russ (1958)

Miller, Stephen R. (1976- 1977)

Millett, Fred B. (1949, 1963)

Millon, Henry A. (1956, 1964, 1966-1967, 1978, 1980-1981, 1983)

Millon, Henry A. and Judy (1973)

Millon, Judy (1982, 1984)

Milne-Henderson, Pat (1960, 1962) ( -- see also -- : Henderson, Pat Milne)

Milwaukee Art Center (1977)

Milwaukee Public Library (1952)

Minard, Ralph (1963)

Mindlin, Henrique E. (1955)

Minneapolis City Planning Department (1969)

Minneapolis Institute of Arts (1941, 1956, 1959)

Minnesota Society of Architects (1958)

Minnesota, University of (1944, 1946-1947, 1949-1950, 1955, 1958, 1961-1962, 1969, 1972, 1985)

Minnick, Margaret (1979-1981)

Minton, Lee R. (1973)

Mississippi State College for Women (1947)

Mitchell, Allen (1963)

Mitchell, Anthon (1952)

Mitchell, Charles (1962, 1974)

Mitchell, Herbert (1969, 1975)

Mitchell, Robert D. (1970)

Mitchell, Shirley Spratt (1968)

Mock, Betty (1947, 1949-1951)

Modern Age (1962)

Modern Architecture (1943, 1945)

Modern Architecture Symposium (1962, 1964, 1966)

Moe, Henry Allen (1953, 1963, 1968)

Moeller, Achim F. (1973)

Moholy-Nagy, Sibyl (1969, 1971)

Mohr, Elizabeth Heaton (1963)

Moise, Howard (1951)

Moller, C. F. (1956)

Moltke, J. W. (1971)

Mongan, Agnes (1944-1948, 1950-1955, 1963, 1969, 1973)

Mongan, Elizabeth (1945)

Monkhouse, Christopher P. (1982)

Monks Hall Museum (1964)

Montgomery, Charles F. (1955, 1959)

Montrose (1952)

Moog, Helen C. (1948)

Moore, Asher (1940-1941, 1943, 1945-1954, 1958-1961, 1981)

Moore, C. A. (1953)

Moore, Charles (1952)

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Frazes (1951)

Moore, Henry (1955)

Moore, Hugh (1965)

Moore, Lamont (1951)

More, Hermon (1948)

Morea, Alberto (1957, 1959)

Moret, O.J.V. (1955)

Morgan, Charles H. (1965)

Morgan, Keith N. (1980-1981)

Morgan, William N. (1957)

Morgas, Antonio de (1956)

Morison, Samuel E. (1951)

Morley, Grace L. McCann (1937)

Morra (1958)

Morris, Mrs. E. Huckins (1959)

Morris, Ellen (1980)

Morris, Laura B. S. (1962)

Morris Society (1965)

Morris, Mrs. V. C. (1951)

Morrison, Hugh (1935-1936, 1940-1941, 1945, 1947-1953, 1956, 1970)

Morrison, Mary Lane (1977)

Morrissey, Rita (1957-1961, 1966-1967, 1969-1975, 1980, 1982, 1985-1986)

Morse, John D. (1946- 1947)

Morton, James P. (1976)

Morton, John and Flossie (1941)

Morton, M. M. (1960)

Moss, Richard (1959)

Mount Holyoke College (1942, 1947, 1949, 1951-1952, 1957, 1963, 1970)

Mount Vernon Ladies Association (1955)

Moynihan, Daniel Patrick (1986)

Mumford, Lewis (1927-1930, 1945-1946, 1948, 1951, 1979, 1982)

Munich (1956)

Municipal Art Society of New York (1957, 1978-1981, 1983)

Munson Williams Proctor Institute (1951, 1962, 1966-1967)

Munsterberg, Hugo (1946)

Munz, Heinrich (1958)

Munz, Ludwig (1956)

Murphy, Francis (1967)

Murray, Edward (1971)

Murtagh, William J. (1979-1980)

Museo Internazionale di Architettura Moderna (1961-1963)

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1962) ( -- see also -- : Boston, Museum of Fine Arts)

Museum of Modern Art (1936, 1939, 1941, 1943-1962, 1964-1969, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1982, 1984, undated)

Museum of the City of New York (1956-1958)

Musgrave, Clifford (1956)

Music Press (1949)

Myers, Denys P. (1963)

Mylonas, Paul M. (1956)

Mystic Seaport (1974)

Nachmani, Cynthia (1977)

Nagel, Charles (1954-1955)

Nagle, Priscilla C. (1963)

Nairn, Ian (1956)

Napoli, Univesita degli Studi di (1978)

Napper, J. H. (1961)

Nash, Roy (1949-1950)

Nash, Suzanne (1952)

Nation -- (1957)

National Academy of Design (1962)

National Archives of Canada ( -- see -- : Canada, National Archives of)

National Buildings Record -- (1942, 1947, 1949)

National Buildings Register (1942-1943, 1954, 1956, 1958, 1960)

National Council on the Arts and Government (1957)

National Cyclopedia of American Biography -- (1961, 1970-1971)

National Endowment for the Humanities (1969-1970, 1973, 1975-1976, 1978-1979)

National Foundation for Arts and Humanities (1970-1971)

National Galleries of Scotland (1946)

National Gallery (London) (1964)

National Gallery of Art (1950, 1962, 1964, 1968, 1975, 1980-1982)

National Gallery of Canada (see: Canada, National Gallery of)

National Institute of Arts and Letters (1956)

National Monuments Record (1971)

National Park Service (1965, 1970)

National Registration Identity Card (Great Britain) (1946)

National Science Foundation (1968)

National Trust (1950, 1952)

National Trust for Historic Preservation (1955, 1958, 1961-1962, 1964-1966, 1969-1970, 1976-1978)

National Trust for Scotland (1953)

Navy League (1946)

Naylor, Edith M. (1944)

Nebraska, University of (1955)

Nelson, Paul D. (1928)

Nesbin, Esther W. (1950)

Netherlandish Scrolled Gables... -- ( -- see -- : Dutch Gables Book)

Netsch, Walter (1961)

Neuburg Staatsarchiv (1973)

Neuman, Hartwig (1985)

Neutra, Richard (1928, 1940-1941, 1954, 1969, undated)

Neville, Elizabeth (1964)

Neville, Richard G. (1958)

Neville, Harriett Elizabeth (1966)

New American Library (1952)

New Amsterdam Casualty Co. (1948)

New England Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of (1972-1973) ( -- see also -- : Preservation of New England Antiquities, Society for the; Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities)

New England Architecture, Committee for the Centennial Exhibition of (1957)

New England Quarterly -- (1955)

New Gallery (1963)

New Haven Festival of Arts (1959)

New Haven Preservation Trust (1964, 1966-1969)

New Jersey Historical Society (1962)

New Jersey Society of Architects (1957)

New Liberty (1952)

New London (1976)

New Mexico, University of (1957)

New Watson Hotel (1955)

New York Central Railway (1956)

New York City (1972)

New York City, Art Commission of (1983)

New York City Planning Commission (1972)

New York Graphic Society (1970

New York Herald Tribune -- (1947)

New-York Historical Society (1950-1951, 1961-1962, 1969)

New York State Association of Architects (1949)

New York State, Temporary Commission on the Restoration of the Capitol (1980-1981)

New York, State University of (1952)

New York Times -- (1947-1948, 1957, 1960-1961)

New York University (1945-1949, 1951-1954, 1958, 1960-1961, 1968-1986) ( -- see also -- : Gray Art Gallery; Institute of Fine Arts) New York University Seminar (1977, 1980)

New Yorker -- (1926, 1946)

Newark Public Library (1969)

Newbegin's Bookshop (1947)

Newberry, S. W. (1958)

Newcastle (1956)

Newcastle on Tyne, University of (1970)

Newcomb College (1961)

Newcomb, Rexford (1946-1947)

Newhall, Beaumont (1947, 1950, 1952, 1955-1958, 1967)

Newhan Book Shop (1947)

Newhouse, S. I., Jr. (1982)

Newhouse, Victoria (1980-1982, 1984)

Newman, Robert B. (1952, 1954-1955)

Newmeyer, Alfred (1959-1960)

Newnham College (1962)

Newnes, Ltd. (1946)

Newport Co. [Rhode Island], Preservation Society of (1952) ( -- see also -- : Preservation Society of Newport Co. [Rhode Island])

Newport Historical Society (1968)

Newton, Roger Hale (1946, 1953)

Nicholette, Manfredi (1955)

Nichols, Fred (1956-1960)

Nicholson, Ben (1946, 1950-1953)

Niebling, Howard V. (1973)

Niemeyer, Oscar (1955-1956)

Nijmegan (1969)

Nineteenth Century American Architects -- [with Philip Johnson] (1932)

Nismonger, Estelle (1948)

Noble, Michael (1972)

Nodena Foundation (1952)

Noehles, Karl (1956)

Nordt, Janis M. H. 1981

North Carolina, University of (1941, 1960, 1969)

North Dakota Agricultural College (1953)

North Easton (1968)

North Easton Historic District, H. H. Richardson Tour (1975)

Northampton Historical Society (1952)

Northwest College Lectures and Concerts Association (1959)

Northwestern University (1968-1971, 1977-1978, 1985)

Norton and Co. (1965-1967, 1970, 1978-1979, 1981-1982)

Norton, Paul H. (1952-1953, 1957-1960, 1963, 1966-1968)

Notre Dame, University of (1965)

Novotny (1959)

Noyes, S. R. (1947)

Nutt, Richard S. (1959)

Oak Park (1969)

Oak Park, Landmarks Commission of (1978)

Oakes Ames Memorial Hall (1970)

Oberhuber, Konrad (1965)

Oberlin College (1947, 1950)

Obesity Diet (1945)

O'Brien, Wendy (1962)

Observer -- (1953)

O'Callaghan, John (1970-1971, 1974)

Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl (1972, 1975, 1979-1987)

O'Connor, R. B. (1962)

O'Gorman, James F. (1970, 1974, 1977)

Ogunquit Museum of Art (1965)

Ohio Historical Society (1956)

Ohio State University (1952, 1959, 1962, 1967)

Ohle (1956)

Ojeda, Luis (1949)

Oklahoma, University of (1949)

Olana (1964, 1966)

Old Print Shop, Inc. (1951)

Olds, Irving S. (1952)

O'Leary, Pat (1956-1957)

Olfanos (1970)

Ollinger, G. Batchelder (1970)

Olmstead, Lorena Ann (1951)

Olpp, William H. (1948)

Olsen, Karolyn (1954-1955)

Olson, Charles (1965-1966)

Olson, Joan H. (1964)

O'Malley, Rev. J.M.E. (1960)

O'Malley-Williams, A. C. (1961) ( -- see also -- : Williams, A. C. O'Malley)

Omoto, Sadayoski (1951)

O'Neal, William B. (1961, 1967, 1970, 1978)

O'Neil, Kathleen (1946)

One World (1946)

Onot, Etta S. (1973)

Open University (1981)

Oppeille (1946)

Oppenheimer, Herbert (1975-1977)

Oppositions -- (1974)

Opus Musicum -- (1964)

Oregon, University of (1953, 1960-1962)

Orfanos, Patricia (1982)

Orth, Myra (1971, 1973)

Ortner, Evelyn (1970)

Ortner, Everett H. (1975)

Osmun, Bill (1959)

Osterreichische Nationalbibliothek (1956, 1958)

Osterstrom, Marta (1966)

Ostrow, Stephen (1957)

Osuhowski, Carol (1955)

Ott, Orville (1956)

Otto, Christian F. (1965-1966, 1968, 1970-1972, 1975, 1979-1982)

Oud, J.J.P. (1928-1929, 1948, 1950, undated)

Oudheidkunding Genootschap (1962)

Owings, Nathaniel (1961)

Overby, Osmund (1968, 1971, 1973, 1976-1977)

Owens, Dean (1981)

Owens, Jean (1976)

Oxford University (1935, 1953)

Ozinga, M. D. (1953, 1961-1964, 1966)

Pacific Historical Review -- (1970)

Padovic, James Farrell (1952, 1955)

Paffrath Gallery (1960-1961)

Pagano Foundation (1963)

Page, Evelyn (1950, 1954)

Page, Gertrude W. (1931)

Page, H. (1952)

Page, Robert (1975)

Paget, Paul (1971)

Paige, Maude Steinway (1969)

Paint Journal -- (1956)

Palestrant, Stephen (1963)

Pallottino, Massimo (1961)

Palmer, James E. (1952)

Palmer, Richard (1946)

Palmes, James C. (1957)

Palsgrove, James L. (1948, 1953)

Panofsky, Erwin (1940, 1945, 1952-1953, 1956, 1961)

Park, Helen O'B. (1975)

Park, Rosemary (1954)

Paris, Barbara (1949)

Parker, Barbara (1954)

Parkhurst, Charles (1952, 1954-1955, 1961, 1968)

Parkin, John C. (1959-1960, 1962, 1964, 1968)

Parks, Robert O. (1955-1956, 1961-1962)

Parmentier, Douglas (1945)

Parsons, Katharine (1952-1953, 1960, 1963)

Parsons School of Design (1947)

Partovi, Zahra (1985)

Partridge, Margaret (1973)

Passediot Gallery (1949)

Passport (1945, 1954, 1968)

Pastuhov, Vladimir Dimitrievitch (1961)

Paterson, A. B. (1953)

Patterson, John (1942, 1947)

Pattison, Walter (1947)

Paul, Adaline (1952-1953)

Paul, Jacques (1966)

Paul, Jurgen (1965, 1971, 1973-1974)

Paul Memorial Library (1954)

Paulsson, Gregor (1956)

Paxton Drawings (1951)

Peabody Institute of Baltimore (1938)

Peabody Museum (1948, 1951)

Peale Museum (1952-1953, 1956) ( -- see also -- : Baltimore City Museum)

Pearlman, Jill (1985-1986)

Pearson Fund (1977)

Pearson, Marjorie (1972, 1978-1980)

Pearson, Norman H. (1952)

Peat, Wilbur (1955)

Peck, F. Taylor (1954)

Pegge, Denis (1962)

Pei, I. M. (1962)

Pelican Books (1971, 1979)

Pelligrini and Cudahy, Inc. (1948)

Pelzer, Dorothy (1948)

Pendleton, Ralph (1955)

Penguin Books (1945-1946, 1953, 1955, 1957-1979, 1981- 1982, 1984)

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (1950-1951, 1972-1973)

Pennsylvania, Historical Society of (1942, 1953, 1958)

Pennsylvania Railroad Co. (1956-1957)

Pennsylvania State College (1949-1950, 1952)

Pennsylvania, University of (1955-1957, 1970, 1973, 1976-1978)

Pennsylvania, University of, Architecture Society (1952-1953)

Penrose Annual -- (1956)

Penshorn, Everett (1973)

Pentland, W. T. (1957)

Perkin, George (1960)

Perkins, Elizabeth (1966)

Perkins, Holmes (1952-1953, 1956, 1960-1961)

Perry, Judy (1956)

Perspecta -- (1957, 1959-1960, 1963-1964, 1970, 1981)

Perspectives U.S.A. -- (1952)

Perstel Verlag (1972)

Peters, Susan Dodge (1978)

Peterson, Bob (1961)

Peterson, Charles E. (1936, 1947-1948, 1950-1954, 1956, 1966, 1974)

Peterson, Jon (1964)

Peterson, Joyce (1952-1953)

Petersson, Robert (1956)

Petrick (1950)

Petrides, Andreas (1980)

Pettingil, George E. (1956-1957, 1978)

Pevsner Festschrift (1966-1969)

Pevsner Memorial Library (1986)

Pevsner, Nikolaus (1941-1942, 1945, 1947-1979, 1983-1984, undated)

Pfistermeister, Ursula (1971)

Phaidon Press, Ltd. (1967, 1969, 1970-1973)

Phelps, Kevin (1977)

Phi Beta Kappa (1948, 1954, 1958)

Philadelphia Award (1960)

Philadelphia, Free Library of (1944)

Philadelphia, Library Company of (1980)

Philadelphia Museum of Art (1945, 1951, 1954-1955, 1974-1975, 1982)

Phillips, Cecil L. (1946)

Phillips, John (1946)

Phillips, Wildger John (1952)

Phoenix Indemnity Co. (1955)

Photographie Giraudon (1958)

Pickard of Leeds, Ltd. (1954)

Pickens, Buford L. (1941, 1945, 1960, 1968, 1978)

Picture Post Library (1952-1955)

Pidgeon, Monica (1955)

Pierson, Jewel (1965)

Pierson, William (1948, 1953)

Pilgrim Society (1945-1954, 1956-1958, 1960-1986)

Piper, Marion K. (1971)

Pitt and Scott Ltd. (1956)

Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation (1967)

Pittsburgh, University of (1928, 1956-1957)

Placzek, Adolph K. (1965-1967, 1973-1974, 1976, 1979)

Plagemann, Volker (1969)

Planning Committee [Birkenhead Co., England] (1954)

Plaut, James S. (1946, 1953)

Pleasants, Frederick K. (1948, 1954)

Plenum Publishing Corp. (1969-1972)

Pleydel, H. Cliquet (undated)

Pleydell-Bouverie, David (1965, 1971, 1977-1978, 1983, undated) ( -- see also -- : Bouverie, David Pleydell)

Plimouth Plantation, Inc. (1950, 1953, 1955)

Plishke, E. A. (1954)

Plymouth Antiquarian Society (1952, 1960, 1962-1963, 1970, 1973-1974, 1976, 1983)

Plymouth Five Cents Savings Bank (1961)

Plymouth National Bank (1945, 1955)

Poe, Anthony (1955)

Poland (1973)

Polish Academy of Sciences (1972)

Polish Embassy (1970)

Pollard, Phyllis (1958)

Polshek, James Stewart (1980)

Polytechnic School of Architecture, Surveying, and Building (1955)

Pommer, Richard (1965, 1967, 1971, 1974-1975)

Pomona College (1946, 1963)

Pope-Hennessy, John (1959, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1971-1973, 1978)

Poppeliers, John C. (1968)

Porter, A. Kingsley (1923-1925, 1927-1931)

Porter, Lucy (1930, 1936, 1945-1946, 1949-1954, 1956-1957, 1963, undated)

Porter-Phelps-Huntington House, Inc. (1953, 1955-1957)

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation (1962-1964, 1967)

Portnoy, Martin (1986)

Portsmouth Priory (1949)

Posener, Julius (1964-1966, 1968-1969)

Postmaster, Western District, London (1956)

Potter, Brooks ( 1956)

Potter, Inc. (1969)

Powell, Herbert ( 1963)

Powell, Philip (1952)

Powell, Philip and Moya (1954)

Praeger, Inc. (1962-1963, 1967-1971, 1973)

Prairie School Press (1963, 1966, 1968, 1970)

Prakapas, Eugene J. (1974, 1985)

Prats, Joan (1956)

Pratt and Whitney Aircraft (1945)

Praz, Mario (1955-1956)

Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1962)

Pre-Raphaelite Decorative Arts Exhibition (1971)

Preservation League of New York (1981)

Preservation of New England Antiquities, Society for the (1956, 1963, 1966) ( -- see also -- : New England Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of; Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities)

Preservation Society of Newport Co. [Rhode Island] (1948, 1955) ( -- see also -- : Newport Co. [Rhode Island], Preservation Society of)

Prestel Verlag (1975)

Preston, James (1963)

Preusser, Robert (1957)

Prey, Pierre du (1968-1969)

Preziosi, Donald (1981)

Price, Eric J. (1946)

Price, Paton (1949)

Priest, Allen (undated)

Primex Trading Co. (1950)

Prince, Charlotte (1969)

Princeton University (1945-1947, 1951-1952, 1955, 1957-1958, 1963, 1972, 1974-1978, 1985)

Prior, Harris K. (1947-1949, 1951, 1954-1956, 1962)

Pritzker Architecture Prize (1982)

Prochnik, Wit-Olaf (1956)

Producers' Council (1961-1962)

Program (1964)

Progressive Architecture -- (1948, 1953-1954, 1956-1958, 1960-1961, 1965-1967, 1969, 1971, 1977)

Propylaen Verlag Berlin (1975)

Providence Preservation Society (1960-1961)

Providence Public Library (1969)

Ptasnik, Mieczyslaw (1970)

Pugin's "Contrasts," Introduction to (1968)

Pulitzer, Mrs. Ralph (1954)

Putnam, George (1941)

Putnam, Natalie (1953)

Quadrangle Books (1969)

Quantrill, Malcolm (1956-1963, 1967, 1983, 1985)

Quaritch Ltd. (1953)

Queens College (1947)

Quinan, John (1972, 1980)

Quincy, Edmund (1959-1962)

Quincy Society of Fine Arts (1965-1966)

Raab, Martin D. (1954)

Rabinovich, Guillermo (1962)

Radcliffe College (1962)

Radice, E. A. (Ted) (1946, 1953-1954)

Raider, Nancy (1985)

Rainer, Roland (1956)

Rambusch, Catha Grace (1980-1981, 1983)

Ramsey, Ronald Lanier (1972)

Rand, Marvin (1959)

Randall, John D. (1958, 1973, 1981, 1984)

Randall, Richard R. (1966)

Randolph Hotel (1958)

Randolph Macon Women's College (1955)

Random House (1963)

Ransom, David (1977)

Rapson, Carin (1961)

Rapson, Ralph (1954, 1958-1959)

Rat fur Formgebung (1956)

Rathbone, Perry (1951-1952)

Rathbun, Mary C. (1947)

Rauch, Basil (1954, 1956)

Rava, Rebzi (1957)

Rawles Ltd. (1953)

Rebhuhn, Anne (1941)

Redfern Gallery (1946)

Reed, L. B. (1948-1950, 1952-1953)

Reed, Susan Welsh (1965)

Reeves and Son (1946)

Reform Club (1955)

Regensburg Stadt Museum (1973)

Regina College (1952)

Regional Planning Office [Australia] (1953)

Reiach, Alan (1954, 1956-1957)

Reid, Alexander (1946)

Reiff, Robert (1959)

Reinauer, B. Franklin (1985)

Reinberger, Mark (1982)

Reiner, Jan (1952)

Reinhardt, Phyllis A. (1953-1955, 1960-1961, 1967-1968)

Reinhold Books (1957, 1959)

Reinhold Publishing Co. (1954)

Reinink, A. W. (1964, 1966-1967, 1969-1972)

Renaissance Conference (1945)

Renaissance Quarterly -- (1970)

Renaissance Society of America (1954, 1956-1958, 1961)

Renascence (1955)

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1947, 1986)

Research Publications (1970-1971)

Residenz Verlag (1968)

Revista de Occidente Argentinia -- (1949)

Rewald, John (1977)

Rewald, S. (1976)

Rheinisches Museum (1958)

Rheinland Landschaftsverband (1956)

Rhode Island (1968)

Rhode Island Architecture -- (1939, 1968)

Rhode Island School of Design (1949-1950, 1952, 1956, 1982-1983)

Rhoads, William B. (1969)

Ribner, Jonathan (1979)

Rice, Davis and and Daley (1946-1949)

Rice Institute (1958)

Rice, Norman (1966)

Rich, Daniel Catton (1981)

Rich, Frances (1966)

Richards, Brian (1955)

Richards, Charles R. (1928)

Richards, Jim (1950, 1956)

Richards, Jim and Kit (1955)

Richards, John M. (1946, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1965)

Richardson (1956)

Richardson, A. E. (1945, 1954)

Richardson, Douglas (1971-1972, 1974-1976)

Richardson, Douglas Scott (1966)

Richardson, E. P. (Ted) (1953, 1955)

Richardson, H. H. (1974, 1978, 1982)

Richardson, Joseph P. (1973)

Richmond (1947, 1965)

Ricketson, John H. (1963)

Rickey, George W. (1961)

Rider, Fremont (1950)

Rietveld (1963)

Rijksmuseum (1956)

Rindge, Agnes (1930, 1945, 1947) ( -- see also -- : Claflin, Agnes Rindge)

Ringling Museum of Art (1948-1949, 1952)

Riopelle, Chris (1979-1982, 1984)

Ripley, Dillon (1958)

Ritter, John C. (1962)

Riverside, University of California at (1966)

Robb, David M. (1945, 1953, 1959)

Roberts, Abby B. (1941)

Roberts, Laurance (1959)

Robertson, Jacques (1955)

Robertson, Nancy (1959)

Robie House, Committee for the Preservation of the (1962-1965, 1967)

Robinson and Cleaver (1960-1961)

Robinson, Cervin (1962)

Robinson, Franklin W. (1981)

Roche, Kevin (1966, 1974-1975)

Rochester (1967)

Rochester Memorial Art Gallery (1949)

Rochester, Print Club of (1949-1950)

Rochester, University of (1970)

Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. David (1967)

Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. John D., 3rd (1955)

Rockefeller, Winston (1957)

Rococo Architecture in Southern Germany -- (1967-1968)

Rodman, Selden (1949)

Roe, Albert S. (1961)

Rollins, Clara B. (1950)

Romaine, Lawrence B. (1941, 1946-1953, 1955, 1958, 1961)

Rome (1959)

Roop, Ellen (1967)

Roos, Frank J. (1938, 1947)

Roosevelt University (1957-1958)

Rorimer, James J. (1955)

Roscoe, Field (1952)

Rose, Francis (1947, 1949-1954, 1956, 1964, undated)

Rose, Frederica (1955)

Rose, Laura (1976)

Rosebery, Earl of (1952)

Rosenberg, Arthur M. (1951)

Rosenberg, Eugene (1956)

Rosenberg, George (1976)

Rosenberg, Jim (1954)

Rosenblum, Robert H. (1952-1953, 1956-1969, 1972, 1982)

Rosenthal, Julius (1948)

Rosenwald, Lessing J. (1948)

Rosett, Francis (1957-1958)

Rosever, Kenneth M. (1952)

Ross, Marian Dean (1941, 1947, 1952-1954, 1956, 1960-1962, undated)

Ross, Marvin C. (1957, 1962)

Ross, Robert W. (1925, undated)

Roth, Leland (1970, 1973-1974, 1976, 1978, 1982)

Rothenberg, Jacob (1952)

Rowaan, H. (1963)

Rowe, Barbara C. (1958)

Rowe, Brian and Colin (1952)

Rowe, Colin (1953-1956, 1960-1961, 1964, 1977)

Rowland, Browse and Delbanco (1952)

Rox, Henry (1953, 1945)

Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (1955)

Royal Architectural Institute of Canada ( -- see -- : Canada, Royal Architectural Institute of)

Royal Automobile Club (1956)

Royal College of Art (1953)

Royal Institute of British Architects (1936, 1946-1957, 1959, 1962, 1968, 1970, 1975, 1981,1986)

Royal Society of Arts (1950, 1953, 1955-1956, 1959-1962, 1964, 1966-1967, 1969-1970, 1972, 1975-1976, 1978-1980, 1983, 1985-1986)

Royal Vangorcum Ltd. 1965

Rub, Timothy (1978-1982, 1986-1987)

Rubin, Don (1970)

Rubin, Joan Carpenter (1980)

Rudd, J. William (1961, 1963, 1966)

Rudisill, Richard (1964)

Rudolph, Paul (1950, 1952-1954, 1963-1964, undated)

Rueger, Charles (1954)

Rufford Travel (1954-1955)

Ruggie Agency (1949-1950, 1952-1955, 1961)

Rusch, Basil (1955)

Rusk, W. S. (1935)

Ruskin Society of America (1951, 1953)

Russell, A. LeBaron (1947)

Russell, Beverly (1975)

Russell, Christopher A. (1953)

Russell, Gordon (1956)

Russell, Mr. and Mrs. William G. (1954)

Russian Review -- (1955)

Rutgers University (1955, 1972-1973, 1982, 1985)

Rutledge, Anna Wells (1951, 1955, 1957, 1962, 1966)

Ryan Studios (1958)

Ryder, Arthur (1949)

Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, Art Institute of Chicago (1949) ( -- see also -- : Burnham Library; Art Institute of Chicago; Chicago, Art Institute of)

Saarinen, Aline B. (1962)

Saarinen, Eero (1957, 1963-1964)

Sabin Coal Co. (1954-1955)

Sachs, Paul J. (1925-1926, 1928, 1951-1952, 1955)

Saint, Andrew (1982, 1986)

St. George's Gallery Books (1959, 1964-1965, 1968, 1970, 1977-1978)

St. James Press (1978)

St. John's University (1961)

St. Louis, City Art Museum of (1961, 1966)

Salmon and Son (1954)

Salto Liberia (1962)

Saltonstall, Gladys (1928)

Saltonstall, Leverett (1953)

Salzberg Seminar in American Studies (1959)

Salzburg (1953)

Samoset Garage (1946)

Samson, Miles D. (1984)

Samuel, Godfrey (1948, 1952, 1956, 1959)

San Antonio Fine Arts Forum (1958)

Sanborn, Herbert J. (1960)

San Jose State University ( -- see -- : California, San Jose State University)

Santacroce, Valeria A. (1959-1960)

Sarton, May (1953)

Satterwaithe, Margaret (1970)

Sauer, David (1958)

Sauerlander, Willebald (1961-1966, 1969, 1971-1974)

Sauermost, Heinz Jurgen 1969

Savage, Charles C. (1972-1977, 1979, 1983, 1986)

Savage, Henry (1973)

Saville Club (1946)

Sawelson-Gorse, Naomi (1986)

Sawyer, Charles H. (1947, 1952-1953)

Sawyer, H. Keith (1983)

Scalvini, Maria Luisa (1983)

Scanlan, Stuart J. (1954)

Scarmuzza, Jack (1952)

Schaack, Margaret C. D. (1974)

Schaefe, Madeline (undated)

Schaeffer, Bertha (1955)

Schaeffer, John (1946)

Schafran, Lynn (1970)

Schalk, Dorothy (1957)

Scheper, H. (1956)

Scheu-Riesze, Helene (1959)

Schindler, R. M. (1930)

Schlee (1973)

Schmidt, Erwin (1958)

Schmitt, Robert (1962-1967, 1970)

Schmoller, Hans (1958)

Schmuzer Article (1965)

Schnabel, Henry H. (1964, 1967, 1969)

Schneider, Donald D. (1961, 1966, 1975, 1976)

Schneiderman, Stephen (1962)

Schnell, Hugo (1966-1967)

Schoener, Allan (1953)

School Service Bureau (1950, 1957)

Schorske, Elizabeth (1953)

Schorske, Elizabeth and Carl (1948, 1954)

Schraack, Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. (1975)

Schreider, Louis (1971)

Schulze, Franz (1986)

Schwarz, Heinrich (1952)

Schwinn, Walter K. (1976)

Scientific American -- (1952)

Scott, Geoffrey (1928)

Scott, Hayden (1952, 1958)

Scribner's Sons (1948, 1950, 1960, 1966-1967, 1969, 1979)

Scully, Arthur (1982)

Scully, Vincent (1948, 1950-1956, 1962, 1971-1972, 1977)

Scutt (1963)

Seagram and Sons U. S. Bicentennial Project (1976-1978)

Seale, William (1973, 1975, 1980-1981, 1984, 1986)

Searing, Helen (1962-1963, 1967, 1971, 1973, 1975-1976, 1979, 1983-1984)

Seaver, Esther (1948-1949, 1952)

Seeger, Mia (1956)

Segre, Maria (1963)

Seiberling, Frank (1952, 1955-1956, 1958, 1963)

Sekler, E. F. (1953)

Sekler, Edward F. (1976)

Sekler, Edward L. (1960, 1965-1967)

Seligman, Georges E. (1950)

Sellin, David (1972)

Selz, Peter (1959-1960)

Senie, Harriet (1976, 1979, 1981)

Senter, Terance A. (1972, 1974)

Serynyk, Peter (1966, 1973)

Sert, Jose Luis (1954, 1956)

Seven Arts Book Society (1957)

Severini, Lois (1978-1979, 1982-1984)

Seymour, Anne Halle (1966)

Seznec, Jean (1955)

Shaker Community, Hancock, Mass. (1962)

Shapira, Nathan, H. (1961)

Shapiro, Ellen R. (1977)

Shapiro, Meyer (1961)

Shaw, Thomas S. (1966)

Shawe-Taylor, Desmond (1946)

Shawmut Bank (1954)

Shea, Mrs. John L. (1954)

Shear, John K. (1956)

Sheffield, Margaret (1974)

Shelter Publications (1973)

Shepley, Bullfinch, Richardson and Abbott (1961, 1981)

Shepley, Henry (1948)

Sheraton Hotel (1952, 1968)

Sheridan, Friede (1956-1959, 1961)

Sherwood, Mrs. John R. (1952)

Shillaber, Caroline (1957, 1972)

Shipley, Brown (undated)

Shipman, Mary (1965)

Shipman, Mary and Arthur (1956)

Shoe String Press, Inc. (1965, 1979)

Shokokusha Publications (1961)

Shore, James R. (1962)

Shores, Ken (1962)

Sias, Garrett K. (1959)

Sidles, Mrs. Frank C. (1963)

Sihriu, Omico (1955)

Silsby, Peter (1961)

Silverman, Jill Anne (1975)

Silvermine Publications (1965)

Simpson, Charles (1968)

Simpson, Mrs. Kenneth F. (1950)

Simpson, Marc (1977)

Simpson, P. L. (1973)

Sims, W. S. (1946)

Simson, Otto G. (1954)

Singelenberg, Pieter (1962-1963, 1970-1971, 1974)

Singleton, W. A. (1956)

Sinnen, Jean (1964)

Sise, Hazen (1969)

Sitwell, Gilbert (1952)

Sizer, Theodore (1933, 1945-1946, 1950-1952, 1956, 1963)

Skempton, A.W. (1961)

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (1960-1963, 1979)

Skopek, Thomas (1949)

Sky, Alison (1975)

Slater Memorial Museum (1950)

Sleepy Hollow Restorations (1957)

Slive, Seymour (1958)

Slive, Zoya (1965)

Sloan, Joseph C. (1959)

Sloane, Joseph C. (1958)

Small, Philip L. (1928)

Smartt, Donald (1981)

Smith, Alexander Mackay (1949) ( -- see also -- : Mackay-Smith, Alexander)

Smith and Sons (1953)

Smith, Anna L. (undated)

Smith, Betty (1928-1929)

Smith College (1946-1964, 1966-1973, 1975-1976, 1978, 1981-1982) ( -- see also -- : Department; Kennedy Fund)

Smith College Alumnae Association (1954) ( -- see also -- : Alumnae Association)

Smith, E. Baldwin (1946-1947, 1953)

Smtih, Edith (1928-1929)

Smith, Fred S. (1928)

Smith, Mrs. Frederick (1945)

Smith, G. E. Kidder (1957, 1961, 1963, 1965)

Smith, George Walter Vincent Museum (1961)

Smith, Gertrude D. (1972)

Smith, Hinchman and Grulls Associates, Inc. (1976)

Smith, Kathryn (1976-1980, 1983, 1986)

Smith, Linn (1947)

Smith, Meg (1972, 1974)

Smith, Patricia Anne (1950)

Smith, Peter van der Meulen (1927-1928)

Smith, Robert C. (1950-1952, 1956)

Smith, Sidney (1947)

Smith, Vincent (1971)

Smith, William and Son (1949)

Smithson, Peter (1966)

Smithsonian Associates (1975)

Smithsonian Institution (1967, 1976, 1979)

Smyser, H. M. (1965)

Smyth, Craig Hugh (1951-1952, 1956, 1983)

Snow, Florence (1955)

Snow, Wilbert (1945)

Snowden, Ernest (1927-1928)

Snyder, John (1974)

Soby, James Thrall (1945-1950, 1954-1955, 1957-1958, 1960-1961, 1968, 1977, 1979)

Soby, Nellie (1951-1953)

Societe Editions de France (1958)

Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities ( -- see -- : Long Island Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of)

Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (1948, 1972, 1975) ( -- see also -- : New England Antiquities, Society for the Preservation of; Preservation of New England Antiquities, Society for the)

Society of Architectural Historians (1949-1985, 1987)

Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (1958-1980, 1983-1986)

Society of Mayflower Descendants ( -- see -- : Mayflower Descendants, Society of)

Solomon, Arthur and Marny (1975)

Solomon, Pringle (1948)

Somerset Co. [N.J.] Park Commission (1970)

Somerwil, J. (1962)

Sommer, Clifford C. (1958)

Sommer, Frank (1970)

Sonne, Fi (1955-1956)

Sonnenberg, Benjamin (1972)

Sorem, Lucia (1961)

Soria, Martin (1958)

Sotheby Parke Bernet, Inc. (1971, 1982)

Southern California, University of (1966, 1968)

Southern Regional Education Board (1966)

Spaeth, John W. (1945-1946)

Spark, Victor (1948, 1971)

Spear, Dorothea (1955)

Speed Art Museum ( -- see -- : Louisville, J. B. Speed Art Museum)

Speed, Herbert (1946)

Speirs, Bruce (1982)

Spence, Basil (1963-1964)

Spence, Eleanor (1954)

Spencer, Brian (1973-1974)

Spencer, Stephen (1956)

Spencer, Walter L. (1975-1976, 1978)

Sperling, Harry G. (1955)

Speyer, Darthea (1952)

Spokes, P. S. (1955)

Sprague, Joan Forrester (1960)

Sprague, Paul (1973, 1980, 1983)

Springarn, J. E. (1938)

Springfield [Mass.] (1980-1981)

Springfield [Mass.] City Planning Department (1971)

Springfield [Mass.] Museum of Fine Arts (1949, 1954)

Springfield [Mass.] Republican (1944-1945)

Springfield [Miss.] Art Museum (1949)

Staatsarchiv (1966)

Stabile, Elizabeth (1963)

Stadt Koln (1957)

Stahl, Frederick A. (Tod) (1969-1970)

Staib, Hermann (1966, 1968-1969, 1974)

Staley, Karl A. (1953)

Stamm, Gunther (1979)

Stamp, Gavin (1978, 1985)

Stanford University (1985)

Stanton, Phoebe B. (1952-1954, 1958, 1965, 1968, 1970)

Staples Press (1950)

Starr, Mrs. Nathan C. (1952)

State Department, U. S. (1955, 1956, 1958) ( -- see also -- : Department of State; United States Department of State)

State Department, U.S. Information Agency (1957)

State Historical Society of Wisconsin ( -- see -- : Wisconsin, State Historical Society of)

Stebbins, Theodore E. (1965-1969, 1972-1973, 1977-1978)

Steegman, John (1950-1952, 1955-1956)

Steele, Geoffrey (1946, 1948, 1953)

Steen Hasselbalchs Forlag (1962)

Stein, Donna (1973-1974, 1978-1979)

Stein, Joseph A. (1947)

Stein, Margaret (1949)

Stein, Roger B. (1960)

Steiner, Johannes (1966)

Steinway and Sons (1946)

Steinway, Cassie (1960-1961, 1976, 1979, 1983-1985, undated)

Steinway, Cassie and Federick (1954)

Steinway, Frederick (1974)

Steinway, Lydia (1952-1953)

Steinway, Ruth (1928, 1945, 1947, 1949-1950, 1955-1956, 1958-1963, 1965-1968, 1970-1971, 1973-1974, 1978)

Steinway, Ruth and Theodore D. (1952-1954)

Steinway, Theodore D. (1982)

Steliaros, Mary (1974)

Stephens, Sherrie L. (1962)

Stern (1979)

Stern, Edgar (1977)

Stern, Edgar and Bita (1975)

Stern, Robert (1964, 1975, 1984-1985)

Sterner, Harold (1947)

Sternfeld, Fred and Sophia (1946-1957, 1959-1964, 1966, 1968, 1978, 1985-1986)

Sternfeld, Sophia (1970)

Stetson, Eugene W. (1965)

Stevens and Brown (1946)

Stevens, Sam (1964)

Stevens, Samuel (Thomas) (1953-1954)

Steyer, Glenn (1978)

Stiles, Florence Ward (1949-1950)

Sting, Hellmut (1966)

Stirling, James (1953)

Stockwell, E. Sidney (1960)

Stoddard and Talbot (1941, 1950, 1953, 1956, 1975)

Stoddard, Whitney (1952, 1054)

Stoedtner, Franz (1956-1958, 1964, 1970)

Stoller, Ezra (1956-1957, 1960)

Stone and Downer (1946)

Stony Point Folk Art Gallery (1957)

Stora Co. (1949)

Storrer, William Allin (1971-1978, 1980)

Stott, Eric (1982)

Stout, George L. (1953)

Stowe-Day Foundation (1965)

Stowell, Robert F. (1949)

Strache, Wolf (1963)

Strachey, John (1945)

Straight, Stephen M. (1966, 1970)

Straka, Paul (1974)

Strand, Janann (1976)

Stratton, Julius Adams (1963)

Strauss, Irma (1982)

Strickland, Charles R. (1938, 1948, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1966-1967, 1979)

Stroheim and Romann (1965)

Stroock, Paul A. (1969)

Stroud, Dorothy (1949-1953, 1955-1964, 1966-1967, 1971, 1973, 1978, 1983, undated)

Struck, Paul (1948)

Stubbins, Hugh (1952, 1960)

Stubblebine, James H. (1959, 1967-1968)

Stubbs, Mr. and Mrs. (1986)

Studio Books (1960-1961)

Studio Publications (1927-1928)

Stulz, Dale W. (1981)

Sturbridge Village (1966-1976)

Sturges, W. K. (1952)

Sturges, Walter Knight (1969-1970)

Sturm, Martha (1967)

Stuttgart (1956, 1963)

Suffness, Rita (1977)

Summerson, John (1936-1937, 1939, 1941, 1945-1949, 1952-1954, 1956, 1958, 1960-1962, 1966-1967, 1969-1970, 1980, 1982)

Sun [Baltimore] 1952 ( -- see also -- : -- Baltimore Sun -- )

Sunderland, Elizabeth (1946)

Sunderland, John (1953)

Sutherland, A. M. (1962)

Sutton, Mrs. Harvey P. (1941)

Swan, C. P. (1954)

Swarthmore College (1928, 1939, 1945)

Swayze, H. (1959)

Sweeney, James Johnson (1954, 1960)

Sweeney, Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson (1967)

Sweeney, John (1949, 1952-1953)

Sweeney, Robert L. (1976, 1980)

Sweet Briar College (1953)

Sweet, Frederick A. ( 1946, 1948, 1954)

Sweet, Victoria M. (1968)

Sweetland Photographers (1950)

Swets and Zeitlinger (1960)

Swetzoff Gallery (1951)

Swetzoff, Hyman (1952)

Swinton, George (1954-1955, 1957, 1964)

Swiss Review of World Affairs -- (1962)

Sylvester, David (1955)

Syracuse University (1976)

Syrkus, Szymon (1929)

Szambien, Werner (1977)

Tafel, Edgar (1962, 1971, 1973-1975, 1979-1980)

Tait, Alan (1966-1967)

Talbot, Harry (1952)

Talbott, Page (1976)

Talkington, Melinda (1969)

Tallmer, Jerry (1954)

Tamms, Frederick (1971)

Tannenbaum, Lily (1969)

Tanennbaum, Samuel (1952-1953)

Tate, Vernon (1947)

Tatum, George B. (1966, 1970, 1973, 1976)

Taube, Ivan (1975)

Taxes (1955)

Taylor, Fred M. (1954)

Taylor, Helen-Louise (1936-1938, undated)

Taylor, Lisa (1984)

Taylor, Nicholas (1962, 1966)

Taylor, Richard (1971)

Taylor, Walter (1953)

Tchelitchew, Paul (1952)

Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (1946, 1948, 1954, 1956, 1962)

Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt ( -- see -- : Darmstadt, Technische Hochschule)

Technology Christian Association (1949)

Teel, William E. (1955)

Teichmann, Maurice (1956)

Teitelbaum Holdings, Ltd. (1982)

Tembo, Allan (1952)

Temple Hoyle-Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture, Columbia University ( -- see -- : Columbia University, Temple Hoyle-Buell Center...)

Temple University, Tyler School of Art (1962)

Tendler, Max (1962)

Tenko, Allen (1963)

Terrestris Greenhouses (1970)

Terry, Laurence (1952)

Texas Co. (1954)

Texas, University of (1968)

Thames and Hudson, Ltd. (1961, 1967-1968, 1970, 1972)

Thevoz, Michel (1970, 1974)

Thirteen, WNET (1978)

Thom, Mary (1955-1956)

Thomas, Downing (1949)

Thommasini, Anthony (1984)

Thompson, Francis (1946)

Thompson, K. (1954)

Thompson, Luther (1946-1948, 1950)

Thompson, Margaret and Randall (1948, 1956)

Thompson, Molly (1949)

Thompson, Paul (1968)

Thompson, R. S. (1960)

Thomson, Virgil (1927-1928, 1937, 1945-1948, 1950-1952, 1955, 1959, 1963, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1971-1972, 1974, 1979-1981, 1983, 1986, undated)

Thornburrow, David A. (1958)

Thornton Society of Washington (1943)

Ticeand Lynch (1946-1947)

Time -- (1959, 1967)

Time-Life (1946)

Times Literary Supplement -- (1967)

Tiranti, John, Ltd. (1949-1950)

Tirion, P.D.J. (1949)

Tobias and Co. (1946)

Toe, Abby N. (1970)

Toledo Museum of Art (1951, 1955)

Tomlinson, Mrs. (1951)

Tomlinson, Juliette (1975, 1977)

Tonetti, Joseph (1963)

Tongue, Sukru (1955)

Tonny, K. (1932)

Topeka City Beautification Association (1955)

Torbert, Donald R. (1956, 1959, 1961)

Toronto (1957)

Toronto, Art Gallery of (1950-1951, 1958-1960, 1974, 1977) ( -- see also -- : Art Gallery of Toronto)

Toronto, University of (1957-1960, 1976)

Town and Country -- (1946)

Trachtenberg, Martin (1976)

Trager, Philip (1983-1984)

Trans-World Shipping Co. (1960)

Trapp, Frank (1953)

Trappes-Lomax, Michael (1954)

Traversa de Dalt (1956)

Treasury Department, United States ( -- see -- : United States Treasury)

Trehearne and Norman (1959-1960)

Tremaine, Dee (1950)

Tremaine, Emily (1951-1957, 1962, 1965, 1969)

Trenton (1973)

Triennale de Milano (1959)

Trinity College ( -- see also -- : Austin Art Center) (1961, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1972-1973)

Trojan, Alina (1971)

Truex, Van Day (1946-1947)

Tselos, Dmitri (1943, 1946, 1956, 1958, 1961)

Tucker and Sons, Ltd. (1954)

Tunick, Susan (1982)

Tunnard, Christopher (1945, 1949-1951, 1958, 1965, undated)

Tunnard, Christopher and Lydia (1946-1948, 1975, 1981)

Tunnard, Lydia (1956, 1963)

Turl, Victor (1946, 1956)

Turner, Evan (1958)

Turner, Paul (1970, 1977, 1985)

Tuttle Co. (1952)

Twitchell, Ralph S. (1953)

Twiss, Richard E. (1979)

Tyler School of Art ( -- see -- : Temple University)

Ufford, James K. (1958)

UNESCO (1953)

Union College (1966, 1969)

Union Internacional de Arquitectos (1963)

Unitarian Association (1950)

Unitarian Congregational Society (1945)

Unitarian Universalist Church (1963)

United Engineering Trustees (1947)

United Kingdom Income Tax (1978)

United Press Association (1955)

United States Cultural Center, Berlin (1967)

United States Department of the Interior (1938, 1962)

United States Department of State ( -- see -- : Department of State; State Department, U. S.)

United States Congress, Committee on Education and Labor ( -- see -- : Committee on Education and Labor, U. S. Congress)

United States Information Service (1946, 1961)

United States Treasury (1945, 1969)

Unity Temple (1970)

Universal Transcontinental Corp. (1947)

Univesita degli Studi di Napoli ( -- see -- : Napoli,

Universita degli Studi di) (1978)

Universita Internazionale dell'Arte (1970)

University of Bristol ( -- see -- : Bristol, University of)

University of California at Riverside ( -- see -- : Riverside, University of California at)

University of California, San Jose State ( -- see -- : California, San Jose State University)

University of Chicago (1941, 1942) ( -- see also -- : Chicago, University of)

University of Cincinnati ( -- see -- : Cincinnati, University of)

University of Delaware ( -- see -- : Delaware, University of; Winterthur Program, University of Delaware)

University of Georgia ( -- see -- : Georgia, University of)

University of Glasgow ( -- see -- : Glasgow, University of)

University of Massachusetts ( -- see -- : Massachusetts, University of)

University of Melbourne ( -- see -- : Melbourne, University of)

University of Minnesota ( -- see -- : Minnesota, University of)

University of Nebraska ( -- see -- : Nebraska, University of)

University of New Mexico ( -- see -- : New Mexico, University of)

University of Notre Dame ( -- see -- : Notre Dame, University of)

University of Oklahoma ( -- see -- : Oklahoma, University of)

University of Oregon ( -- see -- : Oregon, University of)

University of Pennsylvania ( -- see -- : Pennsylvania, University of)

University of Pittsburgh ( -- see -- : Pittsburgh, University of)

University of Texas ( -- see -- : Texas, University of)

University of Toronto ( -- see -- : Toronto, University of)

University of Wisconsin ( -- see -- : Wisconsin, University of)

University of Witwatersrand ( -- see -- : Witwatersrand, University of)

University of York ( -- see -- : York, University of)

University Prints (1956-1959, 1962, 1964)

Unnitzer, Petra (1983)

Upjohn, Everared M. (1953)

Upton, Eleanor S. (1953)

Usonia (1983)

Utrecht, Kunsthistorische Instituut (1962)

Utrecht, Ryksuniversiteit te (1968)

Valentine and Sons Ltd. (1954)

Van Agtmaal (1958)

Van Bolschwig, Otto A. (1954) ( -- see also -- : Bolschwig, Otto A. Van)

Van der Berg, H. M. (1962)

Van der Poel, Priscilla (1949-1950, 1952, 1955-1956, 1958, 1960, 1962-1964, 1966, 1968-1969)

Van Derpool, James G. (1954-1956, 1959)

Van Eyck, Aldo (1956, 1963)

Van Fleet, Frederick A. (1946)

Van Gent, Arie (1957)

Vann, James Allen (1973)

Van Ojen (1958)

Van Ravensway, Charles (1939, 1963, 1966)

Van Tassel, Peter (1952-1953, 1966)

Van Trump, James D. (1957-1959, 1961, 1965, 1969)

Van Zanten, David T. (1965-1970, 1972-1973, 1975-1979, 1983, 1985)

Vancouver Hotel (1954)

Vanderbilt, Paul (1928-1930, 1941, 1945-1946, 1948-1950, 1952-1954, undated)

Vandersall, Amy (1966, 1971-1972)

Vanity Fair -- (1982)

Varley, Lee (1946, 1948, 1954, 1979)

Vassar College (1927, 1944-1946, 1961, 1965-1966, 1975, 1977)

Vaughan College (1962)

Venezuela, Universidad Central de (1967)

Venice (1975)

Venturi, Robert (1961, 1972)

Verlag Schnell and Steiner (1967, 1969)

Veronen, L. (1966)

Victoria and Albert Museum (1946, 1948-1949, 1953, 1955-1956, 1958)

Victorian Exhibition (1972)

Victorian Paperback [ -- Early Victorian Architecture in Britain -- ] (1966)

Victorian Society (1958, 1960-1966, 1968-1970, 1972-1980, 1985)

Victorian Society in America (1968, 1971-1986)

Victorian Society in America, American State Capitols Research Project (1971-1977)

Victorian Studies -- (1956-1959, 1962, 1967, 1969, 1971, 1973-1974)

Viereck, Florence (1955)

Viereck, Peter (1949-1950, 1952-1953, 1956, 1961)

Viereck, Peter and Anya (1955)

View Magazine -- (1945)

Villanueva, A. (1956)

Villanueva, Carlos Raul (1955, 1957-1959, 1961)

Villanueva, Marcel (1965)

Viollet, Brian (1958)

Viollet, H. Roger (1959)

Virginia, Commonwealth of (1953, 1957)

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (1954, 1957)

Virginia Quarterly Review -- (1960)

Virginia, University of (1928, 1962, 1969-1970)

Visson, Assia R. (1946-1947)

Visual Publications Ltd. (1961)

Vogt, Adolf Max (1975)

Voice of America (1960, 1967)

Volpe, Anne R. (1974)

Von Erffa, Helmut (1948, 1952, 1955-1956, 1958, 1963, 1968)

Von Groschwitz, Fran (1970)

Von Groschwitz, Gustav [Von] (1945-1948, 1951-1952, 1961-1962, 1965, 1968, 1972, 1978)

Von Klemperer, Betty (1961, 1968)

Von Moschzisker, Berthe (1945, 1947-1951)

Vorenkamp, A.P.H. (1952)

Vorobiov, Mary (1954)

Vose Galleries (1960)

Vose, Robert C. (1949)

Vose, S. Morton (1952)

Vygen, Willy (1928)

Wachs, W. C. (1937)

Waddy, Patricia (1976)

Wade, John (1954)

Wade, Karen Graham (1974-1975, 1977, 1982)

Waddington Galleries (1956)

Wadsworth Athenaeum (1928, 1941, 1946-1948, 1958, 1963)

Wadsworth, Cleome (1945)

Wadsworth, Julius and Clarice (1959)

Wagner, Gunter (1983)

Wagner, Mary-Louise (1954)

Walch, Nicole (1972)

Wald, Alan (1977)

Walker Art Center (1944-1945, 1948, 1952, 1958-1959)

Walker, John (1928, 1965, 1977)

Walker, Robert (1959)

Walker, William (1946)

Wallace, Michael Lee (1959)

Walsh, Alice M. (1970)

Walter, Gayle (1953)

Walter Parrish International, Ltd. (1977)

Walters Art Gallery (1949)

Walters, Walter H. (1971)

Warburg Institute (1946, 1948)

Ward, Clarence (1943, 1945, 1947, 1952)

War Department (1948)

Ward, James (1980-1985)

Warn, Robert (1972, 1974)

Warner Burns Toan Lund (1982)

Warners, Albert (1963)

Warnoff, Deborah (1974)

Warren, Geoffrey (1936)

Warren, Richard (1974)

Warren and Whetmore (1957)

War Service Appointment (1942-1943)

Wasch, William (1983)

Washburn College (1938)

Washburn, Gordon B. (1945, 1948-1949, 1953-1954, 1965, undated)

Washington, Associated Students' University of (1965)

Washington Memorial Library (1954)

Wasmuth Antiquariat (1963-1968, 1970, 1972-1974, 1979)

Wasserman, Mrs. Amha (1959)

Wasserman, Jack (1961-1964)

Waterhouse, Ellis (1952)

Watkin, David A. (1965, 1973, 1981)

Watrous, James (1960-1961)

Watson, Peter (1946)

Watson, Steven (1985-1986)

Watts, Sarah Miles (1985)

Waugh, Arthur (1951-1953)

Way Forum (1963)

Weade, Katharine H. (1947)

Weakley, Joan (1980-1981)

Weatherby, Mrs. J. H. (1952)

Webb, Brian (1949-1950)

Webb, Geoffrey (1956)

Webb, James H. (1955)

Webb, Ltd. (1948)

Webber, Elroy (1949)

Weber, Harvey A. (1939, 1952)

Weber, Roland (1976)

Webster, J. Carson (1941, 1949, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1972-1974)

Webster, Sara (1983)

Wedgewood (1954, 1958-1959, 1961-1962)

Weese, Harry (1956)

Weill, Betsy (1977)

Weinberg, H. Barbara (1970, 1974, 1978, 1980)

Weinberg, Herbert (1954)

Weinrab, Ben (1966)

Weinreb Ltd. (1965)

Weirick, James (1974)

Weisberger, Bernard A. (1979)

Weiser, Walter (1956)

Weisman, Winston (1951-1957, 1960-1963, 1966, 1968, 1973-1975)

Weissburger, Herbert (1961)

Welch and Forbes (1956-1957, 1959, 1961, 1970, 1982, 1985)

Welch and Goodhue (1986)

Weller, Allen S. (1955)

Wellesley College (1945, 1947, 1952, 1954, 1958, 1969)

Wellington, Ohio (1973)

Wells College (1965)

Wells, Mason B. (1957-1958)

Wells, Ruth (1949)

Welsh College of Advanced Technology (1962-1963, 1966)

Wensinger, Arthur Stevens (1956, 1967)

Wenzinger, Jerry (1961)

Werkkunstschule Krefeld (1964-1965)

Wesley, Richard (1980)

Wesleyan College [Macon, Ga.] (1945)

Wesleyan University (1935, 1937-1943, 1945-1950, 1952, 1962-1963, 1967, 1973-1979, 1981-1982, 1987) ( -- see also -- : Gift)

West, J. (1952)

West-Taylor, John P. (1960, 1962)

Westbrook, Shirlee (1973-1974)

Western Reserve University (1952, 1958)

Weyhe, E. (1928, 1941, 1949, 1952-1953)

Wheaton College (1949, 1971)

Wheelock, Phyllis (1958)

Wheldon, Rupert (1927)

Whiffen, Marcus (1950-1966, 1968,-1969, 1971, 1978, 1980)

White House (1981, 1986)

White, Keith E. (1959)

White, Norval (1961)

White, Patricia (1975)

Whitechapel Art Gallery (1956)

Whitehead, Philip B. (1946)

Whitehill, Walter Muir (1951-1953, 1955, 1966, 1976)

Whitlock and Sons (1946)

Whitney Museum of American Art (1949-1950)

Whitson, Jim (1948)

Whitson Publishing Co. (1979)

Whittesley, Julian (1949)

Whittier, Charles H. (1970, 1973)

Who's Who -- (1946-1947, 1952, 1958, 1961, 1975, 1982)

Wichman, Douglas J. (1973)

Wick, Peter A. (1973)

Wickey, Thomas (1952)

Wickiser, Ralph L. (1955)

Wicksteed, O. H. (1956)

Wiebenson, Dora (1965-1966, 1968-1972, 1977, 1979, 1980)

Wiedenhoeft, Ron (1969)

Wilbraham Place (1953, 1955, 1957, 1959-1962)

Wildenstein, Georges (1953)

Wiley and Sons (1948, 1966)

Wilk, Christopher (1976, 1978)

Wilkie, David (1951-1955, 1957-1958)

Wilkinson (1956)

Wilkinson, Catherine M. (1963, 1965-1966)

Willard, Helen (1950)

Willett, Frederick W. (1969)

Williams, A. C. O'Malley (1961) ( -- see also -- : O'Malley-Williams, A. C.)

Williams, Arthur G. A. (1955)

Williams, B. (1957, 1964, 1967-1968)

Williams, Buck (1958)

Williams College (1940, 1946, 1948-1949, 1953, 1975-1976)

Williams College Museum of Art (1963)

Williams, Eda Carter (1958)

Williams, Edgar I. (1952)

Williams, David (1975)

Williams, Gail (1979)

Williams, J. Ronald (1967)

Williams, Marjory (1951)

Williams, Richard B. (1985)

Williams, Richmond (1960-1961, 1963)

Williams, Ronald (1973)

Williams, Stanley T. (1950)

Williams, Talcott (1940)

Williamsburg (1956-1957, 1961, 1972)

Williamson, L. S. (1962)

Willis, L. S. (1941)

Willis, Peter (1964-1965)

Wills, Royal Barry (1957)

Willson, Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Van Vranken (1953)

Wilmerding, John (1966, 1968)

Wilson, A. F. Johnson (1950)

Wilson, Arnold (1962)

Wilson, Daphne (1951)

Wilson, H. L. McG. (1950)

Wilson, J. P. (1956)

Wilson, Jean (1950, 1955)

Wilson, Joan R. (1969)

Wilson, John H. (1980-1984)

Wilson, Richard G. (1971, 1973)

Wilson, Suzanne (1975, 1978)

Wilson, Thomas J. (1955)

Wimpfheimer, Greta (1950)

Winchester, Alice (1953)

Wind, Edgar (1945-1946)

Wingerter, Wolfgang (1981)

Winnipeg Art Gallery Association (1959)

Winslow House (1944-1945)

Winslow, Philip N. (1961)

Winslow, Ralph E. (1947)

Winter, Robert W. (1959)

Wintersteen, Bonnie (1952)

Winterthur Museum (1952-1953, 1955-1957, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1969, 1983)

Winterthur Program, University of Delaware (1954-1955)

Winthrop and Co. (1926)

Wichnitzer, Rachel (1951)

Wischnitzer, Ruth (1964)

Wisconsin State Conservation Commission for Historic Preservation (1972)

Wisconsin, State Historical Society of (1960)

Wisconsin, University of (1946-1947, 1963, 1967, 1977)

Wisner, John B. (1970-1971)

Wittamer, L. (1961, 1962)

Wittenborn and Co. (1947, 1949-1950, 1955)

Wittenborn, George (1967-1968)

Wittkower Fellowship Fund (1974)

Wittkower, Rudolph (1945, 1949, 1951-1954, 1947, 1959, 1966-1968)

Wittler, Leila (1947, 1950)

Wittmann, Otto (1952, 1964)

Witwatersrand, University of the (1948-1950)

WNET, Channel Thirteen ( -- see -- : Thirteen, WNET)

Woburn Public Library (1936)

Wofsy, Alan (1982)

Wolf, Gertrude (1952)

Wolf, J. Robert (1962)

Wolf, Peter M. (1965, 1970)

Wolf, Reva (1980)

Wolfe, Christopher (1977)

Wolfe, R. (1963)

Wolff, Michael (1957)

Wollman, Henry (1971, 1973, 1976-1978)

Wood, Barbara L. (1950)

Wood, Charles B. (1971, 1974)

Wood, W. L. (1941)

Wood, Welby Carter (1970)

Woodbridge, Henry (1949)

Woodhouse, Lawrence M. (1965, 1984)

Woodring, Carl (1971)

Woodrow Wilson Foundation (1969-1970)

Woodside, Joan (1974-1980, 1983-1984, 1986)

Woolf, Virginia (1927)

Worbs, Dietrich (1982-1983)

Worcester Art Museum (1947, 1981)

World Construction Program (1957)

World Crossroads of Learning, Inc. (1965)

World Publishing Co. (1952, 1967)

World Writing (1953)

Wortman, Julie (1974)

Wrenn, George (1959)

Wright, Benjamin F. (1949, 1951)

Wright, David (1950-1952)

Wright, Frank Lloyd (1937, 1942-1943, 1945, 1947, 1950-1953, 1957-1958, 1978, 1980, 1982-1983, undated)

Wright, Mrs. Frank Lloyd (1959)

Wright, Frank Lloyd, Home and Studio Foundation (1977, 1984)

Wright, Frank Lloyd, and -- In the Nature of Materials -- (1941)

Wright, John Lloyd (1968)

Wriston, Barbara (1952-1953, 1956, 1960, 1962, 1967)

Wurm, Heinrich (1966)

Wurster, William W. (1943-1944, 1946,-1948, 1950, 1951-1957, 1959, 1961)

Wurster, William W. and Catherine 1945

Wyoming, University of (1975)

Xenakis, Jason (1958)

Yale Review -- (1966-1968, 1970)

Yale University (1947-1960, 1962-1963, 1965-1979, 1982, 1986)

Yardley, Michael (1975-1978)

Yeon, John (1954)

York City Art Gallery (1958)

York Institute of Architectural Study (1957-1959, 1961)

York, University of (1962, 1970)

Yorke, R.F.S. (1952)

Youell, William (1948)

Young, E. A. (1947)

Young, Elaine (1962)

Young, Elizabeth (1961)

Young, Paul E. (1949)

Young, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred B. (1954-1955)

Youritzin, Glenda Green (1974)

Zacchwatowicz, Jim (1963)

Zador, Anna (1970, 1972)

Zarnecki, George (1953)

Zaroff, Anne T. (1975)

Zawisa, Bernard J. (1952-1953, 1956)

Zenith Corp. (1969-1970)

Zenobi Sarto (1963)

Zerkowitz, A. (1957)

Zevi, Bruno (1952)

Zewicher, Mrs. Victor K. (1950)

Zimmerman Brothers (1963-1966, 1969)

Zimmerman, Mrs. Isadore (1952)

Zodiac Revue -- (1959-1969)

Zorn, Kate (1979)

Zubarec, Michael (1956-1957)

Zwemmer, A. (1946-1948, 1955, 1959)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Henry-Russell Hitchcock papers, 1919-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hitchenp, Series 2
See more items in:
Henry-Russell Hitchcock papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-hitchenp-ref1065

Cleve Gray papers

Creator:
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Names:
Berry-Hill Galleries  Search this
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Connecticut. Commission on Arts, Tourism, Culture, History and Film  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Neuberger Museum of Art  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Princeton University  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Barzun, Jacques, 1907-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Davis, Jim, 1901-1974  Search this
Dillenberger, Jane  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Gabo, Naum, 1890-1977  Search this
Grace, Louise N.  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Richter, Hans, 1888-1976  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Weber, Nicholas Fox, 1947-  Search this
Extent:
9.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Date:
1933-2005
Summary:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam protest movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.
Scope and Content Note:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.

Among the biographical material are award and membership certificates, biographical notes, and personal documentation.

The alphabetical files contain Cleve Gray's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Correspondence is with friends and family, colleagues, publishers, museum curators and directors, art dealers, collectors, and fans. Among the correspondents of note are: Jacques Barzun, James E. Davis, Naum Gabo, Louise N. Grace, Hans and Fridel Richter, and Jacques and Gaby Villon. Other substantial correspondence includes: Berry-Hill Galleries, Betty Parsons Gallery, Connecticut Commission on the Arts, Jacques Seligmann and Co., Neuberger Museum of Art, Pratt Institute, Princeton University, and Rhode Island School of Design. Subject files mostly consist of correspondence, but include printed material and some photographs. Among the subject files are: Art Collection of Cleve and Francine Gray, Artist-Dealer Consignments and Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1989, Artists' Tax Equity Act of 1979, Promised Gifts to Museums, Threnody, Vestments, and Vietnam Protest. Of particular interest are files relating to the Estate of Hans Richter (Cleve Gray, executor), and Gray's research correspondence and illustrations for his Cosmopolitan article "Women-Leaders of Modern Art."

Writings are manuscripts and drafts, research materials, notes, and miscellaneous writings by Cleve Gray and other authors. Those by Gray include articles and catalog introductions on a wide range of art-related topics, as well as book and exhibition reviews. Also found are a book proposal, texts and notes for lectures and talks, miscellaneous notes, poems, political statements, and student papers. Of particular interest are autobiographical notes in the form of a chronology that his biographer, Nicholas Fox Weber, cited as an "autochronology."

Among the writings by other authors are pieces about Cleve Gray including Nicholas Fox Weber's manuscript Cleve Gray. A significant amount of material relates to three books edited by Gray: David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin. Research material survives for an unpublished volume, Naum Gabo. Also included are notes relating to his translation of A l'Infinitif by Marcel Duchamp. Jane Daggett Dillenberger is represented by a lecture, "The Resurrection in Art." The remaining items by other authors are unsigned; of particular interest is a small notebook of reminiscences and notes about Jackson Pollock.

Artwork by Cleve Gray consists mostly drawings and sketches, and a small number of paintings, prints, and watercolors. Works by other artists consist are an unsigned mobile of paper cut-outs, possibly by Alexander Calder, and a pencil drawing signed Dick (probably Richard Avedon).

Audio recordings are a radio broadcast featuring Cleve Gray, several lectures by Gray on John Marin, and a lecture titled "Meaning in the Visual Arts." Other recordings are of Hans Richter and an interview with Jimmy Ernst conducted by Francine du Plessix Gray. Also found is a videocassette of "Glenville School Students at SUNY (Lincoln Center Activity)."

Artifacts are a Chinese scroll representative of those that hung in Cleve Gray's studio, two of his paintbrushes, Aberdeen-Angus Breeders' Association blue ribbon, and Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

The vast majority of printed material - articles, clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, reproductions of art work, etc. - are about or by Cleve Gray. Miscellaneous items and publications mentioning Gray consist of annual reports, brochures, calendars, newsletters, programs, etc. Clippings about Vietnam and Vietnam protest memorabilia reflect his passionate involvement in the anti-war movement; a small number of these items mention Gray or were written by him.

Photographs are of artwork, events, people, places, and miscellaneous subjects. Most of the art work appearing in the photographs is by Cleve Gray and includes images of destroyed paintings. Also found is an original print of Photo Abstraction by Gray, circa 1934. Of particular note are photographs of Threnody, among them preparatory drawings and views of the work in progress. Photographs of artwork by other artists include Louise N. Grace, Jacques Lipchitz, John Marin, Hans Richter, and Jacques Villon.

Photographs of people are mainly portraits of Gray, and views of him with his wife and sons. Other individuals appearing in photographs are Hans Richter and some of Richter's descendants. Pictures of places consist of Gray's studio.

Events are an unidentified exhibition opening. Miscellaneous subjects are mostly exhibition installations. Illustrations consist of photographs published in David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings. Also found are small number of negatives and color transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943-circa 2001 (Box 1; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 2: Alphabetical Files, 1936-2005 (Boxes 1-5, 9; 4.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings, 1935-2000 (Boxes 5-6; 0.85 linear ft.)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1933-1987 (Boxes 6, 9, OV 12; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 5: Audio/Visual Records, 1971-1989 (Box 6; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 6: Artifacts, 1957-1999 (Box 6, RD 11; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1933-2005 (Boxes 7-8; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1934-2002 (Boxes 8-10; 1.15 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Abstract Expressionist painter, sculptor, and writer Cleve Gray (1918-2004) lived and worked in Connecticut where he was politically active in the Vietnam protest movement and other liberal causes.

Born Cleve Ginsberg in New York City (the family changed its name to Gray in 1936), he attended the Ethical Culture School and at a young age developed a fascination with color and paint. At the urging of friends, Cleve's parents allowed him to accompany a school friend for lessons with George Bellows' student Antonia Nell. She encouraged and inspired the young artist, and a still life he painted in her class was shown at the National Academy of Design's 1932 annual exhibition. Miss Nell also introduced him to Louise N. Grace, an artist who became a good friend and had a lasting influence on him. While a student at Phillips Academy, Cleve studied painting with Bartlett Hayes and aspired to paint in France. Upon his graduation in 1936, he was awarded the Samuel F. B. Morse Prize for most promising art student.

Gray's mother was always supportive of his career choice. His businessman father, who didn't understand his son's desire to be an artist, insisted on a college education. Cleve chose Princeton, where he majored in art and archaeology, and studied painting with James E. Davis. His senior thesis was on Chinese landscape painting; both Eastern philosophy and art were long-term influences on Gray's work and outlook. He graduated summa cum laude in 1940, and then spent several months painting while living at the farm of a family friend in Mendham, New Jersey.

When a doctor suggeted that a dry climate might relieve sinus and asthma problems, Gray moved to Tucson, Arizona. Once settled in the desert, he contacted Louise N. Grace, whom he had met as a young teenager through his art instructor. Miss Grace, an artist and daughter of the founder of W. R. Grace and Co., was a highly cultured and independent woman older than his parents. The summer before Gray entered Phillips Academy, she had hired him to brush ground color onto canvases for murals she was painting for "Eleven Arches," her home in Tuscon then under construction. Miss Grace invited Gray to visit "Eleven Arches" to see the completed murals, and despite the substantial age difference, their friendship deepened; Gray found in her intellectual and spiritual guidance that was lacking in his own family. He remained in Tucson until enlisting in the U. S. Army in 1942, and they corresponded frequently during the the war. When a stroke in 1948 prevented Miss Grace from participating in the extensive tour of Europe she was arranging for a small group of friends, including Gray, she provided sufficient funds and insisted he make the trip on his own. Another stroke, suffered while Gray was traveling, left her in a coma; he was not permitted to see her again. Upon her death in 1954, Gray inherited "Eleven Arches."

Between 1943 and 1946, Gray was stationed in England, France, and Germany, serving in Army Signal Intelligence. Most of his work was performed at night, and he spent his free time drawing. While in London, Gray produced many colored pencil drawings of buildings that had been bombed. In France, a Red Cross volunteered to introduce him to Jacques Villon; although unfamiliar with the artist, Gray knew of Villon's brother, Marcel Duchamp, and accepted the invitation. Jacques and Gaby Villon lived near Gray's billet and he became a frequent visitor. Their friendship was important to his development as an artist. After being discharged from the Army in 1946, Gray remained in France to work with Villon who introduced him to the study of color and the concept of intellectual quality in painting. Gray also studied informally with André Lhote, Villon's former teacher. "American Painters in Paris," an exhibition presented in 1946 at Galerie Durand-Ruel, included work by Cleve Gray.

He returned to New York City in 1946. In the tight post-war rental market Gray managed to find a small room upstairs from a grocery store on East 106th Street for use as a studio. He commenced painting the London Ruins series based on drawings he had made during the war, and began thinking about exhibiting in New York. Gray secured introductions to Pierre Matisse, Curt Valentin, and Dorothy Miller. They encouraged him, but no opportunities came his way until Germain Seligmann, whose gallery was expanding its scope to include contemporary art, followed the advice of Curt Valentin and looked at Gray's work. Gary's first solo exhibition, held at Jacques Seligmann and Co., included selections from the London Ruins series, paintings done in Maine and Arizona, and a few portraits. The New York Times called it "an auspicious first," and one of the London Ruins series was selected by Edward Alden Jewell for the "Critic's Exhibition" at Grand Central Gallery.

Gray found New York City too frenetic. In 1949 he bought a large, old house in Warren, Connecticut, and lived and worked at "Graystones" for the remainder of his life. Half of a 6-car garage was converted to a studio; many years later, his studio moved to a barn, its renovation and design planned by sculptor and architect Tony Smith.

He married Francine du Plessix in 1957. Always interested in literature and philosophy, in the 1960s Francine du Plessix Gray began contributing articles to The New Yorker and is still affiliated with the magazine. Her reviews and articles appeared in prominent publications, and she wrote several award-winning novels and biographies. Their sons, Thaddeus and Luke (now a painter), were born in 1959 and 1961. Francine's mother, Tatiana du Plessix (the hat designer Tatiana of Saks), and step-father, the sculptor Alexander Liberman (also former art director of Vogue and later editorial director of Condé Nast publications) became Cleve Gray's closest friends.

The paintings and drawings of Cleve Gray - first consisting of figures and portraits, and then abstract compositions - were often produced in series. The earliest series, London Ruins, grew from the colored pencil drawings made while stationed in London during World War II. Travels to France, Italy, Greece, Morocco, Hawaii, Spain, Egypt, Japan, and Czechoslovakia, inspired many series, among them: Etruscan, Augury, Ceres, Demeter Landscape, Hera, Morocco, Hawaii, Ramses, Perne, Hatshepsut, Roman Walls, Zen, and Prague. His hometown, the Holocaust, and musicians inspired other series: Warren, Sleepers Awake!, Bela Bartok, and Four Heads of Anton Bruckner. Some series were works on paper, others were collage canvases, and a few series later spawned prints. Gray began using acrylics in the 1940s. Although the medium offered many benefits, he did not always like its appearance and frequently returned to oils. Around 1966 Gray was painting almost exclusively with acrylic, and eventually developed a technique of thinning the paint and applying successive layers of color (sometimes by pouring or with a sponge) on cotton duck rather than traditional canvas.

Gray was attracted to sculpture, too, working in that medium at different points in his career. His first sculpture, in plaster, was completed in 1959. In the early 1960s he visited a commercial sand-casting foundry and became excited about learning to cast in bronze. He made about a dozen sculptures to cast in sand, but due to too much undercutting, their casting became too difficult a problem. Lava flows seen while in Hawaii during 1970 and 1971 inspired a return to sculpture. This time, he used wood, papier maché, and metal. Gray then decided these pieces should be cast in bronze, and he was determined to do it himself. Friends taught him the lost wax process and he began working at the Tallix Foundry in Peekskill, New York where, over the next year, he cast about forty bronzes.

Gray's best known work is Threnody, a lament for the dead of both sides in Vietnam. In 1972, Gray received a commission to fill a very large gallery of the soon-to-open Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, College at Purchase) designed by Philip Johnson. Friends of the Neuberger Museum paid his expenses and Gray, who was enormously excited about the project he considered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, donated his time. Developing plans for the execution of Threnody consumed most of his time during 1972 and 1973. Composed of a series of fourteen panels, each approximately twenty feet square, the piece presented a number of technical challenges. It was constructed and painted in situ during the summer and early fall of 1973. Since then, Threnody has been reinstalled at the Neuberger Museum of Art on several occasions.

Gray was commissioned to design liturgical vestments for two Episcopal churches in Connecticut in the 1970s. A chasuble, stoles, and a mitre were commissioned by the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut in 1984.

He won the "Outdoor Art at the Station Competition," for Union Station, Hartford, Connecticut. His very large porcelain enamel tile mural, Movement in Space, was installed on the façade of the transportation center in 1988.

Gray began writing occasional articles and exhibition reviews in the late 1940s. His concern with rational structure in art led him to question Abstract Expressionism and write "Narcissus in Chaos." This article, published in 1959 by The American Scholar, drew considerable attention. In 1960, Cosmopolitan published "Women - Leaders of Modern Art" that featured Nell Blaine, Joan Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gretchoff, Grace Hartigan, Ethel Magafan, Louise Nevelson, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Between 1960 and 1970, Gray was a contributing editor of Art In America, producing numerous articles (a few co-authored with Francine) and reviews for the periodical. He edited three books, David Smith by David Smith: Scupture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin, all published by Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, and translated Marcel Duchamp's A l'Infinitif.

During the early 1960s, Gray became intensely focused on the situation in Vietnam. His first artistic response came in 1963 with Reverend Quan Duc, painted to commemorate a Buddhist monk who had immolated himself. Francine, too, felt strongly about the issue and over time the couple became increasingly active in the anti-war movement. They joined a number of organizations and helped to found a local chapter of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The years 1968 and 1969 were an especially intense and active period for the Grays. They protested, wrote and spoke out against the war, raised funds to support anti-war political candidates, and on a few occasions were arrested and jailed. Writing for Art in America, editing the book series, and anti-war activities left little time for his art. In 1970 Gray refocused his attention on painting.

Beginning in 1947, Gray was always represented by a New York Gallery: Jacques Seligmann and Co. (1947-1959), Staempfli Gallery (1960-1965), Saidenberg Gallery (1965-1968), Betty Parsons Gallery (1968-1983), Armstrong Gallery (1984-1987), and Berry-Hill Galleries (1988-2003). He was represented by galleries in other cities, as well, but not as consistently or for such long periods.

He exhibited extensively in group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions presented by the dealers who represented Gray, there were retrospective exhibitions at: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Columbus Museum of Art, Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois, Champaign), Princeton University Art Museum, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Many museums' permanent collections include the work of Cleve Gray, among them: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Butler Institute of American Art, Columbus Museum of Art, Neuberger Museum of Art (SUNY, College at Purchase), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Newark Museum, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Phillips Collection, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Smithsonian Institution, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Yale University Art Gallery.

Cleve Gray served as artist-in-residence at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in 1963 and at the Honolulu Academy of Arts in 1970, both sponsored by Ford Foundation programs. In 1980, he was appointed an artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome, where Francine concurrently served as a writer-in-residence; they returned for shorter periods during each of the subsequent seven years. Cleve Gray was presented the Connecticut Arts Award in 1987, and the Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Hartford in 1992, and was elected a member of The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998. In addition, he was a trustee of the Neuberger Museum of Art, New York Studio School, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Cleve Gray hit his head and suffered a massive subdural hematoma after falling on ice outside of his home. He died the following day, December 8, 2004.
Separated Material:
Exhibition catalogs and announcements and two scrapbooks donated to the Archives in 1967 and 1968 were microfilmed on reels D314-D315. Items on reel D315, transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library in 1975, are not described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The Cleve Gray papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Mr. Gray in 1967 and 1968. The bulk of the collection was given by his widow, Francine du Plessix Gray, in 2007 and 2008.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordigs with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Women artists -- Photographs  Search this
Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975 -- Protest Movements -- United States  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Designers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Citation:
Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grayclev
See more items in:
Cleve Gray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grayclev

Annual Reports

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Collector:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Churchill, Frank C. (Frank Carroll), 1850-1912  Search this
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Churchill, Clara G.  Search this
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Harvey, Byron  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Gridley, Marion E. (Marion Eleanor), 1906-1974  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1871-1954  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Harvey, Fred  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Barrett, S. A. (Samuel Alfred), 1879-1965  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Collection Director:
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Collection Source:
Force, Roland W.  Search this
Burnett, Edwin K.  Search this
Container:
Box 404, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1921 - 1924
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 12: Publications / 12.1: Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref15241
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Annual Reports

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Collector:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Churchill, Frank C. (Frank Carroll), 1850-1912  Search this
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Churchill, Clara G.  Search this
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Harvey, Byron  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Gridley, Marion E. (Marion Eleanor), 1906-1974  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1871-1954  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Harvey, Fred  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Barrett, S. A. (Samuel Alfred), 1879-1965  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Collection Director:
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Collection Source:
Force, Roland W.  Search this
Burnett, Edwin K.  Search this
Container:
Box 404, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1925 - 1927
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 12: Publications / 12.1: Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref15242
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  • View Annual Reports digital asset number 1
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Annual Reports

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Collector:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Churchill, Frank C. (Frank Carroll), 1850-1912  Search this
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Churchill, Clara G.  Search this
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Harvey, Byron  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Gridley, Marion E. (Marion Eleanor), 1906-1974  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1871-1954  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Harvey, Fred  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Barrett, S. A. (Samuel Alfred), 1879-1965  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Collection Director:
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Collection Source:
Force, Roland W.  Search this
Burnett, Edwin K.  Search this
Container:
Box 404, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1935 - 1937
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 12: Publications / 12.1: Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref15245
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  • View Annual Reports digital asset number 1
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