Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
39 documents - page 1 of 2

Costanoan Sound Recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Meadows, Isabelle  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Disc (14in)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Discs
Sound recordings
Date:
SEP 1929
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00001030
Funding note:
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.
Local Note:
Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington 07 Sep 1929
COS CT1, 6 MINS, 7.50IPS
Aluminum disc
Other Title:
1 No Description, Possibly One Leg Myth
2 Antelope Song
Place:
California
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Runsien  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36bc168b9-4174-4315-a73f-c299d585c9b1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16590
Online Media:

Costanoan Sound Recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Meadows, Isabelle  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Disc (14in)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Discs
Sound recordings
Date:
OCT 1929
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00001031
Local Note:
Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington 07 Oct 1929
COS CT1, 6 MINS, 7.50IPS
Aluminum disc
Other Title:
5 Creation Myth
6 Same
Place:
California
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Costanoan  Search this
Runsien  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38857ca1a-a60c-4a71-9c55-f6af23d73900
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16591

Costanoan Sound Recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Panocha, Manuel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Disc (14in)
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Discs
Sound recordings
Date:
SEP 1929
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00001032
Local Note:
Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington 31 Aug 1929
COS CT2, 33 MINS, 7.50IPS
Aluminum disc
Other Title:
1 No Description
2 No Description
Place:
California
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Costanoan -- Mythology?  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ec054460-a236-4f54-99b5-1595f707147a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16592

Costanoan Sound Recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Panocha, Manuel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Disc (14in)
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Discs
Sound recordings
Date:
SEP 1929
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00001033
Local Note:
Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington 31 Aug 1929
COS CT2, 33 MINS, 7.50IPS
Aluminum disc
Other Title:
7 No Description
Place:
California
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Costanoan -- Mythology?  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33ce45b7b-c236-4fdf-960f-b5831fbda45d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16593

Costanoan Sound Recording

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Informant:
Panocha, Manuel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Disc (14in)
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Discs
Sound recordings
Date:
SEP 1929
Local Numbers:
NAA INV.00001034
Local Note:
Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington 31 Aug 1929
COS CT2, 33 MINS, 7.50IPS
Aluminum disc
Other Title:
5 No Description
6 No Description
Place:
California
Collection Restrictions:
The John Peabody Harrington papers are open for research

Access to the John Peabody Harrington papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Costanoan -- Mythology?  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / John Peabody Harrington Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3973b0ed4-8fbd-4381-8b9a-e4da36e314b8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16594

Arrow

Culture/People:
possibly Ohlone (Costano) (attributed)  Search this
Object Name:
Arrow
Media/Materials:
Wood, feather/feathers
Techniques:
Carved
Object Type:
Hunting/Fishing/Warfare
Place:
Near Monterey; Monterey; Monterey County; California; USA
Catalog Number:
4/8917
Barcode:
048917.000
See related items:
Ohlone (Costano)
Hunting/Fishing/Warfare
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6067f3bb7-7d1a-4aa3-9bd2-d616719c7138
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_52803
Online Media:

Basket sieve/sifter

Culture/People:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Object Name:
Basket sieve/sifter
Media/Materials:
Vegetal Fiber
Techniques:
Twined
Object Type:
Food Gathering and Preparation
Place:
Near Monterey; Monterey; Monterey County; California; USA
Catalog Number:
5/234
Barcode:
050234.000
See related items:
Ohlone (Costano)
Food Gathering and Preparation
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws61458ba3b-4f94-412e-8500-31b6a7bff6c6
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_54285
Online Media:

Winnowing basket

Culture/People:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Object Name:
Winnowing basket
Media/Materials:
Sedge, equisetum root
Techniques:
Twined
Dimensions:
43.5 x 27 x 15 cm
Object Type:
Food Gathering and Preparation
Place:
Near Monterey; Monterey; Monterey County; California; USA
Date created:
circa 1780
Catalog Number:
5/786
Barcode:
050786.000
See related items:
Ohlone (Costano)
Food Gathering and Preparation
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6788fc586-8832-4615-953c-2095f8fb2641
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_54515
Online Media:

Basket bowl

Culture/People:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Object Name:
Basket bowl
Media/Materials:
Vegetal Fiber, cotton cloth, glass bead/beads
Techniques:
Coiled, stitched
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Near Monterey; Monterey; Monterey County; California; USA
Catalog Number:
5/867
Barcode:
050867.000
See related items:
Ohlone (Costano)
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws62d39142f-56de-4b17-b1be-9e75fc8a12d1
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_54552
Online Media:

Basket bowl

Culture/People:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Object Name:
Basket bowl
Media/Materials:
Vegetal Fiber
Techniques:
Coiled
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Monterey; Monterey County; California; USA
Catalog Number:
5/961
Barcode:
050961.000
See related items:
Ohlone (Costano)
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6f490bc98-c471-4612-8002-f6ae0e07cd5f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_54682
Online Media:

Esselen

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
9 Boxes
Culture:
Esselen Indians  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Languages
Date:
1913-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Esselen. Materials include drafts of a paper on Esselen; copies of primary and secondary sources; file slips containing Esselen vocabulary, cognates, and equivalent terms; notes on rehearings of Esselen vocabulary; and notes on a comparison of Esselen and Southern Pomo vocabulary. The drafts are for a paper on sources of Esselen, with notes on phonetics, grammar, and vocabulary. The section of primary and secondary sources contains notes from 1916 to 1953 and include handwritten and typed copies of manuscripts and published versions of the various Esselen vocabularies. The file contains fairly extensive notes from a conversation with Henshaw regarding his fieldwork, dated August 31, 1920, and notes on the chapter entitled "The Esselen and Salinans" from Kroeber's "Handbook of the Indians of California." There are also several pages of notes on Esselen which were sent to Harrington by C. Hart Merriam. The slipfiles are organized under broad semantic headings: nature, material culture, bodyparts, animals, plants, kinship, tribenames, and placenames. The remainder of the slips were filed under such grammatical headings as nouns, verbs, pronouns, adverbs, reduplication, and phonetics. The sources of Esselen vocabulary from which he extracted the data were de Lamanon, Alcala Galiano, Arroyo de la Cuesta, Pinart, Henshaw, Merriam, and Kroeber. For comparative purposes, he also copied lexical items in other languages. Notes from rehearings of Esselen vocabulary are from his work with Ascencion Solorsano and Isabelle Meadows, both Costanoan speakers. The files on the comparison of Esselen and Southern Pomo contains Pomo vocabulary that Harrington recorded from Manuel C. Cordova along with Harrington's notes on the similarity of certain terms to Esselen.

A number of abbreviations were utilized by Harrington throughout the work to refer to the various reference works which he consulted. "Man." and "Per." refer to the vocabulary collected by de Lamanon and published by Laperouse. "Suen." and "Gal." allude to the vocabulary obtained by Lasuen and often credited to the explorer Dionicio Alcala Galiano.) Harrington also refers to this work as "Esp." for Espinosa y Tello. "Pi." and "Pin." stand for Alphonse Pinart and "Hen." for Henry W. Henshaw. The code "Mof." was utilized for Eugene Duflot de Mofras and "Cues." or "Arr." for Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta. Harrington employed the abbreviations "Mer." and "Kr." for the writings of his contemporaries C. Hart Merriam and Alfred L. Kroeber.
Biographical / Historical:
Harrington began a study of Esselen relatively early in his career and maintained a continuing interest in relating it to a recognized language family. Because the language became extinct in the early 1900s, he himself was not actually able to conduct any fieldwork with a native speaker. He did undertake research among the existing primary and secondary sources and attempted to learn what he could from various Native Americans who he thought might have some knowledge of the language.

As early as 1913 Harrington began compiling notes on the historical accounts of Esselen. It is known that he presented a paper on the subject at the meeting of the San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America at Berkeley in November of that year. An undated manuscript titled "The Excelen Language" presumably dates from that period.

As his research continued, Harrington was pleased to locate a "new source," the vocabulary recorded by Alphonse Pinart, at the Bancroft Library. This manuscript had been unavailable to Alfred Kroeber when he published his summary of Esselen in 1904. The discovery may have led Harrington to present a paper titled "Notes on Esselen" at the joint session of the San Francisco Society of the A.I.A. and the Anthropological Section of the Pacific Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science held in Berkeley on December 1 and 2, 1916.

Harrington continued revising his notes on secondary sources in the 1920s, producing two additional drafts of his earlier summary in 1921 and 1927. In addition, he compiled slipfiles and various handwritten and typed lists of lexical items which were culled from the available sources on Esselen and some neighboring languages.

In the mid-1930s Harrington reviewed his files with Rumsen speaker Isabelle Meadows in hopes that she might recognize or help him reconstruct various Esselen words. At the end of their work he concluded that she knew only eleven words of the language.

In February 1947 Harrington reheard Esselen vocabulary items with his Southern Pomo consultant, Manuel C. Cordova, in an attempt to find similarities between the two languages. A number of years later he began another draft write-up. This remains in a sketchy, outline form.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Esselen language  Search this
Pomo languages  Search this
Ohlone language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 2.14
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3793f68bd-bc92-44f9-b0b7-325709a41092
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13841
Online Media:

Supplemental Material on Northern and Central California

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Underhill, Ruth, 1883-1984  Search this
Names:
Drake, Francis, 1540?-1596  Search this
Du Bois, Cora Alice, 1903-1991  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Morton, C. V. (Conrad Vernon), 1905-1972  Search this
Uldall, Hans Jørgen, 1907-1957  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
5 Boxes
Culture:
Wiyot  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Mattole  Search this
Nisenan Indians  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Karuk (Karok)  Search this
Chimariko  Search this
Shasta  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Atsugewi (Hat Creek)  Search this
Wintu  Search this
Yana  Search this
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Esselen Indians  Search this
Salinan Indians  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Vocabulary
Field notes
Manuscripts
Place:
California -- Discovery and exploration
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Northern and Central California field notes. There are materials on Wiyot/Yurok/Mattole; Nisenan/Northern Sierra Miwok; Southern Pomo/Central Sierra Miwok; Plains Miwok; Karok/Shasta/Konomihu; Chimariko/Hupa; Wailaki; Achomawi/Atsugewi/Wintu/Yana; Yana/Achomawi/Wintu/Chimariko; Costanoan; Esselen; Salinan; and Yokuts. The files include notes Harrington collected from the field, covering linguistic, botanical, biographical, geographical, and ethnographic topics; notes from rehearings; notes and drafts from his papers; notes on his travels and activities; and notes from secondary sources, including field notes from Alfred Kroeber and other colleagues and notes on Sir Francis Drake's travels in California. Some of his botanical notes include scientific identifications and comments by botanist C. V. Morton of the National Herbarium. The Karok section contains labels for Karok baskets housed in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution's Department of Anthropology.

There are also some general and miscellaneous materials, notes relating to collections of artifacts, notes relating to mission records, notes from conversations, notes from secondary sources, and notes and writings collected from others. Miscellaneous material includes lists of possible informants for a number of California languages, bibliographic references, notes on boats, a list of captions for Harrington's paper "Chainfern and Maidenhair, Adornment Materials of Northwestern California Basketry," a tracing of a map labeled "Plano de la Mision San Jose, 1824," additional references to that mission, and a text. The papers contain references to the Hupa, Maidu, and Yurok tribes. Notes on artifacts pertain to collections held by others, including the George Heye collection of artifacts for the Modoc, Klamath, Pomo, Tolowa, Hupa, and Yurok tribes. Notes from conversations includes interviews with Cora DuBois, C. Hart Merriam, Carl F. Voegelin, and T.T. Waterman. Notes from his meeting with Dr. J.W. Hudson are the most extensive. The last file in the subseries consists of notes from a meeting with Ruth Underhill on January 10, 1941, and a notebook which Harrington evidently obtained from her at that time. The notebook contains class notes from a course on Maidu which Underhill had taken at Columbia University in 1932 with Hans Jorgen Uldall. Included are information on phonetics and grammar and a number of texts.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Wiyot language  Search this
Yurok language  Search this
Mattole language  Search this
Nisenan language  Search this
Miwok languages  Search this
Karok language  Search this
Shasta language  Search this
Konomihu language  Search this
Chimariko language  Search this
Hupa language  Search this
Achomawi language  Search this
Atsugewi language  Search this
Wintu language  Search this
Yana language  Search this
Ohlone language  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Salinan language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Karuk  Search this
Achumawi  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Field notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30cfeef45-d96e-4d0f-b57c-8ea915d225b3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15214
Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
San Juan Bautista (Mission : San Juan Bautista, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
149 Boxes
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1921-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Costanoan (Ohlone) languages, particularly Chocheno, Mutsun, and Rumsen. Materials include linguistic, ethnographic, and historical notes.

Harrington obtained a large amount of vocabulary during his fieldwork. Harrington organized the Mutsun vocabulary into a dictionary of sorts, and also compiled a rudimentary Rumsen dictionary. The bulk of the subseries, however, consist of his notes from rehearings of vocabulary recorded by Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta, C. Hart Merriam, Henry W. Henshaw, Alfred Kroeber, Alexander S. Taylor, Alphonse Pinart, R.G. Latham, Adam John (an Indian agent), Reverend Professor Gregory Mengarini, Eugene Duflot de Mofras, Father Juan Comelias, and Horatio Hale. Harrington reviewed their data, some of which include ethnographic material, with various Costanoan speakers. He also reviewed with them some Esselen, Chumash, and Yokut vocabulary to elicit Costanoan equivalences. In addition, Harrington conducted rehearings of the records of San Juan Bautista Mission, Carmel Mission, and Santa Barbara Mission.

Harrington also collected Costanoan tribenames and placenames. There is a list of ranches and, in some cases, brief notes on the location and approximate number of Indian residents. There are also diaries of placename trips which Harrington made with Isabelle Meadows in 1932 and his travel from Berkeley to San Juan Capistrano with Henry Cervantes and Marta Herrera in 1932. The notes include sketch maps, records of mileage, and notes on photographs taken. In addition, Harrington formulated a questionnaire on Rumsen tribenames and placenames.

Another portion of the subseries consists of Harrington's notes for a proposed monograph on the native people brought together at Mission San Juan Bautista from various parts of San Benito County and the adjacent region. There are ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes from Ascencion Solosano and others as well as excerpts from a letter written by C. Hart Merriam, mission records, and notes from placename trips. The sections on Indian and Spanish cooking and on clothing are particularly extensive, as are the files on historical anecdotes and the mission itself.

Other materials in the subseries include notes on Chocheno and Mutsun song texts; information from Ascencion Solorsano regarding the use of herbs and native wild plants in the treatment of various diseases; myths and songs, anecdotes and historical accounts, and translations; and a miscellany of notes from interviews with various Costanoan speakers. Among his miscellaneous notes are comments on photographs taken by Harrington and information about his sound recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington recorded three Costanoan dialects in three separate, primary periods: Chocheno (1921), Mutsun (mostly 1929), and Rumsen (mostly 1932-1939).

During the month of August 1921, prompted, no doubt, by suggestions from C. Hart Merriam, Harrington worked in the area of Pleasanton, California, gathering data on Chocheno, which he sometimes referred to as "the Nepeno language." His principal informant in the work was Maria de los Angeles Colas, usually called "Angela." A man named José, presumably Angela's husband José Guzmán, also provided information.

In January 1922 Harrington had his first opportunity to record basic vocabularies of the Mutsun and Rumsen dialects of Costanoan. Early in the month he worked briefly with an eighty-seven year-old Mutsun speaker, Ascencion Solorsano of Gilroy. Seven years later Harrington reestablished contact with Solorsano. He found Solorsano to be an excellent source of linguistic information. Much of his work with her was devoted to reviewing all historical and contemporary recordings of Mutsun. Although Solorsano was not a speaker of any other Costanoan dialect, Harrington felt that her Mutsun data were fundamental to his understanding of the other languages. For this reason he asked her to rehear a number of vocabularies in Rumsen, Santa Cruz, and Soledad. Harrington deemed as "astonishing" Solorsano's knowledge of Mutsun material culture, myths, native plants, ceremonies, customs, and life at the mission. She had intimate personal knowledge of missionary influences and a secondhand knowledge dating from pre-mission days. She had also lived with her parents on a ranch near the Pinnacles, where she learned the practice of herbal medicine.

During the period 1929-1930, Harrington also resumed fieldwork on Chocheno and Rumsen. In March 1930 he interviewed and recorded Chocheno songs from Jose Guzman. Another person involved in the later "San Jose mission" work was Susana Nicolas. Harrington evidently read various Chocheno forms to her but she responded in Rumsen. Laura Ramirez (nee Escobar), the older sister of Tomasa Cantua, was his major source of Rumsen informantion. She gave him a sizable vocabulary as well as a significant amount of ethnographic data.

On March 28, 1932, Harrington returned to Monterey to work with Isabelle Meadows, who learned Rumsen as a child from an elderly Wacharon woman, Maria Omesia. Throughout the spring of 1932, Harrington roomed with Solorsano's family in New Monterey and drove to Meadows' house in Carmel each day. By utilizing his earlier field notes as well as various primary and secondary sources, Harrington began to elicit a "big, thorough vocabulary of the Carmel-Monterey language." During automobile and walking trips, which took them as far as Salinas, he recorded some Indian names of sites as well as many old Spanish placenames. He scheduled other trips for collecting flowering plants with Claudia Corona.

In the summer of 1932, Harrington's interest turned to the study of Uto-Aztecan languages (Gabrielino, Luiseno, and Juaneno) and the annotation of Geronimo Boscana's writings. Meadows accompanied him to the San Juan Capistrano area to pursue this fieldwork. In 1933 she also traveled with him to Santa Ana, where he worked out the details for the publication of Chinigchinich. Harrington brought her back with him to Washington for several months in 1934. The following year they again returned to the capital, where she continued working intermittently with him until her death in 1939. During this later phase, their interviews consisted of repetitive reviews of all of the Costanoan notes which Harrington had compiled to date. He was attempting to refine his orthography and to check on detailed points of Rumsen grammar. Simultaneously he amassed voluminous notes of ethnographic and biographical interest and recorded a wealth of data relating to California Spanish.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into three catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2) and (part 3) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Mutsun dialect  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California / 2.13: Costanoan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3251d030c-1b89-42cb-a003-668f97a38d00
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17247

John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
San Juan Bautista (Mission : San Juan Bautista, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
149 Boxes
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1921-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Costanoan (Ohlone) languages, particularly Chocheno, Mutsun, and Rumsen. Materials include linguistic, ethnographic, and historical notes.

Harrington obtained a large amount of vocabulary during his fieldwork. Harrington organized the Mutsun vocabulary into a dictionary of sorts, and also compiled a rudimentary Rumsen dictionary. The bulk of the subseries, however, consist of his notes from rehearings of vocabulary recorded by Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta, C. Hart Merriam, Henry W. Henshaw, Alfred Kroeber, Alexander S. Taylor, Alphonse Pinart, R.G. Latham, Adam John (an Indian agent), Reverend Professor Gregory Mengarini, Eugene Duflot de Mofras, Father Juan Comelias, and Horatio Hale. Harrington reviewed their data, some of which include ethnographic material, with various Costanoan speakers. He also reviewed with them some Esselen, Chumash, and Yokut vocabulary to elicit Costanoan equivalences. In addition, Harrington conducted rehearings of the records of San Juan Bautista Mission, Carmel Mission, and Santa Barbara Mission.

Harrington also collected Costanoan tribenames and placenames. There is a list of ranches and, in some cases, brief notes on the location and approximate number of Indian residents. There are also diaries of placename trips which Harrington made with Isabelle Meadows in 1932 and his travel from Berkeley to San Juan Capistrano with Henry Cervantes and Marta Herrera in 1932. The notes include sketch maps, records of mileage, and notes on photographs taken. In addition, Harrington formulated a questionnaire on Rumsen tribenames and placenames.

Another portion of the subseries consists of Harrington's notes for a proposed monograph on the native people brought together at Mission San Juan Bautista from various parts of San Benito County and the adjacent region. There are ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes from Ascencion Solosano and others as well as excerpts from a letter written by C. Hart Merriam, mission records, and notes from placename trips. The sections on Indian and Spanish cooking and on clothing are particularly extensive, as are the files on historical anecdotes and the mission itself.

Other materials in the subseries include notes on Chocheno and Mutsun song texts; information from Ascencion Solorsano regarding the use of herbs and native wild plants in the treatment of various diseases; myths and songs, anecdotes and historical accounts, and translations; and a miscellany of notes from interviews with various Costanoan speakers. Among his miscellaneous notes are comments on photographs taken by Harrington and information about his sound recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington recorded three Costanoan dialects in three separate, primary periods: Chocheno (1921), Mutsun (mostly 1929), and Rumsen (mostly 1932-1939).

During the month of August 1921, prompted, no doubt, by suggestions from C. Hart Merriam, Harrington worked in the area of Pleasanton, California, gathering data on Chocheno, which he sometimes referred to as "the Nepeno language." His principal informant in the work was Maria de los Angeles Colas, usually called "Angela." A man named José, presumably Angela's husband José Guzmán, also provided information.

In January 1922 Harrington had his first opportunity to record basic vocabularies of the Mutsun and Rumsen dialects of Costanoan. Early in the month he worked briefly with an eighty-seven year-old Mutsun speaker, Ascencion Solorsano of Gilroy. Seven years later Harrington reestablished contact with Solorsano. He found Solorsano to be an excellent source of linguistic information. Much of his work with her was devoted to reviewing all historical and contemporary recordings of Mutsun. Although Solorsano was not a speaker of any other Costanoan dialect, Harrington felt that her Mutsun data were fundamental to his understanding of the other languages. For this reason he asked her to rehear a number of vocabularies in Rumsen, Santa Cruz, and Soledad. Harrington deemed as "astonishing" Solorsano's knowledge of Mutsun material culture, myths, native plants, ceremonies, customs, and life at the mission. She had intimate personal knowledge of missionary influences and a secondhand knowledge dating from pre-mission days. She had also lived with her parents on a ranch near the Pinnacles, where she learned the practice of herbal medicine.

During the period 1929-1930, Harrington also resumed fieldwork on Chocheno and Rumsen. In March 1930 he interviewed and recorded Chocheno songs from Jose Guzman. Another person involved in the later "San Jose mission" work was Susana Nicolas. Harrington evidently read various Chocheno forms to her but she responded in Rumsen. Laura Ramirez (nee Escobar), the older sister of Tomasa Cantua, was his major source of Rumsen informantion. She gave him a sizable vocabulary as well as a significant amount of ethnographic data.

On March 28, 1932, Harrington returned to Monterey to work with Isabelle Meadows, who learned Rumsen as a child from an elderly Wacharon woman, Maria Omesia. Throughout the spring of 1932, Harrington roomed with Solorsano's family in New Monterey and drove to Meadows' house in Carmel each day. By utilizing his earlier field notes as well as various primary and secondary sources, Harrington began to elicit a "big, thorough vocabulary of the Carmel-Monterey language." During automobile and walking trips, which took them as far as Salinas, he recorded some Indian names of sites as well as many old Spanish placenames. He scheduled other trips for collecting flowering plants with Claudia Corona.

In the summer of 1932, Harrington's interest turned to the study of Uto-Aztecan languages (Gabrielino, Luiseno, and Juaneno) and the annotation of Geronimo Boscana's writings. Meadows accompanied him to the San Juan Capistrano area to pursue this fieldwork. In 1933 she also traveled with him to Santa Ana, where he worked out the details for the publication of Chinigchinich. Harrington brought her back with him to Washington for several months in 1934. The following year they again returned to the capital, where she continued working intermittently with him until her death in 1939. During this later phase, their interviews consisted of repetitive reviews of all of the Costanoan notes which Harrington had compiled to date. He was attempting to refine his orthography and to check on detailed points of Rumsen grammar. Simultaneously he amassed voluminous notes of ethnographic and biographical interest and recorded a wealth of data relating to California Spanish.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into three catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2) and (part 3) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Mutsun dialect  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California / 2.13: Costanoan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39cd23197-d0a9-4b0c-90db-071591869a31
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17248

John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 3)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Mission San Carlos Borromeo (Carmel, Calif.)  Search this
San Juan Bautista (Mission : San Juan Bautista, Calif.)  Search this
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
149 Boxes
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1921-1939
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northern and Central California series contains Harrington's research on Costanoan (Ohlone) languages, particularly Chocheno, Mutsun, and Rumsen. Materials include linguistic, ethnographic, and historical notes.

Harrington obtained a large amount of vocabulary during his fieldwork. Harrington organized the Mutsun vocabulary into a dictionary of sorts, and also compiled a rudimentary Rumsen dictionary. The bulk of the subseries, however, consist of his notes from rehearings of vocabulary recorded by Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta, C. Hart Merriam, Henry W. Henshaw, Alfred Kroeber, Alexander S. Taylor, Alphonse Pinart, R.G. Latham, Adam John (an Indian agent), Reverend Professor Gregory Mengarini, Eugene Duflot de Mofras, Father Juan Comelias, and Horatio Hale. Harrington reviewed their data, some of which include ethnographic material, with various Costanoan speakers. He also reviewed with them some Esselen, Chumash, and Yokut vocabulary to elicit Costanoan equivalences. In addition, Harrington conducted rehearings of the records of San Juan Bautista Mission, Carmel Mission, and Santa Barbara Mission.

Harrington also collected Costanoan tribenames and placenames. There is a list of ranches and, in some cases, brief notes on the location and approximate number of Indian residents. There are also diaries of placename trips which Harrington made with Isabelle Meadows in 1932 and his travel from Berkeley to San Juan Capistrano with Henry Cervantes and Marta Herrera in 1932. The notes include sketch maps, records of mileage, and notes on photographs taken. In addition, Harrington formulated a questionnaire on Rumsen tribenames and placenames.

Another portion of the subseries consists of Harrington's notes for a proposed monograph on the native people brought together at Mission San Juan Bautista from various parts of San Benito County and the adjacent region. There are ethnographic, historical, and biographical notes from Ascencion Solosano and others as well as excerpts from a letter written by C. Hart Merriam, mission records, and notes from placename trips. The sections on Indian and Spanish cooking and on clothing are particularly extensive, as are the files on historical anecdotes and the mission itself.

Other materials in the subseries include notes on Chocheno and Mutsun song texts; information from Ascencion Solorsano regarding the use of herbs and native wild plants in the treatment of various diseases; myths and songs, anecdotes and historical accounts, and translations; and a miscellany of notes from interviews with various Costanoan speakers. Among his miscellaneous notes are comments on photographs taken by Harrington and information about his sound recordings.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington recorded three Costanoan dialects in three separate, primary periods: Chocheno (1921), Mutsun (mostly 1929), and Rumsen (mostly 1932-1939).

During the month of August 1921, prompted, no doubt, by suggestions from C. Hart Merriam, Harrington worked in the area of Pleasanton, California, gathering data on Chocheno, which he sometimes referred to as "the Nepeno language." His principal informant in the work was Maria de los Angeles Colas, usually called "Angela." A man named José, presumably Angela's husband José Guzmán, also provided information.

In January 1922 Harrington had his first opportunity to record basic vocabularies of the Mutsun and Rumsen dialects of Costanoan. Early in the month he worked briefly with an eighty-seven year-old Mutsun speaker, Ascencion Solorsano of Gilroy. Seven years later Harrington reestablished contact with Solorsano. He found Solorsano to be an excellent source of linguistic information. Much of his work with her was devoted to reviewing all historical and contemporary recordings of Mutsun. Although Solorsano was not a speaker of any other Costanoan dialect, Harrington felt that her Mutsun data were fundamental to his understanding of the other languages. For this reason he asked her to rehear a number of vocabularies in Rumsen, Santa Cruz, and Soledad. Harrington deemed as "astonishing" Solorsano's knowledge of Mutsun material culture, myths, native plants, ceremonies, customs, and life at the mission. She had intimate personal knowledge of missionary influences and a secondhand knowledge dating from pre-mission days. She had also lived with her parents on a ranch near the Pinnacles, where she learned the practice of herbal medicine.

During the period 1929-1930, Harrington also resumed fieldwork on Chocheno and Rumsen. In March 1930 he interviewed and recorded Chocheno songs from Jose Guzman. Another person involved in the later "San Jose mission" work was Susana Nicolas. Harrington evidently read various Chocheno forms to her but she responded in Rumsen. Laura Ramirez (nee Escobar), the older sister of Tomasa Cantua, was his major source of Rumsen informantion. She gave him a sizable vocabulary as well as a significant amount of ethnographic data.

On March 28, 1932, Harrington returned to Monterey to work with Isabelle Meadows, who learned Rumsen as a child from an elderly Wacharon woman, Maria Omesia. Throughout the spring of 1932, Harrington roomed with Solorsano's family in New Monterey and drove to Meadows' house in Carmel each day. By utilizing his earlier field notes as well as various primary and secondary sources, Harrington began to elicit a "big, thorough vocabulary of the Carmel-Monterey language." During automobile and walking trips, which took them as far as Salinas, he recorded some Indian names of sites as well as many old Spanish placenames. He scheduled other trips for collecting flowering plants with Claudia Corona.

In the summer of 1932, Harrington's interest turned to the study of Uto-Aztecan languages (Gabrielino, Luiseno, and Juaneno) and the annotation of Geronimo Boscana's writings. Meadows accompanied him to the San Juan Capistrano area to pursue this fieldwork. In 1933 she also traveled with him to Santa Ana, where he worked out the details for the publication of Chinigchinich. Harrington brought her back with him to Washington for several months in 1934. The following year they again returned to the capital, where she continued working intermittently with him until her death in 1939. During this later phase, their interviews consisted of repetitive reviews of all of the Costanoan notes which Harrington had compiled to date. He was attempting to refine his orthography and to check on detailed points of Rumsen grammar. Simultaneously he amassed voluminous notes of ethnographic and biographical interest and recorded a wealth of data relating to California Spanish.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into three catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Costanoan (part 2) and (part 3) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ohlone language  Search this
Mutsun dialect  Search this
Esselen language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 2: Papers Relating to the Native American history, language and culture of northern and central California / 2.13: Costanoan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw302f03cb6-a86a-4d2e-b358-4a59db54a02e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17249

MS 302 Soledad (Costanoan) vocabulary with some Obispeno Chumash entries

Creator:
Henshaw, Henry W. (Henry Wetherbee), 1850-1930  Search this
Extent:
47 Items (ca. pages ca. 47 pages)
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Chumash [San Luis Obispo Mission]  Search this
Esselen Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Chumash  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Chumash encircled with a line, or otherwise marked; also the numbers 1-5 and 10 in Esselen (page 97). In pencil, in Powell's schedule of Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages.
Biographical / Historical:
Recorded from Clara, who lived at Arroyo Seco, 10 miles from Soledad; place of record not stated.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 302
Topic:
Numbers -- Esselen  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 302, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS302
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a4b9f9bd-0a28-4dd0-9db5-e7a4f4368364
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms302
Online Media:

MS 3950 Lists of Costanoan and Moquelumnan numerals collected by John N. Hewitt

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Extent:
8 Pages
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
In languages of these tribes.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3950
Topic:
Numbers -- Costanoan  Search this
Numbers -- Moquelumnan  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3950, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3950
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e0e4f3aa-f0f7-41d8-a4c7-0c98857cb51a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3950
Online Media:

MS 385 "Idiomas Californias"

Creator:
Arroyo de la Cuesta, Felipe, -1842  Search this
Murray, E. F. (Edward F.)  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages
Culture:
Chumash -- Purismeno  Search this
Santa Ynez Chumash (Santa Inez)  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Salinan -- San Miguel  Search this
Chumash [San Luis Obispo Mission]  Search this
Salinan -- San Antonio  Search this
Barbareño Chumash (Santa Barbara)  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Wintun  Search this
Esselen Indians  Search this
Karkin  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Chumash  Search this
Salinan Indians  Search this
Patwin  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1821
Scope and Contents:
Copied by E.F. Murray in 1878 from the original made in 1821. It includes vocabularies of the following languages: Esselen, San Antonio (Salinan), San Miguel (Salinan), San Luis Obispo (Obispeno Chusmash), Santa Barbara (Barbareno Chumash), La Purisima (Purismeno Chusmash), Santa Inez (Inezeno Chumash), Nophrinthres of San Juan Bautista (a Yokuts dialect), Lathruunen (Yokuts), San Luis Rey (Uto-Aztecan), Karkin (Costanoan), Saclan (Miwok), Juichun (Costanoan), Huimen (Marin Miwok), and Suisen (a dialect of Patwin [Wintun]).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 385
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ynezeno  Search this
Antoniaños  Search this
Migueleños  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 385, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS385
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ef078075-0f0c-4568-a7c9-a16db1c965ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms385
Online Media:

MS 300 The Mutsun linguistic family of Middle California: a comparative table of affinities drawn from its numerous dialects

Creator:
Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
7 Pages
2 Items (tables )
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1888
Scope and Contents:
MS 300-a: "The Mutsun linguistic family of Middle California: a comparative table of affinities drawn from its numerous dialects" by Albert S. Gatschet. January 1888. 13 pp. The purpose of the paper was to consolidate the Costanoan with the Moquelummnan (Miwok) families, and to designate the aggregate by the name Mutsun.

MS 300-b Letter from Jeremiah Curtin to Henry W. Henshaw. February 188. 7 pp. and 2 large tables. Letter encloses and is critical of Gatschet's paper.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 300
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 300, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS300
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw375d43826-958a-4337-9821-4f96af8f166d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms300
Online Media:

Color transparencies of J.P. Harrington Informants

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Painter:
Cassidy, Gerald  Search this
Moore  Search this
Names:
Keahtigh, Perry A.  Search this
Kitsepawit  Search this
Librado, Fernando  Search this
Meadows, Isabel  Search this
Smoky, Enoch  Search this
Extent:
8 Slides
Culture:
Ohlone (Costano)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Place:
California
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Transparencies of four paintings of informants of John P. Harrington, by different artists. Includes 1 duplicate set of slides.
Catalog Number 4643: (1) California (?) Description: Kitsepawit or Fernando Librado. Painter: Gerald Cassidy (signature on painting) S. I. Negative 49,393. (2) Rumsen Meadows, Isabel Painter: "M. H." (signature on painting). BAE Negative Number: S. I. Negative Number 49392. (3) Kiowa Enoch Smoky Painter: Moore (see BAE negative catalog card) BAE Negative Number 49,391. (4) Kiowa Perry A. Keahtigh Painter: Moore (signature on painting) BAE Negative Number: S. I. Negative 49,390.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4643
Local Note:
Transparencies made by Bureau of American Ethnology, October, 1962. (Black and White copy negatives have also been made; S. I. Negatives 49,390-393).
Filed: Slide file, by tribe.
Topic:
Slides  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4643, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4643
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39b76cb9d-ecbe-41d2-8e15-be91215eaf73
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4643

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By