Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
72 documents - page 1 of 4

Matthew Baigell papers

Creator:
Baigell, Matthew  Search this
Names:
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Gropper, William, 1897-1977  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Sherman, Hoyt Leon, 1903-  Search this
Weichsel, John, 1870-1946  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 1 reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
[ca. 1965-1985]
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, writings and research material concerning Thomas Hart Benton and Baigell's other writings. Also included is a ca. 1965 interview with Hoyt Sherman conducted by Baigell.
REEL 2086: Letters, notes, and writings, some illustrated, ca. 1967-1972, from Thomas Hart Benton to Baigell for Baigell's writings and biography of Benton. Benton writes about synchronism, cubism, regionalism, social realism, John Weichsel, Stuart Davis, Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Reginald Marsh, and others, and his life. Inluded is a copy of Benton's 53-page handwritten manuscript, "The Thirties," describing his mural commissions and the controversies with the social realists over his regionalist style of painting. Also included are 2 letters from Louis Lozowick, and one each from William Gropper and Harry Gottlieb in response to Baigell's questions of social realism, regionalism, and art in the 1930's.
ADDITION: Letters, research notes, and writings on Thomas Hart Benton, as well as correspondence with Dorothy Dehner, Doris Lee, Louis Lozowick, Raphael Soyer and Ben Shahn, among others, relating to Baigell's book, "The American Scene: American Painting of the 1930s," (1974). Also included is an interview with colleague Hoyt Sherman conducted by Baigell, ca. 1965, in which Sherman discusses perception, Cézanne, and Sherman's most famous pupil, Roy Lichtenstein, who always testified that he was profoundly influenced by Sherman's methods and philosophy. Sherman analyzes Lichtenstein's work and recalls the artist during his student days at Ohio State University, and discusses his possible impact on Lichtenstein.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian; New York, N.Y. b. 1933. Baigell is associate professor of art, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
Provenance:
Donated 1980, 2002 and 2004 by Matthew Baigell.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Cubism  Search this
Regionalism  Search this
Social realism  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.baigmatt
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-baigmatt

Military Data and Memoranda

Collection Creator:
Milling, Thomas DeWitt, 1887-1960  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1911-1913
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Thomas DeWitt Milling Collection, NASM.XXXX.0133, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Thomas DeWitt Milling Collection
Thomas DeWitt Milling Collection / Series 2: Career
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0133-ref23
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Military Data and Memoranda digital asset number 1

Charles F. Hockett papers

Creator:
Hockett, Charles  Search this
Extent:
5.4 Linear feet ((10 document boxes) plus 2 record storage boxes of sound recordings)
Culture:
Fijians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1934-2000
bulk 1940-1989
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of linguist Charles F. Hockett. Included are research materials consisting of field notes and notebooks, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, annotated copies of other scholars' work, a few drawings, photographs, and sound recordings.
Scope and Content Note:
This collection contains the professional papers of linguist Charles F. Hockett. Included are research materials consisting of field notes and notebooks, correspondence, published and unpublished writings, annotated copies of other scholars' work, a few drawings, photographs, and sound recordings.

The materials in this collection document Hockett's career as a structural linguist, and provides glimpses into his military service and his passion for music. Hockett's writings and notes, which comprise the majority of the materials in the collection, demonstrate his contributions to the field of linguistics.
Arrangement:
Collection is organized into 9 series: 1) Field Research, 1937-38, 1940; 2) Writings, 1940-2000; 3) Correspondence, 1945-2000; 4) Professional Activities, 1965-1970, 1989, 1993; 5) Teaching Files, 1993; 6) Biographical Files, 1934, 1942-1957-1965, 1974, 1984, 1988, 1999; 7) Notes and Drawings, 1964, 1970-1983, 1987-1988; 8) Photographs, 1944, 1960, 1978-1991, 1999; 9) Sound Recordings, 1952-1957, 1961, 1970-1976
Biographical Note:
Charles Francis Hockett was a linguist best known for his contribution to structural linguistics. Strongly influenced by the work of Leonard Bloomfield, he was "widely considered Bloomfield's chief disciple, and the most prominent explicator and elaborator of Bloomfield's works" (Gair 7). While he primarily focused on Algonquian languages, Hockett also studied Chinese, Fijian, and English.

Hockett was born in Columbus, Ohio on January 17, 1916 to Homer and Amy Hockett. He matriculated at Ohio State University in 1932 and graduated in 1936 with a BA and MA in ancient history. He then went on to study at Yale where he received his PhD in 1939. Afterward, he completed two years of postdoctoral study and had the opportunity to work with Leonard Bloomfield directly.

Drafted into the US Army in 1942, Hockett prepared language-training materials, language guides, and dictionaries for military personnel. He was eventually promoted to Captain and left the military in 1946 when he became a professor of linguistics at Cornell University. In 1957 he joined the Department of Anthropology. Hockett stayed at Cornell until 1982 when he retired to emeritus status. He later served as an adjunct professor of linguistics at Rice University.

He died on November 3, 2000.

Sources Consulted

James W. Gair, "Charles F. Hockett," in Biographical Memoirs volume 89. Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, 2007.

Chronology

1916 -- Born January 17 in Columbus, Ohio

1932 -- Entered Ohio State University at 16

1936 -- Graduated summa cum laude with BA & MA in ancient history

1939 -- Summer of fieldwork in Kickapoo and autumn in Michoacán, Mexico Received PhD in Anthropology from Yale; dissertation based on fieldwork in Potawatomi

1940-1941 -- 2 years of postdoctoral study, including two quarters with Leonard Bloomfield at Chicago, followed by a stay at Michigan

1942 -- Drafted into US Army

1945 -- Dispatched to Tokyo as a first lieutenant to help train U.S. troops in Japanese

1946 -- Began university teaching career as an assistant professor of linguistics in the Division of Modern Languages at Cornell where he was in charge of Chinese and continued to run the Chinese program for 15 years Separated from the army with a terminal leave promotion to captain

1957 -- Become a member of Cornell's Department of Anthropology (later named the Goldwin Smith Professor of Linguistics and Anthropology)

1964 -- President of the Linguistic Society of America

1974 -- Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

1982 -- Retired from Cornell to emeritus status

1983 -- Festschrift written (Agard et al., 1983)

1986 -- Distinguished lecturer of the American Anthropological Association Visiting professor, later adjunct professor of linguistics at Rice University

2000 -- Died on November 3

Selected Bibliography

1939 -- Potawatomi Syntax. Language 15: 235-248.

1944 -- with Zhaoying Fang. Spoken Chinese: Basic Course. Military edition published (without authors' names) as a War Department Education Manual. Civilian Edition. New York: Holt.

1947 -- Peiping phonology. Journal of the American Oriental Society 67: 253-267.

1948 -- Implications of Bloomfield's Algonquian Studies. Language 24: 17-131.

1955 -- A Manual of Phonology. Baltimore: Waverley Press. How to Learn Martian. Astounding Science Fiction 55: 97-106.

1958 -- A Course in Modern Linguistics. New York: Macmillan.

1960 -- The Origin of Speech. Scientific American 203(3): 88-89.

1970 -- A Leonard Bloomfield Anthology. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

1973 -- Man's Place in Nature. New York: McGraw-Hill.

1987 -- Refurbishing our Foundations: Elementary Linguistics from an Advanced Point of View. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

1997 -- Approaches to Syntax. Lingua 100: 151-170.
Related Collections:
National Anthropological Archives Manuscript 7402. Letters to Charles Hockett regarding Algonquian linguistics 1937-1938.

National Anthropological Archives Manuscript 2009-15. May Mayko Ebihara conducted this oral history interview with Hockett on August 25, 1981 as part of a larger oral history project with anthropologists.

For additional Hockett correspondence, see: C. F. Voegelin Papers, American Philosophical Society. Henry Lee Smith Papers, 1935-1972 (bulk 1956-1972), University Archives, State University of New York at Buffalo.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Charles Hockett's daughter, Rachel Hockett.
Restrictions:
The Charles F. Hockett Papers are open for research.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Kickapoo language  Search this
Linguistics, general and theoretical  Search this
Citation:
Charles F. Hockett Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2011-14
See more items in:
Charles F. Hockett papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2011-14
Online Media:

Kenneth M. Davis papers

Creator:
Davis, Kenneth M., 1939-  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1968-2005
Scope and Contents:
The Kenneth M. Davis papers measure 0.2 linear feet and date from circa 1968-2005. The small collection relates to Kenneth M. Davis' reserarch about Leon Kroll and his career an an art history professor. Included are two letters from Leon Kroll, one letter from Paul Cadmus, and three letters from Alexander Hogue in support of Davis' dissertation "The Life and Work of Leon Kroll with a Catalog of his Nudes", Ohio State University, 1993; a project file containing letters, photographs, printed material and writings regarding research prepared by Thomas Lingeman, a student of Kenneth Davis', at Ball State University comparing Claes Oldenburg's and Christo's monuments; a biography and printed material on Alexander Hogue sent to Davis from Christo; three letters to Davis from artist and colleague, Sid Chafetz, and printed material regarding Chafetz; a photograph of a work of art signed by Sol Lewitt; and a newspaper clipping about the show "Ohio Printmakers" at Kenyon College, 1968.
Biographical / Historical:
Kenneth M. Davis (1939- ) is a retired art history professor in Washington, D.C. Davis taught at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana from 1970-2008.
Provenance:
Donated 2018 and 2019 by Kenneth M. Davis.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Identifier:
AAA.davikenn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-davikenn

Clubs and Organizations, Lockbourne Officers' Wives Club

Collection Creator:
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Collection, Acc. 1992.0023, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection / Series 2: Military Career / 2.3: Materials Arranged by Posting / 2.3.9: Lockbourne AAB/AAF/AFB (Lockbourne, OH), Base Commander
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0023-ref1829
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Clubs and Organizations, Lockbourne Officers' Wives Club digital asset number 1

Official Duties, Eastern Area Air Force Track and Field Meet, Pre-Olympic Trials (June 12, 1948)

Collection Creator:
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 18
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1948 June 12
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Collection, Acc. 1992.0023, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection / Series 2: Military Career / 2.3: Materials Arranged by Posting / 2.3.9: Lockbourne AAB/AAF/AFB (Lockbourne, OH), Base Commander
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0023-ref1837
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Official Duties, Eastern Area Air Force Track and Field Meet, Pre-Olympic Trials (June 12, 1948) digital asset number 1

Official Duties, Operation Happiness

Collection Creator:
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 19
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Collection, Acc. 1992.0023, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection / Series 2: Military Career / 2.3: Materials Arranged by Posting / 2.3.9: Lockbourne AAB/AAF/AFB (Lockbourne, OH), Base Commander
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0023-ref1838
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Official Duties, Operation Happiness digital asset number 1

Oral history interview with Alexis Smith

Creator:
Smith, Alexis, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter  Search this
Names:
Holly Solomon Gallery  Search this
Honor Fraser Gallery  Search this
Margo Leavin Gallery  Search this
Mizuno Gallery  Search this
Nicholas Wilder Gallery  Search this
University of California, Irvine -- Students  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
Bell, Larry, 1939-  Search this
Burden, Barbara  Search this
Burden, Chris, 1946-  Search this
Celmins, Vija, 1938-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Coplans, John  Search this
Gehry, Frank O., 1929-  Search this
Grieger, Scott  Search this
Howard, Coy  Search this
Irwin, Robert, 1928-  Search this
Krull, Craig  Search this
Moses, Avilda  Search this
Ruppersberg, Allen, 1944-  Search this
Sedivy, Richard  Search this
Solomon, Jerry  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (3 hr., 11 min.), digital, wav)
84 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
France -- description and travel
Date:
2014 January 24-April 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Alexis Smith conducted 2014 January 24 and April 14, by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, for the Archives of American Art at Smith's studio, in Venice, California.
Ms. Smith discusses growing up in Southern California and her early years living with her parents on the grounds of Metropolitan State Hospital, a mental institution in Norwalk, California; her mother's death when Ms. Smith was 11; the family's time in Whittier and Palm Springs and being raised as an only child by her father; her early interest in French studies and travel to France as a student; her interest in studying art beginning with a John Coplans class at UC Irvine; her time at at UC Irvine in the early days of the university and her growing attraction to the life of an artist; the origin of her name Alexis Smith; and the encouragement of her fellow artists to continue pursuing her cut-up collages from literature, photos, magazines, and Hollywood ephemera. Ms. Smith also describes her time with her artist women's group in the 70s; her husband Scott Grieger; working for Frank Gehry; her showing with the Nicholas Wilder Gallery; her relationship with Chris Burden and her time with him during his period of performance pieces in the 70s; the Riko Mizuno Gallery; her work with terrazzo and its use for installations at the LA Convention Center, Ohio State University, and other installations; the appropriation of text and the assistance of Jerry Solomon utilizing custom frames in her artwork; the impact of women from history, media and literature on her art; her relationship with Coy Howard; the Holly Solomon Gallery; her Jane series; her On the Road series; her installation Snake Path at UC San Diego; her piece for SITE Santa Fe Red Carpet; teaching at UCLA; her installation of the piece Scarlet Letter at Las Vegas Central Library and its subsequent removal; her associations with Margo Leavin Gallery and Honor Fraser gallery; and the loss of her long-time studio space and the challenges of storing her artwork. Ms. Smith also recalls Judy Chicago, Robert Irwin, Vija Celmins, Larry Bell, Barbara Burden, Richard Sedivy, Avilda Moses, Craig Krull, and Allen Ruppersberg among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alexis Smith (1949- ) is a collage, multimedia, and installation artist in Los Angeles, California. Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is an art critic and writer from Beverly Hills, California.
General:
Originally recorded as 5 sound files. Duration is 3 hr., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collagists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Multimedia (Art)  Search this
Multimedia installations (Art)  Search this
Women artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.smith14
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smith14

Oral history interview with Allan Sekula

Interviewee:
Sekula, Allan  Search this
Interviewer:
Panzer, Mary  Search this
Names:
Artforum  Search this
California Institute of the Arts  Search this
Ohio State University -- Faculty  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)  Search this
University of California, San Diego. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Altoon, John, 1925-  Search this
Antin, David  Search this
Antin, Eleanor  Search this
Ascott, Roy  Search this
Baldessari, John, 1931-  Search this
Barthes, Roland  Search this
Becker, Howard  Search this
Bercovitch, Sacvan  Search this
Beveridge, Karl  Search this
Brach, Paul, 1924-  Search this
Braderman, Joan  Search this
Burch, Noël, 1932-  Search this
Burn, Ian, 1939-1993  Search this
Captain Beefheart  Search this
Charlesworth, Sarah, 1947-2013  Search this
Chayefsky, Paddy, 1923-1981  Search this
Conde, Carol  Search this
Connell, Brian  Search this
Diddley, Bo, 1928-2008  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Farber, Manny  Search this
Feldman, Ronald, 1938-  Search this
Folks, Homer, 1867-1963  Search this
Fox, Terry, 1943-  Search this
Fried, Howard, 1946-  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997  Search this
Graham, Dan, 1942-  Search this
Graves, Michael, 1934-2015  Search this
Halleck, DeeDee  Search this
Hanhardt, John G.  Search this
Hassan, Ihab, 1925-2015  Search this
Hayes, Woody, 1913-1987  Search this
Heinecken, Robert, 1931-  Search this
Higgins, Dick, 1938-1998  Search this
Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940  Search this
Kienholz, Edward, 1927-  Search this
Kirschenbaum, Baruch David, 1931-  Search this
Knowles, Alison, 1933-  Search this
Kosuth, Joseph.  Search this
Kozloff, Max  Search this
Kramer, Hilton  Search this
Krauss, Rosalind E.  Search this
König, Kasper  Search this
Liebling, Jerome  Search this
Lifson, Ben  Search this
Little Richard, 1932-  Search this
Lonidier, Fred  Search this
Lord, Catherine, 1949-  Search this
Lunn, Harry, 1933-1998  Search this
Mac Low, Jackson  Search this
Mandel, Mike  Search this
Matta, 1912-2002  Search this
Mayer, Grace M.  Search this
Michelson, Annette  Search this
O'Doherty, Brian  Search this
Pommer, Richard  Search this
Ramsden, Mel  Search this
Raskin, Jef  Search this
Reagan, Ronald  Search this
Rosler, Martha  Search this
Ross, David A., 1949-  Search this
Ruby, Jay  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Salle, David, 1952-  Search this
Salvesen, Britt  Search this
Schimmel, Paul  Search this
Segalove, Ilene, 1950-  Search this
Stein, Sally  Search this
Steinmetz, Philip  Search this
Sultan, Larry  Search this
Van Riper, Peter  Search this
Wakoski, Diane  Search this
Wall, Jeff, 1946-  Search this
Extent:
12 Items (Sound recording: 12 sound files (6 hr.,14 min.), digital, wav)
143 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2011 August 20-2012 February 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Allan Sekula conducted 2011 August 20-2012 February 14, by Mary Panzer, for the Archives of American Art at Sekula's studio and home in Los Angeles, California and at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, New York.
Sekula speaks of his career and some of the mediums he works in; language and contemporary art; Roland Barthes; his relation to contemporary art; west coast conceptualism; genre switches; realism; documentary photography; Belgium and the industrial revolution; Meunier; minor figures; art history and marginalism; Roberto Matta; World War I; Homer Folks; Fish Story; historic cinema; economic factors of art shows and publication; galleries and the art world; growing up and his family; his father and moving; Ohio; his brothers and sisters; San Pedro; demographics of students at school; sports at school; Vietnam; protests; cross country and swimming; California; fishing; college; U.C. system; declaring a major; John Altoon; Ed Kienholz; exposure to art; visiting museums; Marcuse's classes; Baldessari's classes; course work and student life; student demonstrations; working in a library and exposure to books; father losing his job; science and working as a chemical technician; politics; his uncle committing suicide; moving away from his father; the draft; John Birch; Students for a Democratic Society; his mother; politics of his parents; Aerospace Folk Tales, autodidacts and scholarship; San Diego and Mexico; obtaining a camera and starting to use it; art school; CalArts; UCSD; Meditations on a Triptych; David Salle; Fred Lonidier; Phel Steinmetz; MFA and art training; poets; story of Allen Ginsberg and one of Sekula's sculptures; production and the audience; A Photograph is Worth a Thousand Questions, photography and the burden of tradition; pictorialism; moving to New York; Artforum; October; New York music scene; Captain Beefheart; Bo Diddley; Little Richard; Steichen and aerial photography; origins of October; New Criterion; Art Critic's Grant; teaching at Ohio State; television; technological historians; New York subway and getting a ticket for using French money; RISD lectures; Long Beach; photography; collages; Metro Pictures; New Topographics; School as a Factory; moral choice and the viewer; work method and the audience; Social Criticism and Art Practice; east and west coasts; Ed Ruscha; documentary; film, Los Angeles; cinema and social history; Ohio State Department of Photography and Cinema; Los Angeles Plays Itself; Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador; Ohio State campus, anti-Semitism; Ronald Reagan and protest; influences and colleagues; intellectual genealogy; Michael Graves and Ohio State architecture; Bad Ohio; tenure; University Exposed; AIDS issue of October; The Body and the Archive; making film; Korean War; collectors and images. Sekula also recalls Eleanor Antin, Jeff Wall, Terry Fox, Lewis Hine, Walker Evans, Paul Saltman, Marcuse, Baldessari, Sacvan Bercovitch, Stanley Miller, Jef Raskin, Paul Brach, David Antin, Howard Fried, Peter Van Riper, Alison Knowles, Dick Higgins, Manny Farber, Ihab Hassan, Diane Wakoski, Jackson Mac Low, Martha Rosler, Lenny Neufeld, Joshua Neufeld, David Wing, Brian Connell, Max Kozloff, Ian Burn, Mel Ramsden, Carole Conde, Karl Beveridge, Barry Rosens, Tom Crow, John Copeland, Harry Lunn, Hilton Kramer, Grace Mayer, Carol Duncan, Eva Cockroft, Richard Pommer, Rosalind Krauss, Sally Stein, Paddy Chayefsky, John Hanhardt, Mel Ramsden, Sarah Charlesworth, Jospeh Kosuth, Baruch Kirschenbaum, Robert Heinecken, Brian O'Doherty, Howard Becker, Jay Ruby, Jerry Liebling, Anna Wilkie, Ronald Feldman, John Gibson, David Ross, Britt Salvesen, Larry Sultan, Mike Mandel, Roy Ascott, Ilene Segalove, Paul Schimmel, DeeDee Halleck, Noel Burch, Joan Braderman, Woody Hayes, Thom Andersen, John Quigley, Ron Green, Kasper Koenig, Dan Graham, Jonathan Green, Christa Wolf, Catherine Lord, Ben Lifson, and Annette Michelson.
Biographical / Historical:
Allan Sekula (1951-2013) was a photographer, filmmaker, and writer, based at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California. Mary Panzer (1955- ) is a historian from New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Sculptors  Search this
Topic:
Activism  Search this
Antisemitism  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- History  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Documentary photography  Search this
Korean War, 1950-1953  Search this
Music -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Photography  Search this
Realism  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.sekula11
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sekula11

Oral history interview with Edward Warder Rannells

Interviewee:
Rannells, Edward Warder, 1892-1972  Search this
Interviewer:
Phillips, Harlan B. (Harlan Buddington), 1920-  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago -- Student  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
University of Chicago -- Students  Search this
University of Kentucky -- Students  Search this
Amyx, Clifford, 1909-1997  Search this
Long, Frank W.  Search this
McVey, Frank LeRond, 1869-1953  Search this
Extent:
19 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Edward Warder Rannells conducted 1965 June 2, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art.
Rannells speaks of his childhood; travels through mid- and far-West; art training at Ohio State in Columbus; Art Institute of Chicago; University of Kentucky at Lexington; Walter Siple, director of Cincinnati Art Museum; WPA and Federal Art Project in Lexington, Ky.; Master's degree in education at University of Chicago; careers of former students; B.A. program at University of Kentucky; his relationship with his father; religion; ballet; development of his art career; his interest in psychology; modern dance; the establishment of a humanities program; and trends in painting. He mentions Anna Louise Rice, Richard O'Hanlon, Frank L. McVey, Frank W. Long, Clifford Amyx, and Carl Lampert.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Warder Rannells (1892-1972) was a writer from Lexington, Ky.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 7 min.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Topic:
Authors -- Kentucky -- Interviews  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rannel65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rannel65

Oral history interview with Jack Earl

Interviewee:
Earl, Jack  Search this
Interviewer:
Milosch, Jane  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Bluffton College (Bluffton, Ohio) -- Students  Search this
John Michael Kohler Arts Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
Toledo School of Art and Design -- Faculty  Search this
Virginia Commonwealth University -- Faculty  Search this
Arneson, Robert, 1930-1992  Search this
Atherton, Carlton  Search this
Bacerra, Ralph, 1938-2008  Search this
Bogatay, Paul  Search this
Fetzer, Margaret  Search this
Friley, Gene  Search this
Keland, Karen  Search this
Kerrigan, Tom  Search this
Kottler, Howard, 1930-1989  Search this
LaDousa, Tom  Search this
Littlefield, Edgar  Search this
Lugenbuhl, Darvin  Search this
Schuman, Norm  Search this
Shaw, Richard, 1941 Sept. 12-  Search this
Smith, Paul J.  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (4 hr., 32 min.), digital, 2 5/8 in.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Ohio -- Description and Travel
Date:
2007 June 19-20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jack Earl conducted 2007 June 19-20, by Jane Milosch, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's home and studio, in Lakeview, Ohio.
Earl speaks of his childhood in Uniopolis, Ohio; using his father's tools in the garage to make toys; developing a long-lasting friendship with his high school art teacher; studying art at Bluffton College and learning to make pottery; learning to read in college and getting a minor in English; getting married while in college; graduating from Bluffton College and getting a job teaching at a local high school; teaching high school art for ten years in New Breman, Ohio; attending a graduate program at Ohio State University and earning a Master's in Ceramic Art; being influenced by professor Paul Bogatay while in graduate school; working at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center over one winter break; teaching at Toledo School of Art and Design following graduation from Ohio State University; learning to make European porcelain; beginning to apply oil paint to his ceramic pieces; copying imagery from European masterpieces; feeling uninspired by Virginia culture after moving there to teach at Virginia Commonwealth University; moving back to Ohio and enjoying the proximity of his children and grandchildren there; his belief that his artwork reflects his life; the greater market for ceramic artwork now compared to when he began working; continuing ceramic tradition by incorporating humor into his work; the importance of his family and Ohio culture to his work; writing a book with Karen Keland to promote crafts, especially ceramics; being much more interested in making things than in his teaching; the versatility of clay as a material; and his work habits. Earl recalls Darvin Lugenbuhl, Paul Bogatay, Carlton Atherton, Edgar Littlefield, Gene Friley, Margaret Fetzer, Howard Kottler, Robert Arneson, Tom LaDousa, Norm Schuman, Peter Voulkos, Paul Smith, Karen Keland, Tom Kerrigan, Ralph Bacerra, Richard Shaw, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Jack Earl (1934- ) is a ceramic artist from Lakeview, Ohio. Jane Milosch is a curator from Silver Spring, Maryland.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 32 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Ceramicists -- Ohio -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.earl07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-earl07

Oral history interview with Victor Mantilla Chalela

Interviewee:
Mantilla Chalela, Victor  Search this
Interviewer:
McChesney, Mary Fuller  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
University of San Marcus (Lima, Peru) -- Students  Search this
Extent:
30 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 July 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Victor Mantilla Chalela conducted 1964 July 28, by Mary McChesney for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.
Mantilla Chalela speaks of his art training at Ohio State University beginning in 1926 and in 1930 at the University of San Marcus in Lima, Peru; studying mosaic techniques and materials in Peru; and his work for the Federal Art Project in California.
Biographical / Historical:
Victor Mantilla Chalela is a designer and mosaicist from California.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 1 hr., 4 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Mosaicists  Search this
Topic:
Mosaics -- Technique.  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Designers -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chalel64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chalel64

Oral history interview with Nancy Crow

Creator:
Crow, Nancy, 1943-  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Interviewer:
Robertson, Jean  Search this
Names:
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts -- Faculty  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Ohio State University -- Students  Search this
Snyderman Gallery  Search this
Extent:
50 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2002 December 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Crow conducted 2002 December 18, by Jean Robertson, for the Archives of American Art, at her home and studio, in Baltimore, Ohio, as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Crow speaks of her early childhood and her father's high standards; her early interest in color; her studies at Ohio State University and her first ceramics professor Edgar Littlefield; joining the textile guild in Athens, Ohio; how her quilting evolved from traditional to contemporary and abstract forms; her practice of working on several quilts simultaneously; the influence of Anna Williams, a quiltmaker in Baton Rouge, Alabama; and she describes her studio. Crow also discusses her association with the Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia; a trip to China that resulted in the series Chinese Souls; and how beauty is her ultimate goal. She talks about her travels to Mexico and South Africa; her technical mastery of strip piecing; working at home while raising two sons; the dyeing process; her sketchbooks; her long-term working relationship with hand quilter, Marla Hattabaugh; teaching at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts; the beginnings of the Quilt National Show at the Dairy Barn; the Ohio Arts Council; the Art Quilt Network; periodicals including FiberArts, Surface Design, Hali, and Raw Vision; two seminal exhibitions in her career, "Nancy Crow: Work in Transition," at the American Craft Museum, 1993, and "Nancy Crow -- Improvisational Quilts," at the Renwick Gallery, 1995; and the changing market for quilts in America. She recalls Bruce Hoffman, Rick and Ruth Snyderman, Jan Myers-Newberry, Rosalie Gascoigne, Sandra Blaine, Vivian Harvey; Linda Fowler, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Crow (1943- ) is a fiber artist and quiltmaker in Baltimore, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 12 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 31 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Researchers note: A separate 1988 interview of Crow, also conducted by Robertson is also available.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Quilting -- Technique  Search this
Quilting -- Study and teaching  Search this
Dyes and dyeing -- Technique  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crow02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crow02

Roy Lichtenstein sketches for "As I Opened Fire"

Creator:
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Extent:
4 Items ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
[ca. 1964]
Scope and Contents:
Preliminary sketch for the painting "As I Opened Fire" [1964] and the comic strip on which it was based.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter and sculptor, New York, N.Y. Studied at Ohio State University and at the Art Students League and under Reginald Marsh. Through his cartoon-like style and commentary, Lichtenstein came to represent a faction of his generation in his art and was one of the great proponents of the Pop Art movement of the 1960's
Provenance:
Donated by Richard Brown Baker.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Topic:
Pop art -- United States  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.lichroy
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lichroy

Black Aviators Interviews

Extent:
4 videotapes (reference copies). 9 digital .wmv files and .rm files (reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Transcripts
Date:
1989-1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ted Robinson, an employee of the Federal Aviation Administration, held a two-year appointment at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum as a historian of black aviation. During that time he recorded two video sessions with five black aviators of the 1930s. The interviewees related how they became interested in flying, how they obtained airplanes and training, how they publicized their aviation skills at the local and national levels, and how they contended with the prejudices opposing them. Robinson was especially concerned with visually capturing the survivors of that era since there are few pictorial records of their past.

In Session One, recorded in Washington, D.C, in November 1989, Robinson interviews C. Alfred "Chief" Anderson, Janet Harmon Bragg, and Lewis Jackson on their social and technical experiences in aviation in the upper Midwest and at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. They discussed their struggles to become accredited pilots and open the United States Army Air Corps to black fliers.

Session Two was recorded in Chicago, Illinois, in March 1990, where Robinson interviewed Cornelius Coffey and Harold Hurd on their similar efforts in the Chicago metropolitan area and specifically on Coffey's organization of a licensed flight and mechanic's school before and during World War II. During both interviews Robinson used period photographs to stimulate and complement the recollections of the participants.

This collection consists of two interview sessions, totalling approximately 7:00 hours of recordings, and 201 pages of transcript. There are three generations of tape for each session: originals, dubbing masters, and reference copies. In total, this collection is comprised of 21 original videotapes (10 Beta and 11 U-matic videotapes), 9 dubbing master videotapes (9 U-matic videotapes), and 4 reference copy videotapes (4 VHS videotapes). The collection has been remastered digitally, with 21 motion jpeg 2000 and 21 mpeg digital files for preservation, and 7 Windows Media Video and 7 Real Media Video digital files for reference.
Historical Note:
Black American men and women struggled throughout the 1930s to gain the opportunity and right to fly airplanes. Organization within African American communities, support by white individuals, and aeronautic feats by blacks working with limited resources all served to challenge the racism and sexism of American society. Despite institutionalized biases and the persisting effects of the Great Depression, the number of licensed black pilots increased about tenfold, to 102, between 1930 and 1941. This development helped move the federal government, though not the private sector, into sanctioning black men to operate the twentieth century technology of powered flight during World War II.

C. Alfred "Chief" Anderson was born in 1906 and had his first airplane ride in 1928. In 1933, he became the first African American to earn a transport, or commercial, pilot's license, and with Dr. Albert E. Forsythe completed a series of long-distance flights in 1933 and 1934 to promote black aviation. In 1940, Anderson instructed students from Howard University for the Civilian Pilots Training Program (CPTP) until he was recruited by Tuskegee Institute in Alabama to act as its chief primary flight instructor. In 1946, he organized Tuskegee Aviation, Inc., to service aircraft until he was forced out of business by the state's attorney general in the late 1950s. He has continued to fly and co-founded Negro Airmen International in 1970 to encourage others to enter the field of aviation.

Janet Harmon Bragg was a registered nurse inspired to fly by the exploits of Bessie Coleman, the first licensed black pilot in the United States. She earned her pilot's license in 1932 at the Aeronautical University, Inc., in Chicago, Illinois, and because she was one of the few black pilots still employed during the Depression, Bragg paid for most of the airplanes used by the Challenger Air Pilots Association during the 1930s. During World War II she was rebuffed by both the Women's Airforce Service Pilots and a license examiner in Alabama from contributing to the war effort as a pilot; the government also refused her services as a nurse. After the war, Bragg married and ran two nursing homes until she retired in Tucson, Arizona.

Lewis A. Jackson was born in 1912 and started flying in 1930. He gained his transport license in 1935; his barnstorming paid for the B.S. he received from Marion College in Indiana in 1939. Jackson joined Cornelius Coffey in Chicago as flight instructor before leaving for Tuskegee where he became director of training for their CPT Program. In 1948, he earned his M.A. in education from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in Columbus in 1950. Jackson served in various teaching and administrative positions, including the presidency, at Central State University. He left in 1972 for an administrative post at Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio. He has maintained an interest in flying, examining applicants for pilot licenses, and designing and building airplanes that could also be used on roads.

Cornelius Coffey was born in 1903 and had his first airplane ride in 1919. He graduated from an automotive engineering school in 1925 and an aviation mechanics school in Chicago, Illinois, in 1931. He co-organized the Challenger Air Pilots Association with John Robinson to promote flying among blacks in the Chicago area, built an airport in Robbins, Illinois, and opened an aeronautics school. In 1937 he earned his transport license and opened the Coffey School of Aeronautics. In 1939 the African-American communities in Chicago and Washington, D.C., successfully lobbied to have Coffey's school included in the CPT Program; Coffey trained black pilots and flight instructors throughout World War II. After the war, Coffey joined the Chicago Board of Education and established an aircraft mechanics training and licensing program in the city's high schools. Coffey retired in 1969 and has since acted as a licensed mechanic examiner and aircraft inspector.

Harold Hurd first saw a black man fly an airplane at an airshow in 1929. Three years later, he was one of the first class of all black graduates from Aeronautical University in Chicago. After graduation Hurd helped organize the Challenger Air Pilots Association and its 1937 successor organization, the National Airmen's Association of America, in efforts to expand black interest in flying. He underwrote his aviation interests by working at the Chicago Defender newspaper. He later worked for several local papers on Chicago's Southside.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Women -- History  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
History of science and technology  Search this
Military history  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9545, , Black Aviators Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9545
See more items in:
Black Aviators Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9545

Frederick Douglass Patterson papers

Creator:
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Names:
Phelps-Stokes Fund  Search this
Tuskegee Institute  Search this
United Negro College Fund  Search this
Carver, George Washington, 1864?-1943  Search this
Moton, Robert Russa, 1867-1940  Search this
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Extent:
18.66 Linear feet (21 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diplomas
Notebooks
Articles
Manuscripts
Photographic prints
Ephemera
Scrapbooks
Newsletters
Awards
Photographs
Invitations
Legal documents
Programs
Correspondence
Clippings
Date:
1882 - 1988
Summary:
President of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (later Tukegee Institute; now Tuskegee University) from 1935 - 1953 and founder of the United Negro College Fund (1944). Patterson was born on October 10, 1901. Orphaned at age two, he was raised by his eldest sister, Wilhelmina (Bess), a school teacher in Texas. He studied at Iowa State College, where he received a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1923 and a master of science degree in 1927. Five years later, he was awarded a second doctorate degree from Cornell University. Patterson taught veterinary science for four years at Virginia State College, where he was also Director of Agriculture. His tenure at Tuskegee University started in 1928 and spanned almost 25 years, first as head of the veterinary division, then as the director of the School of Agriculture and finally as Tuskegee's third president. He married Catherine Elizabeth Moton, daughter of Tuskegee University's second president, Dr. Robert R. Moton. Patterson also founded the School of Veterinary Medicine at Tuskegee in 1944, the same year he founded the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). The UNCF continues today as a critical source of annual income for a consortium of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tuskegee University among them.
Scope and Content note:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson Collection comprises 18.66 linear feet of correspondence, manuscripts, research material, published writings, photographs, audiovisual material, scrapbooks, diplomas, awards, and other materials chronicling the personal life and professional career of Frederick D. Patterson.

The collection is comprised of glimpses into the life of Dr. Patterson. The little correspondece that survived is located in Series 2: Career, Series 3: Correspondence, and Series 4: Organizations. Some of the correspondence takes the form of congratulatory notes from 1953 during Patterson's transfer from Tuskegee Institute to the Phelps-Stokes Fund, located in Series 2. There is also a personal note sent to Patterson's wife, Catherine Patterson, from George Washington Carver in which he describes peanut oil as a good massage oil.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged by series and chronologically therein:

1. Biography: This series provides insight into Patterson's family life through primary documents. It is comprised of family wills, insurance policies, and his autobiography. Sub-series are arranged alphabetically by title.

2. Career: This series contains materials from Patterson's long professional career in the field of higher education, including his tenure as present of both the Tuskegee Institute and the Phelps-Stokes Fund. Sub-series are arranged chronologically.

3. Correspondence: This series contains letters sent to Patterson (and his wife) of a personal and professional nature. Several letters relate to Patterson's personal business "Signs and Services," which was a small billboard advertising company. There are also letters from George Washington Carver. The series is arranged chronologically. 4. Organizations: This series contains material from the various foundations Patterson founded and to which he belonged, including the R.R. Moton Fund and the College Endowment Funding Plan. He is especially noted for developing the United Negro College Fund. The series is organized alphabetically by sub-series title.

5. Honors: This series contains the awards, citations, and resolutions Patterson received during his lifetime. Folders are organized chronologically. 6. Subject Files: This series comprises articles, employee vitas, and other documents collected and organized by Patterson. Among the subjects in the files are higher education, Negroes, segregation, civil rights, and employee records. There is no key to this system.

7. Photographs: The Photograph series mostly documents Patterson's tenure at Tuskegee University. The series includes images of Patterson and various other notable figures during formal functions at the university. Noteworthy personalities include George Washington Carver, Eleanor and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

8. Printed Materials: This series contains books, programs, and other documents from Patterson's personal collection. The series is organized alphabetically by author's last name.
Biographical note:
Frederick Douglass Patterson was born on October 10, 1901 to parents William and Mamie Brooks Patterson, in the Buena Vista Heights area of Anacostia in Washington, D.C. The youngest of six children, Patterson's parents died of tuberculosis before he reached the age of two years, his mother when he was eleven months old and his father a year later. Following his parents' death, the Patterson children were split up and sent to live in the homes of family and friends as stipulated in his father's last will and testament until he was seven years old, Patterson lived in the Anacostia area with a family friend he called "Aunt Julia."

When he was seven years old, Patterson's older sister Bess (a recent graduate of the Washington Conservatory of Music) decided to seek employment in Texas and took him with her. Many of their parents' family still lived in the state, which allowed Patterson the opportunity to spend months with various aunts and uncles, while his sister taught music throughout the South. After completing eighth grade, Patterson joined his sister at the Prairie View Normal School, where she taught music and directed the choir. Patterson attended the school for four years, during which time he developed an interest in veterinary medicine.

In 1920, Patterson enrolled at Iowa State College as a veterinary student. He graduated in 1923 and moved to Columbus, Ohio, to join his brother John. While there, he took the Ohio State Board exam for Veterinary Medicine. Although he became certified, a lack of money prevented him from practicing. Four years later he received a teaching offer from Virginia State College (VSC) in Petersburg, Virginia, which afforded him the opportunity to work within his profession. While at VSC Patterson took a leave of absence and returned to Iowa, in 1926, to pursue a Master's degree in veterinary medicine.

After five years at VSC, the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute offered Patterson a position running the veterinarian hospital and teaching veterinary science. He moved to Tuskegee, Alabama in 1928. While at Tuskegee, Patterson decided to pursue a Ph.D. in bacteriology at Cornell University. During his year and a half leave from Tuskegee, Patterson completed his coursework and wrote his dissertation. After he returned to Tuskegee, a serial killer murdered three people, including the head of the Department of Agriculture. Confronted with this tragedy, school officials quickly offered Patterson the vacant position, which he accepted in 1934.

Robert R. Moton, second president of Tuskegee, retired in 1935 and a search was soon commenced to find the next president for the school. Patterson, in the meantime, pursued more personal matters when he met and married Catherine Moton (with whom he would have a son) in June 1935. By then he was already hired to take his now, father-in-law's, position as President of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute.

As president of Tuskegee, Patterson made several changes and many additions to the institution. He increased faculty housing for professors; integrated the Board of Trustees' meeting meals and eventually arranged for both balck and white members to eat at one table; shortened the name to Tuskegee Institute; and established the Department of Commercial Dietetics in 1935, the veterinary medicine program in 1942, and the engineering program in 1948. While many considered Patterson's changes important achievements, it was his development of the Commercial/Military Aviation Program that would bring the school distinction and fame.

Patterson first attempted to develop the aviation program in 1939. The government fostered the development of such programs by subsiding the expenses. All a university had to do was present able-bodied instructors and willing pupils. Tuskegee had both. By 1940 the United States Air Force was interested in integrating its forces. In order to do this they needed trained black pilots. Tuskegee was the perfect place to provide the needed pilots since the school was situated in an all-black environment where students could concentrate on learning to fly without having to worry about racist reactions from their fellow classmates. To accommodate this program, the Tuskegee Army Air Base was created. Tuskegee pilots flew missions throughout World War II and would later be recognized for their bravery.

An important part of Patterson's duties as president was fund-raising. By 1943 he found it increasingly difficult to find ample sources of funds to run the Institute. He came to realize Tuskegee and similar black colleges would benefit if they pooled their funding resources and asked for larger amounts of money from philanthropic individuals and organizations as a collective. Working together would cut fund-raising expenses; this in turn would leave more money for the colleges to use as they wished. Patterson named his new creation the United Negro College Fund (UNCF); it would go on to raise millions of dollars for the nation's historically black colleges. He served as the first president of the organization.

During the fifteen years Patterson served as president of Tuskegee, he hosted many famous personalities, including W.E.B. DuBois, Mary McLeod Bethune, Eleanor Roosevelt, Duke Ellington, Paul Robeson, Pearl Buck, and Andre Segovia. He developed a lasting relationship with George Washington Carver, who had been a professor with Tuskegee since the days of Booker T. Washington.

Patterson served on many organizational boards in addition to his educational work. His involvement with the Phelps-Stokes Fund would ultimately lead Patterson to leave his beloved Tuskegee Institute to apply his educational philosophies on a broader scale. In 1953 the Fund approached Patterson and offered him the presidency of the organization. Patterson, feeling he needed a change, accepted the offer. He resigned from Tuskegee that same year and moved to New York to begin a new life.

Organized in 1911, the Phelps-Stokes Fund supported African, African American, and Native American education and worked on solving housing problems in New York City. Patterson's interest in African education began before he joined Phelps-Stokes. In 1950 the World Bank/International Bank Commission to Nigeria hired him to "evaluate the resources of Nigeria and…to study the educational programs and the organizational structure of advanced education." Through his work with the Fund he continued his efforts to improve the educational opportunities for Africans and help them move beyond colonialism. Patterson traveled extensively throughout the west coast of Africa in support of these goals.

In addition to forming the UNCF, Patterson created two other organizations (the Robert R. Moton Institute and the College Endowment Funding Plan), during the mid 1960s and 1970s. Each was designed to improve funding efforts for historically black colleges. The Robert R. Moton institute began as an off-shoot of the Phelps-Stokes as a site for conferences to address the Fund's primary concerns. Patterson's idea for the Institute came from a desire to put to use a piece of property inherited after Moton's death. Empathy with the frustrations of college presidents regarding the restricted funding for institutional expenses led Patterson to create the College Endowment Funding Plan. The Endowment was designed to alleviate this situation by providing matching funds to eligible colleges. The Endowment made its first payment in 1978. Unfortunately, by the 1980s, the Moton Institute lost most of its government funding due to federal cutbacks. This resulted in reductions to the Institute's programming.

It was not until Patterson was well into his eighties that he began to retire from his life of public service. On June 23, 1987, President Ronald Reagan presented Dr. Patterson with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest possible honor that can be bestowed upon a civilian, for his service in higher education and his role in creating funding sources for the nation's historically black colleges. A year later Frederick Douglass Patterson died at the age of eighty-seven.

Honorary Degrees

undated -- Xavier University

1941 -- Virginia State College

1941 -- Wilberforce University

1953 -- Morehouse College

1956 -- Tuskegee Institute

1961 -- New York University

1966 -- Edward Waters College

1967 -- Atlanta University

1969 -- Franklin and Marshall College

1970 -- Virginia Union University

1975 -- Bishop College

1977 -- St. Augustine's College

1982 -- Brooklyn College of the City University of New York

1984 -- Stillman College

1985 -- Payne College

Distinctions

undated -- Association for the Study of Negro Life and History Carter

undated -- The Southern Education Foundation, Inc. Distinguished Service Citation

undated -- The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) and Texas Association of Developing Colleges Annual Leadership Awards

1950 -- Christian Education department, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Inc. Citation for Distinguished Service

1953 -- Bethune-Cookman College, the Mary McLeod Bethune Medallion

1953 -- John A. Andrew Clinical Society at Tuskegee Institute, Citation for Distinguished Service in the Cause of Humanity

1953 -- Tuskegee Institute, Certificate of Appreciation for 25 Years of Service

1957 -- Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Beta Lamda Sigma Chapter, Bigger and Better Business Award

1960 -- National Alumni Council of the UNCF, Inc. Award

1963 -- National Business League, Booker T. Washington Award

1965 -- Booker T. Washington Business Association, Certificate of Acknowledgement

1970 -- Moton Conference Center Award

1970 -- Tuskegee National Alumni Association, R.R. Moton Award

1972 -- American College Public Relations Association, 1972 Award for Distinguished Service to Higher Education

1972 -- UNCF F.D. Patterson 71st Birthday Award

1975 -- National Business League, Booker T. Washington Symbol of Service Award

1976 -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Continuous Creative and Courageous Leadership in the Cause of Higher Education for Blacks

1977 -- Yale Alumni Associates of Afro-America, Distinguished Service Award

1979 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation Inc., Distinguished Educator Award

1979 -- Tuskegee Institute Alumni Association Philadelphia Charter Award

1980 -- The Iowa State University Alumni Association, Distinguished Achievement Citation

1980 -- Gary Branch NAACP Life Membership Fight for Freedom Dinner 1980, Roy Wilkins Award

1980 -- State of Alabama Certificate of Appreciation

1982 -- St. Luke's United Methodist Church Achievement Award

1983 -- Tuskegee Airmen, Inc., Distinguished Service Award

1984 -- Booker T. Washington Foundation, Booker T. Washington Distinguished Service Award

1984 -- The Ohio State University Office of Minority Affairs, Distinguished Humanitarian and Service Award

1985 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc, Eta Zeta Lamda Chapter Civic Award

1985 -- United States, Private Sector Initiative Commendation

1987 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc of New York State, Founders Day Award

1987 -- Presidential Medal of Freedom

1987 -- Brag Business Achievement Award

1987 -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Aggrey Medal

Public Service

1941-1971 -- Southern Educational Foundation, Inc., Board Member

1943-1988 -- United Negro College Fund, Founder, President, and Member

1960s-1988 -- Robert R. Moton Memorial Institute, Founder

1970s-1988 -- The College Endowment Funding Plan, Founder

undated -- American National Red Cross, Board of Governors Member

undated -- Boys Scouts of America, National Council Member

undated -- Citizens Committee for the Hoover Report on Reorganization of Federal Government, Board Member

undated -- Institute of International Education, Advisory committee Member

undated -- National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Life Member

undated -- National Business League, President and Board Member

undated -- National Urban League, National Committee Member

undated -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Board of Trustees Member

undated -- President's Commission on Higher Education for Negroes

undated -- Southern Regional Education, Board of Control Member
Related Materials:
Additional biographical materials in the Dale/Patterson Collection of the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

This collection contains artifacts catalogued in the ACM Objects Collection.
Provenance:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2001 by Frederick Douglass Patterson, Jr.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
Universities and colleges -- Administration  Search this
African Americans -- Education (Higher)  Search this
African American universities and colleges  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diplomas
Notebooks
Articles
Manuscripts
Photographic prints
Ephemera
Scrapbooks
Newsletters
Awards
Photographs
Invitations
Legal documents
Programs
Correspondence
Clippings
Citation:
Frederick Douglass Patterson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Frederick Douglass Patterson, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-010
See more items in:
Frederick Douglass Patterson papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-010
Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Spohn, Clay Edgar, 1898-1977  Search this
Extent:
(boxes 2-5, 4.7 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1925-1981, undated
Scope and Contents note:
Correspondence is between Spohn and his colleagues, including two letters from Alexander Calder, eight letters from Mark Rothko, and twenty-eight letters from Clyfford Still.

See Appendix for an alphabetical list of correspondents from Series 2.2.
Appendix: Alphabetical List of Correspondents in 2.2:
Abend, George and Kitty Parker Abend (artists): 1950-1960 (4 letters)

Abingdon Square Painters: 1958 (1 letter)

Addison Gallery of American Art: 1958 (2 letters)

American Artists' Congress: 1938 (1 letter)

American Library of Color Slides: 1941 (1 letter)

Anderson, Claude J. K.: 1958 (1 letter)

Anderson, Wendell (poet): 1955-1956 (2 letters)

Archives of American Art: 1964 (4 letters)

Art Academy of Cincinnati: 1958-1959 (3 letters)

Art Association of Newport: 1958 (1 letter)

Art Career School: 1958 (1 letter)

Artists Equity Association: 1950 (1 letter)

Arts and Architecture: 1963 (1 letter)

Art Students League: 1958-1964 (2 letters)

Art Times: 1959 (1 letter)

Art Workshop of the Rivington Neighborhood Asociation, Inc.: 1958 (1 letter)

Ashton, Dore: 1969 (1 letter)

Ayer, Phyllis: 1956 (1 letter)

Bachels, Andrew: 1969 (1 letter)

Barnett, Rici: 1973 (1 letter)

Barron, John N.: 1966 (1 letter)

Beasley, David and Viola: 1963-1978 (11 letters)

Bender: Albert M. Bender Memorial Trust: 1947-1951 (2 letters)

Bethers, Peggy: 1940 (1 letter)

Blesh, Rudi: 1960 (1 letter)

Board of Education, City of New York: 1958-1965 (2 letters)

Booth, James W. (family friend): 1943-1956 (7 letters)

Borgenight: Grace Borgenight Gallery, Inc.: 1965 (1 letter)

Boru, Sorcha: 1932-1933 (12 letters)

Brandenburg, Helen: 1970 (1 letter)

Braunstein/Quay Gallery: 1977 (1 letter)

Briggs, Ernie: 1967-1977 (2 letters)

Bright, Beatrice: 1971-1973 (2 letters)

Brock, Midu: 1954 (1 letter)

Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture: 1966 (1 letter)

Brown, Lesley: 1955 (1 letter)

Burke, Bob: 1971 (1 letter)

Burnham, Janet B.: 1950 (1 letter)

Bute, Janey: 1971 (1 letter)

Calcagno, Lawrence: 1969-1977 (5 letters)

Calder, Alexander: 1970-1972 (2 letters)

California Palace of the Legion of Honor: 1964 (1 letter)

California School of Fine Arts: 1955-1964 (2 letters)

California: University of California at Berkeley: 1940 (1 letter)

California: University of California at Santa Clara: 1975-1976 (2 letters)

Carewe, Sylvia: 1969 (1 letter)

Carr, James F.: 1967 (1 letter)

Chase Manhattan Bank: 1971 (2 letters)

Chisholm, Stuart (landscape architect): 1925 (1 letter)

Clayton, Janice: undated and 1965-1974 (6 letters)

Clifton, Jim and Mary (owners of a Spohn painting): 1956 (1 letter)

College Art Association: 1949 (1 letter)

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center: 1952-1970 (4 letters)

Cooke, Regina: 1955 (1 letter)

Cooley, Anne: 1941 (1 letter)

Corbett, Ed and Steff, and Rosamond Tirana: undated and 1951-1977(47 letters, including a 1962 wedding announcement for Corbett and Tirana, and a letter dated Mar 21, 1963 enclosing a photograph of Ed with an amputated foot)

Craig, Jeanne: 1963 (2 letters)

Crawford, Jane and Ernie: 1958 (3 letters)

Crehan, Hub and Anne: 1960 (1 letter)

Crewe, Sylvia: 1969 (1 letter)

Crews, Judson and Mildred (publishers of poetry magazine in Taos): 1952-1969 (4 letters)

Cumming, Ann (and Jennifer Sutcliffe): 1956 (1 letter)

Cunningham, Ben: 1950 (1 letter)

D'Arcangelo, Allan and Sylvia: 1965 (1 letter)

Dasburg, Andrew: 1961 (1 letter)

DePuy, John: 1964 (1 letter)

Diebenkorn, Richard: 1951 (1 letter)

Dilexi Gallery (L. James Newman): 1965 (1 letter)

Dixon, Budd (J.B.) and Peggy: 1954-1970 (5 letters)

Dowell-Kahl Gallery (Leone Kahl, director): 1963 (1 letter)

Drumm, Steve: 1953 (1 letter)

Durham, Charlotte: 1968-1970 (3 letters)

D'Vorzon, Berenice and Randal Goya: 1965 (1 letter)

East Hampton Gallery: undated (1 letter)

Edwards, Tom L.: 1945-1974 (2 letters)

Egri, Ted and Kit: 1958-1971

Elster, Grace-Marion: 1926 (1 letter)

Ely, Georgette and Wolcott: 1958-1969 (38 letters)

Finichel, Lilly: 1954 (1 letter)

Forster, Bertrand Dixon: 1961 (1 letter)

Forster, Paul and Else: undated and 1943-1974 (15 letters)

Fort Worth Art Center Museum: 1971 (1 letter)

Foss, Florence: 1958 (1 letter)

Fran, Ford: 1971 (1 letter)

Fryworth, Teressa (Terry) (Registrar at California School of Fine Arts): 1950-1978 (72 letters)

Fuller, Mary: see McChesney, Mary

Fuller, Patti (Ed Corbett's niece): 1955 (2 letters)

Furse, Roger: 1928-1953 (4 letters)

Gallery of Modern Art, Taos, N.M.: 1972 (1 letter)

Garcia, Enos: 1954 (1 letter)

Georgiadis, Alex: 1951 (1 letter)

Gettell, Mrs. Richard Glenn: 1958 (an invitation to meet Col. George Lincoln)

Gluck, Heidi: 1977 (1 letter)

Gomez, Dorothy Massey (mother of anthropologist Bill Massey): 1950 (1 letter)

Gomez, Joe: undated and 1971 (2 letters)

Grant, Bob: 1953-1972 (2 letters)

Grant, Carolyn: 1969 (1 letter)

Great Neck Board of Education: 1960 (1 letter)

Grimm, Marjorie: 1973 (1 letter)

Grossmann, Nancy: 1966 (1 letter)

Guggenheim: John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation: 1953-1954 (2 letters)

Harwood Foundation: 1953-1956 (2 letters)

Harris, Roger: 1973 (1 letter)

Hawley, W. R.: 1977 (1 letter enclosing an exhibition catalog "Unemployed Wizards")

Heischman, R. L.: undated (1 letter)

Hill, Dorothy: 1967 (2 letters)

Hocks, Fred: 1952 (1 letter)

Howard, Ellen and Galen: 1957 (1 letter)

Howard, Robert Boardman and Adaline Kent (San Francisco sculptors): 1951-1955 (2 letters)

Howard, Madge Knight and Charles H.: 1946-1954 (21 letters)

Hultburg, John and Lynne: 1959-1974 (5 letters)

Huntsville Museum of Art: see Braunstein/Quay Gallery

Hurst, Tricia: 1977 (1 letter)

Hutchinson, Mrs. D. H.: 1925 (1 letter)

Illinois: University of Illinois at Urbana: 1952 (2 letters)

Jackson: Martha Jackson Gallery: 1965 (1 letter)

Jacobson, Art (artist) and Ursula: 1950-1960 (9 letters)

Jonson Gallery: 1969-1970 (2 letters)

Kadish, Reuben: 1958 (1 letter)

Kahl: Leone Kahl Gallery: 1964 (1 letter)

Karnes, Marion Watson: undated and 1947-1954 (80 letters from Spohn)

Keeney, James: 1963 (1 letter)

Kieve, Rudolph: 1971 (3 letters)

King, Vivie and Rufus: 1977 (1 letter)

Kingman, Dong: undated calling card

Kuhlman, Walt: 1957 (2 letters)

Kultberg, Lynne and John: 1965 (1 letter)

Labaudt, Lucien: 1943 (1 letter)

Labaudt, Marcelle: 1956 (1 letter)

Landgren, Paula: undated (1 letter)

Lannan, J. Patrick (The Susquehanna Corporation/ The Lannan Foundation): 1966-1971 (4 letters); see Personal Business Records for correspondence pertaining to the Foundation's support of Spohn, 1961-1962

LaPlante, John (Stanford University): 1949 (1 letter)

Lazarus, Rosalind: 1960 (1 letter)

LeBow-Gould Associates: 1958 (3 letters)

Lee, Martha: 1957 (1 letter)

Lehman, Margarett: 1957 (1 letter)

Letter Shop: 1956 (1 letter)

Library of Congress Copyright Office: 1932 (1 letter concerning the trisection of an arbitrary angle)

Lippincott, Janet (artist): 1955-1956 (5 letters)

Lockwood, Ward: 1952 (1 letter)

MacAgy, Douglas and Betty: undated and 1945-1973 (13 letters)

MacAgy, Jermayne (Jerry): 1945-1948 (2 letters)

Macdowell Colony: 1975 (1 letter)

Machcinski, Barbara: 1971 (1 letter)

MacIntyre, Carlyle F.: 1945 (1 letter)

Maes, Virginia: 1941 (1 letter)

Mare, Doris and Emil: 1969 (1 letter)

Marse, John J.: 1962 (1 letter)

Marter, Joan: 1977 (3 letters)

Martin, Agnes: 1958-1975 (3 letters)

Massey, Ellen DeSelms: 1940 (2 letters)

McCarthy, Francis Joseph (AIA): 1950 (1 change of address card)

McChesney, Mary (Fuller) and Mac: 1952-1977 (62 letters, including one dated May 21, 1968 decorated with a lizard skin, one dated Jun 08, 1973 enclosing a wooden Yalalag Indian good luck charm, and one dated May 26, 1976 enclosing a photograph of group and McChesney art work at Temko mansion in Berkeley)

McCormick, Herbert: 1951 (1 letter)

McDonald, Katharyn: 1963-1964 (2 letters)

Merlin Development Company: 1962 (1 letter)

Merrick, Barbara: 1975 (1 letter)

Meyer, Fleur Cowler: 1968 (1 letter)

Miller, Dorothy (Museum of Modern Art): 1952-1977 (8 letters)

Moore Dry Dock Company: 1942 (2 letters)

Murphy, Jack W. and Dori (owners of some of Spohn's work): 1951-1976 (7 letters)

Mygatt, Tony: 1954 (1 letter)

National Collection of Fine Arts: 1977 (1 letter)

Neininger, Urban and Jeanne: 1950-1976 (48 letters)

New Mexico Highlands University: 1958-1969 (3 letters)

New Mexico: Museum of New Mexico Art Gallery: 1952-1957 (3 letters)

New Mexico: University of New Mexico at Albuquerque: 1957-1970 (2 letters)

New York City Transit Authority: 1962-1963 (2 letters)

New York Saucer Information Bureau: 1962-1965 (2 letters)

New York University: 1958-1960 (3 letters)

Oakland Museum (Terry St. John): 1970-1977 (33 letters)

O'Connor, Francis V.: 1979 (1 letter)

Ohio State University: 1958 (1 letter)

Oldfield, Otis: 1942 (1 letter of recommendation for Spohn for Albert M. Bender Grants-in-Aid)

Olmsted, Frederick: 1943 (1 letter)

Oregon: University of Oregon: 1974-1975 (2 letters)

Ortman, George: 1964 (2 letters)

Otto, Curtis, Roberta, and Adrienne: 1957 (1 letter)

Oxford University Press: 1949 (1 letter)

Parrett, Fred C.: undated and 1954 (2 letters)

Peale, Norman Vincent (office of): 1975 (1 letter)

Pepsi-Cola Annual Art Competition: 1947 (2 letters)

Peterson, Arline? and Pete: 1955-1957 (2 letters)

Petrovo, Miriam: 1961-1971 (11 letters)

Pitney, Peggy and Ed: 1948 (1 letter)

Queens College: 1958 (2 letters)

Ramsay, Anna R.: 1954 (1 letter)

Rankine, Vivie (Mrs. Paul Scott Rankine): 1964-1981 (5 letters)

Remington, Deborah: 1963 (1 letter)

Reminick, Harry: 1954 (1 letter)

Reynal, Jeanne: 1941 (an invitation to a reception for Arshile Gorky) and 1952 (1 letter)

Ribak, Louis and Bea: 1954-1976 (5 letters)

Richards, Tally: 1971-1980 (5 letters)

Ridiman, Bob: 1963-1970 (4 letters)

Rogoway, Marjorie and Rog: undated and 1953-1968 (15 letters)

Rosebury, Amy and Ted: 1954 (1 letter)

Rosen, Michael: 1970-1974 (4 letters)

Roswell Museum and Art Center: 1977-1978 (6 letters)

Rothko Foundation: 1971-1975 (4 letters)

Rothko, Mark and Mell: 1946-1958 (8 letters)

Rusnell, Wesley: 1972-1979 (13 letters)

Sachs Gallery: undated and 1968 (2 letters)

St. John's College: 1969 (1 letter)

Salzer, Oscar: 1955 (1 letter)

Sanders, Una and John: 1975-1977 (6 letters)

Sands, Louis: 1948 (1 letter)

San Francisco Art Association: 1939-1955 (19 letters)

San Francisco Museum of Art: 1949-1977 (18 letters)

Saxe, Suzanne: 1972-1973 (2 letters)

Scarpitta, Pat and Sal: 1968 (1 letter)

Schneiderwirth, Joan (friend of Ed Corbett): 1955 (1 letter)

School of Visual Arts: 1964-1970 (86 letters)

Schubart, Pauline: 1950 (1 letter)

Shoemaker, Peter (former student of Spohn): 1955-1958 (5 letters)

Shiras, Mary: 1958-1965 (10 letters)

Sihvonen, Oli: 1953-1977 (66 letters)

Slivka, David: 1954 (1 letter)

Smith, Hassel: 1948 (1 letter)

Spoerri, John: 1965-1977 (10 letters)

Stables Art Gallery (Leone Kahl, director): 1956-1965 (14 letters)

Stanford University: 1946 (1 letter)

Stephens, Dick and Carolyn: 1960-1965 (3 letters)

Stevens: Arthur Stevens Book Club: 1968 (1 letter)

Still, Clyfford: 1948-1968 (28 letters, including one dated Nov 1950 to Ed Corbett, and one dated Nov 29, 1963 enclosing a hand-drawn map to Still's home)

Strehler, Allen (Sociologist): 1954 (1 letter)

Summers, Al: 1952 (1 letter)

Sutcliffe, Jennifer (beautiful English girl who passed through Taos with Ann Cumming): 1956 (2 letters)

Sznajderman, Marius: 1967 (1 letter)

Taggart, Bill, Sandy, and Sean: 1968 (1 letter)

Taos Artist's Association (Taos Art Association): 1956-1964 (6 letters)

Taos Realty: 1968-1969 (3 letters)

Tatarsky, Hy and Muriel: 1952-1957 (2 letters)

Tatarsky, Stephanie: 1963-1964 (7 letters)

Taylor, Gene: 1925 (letter of introduction to Erskine Gwynne)

Temianka, Henri: 1941 (1 letter)

Tensan, Keith and Gene: 1957 (1 letter)

Terrain Gallery: 1960 (1 letter)

Terry Art Institute: 1951-1952 (7 letters)

Third Street Gallery (Helen Kaye, Director): 1950 (1 letter)

Thomas, Corine (owner of a Spohn painting): 1954-1957 (7 letters)

Tirana, Rosamond: undated and 1958-1962 (10 letters); see Corbett, Edward for additional letters

Van Duren, Allan and Betsy: 1953 (1 letter)

Van Ingen, Pat: 1973 (2 letters)

Varda, Yantoo?: 1949 (1 letter)

Visual Arts Gallery: 1967 (2 letters)

Vollmer, George A.: 1945-1948 (3 letters)

Von Herberg, Charlotte: 1950-1958 (2 letters)

Wakefield, Ruth Cravath: 1943 (1 letter of recommendation for Spohn)

Wandell, Walt and Doreen: 1958 (1 letter)

Wasley, Emily (aunt) and Sarah Rhoads (cousin): 1946-1955 (14 letters)

Wehrer, Anne: 1974 (1 letter)

Whaley, Bill: 1974 (1 letter)

White, Minor: 1963 (1 letter)

Who's Who In American Art: 1952-1969 (5 letters)

Who's Who In The Midwest: 1959 (1 letter)

Who's Who In The West: 1959 (1 letter)

Willard, Charlotte: 1960-1967 (3 letters)

Williams, Matilda A.: 1958 (1 letter)

Wilmans, Margery and Steve: 1974 (1 letter)

Winston, James W.: 1941 (1 letter)

Wise: Howard Wise Gallery: 1962 (1 letter)

Woelffer, Emerson and Diana: 1955-1958 (5 letters)

Wood, Ralph: 1960-1970 (5 letters)

Wright, Dorothy: 1926 (1 letter)

Wurlitzer: Helene Wurlitzer Foundation: 1954-1957 (3 letters)

Young-Hunter, Mrs. John: 1959 (1 letter)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use of unfilmed material requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Part 1 of the Clay Spohn papers was loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming and is subject to all copyright laws. Part 2 is owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. Part 2 is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Clay Spohn Papers, circa 1862-1985, bulk 1890-1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.spohclay, Subseries 2.2
See more items in:
Clay Spohn papers
Clay Spohn papers / Series 2: Clay Spohn Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-spohclay-ref47

Matthew Baigell papers, [ca. 1965-1985]

Creator:
Baigell, Matthew, 1933-  Search this
Subject:
Cézanne, Paul  Search this
Weichsel, John  Search this
Davis, Stuart  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton  Search this
Marsh, Reginald  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy  Search this
Sherman, Hoyt Leon  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry  Search this
Gropper, William  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart  Search this
Lozowick, Louis  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Cubism  Search this
Regionalism  Search this
Social realism  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5835
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208675
AAA_collcode_baigmatt
Theme:
Diaries
Art Theory and Historiography
Art Movements and Schools
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208675

Oral history interview with Alexis Smith, 2014 January 24-April 14

Interviewee:
Smith, Alexis, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter  Search this
Subject:
Bell, Larry  Search this
Burden, Barbara  Search this
Burden, Chris  Search this
Celmins, Vija  Search this
Chicago, Judy  Search this
Coplans, John  Search this
Gehry, Frank O.  Search this
Grieger, Scott  Search this
Howard, Coy  Search this
Irwin, Robert  Search this
Krull, Craig  Search this
Moses, Avilda  Search this
Ruppersberg, Allen  Search this
Sedivy, Richard  Search this
Solomon, Jerry  Search this
Holly Solomon Gallery  Search this
Honor Fraser Gallery  Search this
Margo Leavin Gallery  Search this
Mizuno Gallery  Search this
Nicholas Wilder Gallery  Search this
University of California, Irvine  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
France -- description and travel
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collagists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Multimedia (Art)  Search this
Multimedia installations (Art)  Search this
Women artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16169
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)366489
AAA_collcode_smith14
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_366489

How NASA’s New Telescope Will Help Astronomers Discover Free-Floating Worlds

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 30 Sep 2020 12:44:18 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_869c3ef38a7650b90f330a6065acf6c4

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By