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Nvgvmouinvn genvnvgvmouat igiu anishinabeg anvmiajig

Title:
Nugumouinun Genunugumouat igiu Anishinabeg Anumiajig
Author:
Jones, Peter 1802-1856  Search this
Author:
Hall, Sherman 1800-1879  Search this
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions  Search this
Printer:
Crocker & Brewster  Search this
Subject:
Methodist Episcopal Church  Search this
Physical description:
52 pages 18 cm
Type:
Texts
Hymns
Stiffened paper bindings (Binding)
Date:
1836
Topic:
Hymns, Ojibwa  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Call number:
PM854 .J66 1836
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_968826

Our war paint is writers' ink Anishinaabe literary transnationalism Adam Spry

Author:
Spry, Adam 1984-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Date:
2018
Topic:
Ojibwa literature--History and criticism  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Government relations  Search this
LITERARY CRITICISM--Native American  Search this
Ojibwa Indians--Government relations  Search this
Ojibwa literature  Search this
Call number:
PM853.5 S679 2018 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
Unlimited users
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1147908

MS 661 Notes on Ojibwa grammar collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Names:
Jones, William, 1871-1909  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Notes
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes on Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwa) grammar with reference to a text by William Jones.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 661
Topic:
Ojibwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ojibwa, Ojibway, Ojibwe, Chippeway, Chippewa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Citation:
Manuscript 661, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS661
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw334c30baa-4747-4b3c-a916-aa5058d91d5f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms661
Online Media:

MS 68 A.S. Gatschet Notebook with vocabularies, texts, notes

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Informant:
Bottineau, Jno. B. (John B.)  Search this
Toposh, A. J. (Chippewa)  Search this
Bluejacket, Charles, 1817-1897  Search this
Names:
Pokagon, Simon, 1830-1899  Search this
Extent:
54 Pages
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Natchez  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
mainly 1878-1879
Scope and Contents:
Contents:

Shawnee, 48 pages. (3-19; 48-62, even pages only; 72-93). Includes texts with interlinear translation: Story of the fox and the wolf, pages 3-6; story about the end of the world, page 18; Waputhua (great rabbit) story, pages 18-19. Vocabulary includes Shawnee names for other tribes, pages 76-79; Shawnee clans, page 80. Informant for part of data, Blue Jacket, Vinita, I. T.

Chippewa, 22 pages. (23-65, odd pages only). Mainly vocabulary from Jean Baptiste Bottineau, Pembina Band; includes clans of Pembina Band, page 59.

Pottawatomi, 7 pages (22-32a, odd pages only). Mainly vocabulary, from A. J. Toposh, Dowagiac, Michigan. Obituary of Simon Pokagon, Pottawatomi chief (died January 27, 1899), page 30.

Narragansett notes, 4 pages. (94-97).

Natchez word, page 97.

Miscellaneous Algonquian vocabulary notes, 1 page (back cover).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 68
Other Title:
Story of the fox and the wolf
Story about the end of the world
Waputhua story
Great rabbit story
Topic:
Eschatology  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Chippewa language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Natchez language  Search this
Narragansett language  Search this
Folklore -- Shawnee  Search this
Kinship -- Shawnee  Search this
Kinship -- Chippewa  Search this
Names, tribal -- Shawnee  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 68, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS68
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cdfc902a-5e5d-4dda-ac5f-0205f9307e1f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms68
Online Media:

MS 2691 Truman Michelson notes on various Algonquian languages

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
49 Pages
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Notes
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Truman Michelson's handwritten linguistic notes with paradigms (some extracted from the literature) for the following languages: Montagnais, Menominee, Meskwaki (Fox), Cree, Natick, Ojibwa, Passamaquoddy, and Shawnee.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2691
Local Note:
Title changed from "Various verbal tables of different Algonquian tribes" 4/14/2014.
Topic:
Cree language  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Montagnais language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Passamaquoddy language  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Wampanoag language  Search this
Algonquian languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Citation:
Manuscript 2691, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2691
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b36c9590-aa01-4d0f-82f7-da476ed85d31
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2691
Online Media:

MS 2703 Notes on Algonquian languages collected by Truman Michelson at Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Belgarde, Mary  Search this
Groesbeck, Bruce  Search this
Allen, Grover  Search this
Kachicum, Louise  Search this
Azure, Patrick  Search this
Masta, Flora  Search this
Morse, Dorothy  Search this
Names:
United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.)  Search this
Extent:
43 Pages
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1911-1912
Scope and Contents:
Truman Michelson's handwritten linguistic notes on various Algonquian languages from his work with students at Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania during the winter of 1911-1912. The notes include information about the students he worked with, vocabulary, grammar, and an Arapaho text. Mary Belgarde and Patrick Azure provided information on Turtle Mountain Chippewa (which Michelson determined is Cree); Dorothy Morse on Northern Chippewa (near Duluth); Flora Masta on Abenaki; Grover Allen (a Kickapoo) on Potawatomi; Louise Kitchikum (likely Kachicum) on Menominee; and Bruce Groesbeck on Northern Arapaho.
Arrangement:
Notes are organized by language.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2703
Local Note:
Title changed from "Materials relating to various Algonquian languages" 4/15/2014.
Topic:
Cree language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 2703, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2703
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30530495f-5af9-404b-8f66-0f0086463d01
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2703
Online Media:

Algonquian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Miami  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Pequot  Search this
Montauk  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Piscataway (Conoy)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Algonquian research. It consists primarily of material he collected; there is very little original data, most of which are undated. The topics covered are Cheyenne grammar, Fox linguistic notes, Menominee grammar, Miami-Peoria grammar, Mohegan-Pequot-Montauk vocabulary, Montagnais miscellaneous notes, Nanticoke-Conoy-Unalachtigo linguistic notes, Ojibwa linguistic notes, Potawatomi linguistic notes, and comparative and miscellaneous notes.

The Cheyenne material consist of two pages of grammatical excerpts from Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).

The Fox notes stem from conversations which Harrington had with Truman Michelson on the Fox syllabary and grammar. One note is dated September 24, 1924; others are undated. One page gives the etymology of the word Chicago and a Potawatomi equivalent. Phonetic material (former B.A.E. MS 6021 pt. and 6025pt.) is based on William Jones's "Algonquian (Fox)" (1911). A bibliography is included, mainly on Michelson's publications and manuscripts which he submitted to the B.A.E.

The Menominee files contain a phonetic key from Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1928), a short report on a conversation with Michelson (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt. and 6030), and a brief description of Menominee tentshaking was excerpted from W. J. Hoffman's The Menomini Indians (1896).

Miami-Peoria vocabulary were copied from Albert Gatschet's B.A.E. manuscripts 3025 and 3026b. (Those entries marked 3026b are no longer listed as part of that B.A.E. manuscript.)

An 1890 copy of a 1798 Montauk vocabulary taken by John Lyon Gardiner was loaned to Harrington by Foster H. Saville. There are also a three-page typescript of this manuscript and several pages of a Mohegan-Pequot bibliography.

For Montagnais, there are three bibliographical notes. Two placenames came from J.N.B. Hewitt in November 1926.

Reading notes on Nanticoke, Conoy, and Unalachtigo were taken principally from Speck's The Nanticoke and Conoy Indians . .. (1927) and from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907). Some linguistic and ethnohistoric material is included and there is a brief bibliography.

Ojibwa forms the largest portion of this subseries. It includes notes from a joint interview conducted most likely in 1940 with C. F. Voegelin and his informant, Gregor McGregor, who was technically considered a speaker of Ottawa. There are also notes Harrington took of Voegelin's lecture at the University of Michigan on June 25, 1940 (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt.). There is a slight emphasis on placenames in an otherwise random vocabulary. From James Hammond Trumbull's Notes on Forty Algonkin Versions of the Lord's Prayer (1873), Harrington copied the Southern Chippeway version (pp. 74 -75) and penciled in a slightly different English translation. A final potpourri of undated notes includes a miscellaneous vocabulary from secondary sources and a few pages of grammatical material. The etymologies of several Ojibwa words are briefly developed. Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language is the most frequently cited source (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt. and 6025pt.).

The Potawatomi files contain material from Harrington's interview with Chief Simon Kahquados in Blackwell, Wisconsin (n.d.) with whom he recorded general ethnographic information, particularly regarding the loss of Potawatomi lands due to Indian Office policies and illegal acts of the Menominee. A brief vocabulary is included. Unrelated to this interview is a Potawatomi phoneme chart.

Comparative material includes reading notes regarding the earliest appearances of certain Algonquian phonetic sounds. Harrington consulted primarily the works of Sir Isaac Pitman, Jean Claude Mathevet (Nipissing, Abnaki), and Silas Tertius Rand (Micmac). Additional peripheral bibliographical information is identified in the notes. The only date recorded is March 26, 1951. There are other scattered reading notes with Menominee, Cree, Fox, and Ojibwa phonetic comparisons, based mainly on Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1938) and Plains Cree Texts (1934). One page of Arapaho terms was copied from Kroeber.

In the category of general linguistic and ethnographic notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6025pt.), information results from various conversations with fellow linguists: Truman Michelson and J.N.B. Hewitt on September 24, 1924; Hewitt in November 1924 and November 1926; Michelson in October 1930; and Michelson and Frank G. Speck in May 1934. Under the heading "The Southern Delawares," Harrington arranged random information on the Virginia Indians, touching briefly on history and ethnography. He included some Abnaki, Cree, and Cherokee linguistic terms, as well as a general bibliography. Vocabulary material in this series (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt.) consists of terms from various Algonquian languages, most probably taken from unidentified printed sources. One note gives "The Chief from Mass[achusetts]" as an informant. One group of terms is compared with Natick words and with a vocabulary recorded by Roger Williams.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Algonquian languages  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Montagnais language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw320d52ed8-2a4a-49a7-b5a3-67bbc9806544
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14792

Mahican/Stockbridge

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
Mahican  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
Stockbridge-Munsee Reservation (Wis.)
Date:
1930-1952
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Mahican/Stockbridge research. The materials consist of comparative vocabulary, comparative grammar, comparative linguistic notes, and writings.

The vocabulary is arranged according to numerous semantic categories designated by Harrington. The basic source is Truman Michelson's Stockbridge Manuscript 2734, information from which was reheard with Mahican speakers, and compared with secondary sources and with Abenaki material rewritten or removed from his own field notes. Harrington interfiled Menominee information secured later in Washington from Al Dodge. The "Persons" category is quite rich in biographical information. Webb Miller apparently identified for Harrington the subjects of some of his old photographs, although the prints were not found with the notes. There are two pages taken from an old family record listing the names Pye, Bennett, Moon, and Turkey, the dates ranging from 1845 to 1865. Harrington evidently began another (possibly later) semantic organization of the Michelson notes. Other secondary sources used as a basis for comparison are Brinton and Anthony (1888), James Trumbull's Natick Dictionary (1903), and Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language (1853).

A set of grammatical notes is also based on MS 2734 but it is not as well developed as the vocabulary material. Only a few notes deal with phonetics. There is more information on verbs and numerals than on any other morphological category.

The comparative linguistic notes are from Harrington's two 1949 interviews with Bernice Robinson Huntington and encompass vocabulary, grammar, ethnography, ethnohistory, and some miscellaneous information on Stockbridge persons, including something of her own background. One group is arranged alphabetically by main entry in Mahican, with Delaware, St. Francis Abenaki, Natick, Ojibwa, and Cree equivalences (if any) placed immediately following the related Mahican term. The unmarked main entries are apparently Huntington's original terms; those in ink marked Brinton and Anthony are from their 1888 dictionary; the pencil notes are St. Francis Abenaki obtained in the field and are identified by informant "codes" Am. (Alfred Miller), Den. (George Dennis); Watso (John Watso); (Oliver Obomsawin). The significance of the numbered divider pages was not documented. Another group designated "B2" probably refers to the fall rehearing with Bernice Huntington and is confined chiefly to St. Francis Abenaki and Menominee equivalences. Some new information from Huntington, especially changes in orthography, may have been interfiled. A third group contains Huntington's comments on Mathew S. Henry's Vocabulary. ... It represents an attempt to organize Henry's material according to a semantically arranged vocabulary and a brief grammar touching on phonetics and morphology. Harrington crossed out St. Francis Abnaki comparisons and, according to a field note, copied them for use elsewhere. He also incorporated some of Huntington's (B2) terms.

This subseries also contains a draft and notes relating to his unpublished manuscript, "Seven Mahican Texts Recorded by Truman Michelson". Harrington excerpted the texts verbatim from the Michelson MS 2734, including Michelson's interlinear Mahican translations and free English versions. The draft contains a short vocabulary culled from the texts which Harrington arranged semantically. He provided some Mahican historical background and explained certain orthographic changes made to update Michelson's spelling and to facilitate pronunciation. An eighth text in English only was given to Michelson by Sterling Peters. There is informative bibliographical material both in the body of the draft and in the separate section devoted to this category.
Biographical / Historical:
The first evidence of John P. Harrington's interest in studying the Mahican language surfaced in January 1930 correspondence. (At this time, he used the names Mahican and Mohegan interchangeably.) In September 1930 he tried to interest Bernard Hoffmann of Santa Barbara, California, to fund a Wisconsin field trip in a search for Stockbridge vocabulary, legends, songs, placenames, tribenames, history, etc. He hoped to find native speakers who could rehear terms from early manuscripts and publications.

Between 1930 and 1949, Harrington secured copies of or made reading notes from some of these manuscripts, most of which are clearly identified in the field notes. The most exhaustively reheard and reorganized body of material consists of terms and text copied from the Stockbridge linguistic notes and texts recorded by Truman Michelson in 1914 (B.A.E. MS 2734). Harrington's notes and correspondence reveal a diligent search for those informants of Michelson who might still be living in the Stockbridge, Wisconsin, area in the hope that they would be willing to work with him.

In 1949, Harrington arrived at the Stockbridge Reservation on April 16 and remained there until April 23. Mr. Arvid E. Miller drove him around the area and introduced him to numerous other Millers, most of whom supplied linguistic and ethnohistoric information. His first introduction to Bernice Metoxen Robinson Huntington (sometimes erroneously spelled Robertson) took place at this time. In 1914, at the age of about thirty-seven, she had been one of Michelson's informants. She had also worked with Frank T. Siebert,Jr., in 1935 and 1936. She was a black adopted by the Mahicans with whom she lived from earliest childhood; she learned Menominee in school. Harrington's first meeting with her was unsuccessful, the second more cordial and fruitful, and about the last week of October 1949, on a subsequent trip to Wisconsin, he was able to hear and rehear with her a substantial amount of Mahican linguistics. He found another excellent informant in Webb Miller. Most of the notes are of a comparative nature, particularly comparisons with the two Abenaki dialects and with Delaware. This fell into place rather easily as Harrington was in various cities of Maine, in Quebec, and in Albany, N.Y., between April 24 and October 24 taking notes from St. Francis and Penobscot Abenaki speakers. He extracted Delaware terms from Daniel G. Brinton and Albert S. Anthony's A Lenape-English Dictionary (1888), and from the unpublished manuscript of Mathew S. Henry, Vocabulary of Words in Various Indian Dialects of the United States (ca. 1861). In November and December while traveling between New York and Washington for other reasons, he carried most of these notes with him and began the work of sorting and rearranging, which continued on and off in Washington at least until 1952. Other equivalent terms are in Menominee and were supplied by interviews in Washington with Al Dodge, an employee of the Interior Department. Ojibwa and Pequot terms are mainly from secondary sources.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mahican language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Massachuset language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3dab14dc9-d14e-4ac2-b02d-2bed09dbe1a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14955
Online Media:

Delaware (Oklahoma and Ontario)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Siebert, Frank T. (Frank Thomas), 1912-1998  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Munsee Delaware  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's research on two Delaware languages, now distinguished by linguists as Unami (in Oklahoma) and Munsee (in Ontario). Harrington, following local usage, referred to both as Delaware.

His Unami linguistic notes consist of a randomly accumulated vocabulary with some phonetic and grammatical structures interspersed. Included also are historical and cultural comments. The largest single group was apparently collected by C. F. Voegelin and is labeled "Voeg." Other smaller groups represent collections by Voegelin from individually named informants, followed by Harrington's notes from the same informants. Harrington's material consists of both new and reheard terms, with a general emphasis on developing the etymology of state names and placenames. Voegelin inserted some Munsee, Shawnee, Kaw, and Ojibwa equivalences. The Munsee terms may have been those of Frank T. Siebert, Jr., as notes indicate that Voegelin was in possession of some of Siebert's vocabulary lists, which had been collected in June 1938 from Nicodemus Peters at Smoothtown. The most substantial placename information concerns the name Wyoming.

A selection of extracts from Brinton and Anthony (1888) and a few from Truman Michelson's "Preliminary Report on the Linguistic Classification of Algonquian Tribes" (1912) contain comments by Voegelin. Scattered Abenaki comparisons were probably inserted at least a decade later. Filed with this 1940 collection are three pages of notes heard from "the old woman west of Anadarko" in June 1939.

There are also four untitled texts (former B.A.E. ms. 6023pt.) collected by Voegelin in April 1940 with partial interlinear translations by Jesse Longbone. Harrington made handwritten copies of fifteen short songs also collected by Voegelin. Although there are wide variations between Voegelin's orthography and Harrington's, these songs were apparently incorporated into Voegelin's "Word Distortions in Delaware Big House and Walam Olum Songs" (1942). There are scattered notes in English but no translations.

The Unami files also contain miscellaneous notes consisting of a few grammatical notes, correspondence, and names of persons. There are also several pages relating to the Swedish author Amandus Johnson.

Harrington also collected a variety of linguistic notes from Delaware speakers of Ontario. Raw field notes obtained from Josiah Montour and Jesse Moses in the area of Smoothtown, Ontario, include general vocabulary, tribenames, names of persons, and a few grammatical constructions. Montour also contributed Munsee origins associated with the name Wyoming. There are also materials from when Voegelin gave Harrington a list of Walam Olum terms to rehear with Josiah Montour, which Harrington presumably did in the first days of that month. Another small section of field notes contains material from Jane Pattice, Josiah Montour's sister. In addition, there are a few undated pages dealing mainly with the location of the Munsee Reserve in Canada and how to get there.
Biographical / Historical:
In April 1940, John P. Harrington and C. F. Voegelin were in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, on a joint field trip where they interviewed a number of Delaware-speaking Indians. The exact itinerary is difficult to reconstruct. Field notes and correspondence indicate that they were together in Bartlesville at least between April 8 and 20, and early in May, they were in Greencastle, Indiana, where Voegelin gave Harrington a list of Delaware terms to investigate in Smoothtown, Ontario on Six Nations Reserve. Of the two notes that locate Harrington in that vicinity, only one is dated (May 4, 1940-see "Mohawk Linguistic Notes"). It must have been a brief stop as he was in Seattle en route to Alaska on May 7.

In June 1940 Harrington and Voegelin made another trip to Oklahoma. They visited May Haas at Eufaula and Frank T. Siebert,Jr., at Oklahoma City and Norman. On that occasion they worked with a number of Delawares, Shawnees, Otoes, and others. During the first week of August, after his return to Washington, D.C., Harrington reorganized the notes for which Voegelin had requested clarification.

In Oklahoma, Harrington visited the city of Bartlesville; the towns of Dewey and Copan; and Claremore, the location of the Indian Health Services Hospital. Among the people he interviewed were Mabel Bobb Beaver (Mabel) and Henry Duncan Beaver (Duncan); Sally and John Fallleaf (spelled "Fall-Leaf" by Harrington); Annie (Mrs. Lb.) and Jesse Longbone (Jesse, Jes) and his brothers Roy and William (William Lb.); Jake Parks; and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Washington and their son Fred (Mrs. Wash., Fred Wash.). In Ontario, those he interviewed included Josiah Montour, his seventy-five-year-old sister Jane Pattice, and Jesse Moses.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Delaware language  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.8
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31bd6d541-c4e2-4688-bb63-0595d46f8fdc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15032

Supplemental Material on the Plains

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
McKenzie, Parker, 1897-1999  Search this
Reading, Pierson Barton  Search this
Carter, John Galen, 1891-1941  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Kiowa language  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Cree  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Nez Percé Indians  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Plains field notes.

The miscellaneous material on the tribes of the Plains consists of a mix of biographical, ethnographic, and linguistic data. The notes which are largely undated appear to have been written in the late 1930s and the 1940s. There are five pages of linguistic notes on Kiowa, and three are in the hand of Parker McKenzie. There are also carbon copies of two typed pages of a word list in an orthography which is not Harrington's. There are ten pages of notes labeled "Dakota," "Sioux," or "Siouan." Two of the sheets give Delaware, Chippewa, Natick, and Cree comparisons. There is one page each of miscellaneous vocabulary on Arapaho (from A. L. Kroeber), Hidatsa, and Wichita; a page of information on the tribe name "Blackfeet" from John G. Carter dated September 21, 1938; and a photograph caption on the Omaha.

There are also two sets of historical documents which were sent to Harrington under cover of a letter from Alice M. Reading dated December 17, 1931. The first (formerly cataloged B.A.E. manuscript 6043) is a typescript of a portion of the journal which Pierson B. Reading kept for the period May to November 1843 when he traveled from the Missouri River to Monterey, California. The second item (former ms. 6044) is an original copy of a letter from Tom Hill to P. B. Reading dated July 20, 1851. The writer, an Indian, mentions meeting Delawares; Shawnees, including his cousin, Benjamin Kiser; the "Nistcoop" tribe at The Dalles; Nez Perces, including Chief Red Wolf; and Cayuse.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kiowa language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Wampanoag language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Arapaho language  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Wichita language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw365f53aac-8885-4c46-94a3-b92ed9b14da9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15289

Supplemental Material on the Northeast/Southeast

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Conoy Indians  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Northeast/Southeast field notes.

The file on Algonquian includes three slips of Fox, Cree, Ojibwa, and Massachusett (labeled "Natick") vocabulary in the hand of Truman Michelson; typed copies of the above; notes on Cree and Ojibwa from secondary sources; information on the growing of wild rice by the Menominee; and miscellaneous notes on placenames and tribenames regarding the Cree, Ojibwa, Conoy, Nanticoke, and Narraganset.

The Shawnee/Peoria section consists of six pages of notes on Shawnee tribal divisions.

Among the miscellaneous material on the Abnaki languages is a page of Penobscot vocabulary obtained from Frank Siebert in April 1940. The remaining material was compiled during fieldwork on Western Abnaki at St. Francis in 1949. There are four pages on possible informants from Charles Nolet and a page of vocabulary from "Am"; bibliographic references; and lexical and grammatical notes excerpted from the works of Joseph Laurent and Masta.

For Massachusett there are three pages of miscellaneous notes with references to Trumbull's Natick Dictionary.

The bulk of the file on Iroquoian consists of a typed copy of an unidentified historical text from the 1880s. It discusses the relations of the Iroquois with the Spanish, French, and English settlers in the New World. Special mention is made of Gy-ant-va-chia (Cornplanter), chief of the Seneca. The spacing of the lines of text suggests that Harrington was planning to add a translation or annotations of some kind. There are also three pages of miscellaneous notes in his hand.

Most of the file on Delaware consists of information on placenames and tribenames obtained from Frank Siebert, Carl F. Voegelin, and a number of Oklahoma residents in 1940. Siebert gave both Delaware and Penobscot terms, and Unami words were given by Roy Longbone, Salley Fallleaf, and Jake Parks. Munsee forms were obtained from Josiah Montour and Jane Pattice of the Six-Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Also included are a carbon copy of a typed list of possible informants and several pages of miscellaneous notes from the works of Brinton, Strachey, and Zeisberger.

The section on Creek/Seminole/Alabama/Koasati/Choctaw contains twenty-one pages of vocabulary (mostly on tribenames) which Harrington obtained in an interview with James Feagin Sylestine, a speaker of the Alabama language, on April 25, 1940. The informant's home was in Livingston, Texas, although he was at the Shawnee Sanatorium at the time Harrington worked with him. The remaining miscellaneous notes were excerpted from various published and manuscript sources. They include references to Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Alabama, and Choctaw.

Miscellaneous material relating to the East consists of brief notes which Harrington copied from a number of secondary sources. There are mentions of the Huron, Wyandot, Powhatan, and Cherokee tribes, among others. Three of the pages consist of a partial typed list (alphabetically arranged K to M) of "Carolina and Virginia Algonquian" words. This list is based on that given in the commentary on the map of Raleigh's Virginia, pages 852 to 872 of The Roanoke Voyages, which was published by the Hakluyt Society in 1955.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquian languages  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Wampanoag language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Narragansett language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Penobscot language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Munsee language  Search this
Creek language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Alabama language  Search this
Choctaw language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.6
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cd9617a0-28a5-4c9d-a745-4da9c52b91fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15294

Songs and Dances of the Great Lakes Indians

Recorder:
Kurath, Gertrude Prokosch  Search this
Producer:
Kurath, Gertrude Prokosch  Search this
Performer:
Pamptopee, Betty  Search this
Roberts, Wilson, Wapanuetak  Search this
Lacasse, Fred  Search this
Shalifoe, Thomas, 1903-1986  Search this
Shagonaby, Susan  Search this
Kenosha, David, Oshawenimiki, 1893-1963  Search this
Albert, Whitney, Zhagezhin  Search this
Thomas, Eli Wassheshkom  Search this
Smoke, Percy, Kanat'he  Search this
Buck, Richard  Search this
Buck, Gordie  Search this
Buck, Morris  Search this
Lewis, Thomas  Search this
Miller, Huron  Search this
Lyons, Mrs.  Search this
Oshawenimiki  Search this
Blue Cloud  Search this
Kadega'ohiyaie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Asch, Moses  Search this
Distler, Marian, 1919-1964  Search this
Folkways Records  Search this
Extent:
1 Phonograph record (analog, 33 1/3 rpm, 12 in.)
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Americans  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Ottawa Indians  Search this
Onondaga Indians  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Tutelo Indians  Search this
Seneca Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Place:
Michigan
United States
Beartown (Mich.)
New York
Onondaga Indian Reservation (N.Y.)
Ontario
Canada
Six Nations Indian Reserve No. 40 (Ont.)
Iowa
Tama (Iowa)
Wisconsin
Lac du Flambeau (Wis.)
Baraga (Mich.)
Harbor Springs (Mich.)
Cross Village (Mich.)
Mikado (Mich.)
Isabella Reservation (Mich.)
Cattaraugus (N.Y.)
Date:
1956
Contents:
Buffalo head dance 1 ; Buffalo head dance 2 ; Bear claw or Grizzly bear dance ; Pipe of peace or Calumet dance ; Soldier or Victory round dance ; Love song for flute (6:15) -- Fish dance ; Pipe dance ; Powwow or Horse dance ; Forty-nine dance ; Oh Mary (5:11) --Deer song ; Catholic Ojibwa hymn (2:08) --War rally song ; Bear dance ; Eagle dance ; Maple sugar song ; Hoot owl song 1 (3:35) --Hoot owl song 2 ; Coon song ; Rabbit song ; Medicine song (4:48) --Grass dance song ; Drinking song (1:38) --Bear dance (2:18) -- Eagle dance (2:49) --Wasase rain dance or War dance (2:40) --Scalp dance (:56) --Corn dance (2:10) --Women's dance (3:34) --Fishing dance (3:45) --Stomp dance (3:12) -- Two future projects (1:12).
Track Information:
101 Buffalo Head Dance / Wilson, Wapanuetak Roberts. Drum,Water-drum. Fox language.

102 Fish Dance / Fred Lacasse. Drum. Ojibwa language.

103 Deer Song / Thomas Shalifoe. Ojibwa language.

103 Jesus Wegwissian / Thomas Shalifoe. Ojibwa language.

104 War Rally Song / Susan Shagonaby. Ottawa language.

104 Bear Dance / Oshawenimiki, David, Oshawenimiki Kenosha. Ottawa language.

105 Hoot Owl Song / Blue Cloud, Whitney, Zhagezhin Albert. Ottawa language.

106 Grass Dance Song / Eli Wassheshkom Thomas. Ojibwa language.

201 Bear Dance / Percy, Kanat'he Smoke. Drum. Onondaga language.

203 Wasase Rain Dance, War Dance / Richard Buck. Cayuga language.

209 Rituals to the Creator / Gordie Buck, Morris Buck. Cayuga language.

101 Bear Claw Dance, Grizzly Bear Dance / Wilson, Wapanuetak Roberts. Drum,Water-drum. Fox language.

101 Pipe of Peace Dance, Calumet Dance / Wilson, Wapanuetak Roberts. Drum,Water-drum. Fox language.

101 Soldier Dance, Victory Round Dance / Wilson, Wapanuetak Roberts. Drum,Water-drum. Fox language.

101 Love Song / Wilson, Wapanuetak Roberts. Flute. Fox language.

102 Pipe of Peace Dance / Fred Lacasse. Drum. Ojibwa language.

102 Horse Dance, Pow Wow Dance, Friendship Dance, War Dance / Fred Lacasse. Ojibwa language.

102 Forty-nine Dance / Fred Lacasse. Drum. Ojibwa language.

102 Oh Mary / Fred Lacasse. Ojibwa language.

104 Eagle Dance / Oshawenimiki, David, Oshawenimiki Kenosha. Ottawa language.

104 Maple Sugar Song / Oshawenimiki, David, Oshawenimiki Kenosha. Ottawa language.

104 Hoot Owl Song / Oshawenimiki, David, Oshawenimiki Kenosha. Ottawa language.

105 Coon Song / Blue Cloud, Whitney, Zhagezhin Albert. Ottawa language.

105 Rabbit Song / Blue Cloud, Whitney, Zhagezhin Albert. Ottawa language.

105 Medicine Song / Blue Cloud, Whitney, Zhagezhin Albert. Ottawa language.

106 Drinking Song / Eli Wassheshkom Thomas. Ojibwa language.

202 Eagle Dance / Percy, Kanat'he Smoke. Onondaga language.

204 Scalp Dance / Thomas Lewis. Onondaga language.

205 Corn Dance / Thomas Lewis. Onondaga language.

206 Women's Dance / Kadega'ohiyaie, Huron Miller. Onondaga language.

207 Fishing Dance / Kadega'ohiyaie, Huron Miller. Onondaga language.

208 Stomp Dance / Kadega'ohiyaie, Huron Miller. Onondaga language.

209 Wesleyan Hymn / Mrs. Lyons.

209 Owa bagish kichi ingodwok nijinishinabek (O for a thousand tongues) / Betty Pamptopee.
Local Numbers:
Folkways.4003; Folkways.1003

FW-COMM-LP-04003
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
New York Folkways 1956
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Six Nations Indian Reserve No. 40 (Ont.), Canada, Ontario, Onondaga Indian Reservation (N.Y.), New York, Beartown (Mich.), United States, Michigan.
General:
Commercial

Track 102 Personnel: Fred Lacasse, George W. Brown, Sam Link, John Martin. Performed by members of native Indian tribes, principally with percussion acc. Production notes: Recorded in the United States and Canada by Gertrude Prokosch Kurath circa 1956.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. No duplication allowed listening and viewing for research purposes only.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.
Topic:
hymns  Search this
Musicals  Search this
Drum  Search this
Water-drum  Search this
Flute  Search this
Religion  Search this
Catholicism  Search this
Children  Search this
Christianity  Search this
Collection Citation:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.ASCH, Item FW-COMM-LP-04003
See more items in:
Moses and Frances Asch Collection
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk559107b45-2bd0-4a42-a4f1-58a109d50d57
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-asch-ref24603

MS 3401 Albany Ojibwa notes and Weenusk Cree text collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Martin, John  Search this
Allan, William  Search this
Smallboy, Harvey, 1879-1947  Search this
Extent:
16 Pages
Culture:
Cree  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
James Bay (Nunavut)
Hudson Bay
Date:
1935 summer
Scope and Contents:
Notebook (labelled "1935 VI") containing Albany Ojibwa notes and Weenusk (Winusk) Cree text collected by Truman Michelson during his field research in the region of James Bay and Hudson Bay in 1935. Michelson obtained Albany Ojibwa vocabulary and ethnological notes from John Martin, with William Allan, a Cree speaker, serving as an interpreter. The notebook also contains a sample Cree syllabic text from a Weenusk woman at Moosonee; a phonetic text version dictated by a Roman missionary; and an English translation from Allan based on a reading of the Weenusk text by Harvey Smallboy, a Moose Cree speaker. Also present are two loose leaf pages with slightly different versions of the English translation and phonetic text.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3401
Local Note:
Title changed from "Cree and Chippewa Linguistic (and Ethnological) material 1935" 6/3/2014.
Topic:
Ojibwa language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 3401, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3401
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw361fef0f3-5abc-4999-9f6e-dda2f7b100d8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3401
Online Media:

MS 3418 Photostat of letter by Pete Messabie in Chippewa

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Author:
Messabie, Pete  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Vocabulary
Letters
Date:
1936
Scope and Contents:
Photostat of letter by Pete Messabie in Timagami Chippewa transmitted by A.P. Taylor. Also a page of Truman Michelson's notes on words and phrases in the letter with English translations.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3418
Topic:
Ojibwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Temagami  Search this
Algonkin, Ojibway, Ojibwe, Chippeway  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Letters
Citation:
Manuscript 3418, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3418
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35953a698-e9c5-42be-ae04-c11d5f5a121a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3418
Online Media:

MS 2393 Letter containing a grammatical sketch of the Ojibwa language

Creator:
Ferard, Martin  Search this
Extent:
4 Pages
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2393
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2393, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2393
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33f213576-a5db-4699-84c0-2a777e055726
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2393

MS 4384 Ojibwa story by Marie Syrette of Nanabushu swallowed by the Sturgeon

Collector:
Jones, William, 1871-1909  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Syrette, Marie  Search this
Extent:
14 Pages
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Date:
1916
Scope and Contents:
Typed page proofs of "Nanabushu swallowed by the Sturgeon" in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwa) with English translation. The story was collected by William Jones (1971-1909) from Marie Syrette (originally from Lake Nipigon) at Fort William, Ontario, sometime during 1903-1905. The texts were sent in 1916 to Truman Michelson, who was preparing the Ojibwa stories collected by Jones for publication the following year. According to Ives Goddard the dialect of the Ojibwa text is from the north shore region of Lake Superior (8/19/75).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4384
Local Note:
Title changed from "Nanabosho (Nanabushu) swallowed by the Sturgeon 1916" 6/10/2014.
Other Archival Materials:
See also Manuscript 4752 for additional Ojibwa stories collected by William Jones.
Topic:
Nanabush (Legendary character)  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Nanabosho  Search this
Ojibway, Ojibwe, Chippeway, Chippewa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Citation:
Manuscript 4384, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4384
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37f5b0022-a076-4d10-aae9-eb8e54385db7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4384
Online Media:

MS 2270 Ojibway and English Names of Places in Bois Forte Band Country, Minnesota

Collector:
Gilfillan, J. A. (Joseph Alexander), 1838-1913  Search this
Extent:
68 Pages
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes names of places in Northern Minnesota (in Ojibwa) in the region inhabited by the Boise Forte band. (464 names). These names are different from those in Manuscript 2581.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2270
Topic:
Names, place -- Chippewa  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2270, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2270
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35fcaf7b8-b094-458a-9b7c-303896d2bd50
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2270

MS 42 Ojibwa Words, phrases, and sentences in Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages

Collector:
Mahan, J.L.  Search this
Extent:
81 Pages
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
May 25, 1879
Scope and Contents:
Contained in Powell's Schedule in Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 42
General:
Previously titled "Study of the Ojibwa language."
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 42, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS42
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38fcafd2c-6290-44ab-947b-0d2b960319a8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms42

MS 2795 Truman Michelson note that Beothuk is not extinct with contact information of authority on subject

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
1 Page
Culture:
Beothuk Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Typed note stating that Beothuk is not extinct, with the contact information of Dr. H. Addy, the "best authority on them." It appears that this note may have been extracted from a 1914 letter from Lousiana. Handwritten by Truman Michelson at the bottom of the slip of paper is a Cree, Delaware, and Ojibwa cognate set and "Rev. W.C. Gaynor of St. Benedict La."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2795
Local Note:
Title changed from "Note on information showing this stock not extinct" 4/7/2014.
Topic:
Cree language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2795, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2795
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fb313271-e93f-4be0-871e-e4b4263eef3d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2795
Online Media:

MS 2821 Ojibwa notes and stories collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Brown, Julius, circa 1869  Search this
Big-Bear, circa 1852-  Search this
Extent:
58 Pages
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Date:
1911
Scope and Contents:
Linguistic and ethnological notes and texts from Truman Michelson's work in 1911 with members of an Ojibwa delegation from White Earth, Minnesota, visiting Washington, D.C. The materials include notes on kinship terms, vocabulary, paradigms, and the tribe's social organization. Michelson also obtained stories in Ojibwa from Big Bear with English translations from Julius Brown.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2821
Local Note:
Title changed from "Legend; ethnology" 5/1/2014.
Topic:
Ojibwa language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Folklore
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 2821, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2821
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw344fcfd0c-7d5b-4978-aa20-9209eae09ef0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2821
Online Media:

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