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Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005

Creator:
Gray, Cleve, 1918-2004  Search this
Subject:
Richter, Hans  Search this
Marin, John  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques  Search this
Pollock, Jackson  Search this
Grace, Louise N.  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Dillenberger, Jane  Search this
Gabo, Naum  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy  Search this
Davis, Jim  Search this
Calder, Alexander  Search this
Barzun, Jacques  Search this
Weber, Nicholas Fox  Search this
Smith, David  Search this
Villon, Jacques  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Neuberger Museum of Art  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Connecticut. Commission on Arts, Tourism, Culture, History and Film  Search this
Princeton University  Search this
Berry-Hill Galleries  Search this
Type:
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Citation:
Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Protest movements -- United States  Search this
Designers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9567
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211768
AAA_collcode_grayclev
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211768
Online Media:

Leo Castelli Gallery records

Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Names:
Amsterdam (Netherlands). Stedelijk Museum  Search this
Castelli Graphics (Firm)  Search this
Castelli-Sonnabend Tapes and Films, Inc.  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ileana Sonnabend (Gallery)  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Multiples, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Sidney Janis Gallery  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Artschwager, Richard, 1923-  Search this
Barry, Robert, 1936-  Search this
Bloom, Barbara, 1951-  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Chryssa, 1933-  Search this
Daphnis, Nassos, 1914-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Epstein, Ethel Steuer  Search this
Flavin, Dan, 1933-  Search this
Gorgoni, Gianfranco  Search this
Heller, Ben, 1925-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
Kiesler, Frederick  Search this
Klapheck, Konrad, 1935-  Search this
Koons, Jeff  Search this
Landsman, Stanley, 1930-  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Nauman, Bruce, 1941-  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Panza, Giuseppe  Search this
Parker, Raymond, 1922-  Search this
Power, Alan  Search this
Powers, John, 1916-  Search this
Powers, Kimiko  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Rosenquist, James, 1933-  Search this
Rowan, Carolyn  Search this
Rowan, Robert  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Scarpitta, Salvatore, 1919-2007  Search this
Scull, Ethel  Search this
Scull, Robert C.  Search this
Serra, Richard, 1938-  Search this
Starn, Doug  Search this
Starn, Mike  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Tremaine, Burton  Search this
Tremaine, Emily Hall, 1908-1987  Search this
Twombly, Cy, 1928-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Weiner, Lawrence  Search this
Extent:
215.9 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Date:
circa 1880-2000
bulk 1957-1999
Summary:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.
Scope and Content Note:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and audio and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.

The records document the gallery's daily business operations, exhibitions, spaces/buildings, collaborations and joint ventures with other galleries and museums, and its relationship with many artists, dealers, and clients. Artists particularly well-represented throughout the collection include Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Records pre-dating the gallery's establishment in 1957 are primarily newspaper and magazine clippings related to artists, personal photographs and photographs of works of art, and scattered personal business records of Leo Castelli.

General Correspondence is extensive at circa 25 linear feet and consists primarily of the gallery's and Leo Castelli's named and subject correspondence files concerning the gallery's daily operations, exhibitions, artwork installation and fabrication, appraisals, inquiries, loans, sales, consignments, personal and business relationships with artists, and other topics. The general correspondence is arranged either by name of correspondent or topic, and is with museums and galleries, collectors, business associates, artists, employees, and friends. Notes, scattered photographs and slides, and printed materials are often found as enclosures. Leo Castelli's personal correspondence is also found here and consists primarily of solicitations, requests for advice, notes of thanks, congratulations, and invitations.

Letters written by artists in the gallery's stable are somewhat limited. There are scattered letters from artists Christo, Chryssa, Nassos Daphnis, Hanne Darboven, Marisol, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Frederick Kiesler, Robert Morris, Hans Namuth, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Ray Parker, James Rosenquist, Edward Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Frank Stella, Cy Twombly, and Jack Tworkov. There are also letters about artists in this series filed under the artists' name.

Collectors and dealers represented within the correspondence include the De Menil family, Mrs. Henry Epstein, Ben Heller, Giuseppe Panza, Alan Power, John and Kimiko Powers, Robert and Carolyn Rowan, Robert and Ethel Scull, and Burton and Emily Tremaine. Museums and galleries for which there is considerable correspondence includes the Dwan Gallery, Ferus Gallery, the Jewish Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Sidney Janis Gallery, Stedelijk Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Ileana Sonnabend Galerie.

The materials arranged in General Correspondence were originally marked by the gallery as "correspondence" files upon accessioning, and, are thus arranged into their own series. However, in some cases, there appears to be little difference between the General Correspondence and the Administrative Files. Thus, researchers are encouraged to reference both series.

Administrative Files document a wide variety of the gallery's activities and business. Essentially, these are files that were arranged by the gallery according to subject or topic and cover almost all activities except specific exhibitions. These files include records and correspondence about buildings and space, advertising, appraisals, auctions, consignments, loans, miscellaneous business correspondence, index cards, business arrangements with artists, information about artists, interviews with artists (transcripts), history of the gallery, mailings, photograph requests, shipping, and other topics. Few items are in digital format. There are staff notebooks and files and Leo Castelli's notebooks and notes from the late 1950s through the early 1990s. Extensive outgoing chronological correspondence filed in this series dates from 1964-1977. Also found are transcripts of interviews with Leo Castelli, biographical material, some of it in digital format, and scattered photographs.

Researchers should note that the Administrative Files often overlap and complement the General Correspondence. However, they focus slightly more distinctly on gallery business activities and are arranged mostly by subject or topic, except for the chronological business correspondence. Researchers are encouraged to reference both series. For example, correspondence with and about Jasper Johns may be found in both series, but the administrative files most likely focus on a specific loan, consignment, or business activity or transaction.

Exhibition files provide a thorough history of the gallery's exhibitions, as well as the fabrication and installation of artwork for exhibitions. These files include correspondence, exhibition catalogs, guest books, lists of exhibitions by artist and by year, press releases, sketches and notes, and scattered financial records. Photographs document over 650 exhibitions at Leo Castelli Gallery, including The Ninth Street Show organized by Castelli in 1951, and over 200 exhibitions at other galleries.

Extensive artists' files comprise approximately 40% of the records and are a rich resource of printed and compiled information about the careers of over 120 artists and their relationship with Leo Castelli and the gallery. There are exhibition announcements and catalogs, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, posters, press releases, photographs, and a handful of books. Nearly half of the series is comprised of black and white photographs of artwork, presumably handled by the Leo Castelli Gallery.

Additional printed materials include exhibition announcements, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, press releases, and exhibition posters. Exhibition catalogs are filed with the exhibitions files. The general archives files provide a chronological history of the gallery and its exhibitions. There are also files concerning Leo Castelli and numerous art-related topics. Exhibition posters are found here as well.

Artwork is limited and includes a few works of art and signed posters. Artists represented here include photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra and Andy Warhol, as well as others.

The records of the subsidiary Castelli Graphics New York consist of correspondence and administrative files relating to general operations and the sale and loan of prints. Also found are exhibition files, sales records, and scattered financial records. The series provides a wealth of information about Castelli Graphics collaborations with Multiples Inc. in the 1970s.

Also found in the collection are records of Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films, a joint business venture between Leo Castelli Gallery and Sonnabend Gallery from 1974-1985. Records include correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, printed materials, sales and rental records, photographs, and financial records.

The importance and stature of Leo Castelli and the Leo Castelli Gallery to the arts community in New York City and beyond is documented by numerous awards and recognitions, such as framed and unframed certificates, plaques, statues, medals, and scattered photographs.

Nearly seven linear feet of photographs include professional black and white original prints, scattered color photographs, color transparencies, slides and negatives, and disassembled photo albums. The photographs primarily depict social and art events and functions; family and friends of Leo Castelli; and portraits of Leo Castelli and artists and of Leo Castelli with artists, including Richard Artschwager, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, and Andy Warhol. Photographs of exhibitions and exhibition installations are filed with the exhibition files.

Sound and video recordings include sound and video art, performances, interviews with artists and Leo Castelli, recordings from and of exhibitions, and television publicity recorded on sound cassettes, phonograph records (vinyl and lacquer), videocassettes (U-matic, VHS, Betamax), and videocartridges. Artists represented include Vito Acconci, Robert Barry, Barbara Bloom, Hannah Collins, Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Laura Grisi, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Doug and Mike Starn, and Lawrence Weiner, among others.

See Index for list of Exhibitions at the Leo Castelli Gallery and Castelli Graphics
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1948-1999, bulk 1957-1997 (24.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-23, 191, OVs 233-236)

Series 2: Administrative Files, 1941-1999, bulk 1970s-1990s (17.3 linear feet; Boxes 24-39, 192-193, OVs 237-238, 0.001 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1951-1999, bulk 1957-1998 (18.7 linear feet; Boxes 40-56, 192, 194-196, 308-309, OVs 239-241, 280)

Series 4: Artists Files, 1913-1999, bulk 1960s-1990s (80.8 linear feet; Boxes 57-133, 197-208, OVs 242-243)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1949-1998 (23.5 linear feet; Boxes 134-153, 209-211, OVs 244-274, 276, 300, RDs 301-306)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1960s-1990s (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 153, 212-213, OVs 275, 277-278, RD 307)

Series 7: Castelli Graphics, circa 1950-1999, bulk mid 1970s-early 1990s (16 linear feet; Boxes 154-169)

Series 8: Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films, 1969-1998 (5.6 linear feet; Boxes 170-174, 214, OVs 279-281)

Series 9: Awards and Recognition, 1962-1998 (6.9 linear feet; Boxes 175-176, 215-228, OVs 282)

Series 10: Photographs, circa 1880-1997, bulk 1960s-1990s (6.6 linear feet; Boxes 177-180, 229-231, OVs 283-299)

Series 11: Sound and Video Recordings, 1959-2000 (9.7 linear feet; Boxes 181-190, 232)
Historical Note:
Leo Castelli (1907-1999) was one of America's most noted contemporary art dealers and opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City in 1957. The gallery showcased cutting edge American contemporary art, including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Op Art, Color Field painting, Hard-edge painting, Lyrical Abstraction, Minimal Art, Conceptual Art, and Neo-expressionism, among other movements.

Leo Castelli was born as Leo Krauss on September 4, 1907 in Trieste, of Italian and Austro-Hungarian Jewish origin. He married art dealer Ileana Sonnabend in 1932 and the couple lived in Paris up until World War II. They had a daughter, Nina Castelli Sundell. In Paris, Castelli opened his first gallery in 1939. At that time, he was interested in the European Surrealists.

For years after Castelli moved to New York, he worked in his father-in-law's garment business. However, he organized his first American exhibition in 1951, the famous Ninth Street Show of 1951, a seminal event of Abstract Expressionism.

In 1957, he opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in his townhome on E. 77th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues in New York City. Castelli initially featured European Surrealism, but also curated exhibitions of American Abstract painters, including Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Cy Twombly, Friedel Dzubas, and Norman Bluhm.

In 1958, Castelli discovered Pop artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns and forged a life-long nurturing relationship with both artists. The gallery then began focusing more on Pop Art, Minimalism and Conceptual Art. Beginning in the early 1960s, Castelli's stable included Richard Artschwager, Lee Bontecou, Chryssa, John Chamberlain, Ronald Davis, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Larry Poons, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Leo and Ileana divorced in 1959, and Ileana returned to Europe. She later moved back to New York and opened a gallery close to Castelli's. The two remained close and together they established the joint venture of Castelli-Sonnabend Films and Tapes to accommodate artists interested in new media.

In the 1970s Leo Castelli opened a downtown SoHo branch of the Leo Castelli Gallery at 420 West Broadway. In the 1980s he opened a second larger downtown exhibition space on Greene Street also in SoHo.

Leo Castelli's second wife was Antoinette Castelli, with whom he also opened Castelli Graphics, an art gallery devoted to prints and photographs, mostly those by Castelli artists. The couple also had a son together, Jean-Christophe Castelli. In 1995 Leo Castelli married Italian art historian Barbara Bertozzi Castelli. She directs the Leo Castelli Gallery today, showing many of the same artists of the gallery's past.

Leo Castelli's unparalleled eye for quality, combined with his extraordinary skill for nurturing and promoting new art and artists, secured his position as one of the most respected and influential advocates of contemporary art for nearly five decades.
List of Exhibitions:
Below is a chronological listing of over 850 exhibitions and events held at the Leo Castelli Gallery from 1957 to 1999; included are exhibitions at 4 E 77 St (1957-1989), 65 Thompson (1989-1994), 108th St Warehouse (1968-1970), 142 Greene St (1980-1988), 420 W Broadway (1971-1999), and 578 Broadway (1988-1997). Castelli Graphics exhibitions from 1969-1996 and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films exhibitions from 1974-1984 are also included and are noted when known.

Note that this list is not comprehensive. In particular, Castelli Graphics exhibitions from the 1980s and early 1990s are incomplete. Sources used to compile this index include exhibition schedules and lists, installation photographs, announcements, clippings, and other printed materials from the Leo Castelli Gallery records, and the Leo Castelli Gallery website (www.castelligallery.com).

Exhibitions are listed in chronological order by title, if known, and gallery address.

1957 SeasonFeb. -- First Exhibition: de Kooning, Delaunay, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Leger, Mondrian, Picabia, Pollock, David Smith, van Doesburg; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-23, 1957 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 13, 1957 -- Viseux; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15 - May 4, 1957 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

May 6-25, 1957 -- New Work: Bluhm, Budd, Dzubas, Johns, Leslie, Louis, Marisol, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Savelli; 4 E 77 St

1957-1958 SeasonOct. 1-26, 1957 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 16, 1957 -- Horia Damian; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 14, 1957 -- Marisol; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 17, 1957 - Jan. 18, 1958 -- Collector's Annual; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 20 - Feb. 8, 1958 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 1, 1958 -- Friedel Dzubas; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-29, 1958 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1-26, 1958 -- Giuseppe Capogrossi; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 29 - May 31, 1958 -- Pioneers 1910-1950: de Kooning, Delaunay, Domela, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Kandinsky, Leger, Miro, Picabia, Pollock, Schwitters, Smith, van Doejburg; 4 E 77 St

1958-1959 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 25, 1958 -- Angelo Savelli; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 22, 1958 -- Group Exhibition: Bluhm, Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Marisol, Rauschenberg, Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 20, 1958 -- Esteban Vicente, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-24, 1959 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 14, 1959 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Extramurals; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 17 - Mar. 7, 1959 -- Al Newbill; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-28, 1959 -- Gabriel Kohn; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 18, 1959 -- Norman Bluhm, Jean Dubuffet, and Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 21 - May 9, 1959 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

May 12-30, 1959 -- Group Exhibition: Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Sander, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

1959-1960 SeasonOct. 6-17, 1959 -- Opening Exhibition of the New Gallery: Bluhm, Brach, Daphnis, Johns, Kohn, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 20 - Nov. 7, 1959 -- Work in Three Dimensions: Chamberlain, Follet, Giles, Johns, Klein, Kohn, Marisol, Nevelson, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10-28, 1959 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 1-26, 1959 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 5-23, 1960 -- William Giles; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 26 - Feb. 13, 1960 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 5, 1960 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 8-26, 1960 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 16, 1960 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 7, 1960 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 10-28, 1960 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

May 31 - June 25, 1960 -- Summary 1959-1960: Bluhm, Bontecou, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Kohn, Langlais, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1960-1961 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 15, 1960 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 5, 1960 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 9 - Dec. 3, 1960 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6, 1960 - Jan. 7, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg, 34 Illustrations for Dante's Inferno; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-28, 1961 -- Frederick Kiesler; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 25, 1961 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings and Sculpture; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 28 - Mar. 18, 1961 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 21 - Apr. 8, 1961 -- Bernard Langlais; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-29, 1961 -- Yves Klein, Le Monochrome; 4 E 77 St

May 2-20, 1961 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

May 23 - June [10], 1961 -- Sculpture and Relief: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Higgins, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

1961-1962 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 14, 1961 -- An Exhibition in Progress: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Langlais, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 17 - Nov. 4, 1961 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 7 - Dec. 5, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1961 - Jan. 10, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Langlais, [Lichtenstein], Scarpitta, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 6, 1962 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1962 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10 - Apr. 5, 1962 -- Robert Moskowitz; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 7-21, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1962 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 30, 1962 -- Drawings: Bontecou, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1962-1963 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Johns, Klapheck, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Tinguely, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 7, 1962 -- John Chamberlain and Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10 - Dec. 6, 1962 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1962 - Jan. 9, 1963 -- Gerald van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 12 - Feb. 7, 1963 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 9 - Mar. 7, 1963 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1963 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-25, 1963 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Kiesler, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 16, 1963 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 30, 1963 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov, van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

1963-1964 SeasonSept. 28 - Oct. 24, 1963 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 21, 1963 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23, 1963 - Jan. 2, 1964 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4 - Feb. 6, 1964 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 12, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 9, 1964 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-30, 1964 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

May 2 - June 3, 1964 -- Introducing Artschwager, Christo, Hay, Watts; 4 E 77 St

June 6-30, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1964-1965 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 22, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 19, 1964 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 28, 1964 -- Andy Warhol, Flower Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 9-27, 1965 -- John Chamberlain, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 30 - Feb. 24, 1965 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 27 - Mar. 24, 1965 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 27 - Apr. 14, 1965 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 13, 1965 -- James Rosenquist, F-111; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 9, 1965 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Oracle; 4 E 77 St

1965-1966 SeasonOct. 2-21, 1965 -- Group Exhibition: [Chamberlain], Johns, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Stella, [Warhol]; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 23 - Nov. 17, 1965 -- Robert Bart; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1965 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstrokes and Ceramics; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the Foundation for the Contemporary Performance Arts; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Group Exhibition; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 8 - Feb. 2, 1966 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 5 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Cy Twombly, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1966 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1966 -- Andy Warhol, Wallpaper and Clouds; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 30 - May 25, 1966 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 13, 1966 -- Christo, Storefront; 4 E 77 St

June 14-30, 1966 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1966-1967 SeasonOct. 8 - Nov. 8, 1966 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12 - Dec. 3, 1966 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6-10, 1966 -- Benefit Group Exhibition for Experiments in Art and Technology, Inc.; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Stanley Landsman; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-31, 1967 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 4-26, 1967 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-28, 1967 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1967 -- New Work: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 1967 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Revolvers; 4 E 77 St

1967-1968 SeasonOct. 7-26, 1967 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1967 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 23, 1967 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 30, 1967 - Jan. 23, 1968 -- Richard Artschwager, Sculptures and Reliefs; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 17, 1968 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 24 - Mar. 16, 1968 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 23 - Apr. 11, 1968 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1968 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 8, 1968 -- Jack Krueger; 4 E 77 St

1968-1969 SeasonSept. 14-28, 1968 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1968 -- Robert Rauschenberg, White Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-23, 1968 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1968 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 4-28, 1968 -- 9 at Leo Castelli: Anselmo, Bollinger, Hesse, Kaltenbach, Nauman, Saret, Serra, Sonnier, Zorio; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 4-25, 1969 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 1-22, 1969 -- John Chamberlain; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 3-22, 1969 -- David Diao, Richard Pettibone, and Peter Young; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris, A Continuous Project Altered Daily; 108th St Warehouse

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Carnal Clocks; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Jack Krueger; 108th St Warehouse

May 24 - June 14, 1969 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

May 24 - June 21, 1969 -- 4 Painters for Spring: Bower, Cibula, Kalina, Roth, Yrisarry; 108th St Warehouse

June 21 - July 31, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Young; 4 E 77 St

1969-1970 SeasonSept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 108th St Warehouse

Nov. - Dec., 1969 -- Joseph Kosuth; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 13, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Moonshot Series (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 6, 1969 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 11-13, 1969 -- Benefit Exhibition, Art for the Moratorium; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 16, 1969 - Jan. 10, 1970 -- Richard Serra; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 10-31, 1970 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 17-24, 1970 -- Rafael Ferrer; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Tatlin Monuments; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Robert Morris, Earthwork Projects (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 108th St Warehouse

May 16-30, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

June 11-27, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

June 30 - Aug. 28, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1970-1971 SeasonSept. 19-26, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for Referendum '70: Daphnis, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 26 - Oct. 24, 1970 -- Roy Lichtenstein, New Editions: Lithographs, Sculpture, Reliefs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 3-18, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Untitled (to Barnett Newman); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 19, 1970 - Jan. 9, 1971 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Schlossberg, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 16 - Feb. 6, 1971 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 13 - Mar. 6, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 13 - Apr. 9, 1971 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1971 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 8, 1971 -- Robert Barry; 4 E 77 St

May 8 - June 5, 1971 -- Douglas Huebler; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 12, 1971 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

June 26 - Sept. 24, 1971 -- Group Exhibition: Davis, Flavin, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1971-1972 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 9, 1971 -- Group Film Exhibition: Jonas, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 2-16, 1971 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Eighth Investigation, Proposition Three; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1971 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1971 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. [2], 1972 -- Group Film Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Richard Hamilton, Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15 - Feb. 5, 1972 -- Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Larry Stark (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12, 1972 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19, 1972 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19 - Mar. 16, 1972 -- Object Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 19 - Mar. 25, 1972 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 18, 1972 -- Keith Sonnier, Films and Videotapes; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 18 - Apr. 13, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Electric Chairs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 15, 1972 -- Michael Balog; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1972 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15-29, 1972 -- Robert Barry, Projections; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 15 - May 6, 1972 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 18 - May 6, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Hearing; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22 - May 13, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Projects; 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 13, 1972 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Frank Owen; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Donald Judd and Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 12, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tares (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 27 - June 17, 1972 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. 6, 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. [23], 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1972-1973 SeasonSept. 7-23, 1972 -- Furniture Designed by Artists: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 11-23, 1972 -- Larry Stark, Fifty States (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1972 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Barry, Bontecou, Daphnis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 24, 1972 -- Satirical/Political Cartoons, Benefit for American Peace Action Coalition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 7-21, 1972 -- New Works: Judd, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; Videotapes: Jonas, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 27-28, 1972 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Collection for Stockholm; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 11, 1972 -- Frank Stella, Race Track (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 15, 1972 -- Jasper Johns, From Robert Scull Collection (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Ninth Investigation, Proposition One; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Dan Flavin, an exposition of cool white and warm white circular fluorescent light; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 9-25, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Mao Prints [Castelli Graphics]; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 9, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 2-23, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, Early Works: Protoinvestigations; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2-24, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Made in Tampa [Castelli Graphics]; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 9-23, 1972 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs from the book "The New Avant-Garde"; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 16-30, 1972 -- Cirrus Editions: Anderson, Balog, Card Celmins, Cooper, Goode, Nauman, Price, Ruscha (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4-6, 1973 -- Joan Jonas, Performance; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Richard Serra, Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1973 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-17, 1973 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 3-24, 1973 -- Group Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1973 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 24 - Mar. 10, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Still Lifes; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 3-23, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Horsefeathers XIII (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-24, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Retrospective 1958-1972; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 14-16, 1973 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening "A First Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Monoprints; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman, Floating Room; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 24 - Apr. 14, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Dan Flavin, 40th Birthday Drawing Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Venetian Series; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Curved Series; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 19, 1973 -- Group Show, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1973 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

May 5-26, 1973 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 19 - June 6, 1973 -- Laura Grisi, Pebbles; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 7, 1973 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 16, 1973 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

June [3] - Sept. 15, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Waldman, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 8-22, 1973 -- Don Judd, Woodcuts, Silkscreens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 9, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bulls (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 22, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella; 420 W Broadway

1973-1974 SeasonSept. 10-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Black and White Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 22 - Oct. 16, 1973 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 29 - Oct. 20, 1973 -- Videotapes by Twelve Artists: Benglis, Chamberlain, Freed, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 29 - Nov. 16, 1973 -- Stockholm Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 10, 1973 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Committee to Save Venice: Cornell, Dine, Frankenthaler, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Louis, Noland, Oldenburg, Olitski, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-3, 1973 -- Group Film Exhibition: Chamberlain, Jonas, Ruscha, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-14, 1973 -- Group Show: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 10 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 15 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 7, 1973 -- Lewis Baltz, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1973 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- Group Show of New Prints: Balog, Petersen, Rauschenberg, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 15, 1973 - Jan. 19, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha, Retrospective Show, Graphics from the Collection of Donald Marron (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St (upstairs)

Jan. 12-26, 1974 -- [García] Uriburu (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1974 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-16, 1974 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 2-23, 1974 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 16 - Mar. 2, 1974 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Davis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 23 - Mar. 9, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Video Still Screens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 2-23, 1974 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Amplified Local Time: Radio Installation; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1974 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-20, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1974 -- Robert Morris, Voice; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 27 - May 11, 1974 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg; 4 E 77 St

May 4-25, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

May 18 - June 1, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Pages and Fuses (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 15, 1974 -- Lucia Wilcox; 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Ron Davis (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Group Video Exhibition: Acconci, Baldessari, Bell, Benglis, Campus, Gillette, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Oldenburg, Palestine, Serra, Smithson, Wegman (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Exhibition: Darboven, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Baltz, Bontecou, Daphnis, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Petersen, Pistoletto, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

1974-1975 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 4, 1974 -- Frank Stella, Eccentric Polygons (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 5, 1974 -- Jasper Johns, Recent Four Panel Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1974 -- Group Sculpture Show, In Three Dimensions: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5-19, 1974 -- Peter Mauss, Recent Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1974 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 19 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg, Selected Show of Prints from 1968-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2 - 30, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Artist's Studio Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12-30, 1974 -- James Rosenquist, Selected Show of Prints from 1965-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 16-30, 1974 -- Hanne Darboven, 24 Songs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21, 1974 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7-21, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Series; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7, 1974 - [Jan. 4], 1974 -- Michelangelo Pistoletto, New Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1974 - Jan. 4, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Editions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1974 - Jan. 11, 1975 -- Andy Warhol, Hand Colored Flowers (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 4-18, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, Cones/Cojones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11-25, 1975 -- Edward Ruscha, Domestic Tranquility, Four New Lithographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 2, 1975 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Sleds; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15-18, 1975 -- Peter Campus and Paul Kos, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 25 - Feb. 8, 1975 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Tenth Investigation, Proposition Four; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-15, 1975 -- Group Show: Huebler, Morris, Nauman, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8-22, 1975 -- Keith Sonnier, Air to Air; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 8, 1975 -- Nassos Daphnis, A Continuous Painting; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Merce Cunningham Portfolio: Cage, Johns, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Joan Jonas and Charlemagne Palestine, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-8, 1975 -- Frank Gillette and William Wegman, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Sculptures; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Larry Stark, Silkscreens on Canvas; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15 - [Apr. 5], 1975 -- Richard Landry, "1, 2, 3, 4" from Videotapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-5, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Dan Flavin, Flourescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Gray Series Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 3, 1975 -- James Klosty, Around and About Merce Cunningham, Photographs 1968-1972; 420 W Broadway

May 3-17, 1975 -- Richmond Jones, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 3-31, 1975 -- Frank Stella, Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

May 10-31, 1975 -- Ron Davis, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 10-31, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, Stripes; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 7, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 7 - Sept. 5, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Darboven, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 7 - Sept. 20, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition, Black and White: Kelly, Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

June 14-28, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

July 7-25, 1975 -- Group Exhibition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

1975-1976 SeasonSept. 13-27, 1975 -- Autumn Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1975 -- James Rosenquist, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-18, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-25, 1975 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 11-25, 1975 -- Frank Owen; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1975 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-15, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-22, 1975 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1975 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Lewis Baltz, The New Industrial Parks Near Irving, CA, 1974 (a portfolio of 51 photographs) (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 3-17, 1976 -- Ralph Gibson, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Robert Barry, Recent Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Alan Charlton; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 24 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus and Frank Gillette, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Feb. 10, 1976 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening, "A Second Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Jammers; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Keith Sonnier, Abaca Code; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 28 - Mar. 20, 1976 -- Joseph Cornell; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Dan Flavin, Colored Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 27 - Apr. 17, 1976 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1976 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-24, 1976 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 24 - May 15, 1976 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

May 1-22, 1976 -- Hanne Darboven, For Jean-Paul Sartre; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 5, 1976 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 22 - June 12, 1976 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

May 29 - June 12, 1976 -- Robert Adams, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 19 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Noland, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 26 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Darboven, Flavin, Morris, Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

1976-1977 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Portraits: Cohen, Eggleston, Gibson, Gossage, Kelly, Namuth, Sonneman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Daniel Buren, To Transgress; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 25 - Oct. 16, 1976 -- Cy Twombly, Watercolors; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Robert Morris, Black and White Felts; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Paul Kos, Tokyo Rose (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1976 -- Kenneth Noland; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-27, 1976 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Nov. 6 - Dec. 4, 1976 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 11-18, 1976 -- Poppy Johnson, Performance; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 11-22, 1976 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 8-29, 1977 -- Andy Warhol, Still Life Paintings and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 5-26, 1977 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-19, 1977 -- Robert Barry, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Hans Namuth and Georg Reisner, Photographs from the Spanish Civil War; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Beryl Korot, Text and Commentary (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg (Castelli Graphics); [4 E 77 St]

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1977 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28, 1977 -- Brazos River: Videotape by Viola Farber, Robert Rauschenberg, and David Tudor; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-16, 1977 -- Frank Gillette, Mecox (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 23 - May 21, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Spreads and Scales; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1977 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings - Castelli Uptown; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - June [18], 1977 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - Sept. 17, 1977 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1977-1978 SeasonSept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1977 -- James Rosenquist, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Architecture I: Abraham, Ambasz, Meier, Pichler, Rossi, Stirling, Venturi and Rauch; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 25 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- William Eggelston, Color Photographs, 1966-1977 (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 7-28, 1978 -- Numerals 1924-1977; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway (front office)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Robert Barry, A Wall Drawing; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1978 -- Keith Sonnier, Black Ground Series Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 1-29, 1978 -- Hanne Darboven, Card-Index, Filing Cabinet; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-29, 1978 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 6 - June 24, 1978 -- Joseph Cornell, Collages 1931-1972; 420 W Broadway

June 10-24, 1978 -- Alan Sonfist; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

July 5 - Sept. 23, 1978 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

1978-1979 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Jan Dibbets, Structure Panoramas 1977-78; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Douglas Huebler, Mediations; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 2-20, 1978 -- Film/Video 1976-78: Baldessari, Benglis, Campus, Downey, Freed, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Rappaport, Wegman, Wiener (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1979 -- Frank Stella, Indian Birds, Painted Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1979 -- Donald Judd, Survey of Work; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Morris, 6 Mirror Works; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Again and Again; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Hans Namuth, Todos Santos: Portraits (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1979 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Joseph Kosuth, Text/Context (New York); 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Keith Sonnier, Expanded Sel Series; 420 W Broadway

June 23 - Sept. 15, 1979 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Andre, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Owen, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

1979-1980 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1979 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 10, 1979 -- Dan Flavin, 1960's and 1970's Installations; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1979 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-19, 1980 -- Michele Zaza; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 5-26, 1980 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1980 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22-26, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Charles Gaines, Falling Leaves; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 19 - [Mar. 15], 1980 -- Leo Castelli: A New Space: Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Nassos Daphnis, Paintings From the 50's; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Robert Barry, Wall Piece; 420 W Broadway (back office)

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1980 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Apr. [5] - May 10, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, "Color Panels for a Large Wall," 1978, from the Central Trust Company, Cincinnati; 142 Greene St

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints 1978-1980 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Cletus Johnson, Theaters; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 17 - June 21, 1980 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 142 Greene St

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

1980-1981 SeasonSept. 13 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Nauman, Stella, Judd, Warhol, Kelly; 142 Greene St

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Edward Ruscha, New Paintings; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Peter Young, Homage to Agnes Martin; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 22, 1980 -- Architecture II Houses For Sale: Ambasz, Eisenman, Gregotti, Isozaki, Moore, Pelli, Price, Ungers; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Hans Namuth, Pollock Painting, 1950-1951 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1980 -- Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway (rear office)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 6, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, American Architecture Now (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 13, 1980 -- Benefit Exhibition for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1980 -- James Turrell; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13-20, 1980 -- Group Installation: Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 10 - Feb. 7, 1981 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings 1970-1980; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 17 - Feb. 21, 1981 -- James Rosenquist, Star Thief; 142 Greene St

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 28 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Slice; 142 Greene St

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 12 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Film screenings, "Railroad Turnbridge" and "Steelmill/Stahlwerk" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Douglas Huebler, Crocodile Tears; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1981 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1981 -- Michael Harvey, Film screenings, "Sub Rosa" and "Dead Letter" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 13, 1981 -- Joan Jonas, Upsidedown and Backwards (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 16-30, 1981 -- Artists' Benefit For the Trisha Brown Dance Company; 142 Greene St

May 16 - Sept. 4, 1981 -- Dan Flavin, Barred Corridors; 420 W Broadway

1981-1982 SeasonSept. 15 - Oct. 31, 1981 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Richard Serra (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Collaboration; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Charles Gaines, Landscape: Assorted Trees with Regressions; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 14 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17-21, 1981 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Visions and Images - American Photographers on Photography (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1981 -- Hermine Freed, Beads + Marbles [Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films]; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Nov. 28 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Eight Lithographs to Benefit the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 28 - Dec. 23, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Bruce Nauman, Violins, Violence, Silence; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Dollar Signs; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Reversals; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 9 - Feb. 13, 1982 -- Hans Namuth, Portraits; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Claude Viallat; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 20 - Mar. 27, 1982 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 20-27, 1982 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra, "Marilyn Monroe-Greta Garbo," 1981,-(A Sculpture for Gallery-Goers.); 142 Greene St

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3 - May 1, 1982 -- Frank Gillette; 142 Greene St

May 1-22, 1982 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - Oct. 23, 1982 -- Summer Group Show: Chia, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Schnabel, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1982 -- Castelli and His Artists 25 Years; 420 W Broadway

1982-1983 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 9, 1982 -- 25th Anniversary Exhibition of Leo Castelli, Castelli and His Artists 25 Years: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Johns, Johnson, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Schnabel, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Interior Design: The New Freedom; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Architectural Drawings and Models: Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Charrette Competition Entries; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1982 -- Group Show: Flavin, Nauman, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Oct. 30 - Nov. 20, 1982 -- Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

[Nov. 20 - Dec. 12, 1982] -- Salvatore Scarpitta, American Cycle: 1958-1982; 142 Greene St

Nov. 27 - Dec. 18, 1982 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 31, 1982 - Jan. 29, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 142 Greene St

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Margrete Sørensen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Robert Morris, Psychomachia; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1983 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 3-26, 1983 -- Diane Blell; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Longo; 142 Greene St

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Mapplethorpe; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Douglas Huebler; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Sandy Skoglund; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Morris, and Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 30 - June 3, 1983 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 11 - June 30, 1983 -- Michael Smith, Government Approved Home Fallout snack bar (Castelli Graphics); 43 West 61st St

June [11] - Aug. [4], 1983 -- Drawings/Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1983 -- Summer Show, Sculpture; 142 Greene St

1983-1984 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Photogravures (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Ken Price; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 1-[22], 1983 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1983 -- Architectural "Follies": Drawings and Models; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 29 - Nov. 5, 1983 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Handmade in America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 12-26, 1983 -- Marvin Torffield, Pandora's Tears; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3-17, 1983 -- 8 x 8 to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Greene St Mural; 142 Greene St

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 21 - Feb. 18, 1984 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Corten Wall Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 28 - Feb. 25, 1984 -- Jasper Johns, Paintings; 142 Greene St

Feb. 18 - Mar. 10, 1984 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-17, 1984 -- Artists Call Against US Intervention in Central America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 3-31, 1984 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Mar. 10-31, 1984 -- Castelli Graphics 15th Anniversary Exhibition: Graphics, Photographs, Drawings, and Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17 - Apr. 7, 1984 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1984 -- Lucio Pozzi; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-28, 1984 -- Dan Flavin; 142 Greene St

Apr. 14 - May 12, 1984 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1984 -- Eve Sonneman; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 19 - June 9, 1984 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 420 W Broadway

June 6, 1984 -- Michael Smith, Video: Go For It Mike (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

June 15 - July 27, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

June 23 - Sept. 8, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blell, Chia, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Salle, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1984-1985 SeasonSept. 15-29, 1984 -- Billy Apple, Survey: 1962-1974; 142 Greene St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 6, 1984 -- Hanne Darboven, Ansichten '82; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 6 - Nov. 3, 1984 -- Bruce Nauman; 142 Greene St

Oct. 13 - Nov. 10, 1984 -- Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19, [1984] -- Mitchell Kriegman, Video, "The Effect of Gravity on Dogs" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 8, 1984 -- Cunningham Dance Foundation Benefit Art Sale; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-26, 1985 -- Sandro Chia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 12 - Feb. 9, 1985 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 2-23, 1985 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 23, 1985 -- Nassos Daphnis; 142 Greene St

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Ralph Gibson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Warhol; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Wall Reliefs; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1985 -- Francesco Clemente; 142 Greene St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Charles Gaines; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1985 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dianne Blell; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

June 22 - July 27, 1985 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chia, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Serra, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

1985-1986 SeasonSept. 7-21, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Jiri Georg Dokoupil; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Keith Haring; 142 Greene St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Judy Tompkins; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 15 - Dec. 7, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Mario Merz; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Group Exhibition: Chia, Judd, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Sonnier, Warhol, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Robert Ryman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Laura Grisi; 142 Greene St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Robert Combas; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Dan Rodan; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1986 -- Richard Serra, Prints; 142 Greene St

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- Jean Kallina; 420 W Broadway (office)

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1986 -- Miquel Barceló; 142 Greene St

May 10 - June 14, 1986 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May 17 - June 14, 1986 -- Joseph Kosuth, Selected Works, 1965-1986; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Barceló, Dokoupil, Kosuth, Morris, Moskowitz, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blais, Blell, Brown, Chia, Combas, Gibson, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Ryman, Salle, Serra, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

1986-1987 SeasonSept. 19-27, 1986 -- The Law and Order Show; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1986 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen, Sculpture and Drawings, 1983-1986; 142 Greene St

Oct. 4-11, 1986 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Color Video Selections; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Oct. 4-25, 1986 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 18-25, 1986 -- Skowhegan: A Ten-Year Retrospective; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Lawrence Weiner; 142 Greene St

Nov. [1]-22, 1986 -- Robert Therrien, 1st Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Gluts; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 1: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 142 Greene St

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Barceló, Flavin, Grisi, Simonds; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 2nd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1987 -- Charles Gaines, Numbers + Trees; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 2: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Waldman, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - May 2, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Grisi, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 18 - May 2, 1987 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Dan Flavin, A New Work; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Ti Shan Hsu; 420 W Broadway

May [9]-30, 1987 -- Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella, Therrien; 142 Greene St

May 12 - June 27, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 3rd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 16 - June 6, 1987 -- Richard Artschwager, Bruce Nauman, and Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 4-13, 1987 -- Art Against Aids; 142 Greene St

June 20 - July 31, 1987 -- Andy Warhol; 142 Greene St

1987-1988 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1987 -- Richard Serra, Three Sculptures; 142 Greene St

Oct. 3-31, 1987 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1987 -- Peter Schuyff; 142 Greene St

Nov. 7-28, 1987 -- Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 5-22, 1987 -- Similia/Dissimilia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Mike Bidlo, Picasso's Women; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Cletus Johnson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5-12, 1988 -- School of Visual Arts Alumni Show, 1977-87; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1988 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1988 -- Chryssa, Cityscapes 1980-88; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1988 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 23 - May 14, 1988 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May [28] - June 18, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, His Peers and Persuasions, 1963-1988; 142 Greene St

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Frank O. Gehry, Furniture; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

1988-1989 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Joseph Kosuth; 578 Broadway

Sept. 17 - Oct. 22, 1988 -- The Last Show: Kelly, Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5 - Nov. 12, 1988 -- Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, and David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Robert Cumming (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Bruce Nauman and Richard Serra; 578 Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 22, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 8-30, 1988 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performing Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Circa 1989 -- Castelli Graphics 1969-1989 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Robert Barry; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- David Lynch; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- James Rosenquist, Joseph Kosuth, and Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- Dianne Blell; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1989 -- James Brown; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-29, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, To the Citizens of the Republic of France on the 200th Anniversary of their Revolution; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 8 - May 13, 1989 -- Walter De Maria; 65 Thompson

May 6-27, 1989 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 6-27, 1989 -- Charles Simonds, Wall Smears and Rocks; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 19 - July 1, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bronze Sculpture 1976-1989; 65 Thompson

May 20 - June 10, 1989 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

June 3-24, 1989 -- Summer Group Show: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins; 420 W Broadway (front room)

June 3-24, 1989 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

1989-1990 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Sept. 23 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Richard Serra, 8 Drawings: Weights and Measures; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 30, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Fall, 1989; 65 Thompson

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Group Drawing Show: Artschwager, Barry, Brown, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Drawings from Mali; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 1, 1989 - Feb. 24, 1990 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Winter, 1989; 65 Thompson

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Roni Horn, Thicket No. 1; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Hanne Darboven, Requiem For M. Oppenheimer; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- The 60's Revisited: New Concepts/New Materials; 578 Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Edward Ruscha, Selected Portfolios (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Nassos Daphnis, Thirty Years With Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Douglas Huebler; 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Petersen, Selected Works (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 65 Thompson

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Portraits: Recent Prints from Gemini G.E.L. (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bernar Venet, Drawings Scale: 1 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 1990 -- John Gutmann, Talking Picture; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Taking the Picture: Photography and Appropriation; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7 - May 12, 1990 -- Hiroshi Teshigahara, Echizen Ware; 65 Thompson

May 5-26, 1990 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Currents '70 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

May 5 - June 2, 1990 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

May 12 - July 28, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 65 Thompson

June 9 - Sept. 15, 1990 -- Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Stella, Vaisman, van Bruggen, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1990-1991 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- David Salle, Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Cletus Johnson; 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg, Works from Gemini G.E.L., 1988-1990 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Robert Watts; 578 Broadway

Dec. 8, 1990 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Frank Stella, New Work; 65 Thompson

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Chryssa; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lewis Baltz, Rule without Exception (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Hanne Darboven, Urzeit; 578 Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

[Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991] -- [Robert Cumming; 578 Broadway]

Mar. 9 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- James Brown, Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Bertrand Lavier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interior Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 11, 1991 -- Group Drawing Show: Janie Lee Master Drawings; 65 Thompson

May 11-25, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha, Prints; 578 Broadway

May 11 - June 1, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

[May 11 - June 1, 1991] -- [Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway (middle room)]

May 21 - [June 22], 1991 -- Robert Therrien; 65 Thompson

June 1-22, 1991 -- Charles Gaines; 578 Broadway

June 5-22, 1991 -- Group Drawings Exhibition; 578 Broadway

[July 16 - Nov. 9], 1991 -- Frank Stella; 65 Thompson

Summer 1991 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien, Vaisman, Warhol, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1991-1992 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Dianne Blell, Wild Lives, Photographic Portraits Documenting Africa's Vanishing Wildlife; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Group Exhibition: Johns, Kelly, Lavier, Lichtenstein, Starn Twins, Stella, Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 19 - Nov. 16, 1991 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 30, 1991 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Print Survey in Themes, 1952-1992; 578 Broadway

Nov. 23 - Dec. 14, 1991 -- Jean-Pierre Raynaud; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 14, 1991 - Feb. 1, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Large Scale Prints: Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Serra, Starn Twins; 578 Broadway

Jan. 4-25, 1992 -- Pruitt-Early; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 65 Thompson

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Leo Castelli XXXV Anniversary, Installation; 578 Broadway

Feb. 8-29, 1992 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Early Works; 578 Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Hans Namuth; 578 Broadway

[Apr. - July], 1992 -- Elyn Zimmerman, Portals and Passages; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Charles Simonds, Stugg. Thebb?The Singing Monkey, 1992; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier, Prints, Drawings and Multiples 1990-1992; 578 Broadway

May 2-23, 1992 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

May 9 - June 6, 1992 -- James Brown, Survey of Work 1986-1992; 578 Broadway

May 30 - June 13, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

June 6 - July 31, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Drawings, Prints, Multiples, Photographs; 578 Broadway

June 23 - July 31, 1992 -- The Guggenheim in Europe: Architectural Models and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Aug. 17 - Sept. 19, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition 1992, Part II: Artshwager, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1992-1993 SeasonSept. 19 - Oct. 24, 1992 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Minimalist Works; 578 Broadway

Sept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1992 -- Meyer Vaisman, Turkey; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 26 - Nov. 7, 1992 -- Group Architecture Exhibition, Angels and Franciscans: Innovative Architecture from Los Angeles and San Francisco; 65 Thompson

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1992 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 31 - Dec. 5, 1992 -- Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Post-Minimal Works; 578 Broadway

Nov. 14, 1992 - Jan. 9, 1993 -- Andrew Lord, Modelling: A Sculpture of 27 Pieces and Related Works; 65 Thompson

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Waterlilies; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 12, 1992 - Jan. 30, 1993 -- Group Sculpture Exhibit, Object Lessons; 578 Broadway

Jan. 9 - Feb. 6, 1993 -- Jasper Johns, 35 Years with Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 16-23, 1993 -- Benefit for Cunningham Dance Foundation; 65 Thompson

Jan. 30 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Richard Long; 65 Thompson

Feb. 6 - Mar. 6, 1993 -- Word Play: Darboven, Kosuth, Ruscha, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Blind Color: Calle, Charlton, Klein, Manzoni, Rauschenberg, Richter, Rinehardt; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Sophie Calle, Last Seen; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Frank Stella and James Rosenquist, New Prints; 65 Thompson

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist, Prints from "Welcome to the Water Planet" and "House of Fire"; 578 Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Keith Sonnier, Robert Morris, and Robert Rauschenberg, Soft Ware; 578 Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 22, 1993 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 29, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Graphic Works; 578 Broadway

May 15 - July 31, 1993 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Long, Lord, Morris, Rauschenberg, Sonnier, Stella; 65 Thompson

May 29 - Oct. 2, 1993 -- British and American Sculpture: Cragg, Deacon, Kapoor, Long, Kelly, Nauman, Serra, Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 5 - July 24, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Faces and Figures; 578 Broadway

1993-1994 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Sept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris, Blind Time Drawings; 578 Broadway

Sept. 25 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kosuth, Morris, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1993 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Thing-in-itself is found in its Truth through the loss of its immediacy; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 30 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Charles Simonds, Retrospective; 578 Broadway

Nov. 12 - Dec. 4, 1993 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 3, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Frank Stella, Moby Dick Deckle Edges (New Prints from Tyler Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 4, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Andrew Lord; 578 Broadway

Dec. 9, 1993 - Jan. 8, 1994 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 19, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Falls, Pratfalls, and Sleights of Hand; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Robert Morris; 578 Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Prints and Drawings; 578 Broadway

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 65 Thompson

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside the New York Art World; 578 Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Group Exhibition: Lord, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 7, 1994 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Spectroheliographs; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 14, 1994 -- Lee Bontecou, Edward Higgins, and Robert Moskowitz, Sculpture and Painting from the Early 1960's; 578 Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 18, 1994 -- Sandro Chia, New Paintings; 65 Thompson

May 17 - June 11, 1994 -- Hannah Collins, Signs of Life; 420 W Broadway

May 21 - June 25, 1994 -- Jasper Johns, The Prints of Jasper John 1960-1993; 578 Broadway

June 18 - Sept. 10, 1994 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

July 5 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition, Major Works: Artschwager, Judd, Flavin, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1994-1995 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Richard Meier, Sculpture; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 8 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- Dan Flavin, Selected Works 1969-1990; 578 Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 23, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes: 9 Color Relief Prints; PACT 95 International America's Cup Class Yacht; 578 Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1995 -- Lawrence Wiener, Stones + Stones + Stones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 14 - Feb. 11, 1995 -- Robert Morris, Malaprops; The Fallen and the Saved; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1995 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 18 - Mar. 18, 1995 -- Richard Artshwager, Robert Therrien, and Edward Ruscha; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1995 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 25 - Apr. 29, 1995 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tribute 21; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Hannah Collins; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Anamorphic Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 29 - May 20, 1995 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

May 6 - June 2, 1995 -- New Editions: Johns, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha; 578 Broadway

May 31 - June 30, 1995 -- Barbara Bloom, Pictures from the Floating World; 420 W Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Imaginary Places (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Collins, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

July 11 - Sept. 1, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

1995-1996 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Serra; 578 Broadway

Sept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Sayings, Puddinhead Wilson; 578 Broadway

Sept. 18 - Oct. 7, 1995 -- Hanne Darboven, South Korean Calendar; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 4, 1995 -- Nassos Daphnis, Energies in Outer Space; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 18, 1995 -- Joseph Kosuth, Editions The Past 10 Years; 578 Broadway

Nov. 11 - Dec. 16, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Free Standing Murals; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2, 1995 - Jan. 13, 1996 -- Frank Stella, Editions; 578 Broadway

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1996 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 30 - Feb. 10, 1996 -- Bailey House Auction; 578 Broadway

Feb. 10 - Mar. 9, 1996 -- Group Exhibition, New Works by Gallery Artists: Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Sonnier, Stella, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 17 - Mar. 16, 1996 -- Collage - Gallery Artists: Brown, Darboven, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 13, 1996 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 23 - Apr. 20, 1996 -- Photography: Calle, Collins, Kosuth, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 18, 1996 -- James Rosenquist, Horizon Home Sweet Home; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 24, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Eight New Prints; 578 Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Ralph Gibson, Infanta; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Group Drawing Exhibition, Works on Paper: Chryssa, Daphnis, Darboven, Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Sonnier, Therrien, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - July 26, 1996 -- Summer Group Show: Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Ruscha, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1996-1997 SeasonSept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, 25 Years of Artists Portraits; 578 Broadway

Sept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints; 578 Broadway

Sept. 28 - Oct. 26, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes in the Chinese Style; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Jasper Johns, Prints 1960-1996 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 2 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Bruce Nauman, Bronze Heads and End of the World; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11 - Feb. 8, 1997 -- Robert Morris, Horizons Cut Between Clio and Mnemosyne; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Robert Therrien, Drawings; 578 Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Andy Warhol, Prints; 578 Broadway

Feb. 15 - Mar. 15, 1997 -- Lawrence Weiner, Then Now + Then; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1997 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

Mar. 22 - Apr. 26, 1997 -- Keith Sonnier, Alternating Currents; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 29 - Apr. 5, 1997 -- The Printmaking Workshop Benefit Exhibition and Auction; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 17 - May 17, 1997 -- Columbia University MFA Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

May 3 - June 7, 1997 -- Edward Ruscha, Cityscapes and "O" Books; 420 W Broadway

July - Sept., 1997 -- Summer Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Serra; 420 W Broadway

1997-1998 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1997 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 1: Bontecou, Chryssa, Cornell, Johns, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 2: Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Serra, Stella, Therrien, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-31, 1998 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 3: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Grisi, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 7 - Mar. 14, 1998 -- Dan Flavin, Some Drawings and Installations of Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28 - Apr. 25, 1998 -- Hannah Collins, True Stories; 420 W Broadway

May 2 - June 6, 1998 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Black Hole Sun Burned; 420 W Broadway

June 24 - Aug. 29, 1998 -- Summer Show; 420 W Broadway

1998-1999 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 31, 1998 -- Robert Morris, The Rationed Years; 420 W Broadway

Nov. - Dec., 1998 -- Joseph Kosuth, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. - Feb. 1999 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Arcadian Survey; 420 W Broadway
Related Material:
Available in the Archives of America Art are three oral history interviews with Leo Castelli. Paul Cummings interviewed Castelli between May 14, 1969 and June 8, 1973; Barbara Rose in July, 1969; and Andrew Decker on May 22, 1997.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds items lent for microfilming (reel N68) including printed material. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Leo Castelli loaned printed material for microfilming in 1968. Leo Castelli's wife, Barbara Bortuzzo Castelli, and his children, Nina Castelli Sundell and Jean-Christophe Castelli, donated the Leo Castelli Gallery records to the Archives of American Art in 2007.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.leocast
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a74e5e8f-9538-4152-8f10-6561763eb241
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-leocast
Online Media:

Ben Benn papers

Creator:
Benn, Ben, 1884-  Search this
Names:
Artists' Gallery (New York, N.Y)  Search this
Harry Salpeter Gallery  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Walker Art Center  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Benn, Velida  Search this
Bluemner, Oscar, 1867-1938  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Geist, Sidney  Search this
Van Dine, S. S.  Search this
Extent:
6.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Date:
1905-1993
Summary:
The papers of modernist painter Ben Benn measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1906 through 1977, with the bulk of the papers dating from circa 1920 - circa 1970. The collection includes correspondence between Benn and his wife Velida Benn and letters from Oscar Bluemner, Max Weber, Joseph Stella, and other artists. Also found are sketches, sketchbooks, diaries, scrapbooks, personal business records, clippings, photographs, exhibition catalogs, art journals, and auction catalogs. Some of the printed material is quite rare.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of modernist painter Ben Benn measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1906 through 1977, with the bulk of the papers dating from circa 1920 - circa 1970. The collection includes correspondence between Benn and his wife Velida de Benn and letters from Oscar Bluemner, Max Weber, Joseph Stella, and other artists. Also found are biographical materials, sketches, sketchbooks, diaries, scrapbooks, personal business records, clippings, photographs, exhibition catalogs, art journals, and auction catalogs. Some of the printed material is quite rare.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence files dating from 1906 through 1993, and includes personal, professional, and family correspondence of Ben Benn and wife Velida Benn, as well as personal correspondence between the Benn's. Much of the professional correspondence relates to exhibitions and other projects and is with museums, galleries, and art associations, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Artists' Gallery, and the College Art Association. Additional correspondence contains letters from friends and colleagues including Alfred Barr, Oscar Bluemner, Rita Benton, Holger Cahill, Juliana Force, Sidney Geist, Kaj Klitgaard, Audrey McMahon, Julio Osma, Harry Salpeter, Hugh Stix, Hudson D. Walker, and Marguerite Zorach, among others. Letters exchanged between Ben Benn and Velida Benn primarily relate to Benn's activities in Woodstock, N.Y., Gloucester, Ma., and St. Augustine, Fla., places he visited during the early part of his career. Many of Benn's letters are illustrated. Velida Benn's correspondence includes letters from her brother Bernard Lopez, William M. Fisher (Metropolitan Museum of Art), Bessie Beatty, Rita Benton, Sidney Geist, and Julio Osma. Also found are brief notes from Joseph Stella, Max Weber, and Marsden Hartley.

Diaries (1943-1977) contain entries by Velida Benn and reflect her activities and personal observations; also found are numerous references to Benn's exhibitions and projects. Three scrapbooks (1915-1972) document Benn's exhibitions and include copies of correspondence, announcements, checklists, price lists, and clippings; many of the items are annotated. Artwork (1937-1974) consists of sketchbooks and various loose sketches of portraits, figures, and still lifes; also included are fashion sketches by Velida Benn.

Printed material (1905-1991, bulk 1930s-1970s) includes exhibition announcements and catalogs, newspaper and magazine clippings, printed programs, reproductions, and monographs. Of particular interest are Artists' and Writers' Chap Books (1933-1935) that include the work of Ben and Velida Benn. Photographs (1920-1969) contain images of works of art, of Ben Benn, individually and with Velida, and exhibition installation shots.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into seven series based primarily on type of material. Material within each series is arranged chronologically.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1983, undated (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1906-1993, undated (Boxes 1-4; 4.0 linear ft.)

Series 3: Diaries, Notebooks, and Scrapbooks, 1915-1977, undated (Boxes 4-5; 11 folders)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1910-1979, undated (Box 5; 9 folders)

Series 5: Artwork, 1924-1974, undated (Box 5,7; 6 folders, 6 oversized items)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1911-1991, undated (Boxes 5-6; 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 7: Photographs and Negatives, 1920-1969, undated (Box 6; 6 folders)
Biographical Note:
New York painter Ben Benn was born in Russia in 1884 as Benjamin Rosenberg and died in 1983. Benn studied drawing and painting at the National Academy of Design from 1904-1908 and had his first exhibition, "Oils by Eight American Artists," at the Artists' Gallery in 1907. In 1916, Benn participated in the "Forum Exhibition of Modern American Painters" at the Anderson Galleries, along with artists Thomas Hart Benton, Oscar Bluemner, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, John Marin, Man Ray, Abraham Walkowitz, and others. The exhibition was important in advancing the cause of modern art in American, particularly the American avant-garde and was recreated by the Whitney in 1983.

Best known as a modern painter who assimilated in his early style the influences of Matisse, Picasso, and Kandinsky, Benn's first one-man show was held at the J. B. Neumann Gallery in 1925. Portraits, still-lifes, and landscapes formed the core of Benn's subject themes and he often shifted between abstract and figurative images. He is known for his strong joyful colors, thick brush strokes and energetic paintings.

Benn was featured in over twenty one-man exhibitions and countless group shows. Major exhibitions included Abstract Painting in America (Whitney Museum, 1935), American Painting Today (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1950), and Ben Benn, Painter (The Jewish Museum, 1965). The Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. honored Benn with a one-man show on his ninetieth birthday (1974). His work is in permanent museum collections in both the U.S. and abroad including the Albany Institute of Art, the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum, the Knoxville Art Center, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Newark Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, as well as the Museum of Arts, Ein-Harod in Israel and the Kröller-Müller Museum in Holland.

Ben Benn was a recipient of several awards for his achievement in painting. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts honored Benn with the Henry Schiedt award (1952) and the Carol Beck Gold Medal (1965); Benn was also the recipient of the Knoxville Art Center Purchase Prize in 1961. In 1970 Benn was a beneficiary of the Childe Hassam Fund awarded through the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Benn's work is in permanent museum collections in both the U.S. and abroad including the Albany Institute of Art, the Smithsonian Institution's Hirshhorn Museum, the Knoxville Art Center, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Newark Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, as well as the Museum of Arts, Ein-Harod in Israel and the Kröller-Müller Museum in Holland.
Provenance:
The Ben Benn papers were donated by Benn's nephew Peter Rosenberg to the Archives of American Art in 1988.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, American -- Economic aspects  Search this
Painting, American -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Ben Benn papers, 1905-1993. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bennben
See more items in:
Ben Benn papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw928843ebf-2403-418a-a333-69b5b8d63fc4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bennben

Herman Trunk papers

Creator:
Trunk, Herman, 1894-1963  Search this
Names:
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
McFarlane, Arthur E.  Search this
Morrow, B. F.  Search this
Simpson, Charles J.  Search this
Smith, Joseph G.  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1926-1950
Scope and Contents:
Letters, writings, photographs, printed material, and a DVD videorecording relating to Trunk's career as a modernist painter. Letters are from Juliana Force, Arthur E. McFarlane, Henry McFee, author B.F. Morrow, and Charles J. Simpson, secretary of the American Veterans Society of Artists, Harry C. Richardson, Gertrude Herdle Moore, Holger Cahill, Audrey F. McMahon, Hugo C.M. Wendel, Kimon Nicolaides, Zoltan Hecht, and Marion M. Grant, among others. Writings include consignment forms and reports from the Dudensing Gallery, New York City, an artist statement, one notebook labeled Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, Etruscan, and Greco-Roman, one notebook on fresco painting, and two notebooks listing information on art works by Trunk. Photographs are of Trunk, his wife, and others. Printed material consists of scrapbook pages, newspaper clippings, exhibition catalogs and pamphlets mostly concerning Trunk's exhibitions at Dudensing Gallery, New York. The DVD documents the 1989 Trunk exhibition at Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, filmed by the donor, Joseph Smith.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Herman Trunk (1894-1963) was a modernist painter who worked in a variety of media, and is well known for his watercolor paintings produced in the early 20th century.
Provenance:
Donated in 2008 by Joseph G. Smith, Herman Trunk's nephew.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.trunherm
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91040d8ba-0463-4213-888a-8a237d9ced19
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-trunherm

Marchal Landgren Papers

Creator:
Landgren, Marchal E.  Search this
Names:
American Abstract Artists  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Artists Equity Association  Search this
Contemporary Arts (Gallery)  Search this
Joseph Mitchell Gallery  Search this
Municipal Art Committee (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Old Print Shop (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
University of Maryland at College Park  Search this
Washington, D.C.. Public Library  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Avery, Milton, 1885-1965  Search this
Beaton, Cecil Walter Hardy, Sir, 1904-  Search this
Constant, George  Search this
Cox, George Collins, 1851-1902  Search this
De Laittre, Eleanor, 1911-1998  Search this
Fitch, Clyde, 1865-1909  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Fruhauf, Aline, 1909-1978  Search this
Gallatin, A. E. (Albert Eugene), 1881-1952  Search this
Geist, Sidney  Search this
Gershwin, George, 1898-1937  Search this
Glackens, Ira, 1907-1990  Search this
Greene, Balcomb, 1904-1990  Search this
Harari, Hananiah, 1912-2000  Search this
Higgins, Eugene, 1874-1958  Search this
Holtzman, Harry  Search this
Hunt, William Morris, 1824-1879  Search this
Janauschek, Francesca Romana Magdalena, 1830-1904  Search this
Kane, John, 1860-1934  Search this
Kipling, Rudyard, 1865-1936  Search this
Laufman, Sidney, 1891-  Search this
Logasa, Charles, 1883-1936  Search this
Mitchell, Donald Grant, 1822-1908  Search this
Newman, Robert Loftin, 1827-1912  Search this
Orr, Elliot, 1904-1997  Search this
Portinari, Cândido, 1903-1962  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Augustus, 1848-1907  Search this
Sprinchorn, Carl, 1887-1971  Search this
Extent:
15.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Christmas cards
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Drawings
Date:
1881-circa 1982
bulk 1930-1975
Summary:
The papers of Washington, D.C. art historian, librarian, author, educator, and art consultant Marchal Landgren measure 15.3 linear feet and date from 1881 to circa 1982, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930 to 1975. Included are biographical materials, correspondence, writings and notes, professional and organization files, research projects' files, scattered personal business records, printed materials, two clippings scrapbooks, photographical materials, and scattered artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Washington, D.C. art historian, librarian, author, educator, and art consultant Marchal Landgren measure 15.3 linear feet and date from 1881 to circa 1982, with the bulk of the material dating from 1930 to 1975. Included are biographical materials, correspondence, writings and notes, professional and organization files, research projects' files, scattered personal business records, printed materials, two clippings scrapbooks, photographical materials, and scattered artwork.

Biographical material includes address cards, an appointment book, curriculum vitaes, genealogical materials, and military records. Correspondence is with artists, clients, colleagues, museums, and universities, and is predominantly professional in nature. Correspondents include Albert E. Gallatin, George Gershwin, Ira Glackens, Sidney Laufman, Elliot Orr, Candido Portinari, and Carl Sprinchorn, among others.

Writings include miscellaneous published and unpublished writings and drafts by Marchal Landgren primarily those not associated with his major research projects. These include various articles written for magazines and journals, manuscript drafts, research notes, and notebooks. There is also a file of writings by others that includes the John Mitchell Gallery Notes.

Professional and organizational files document Landgren's positions and work for educational institutions and arts organizations, including the American Abstract Artists Group, Art Students League of New York, Association of Artists Equity of Washington D. C., Contemporary Arts, D. C. Public Library, Library Journal, New York City Municipal Art Committee, Old Print Shop, Inc., and the University of Maryland, among others. These files also contain correspondence, perhaps the most notable found in the file on the American Abstract Artists Group which includes letters from Josef Albers, Eleanor de Laittre, Sidney Geist, Balcomb Greene, Hananiah Harari, and Harry Holtzman.

Well over one-half of the collection consists of files for Landgren's ongoing research projects on numerous artists and photographers, Latin American art, as well as his bibliographic reference projects. The bulk of the files cover his research, writing, and curatorial work on Robert Loftin Newman. Files are also found for Berenice Abbott, Milton Avery, George Constant, George Collins Cox, Aline Fruhauf, Eugene Higgins, William Morris Hunt, John Kane, Charles Logasa, Elliot Orr, and Albert Pinkham Ryder, among many others.

Personal business records include personal and general expense documentation and scattered exhibition price lists. Printed materials include clippings, exhibition catalogs, and miscellaneous published articles and essays. There are two scrapbooks of clippings.

There are photographs, slides, and negatives of images of Landgren, other artists and notable figures in the art world, and of artwork. Of note is a portrait photograph of Juliana Force by Cecil Beaton, one photograph by Berenice Abbott, "Barclay Street Ferry", and 14 taken by George C. Cox of Rudyard Kipling, Clyde Fitch, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Madame Fanny Janauschek, Donald G. Mitchell, and others.

The papers also include scattered artwork, including holiday cards illustrated by artists, and sketches and drawings by other artists.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 10 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, circa 1890-circa 1981 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1930-circa 1982 (0.6 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1932-circa 1982 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 4: Professional and Organizational Files, circa 1910-circa 1977 (3.4 linear feet; Boxes 3-6)

Series 5: Research Projects' Files, 1881-circa 1982 (6.9 linear feet; Boxes 6-13, 15)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, circa 1934-circa 1982 (0.4 linear feet; Box 13)

Series 7: Printed Material, circa 1927-circa 1981 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 13-14)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, circa 1931-circa 1979 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 14-15)

Series 9: Photographic Materials, circa 1930s-circa 1978 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 14-15)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1930s-circa 1940s (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 14-15)
Biographical / Historical:
Marchal E. Landgren (1907-1983) was an art historian, librarian, educator, author, and art consultant, active in New York and Washington, D. C.

As associate director and board member of Contemporary Arts, Inc. in New York, Landgren established a program for providing artists with their first solo exhibition in New York, including those of John Kane and Mark Tobey. In 1932, he directed the exhibition schedule at the New School for Social Research; and in 1935, Landgren served as the director of art activities for the New York City Municipal Art Committee where he facilitated many exhibitions over the course of five years, including Recent Paintings by Boris Aronson at Babcock Galleries in 1938.

Working as a freelance art consultant, researcher, and author, Landgren organized numerous exhibitions between 1932 and 1950 of the work of Milton Avery, George C. Cox, Elliot Orr, Robert Loftin Newman, and Albert Pinkham Ryder. He also edited several arts publications, including the Old Print Shop Portfolio, John Mitchell Gallery Notes, and arts manuscripts for Oxford University Press.

In 1939, Landgren was selected by the New York World's Fair Commision to prepare historical notes on Latin American art for the exhibition catalogs of the Latin American art exhibition. After the Fair, he continued his research on this topic and wrote several articles, as well as lecturing on Latin American painting at the Art Students League of New York, the Newark Art Club, and the National Education Association at the Boston Museum.

After serving in the U. S. Army Air Force during World War II, Landgren moved to Washington, D. C. in 1950 and began work as the arts division readers' advisor for the D. C. Public Library. For seventeen years, he built up the library's general collection of art books and created extensive files of art exhibition catalogs.

In 1967, he took a position as a bibliographic consultant for the fine arts department at the University of Maryland. He became director of the University's art gallery and of the art department museum training program. During his tenure at the University of Maryland, Landgren conducted graduate seminars in art history, edited and published exhibition catalogs, and organized exhibitions, including The Late Landscapes of William Morris Hunt in 1976.

Landgren was a visiting scholar at the Smithsonian Institution's National Collection of Fine Arts and curated an exhibition of paintings by Robert Loftin Newman held there from 1973 to 1974 and at the Tennessee Fine Arts Center in 1974.

Marchal Landgren authored two books: Years of Art: The Story of the Art Students League of New York (Robert M. McBride and Company, 1940), and Robert Loftin Newman (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1974). He was a regular reviewer of art books for the Library Journal from 1958 to 1972, and contributed reviews to Trend, Magazine of Art, and other journals. He was awarded a research grant by the American Council of Learned Societies in 1963 for his study of George C. Cox and did a great deal of research in American art and American art institutions for an unfinished manuscript. He also worked on a bibliography of art literature which he never completed.
Provenance:
The Marchal Landgren papers were donated by Landgren in 1974, and by the Landgren estate via David Huddle in 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Librarians -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Educators -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Authors -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art historians -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art consultants -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Christmas cards
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Drawings
Citation:
Marchal Landgren papers, 1881-circa 1982, bulk 1930-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.landmarc
See more items in:
Marchal Landgren Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw946a644a0-83cc-46a7-8c56-e9c63db0e1b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-landmarc

Whitney Museum of American Art artists' files and records

Creator:
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Names:
Whitney Studio Club  Search this
Whitney Studio Galleries  Search this
Baziotes, William, 1912-1963  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Benton, Thomas Hart, 1889-1975  Search this
Bloom, Hyman, 1913-  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Burlin, Paul, 1886-1969  Search this
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
Cassatt, Mary, 1844-1926  Search this
Curry, John Steuart, 1897-1946  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
De Creeft, José, 1884-1982  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-1978  Search this
Eilshemius, Louis M. (Louis Michel), 1864-1941  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Feininger, Lyonel, 1871-1956  Search this
Gatch, Lee, 1902-1968  Search this
Glackens, William J., 1870-1938  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Graves, Morris, 1910-  Search this
Gross, Chaim, 1904-1991  Search this
Grosz, George, 1893-1959  Search this
Harnett, William Michael, 1848-1892  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894  Search this
Karfiol, Bernard, 1886-1952  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935  Search this
Lawson, Ernest, 1873-1939  Search this
MacIver, Loren, 1909-1998  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Mount, William Sidney, 1807-1868  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia, 1887-1986  Search this
Pereira, I. Rice (Irene Rice), 1902-1971  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil, 1858-1924  Search this
Pène Du Bois, Guy, 1884-1958  Search this
Reder, Bernard, 1897-1963  Search this
Rimmer, William, 1816-1879  Search this
Rivers, Larry, 1925-2002  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Schnakenberg, H. E. (Henry Ernest), 1892-1970  Search this
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Stella, Joseph, 1877-1946  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Twachtman, John Henry, 1853-1902  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Walkowitz, Abraham, 1880-1965  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Wyant, A. H. (Alexander Helwig), 1836-1892  Search this
Young, Mahonri Mackintosh, 1877-1957  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
78 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1914-1966
Scope and Contents:
REELS N591-N597: Photographs of the Museum, Juliana Force, Herman Moore; scrapbooks on the Whitney Studio Club, Whitney Studio Galleries and the Museum, 1927-1965.
REELS N599-N604: Notebooks of Edwin W. Dickinson; photographs and provenance information for works by Philip Evergood; a catalog of information and some photographs of Chinese ink drawings and other works by Reginald Marsh; and photographs and information on Bernard Reder, Jack Tworkov, Max Weber (portions also microfilmed on reel NY59-8 (fr. 497-658), reel NY59-9 (fr. 1-51), and William Zorach.
REELS N604-N609: Exhibition catalogs, 1946-1966, for artists and groups shows at the Museum, including Robert Feke, William Rimmer, Ralph Blakelock, Albert Maurer, Albert Pinkham Ryder, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Thomas Cole, Max Weber, Arshile Gorky, Mark Tobey, John Sloan, Loren MacIver, I. Rice Pereira, George Grosz, Reginald Marsh, Charles Burchfield, Morris Graves, Theodore Roszak, John Marin, Hans Hofmann, Bradley Tomlin, Stuart Davis, Milton Avery, Lee Gatch, Jose De Creeft, Maurice Prendergast, Edward Hopper, Hyman Bloom, Robert E. Jones, Balcomb Greene, Karl Zerbe, Arthur G. Dove, William Zorach, Philip Evergood, Bernard Reder, Herbert Feber, Oliver O'Connor Barrett,Arthur B. Davies, Jose De Rivera, Paul Burlin, Joseph Stella, Jack Tworkov, Ivan Albright, Stuart Davis, Edwin Dickinson, John Quidor, and Niles Spencer.
REELS N646-N694: Artists' files on: Oliver O'Connor Barrett,William Baziotes, George Bellows, Thomas Hart Benton, Peter Blume, James Brooks, Patrick Henry Bruce, Charles Burchfield, Paul Burlin, David Burliuk, Paul Cadmus, Mary Cassatt, Thomas Cole, Glenn Coleman, Jon Corbino, John Steuart Curry, Jo Davidson, Arthur B. Davies, Jose DeCreeft, Charles Demuth, Jose De Rivera, Arthur Dove, Guy Pène du Bois, Stuart Davis, Frank Duveneck, Ralph Earl, Eastman Johnson, The Eight, Philip Evergood, Robert Feke, Lyonel Feininger, Ernest Fiene, George Fuller, Lee Gatch, William Glackens, Arshile Gorky, Balcomb Greene, Chaim Gross, George Grosz, William Harnett, Marsden Hartley, Childe Hassam, John Heliker, Robert Henri, Hans Hofmann, George Inness, Leon Kelly, Franz Kline, Karl Knaths, Leon Kroll, Walt Kuhn, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Gaston Lachaise, Robert Laurent, Ernest Lawson, Jack Levine, Seymour Lipton, George B. Luks,
Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Loren MacIver, John Marin, Reginald Marsh, Alfred Maurer, K. H. Miller, Robert Motherwell, William Mount, Jerome Myers, Louise Nevelson, Georgia O'Keeffe (portions also microfilmed on reels NY59-13 (fr. 98-115, 406-424, 586-685), reel NY59-14 (entire), and reel NY59-15 (fr. 1-140, 145-153), I. Rice Pereira, Bernard Perlin, Joseph Pollett, Jackson Pollock, Reginald Pollack, Henry V. Poor, Richard Pousette-Dart, Maurice Prendergast, Abraham Rattner, Bernard Reder, Ad Reinhardt, William Rimmer, Larry Rivers, Hugo Robus, Theodore Roszak, Mark Rothko, Concetta Scarvaglione, Henry Schnakenberg, Ben Shahn, John Sloan, David Smith, Eugene Speicher, Theodoros Stamos, Joseph Stella, Maurice Sterne, Mark Tobey, Bradley Tomlin,Trajan, Allen Tucker, John Twachtman, Jack Tworkov, Abraham Walkowitz (also on reel NY/59-15) , Max Weber, James M. Whistler, Gertrude Whitney, Grant Wood, Alexander Wyant, Mahonri Young, and William Zorach.
REELS NWH 1-NWH 7: Artist files on Charles Sheeler, Bernard Karfiol, Louis Eilshemius; scatterred records of the Whitney Studio Club and Museum, 1914-1945, including minutes, Oct. 15, 1930, and Whitney Studio ledgers, 1928-1931; catalogs of one-man shows, 1932-1945; catalogs of annual painting exhibitions, 1932-1940, sculpture, watercolor and drawing exhibitions, 1933-1945, and group exhibitions, 1932-1945; and clippings, Oct. 1935-1936.
REELS NY59/8 (fr. 256-end)-NY59/10: Files on Max Weber, including biographical material, lists of work, and miscellany. Also found (NY59/8 frames 354-383) are ca.20 letters from Weber to Abraham Walkowitz, 1907-1924.
Biographical / Historical:
Whitney Museum of American Art is an American art museum in New York, New York. Founded by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and formally opened in 1931. Previous to its opening as a museum it was known as the Whitney Studio Club (1914-28) and Whitney Studio Galleries (1928-30).
Provenance:
The Weber files on reels NY59/8-10 were lent for microfilming 1959 by the Whitney Museum of American Art; the remainder was lent 1964-1967; additional material from the Museum was lent at the same time, and subsequently donated, including the papers of Lloyd Goodrich, Juliana Force, Thomas B. Clarke, the American Art Research Council, and Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney; these have each been cataloged separately. Portions of Weber, and O'Keeffe material that was microfilmed in 1959 were refilmed in 1967.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Artists -- Exhibitions -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- New York (State)
Identifier:
AAA.whitmuse
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw990da7b91-a3b8-4ace-b8ba-b5c08cfe3284
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-whitmuse

Zabriskie Gallery records

Creator:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Names:
Galerie Zabriskie  Search this
Zabriskie, Virginia M., 1927-1991  Search this
Extent:
110.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1905-2011
Summary:
The Zabriskie Gallery records measure 110.5 linear feet and date from 1905 to 2011. The records document the history of the Zabriskie Gallery through leases, permits, floor plans, and other administrative files; guestbooks; appointment books, notebooks, and other desk diaries; correspondence from New York and Paris galleries, museums, clients, and other correspondence; appraisals, inventories, consigments, and other registrar files; artist files consisting of resumes, correspondence, exhibition material, and photographs of artwork; institution files consisting of correspondence, consignments,and artwork inquiries with museums, galleries, and corporations; exhibition files consisting of loan agreements, press releases, and correspondence related to exhibitions shown at the gallery; invoices, price lists, and other financial records; clippings, press packets, newsletters, and other printed material; photographs, slides, and transparencies of exhibitions and artists works; and correspondence, photographs, awards, and other personal records of Virginia Zabriskie.
Scope and Contents:
The Zabriskie Gallery records measure 110.5 linear feet and date from 1905 to 2011. The records document the history of the Zabriskie Gallery through leases, permits, floor plans, and other administrative files; guestbooks; appointment books, notebooks, and other desk diaries; correspondence from New York and Paris galleries, museums, clients, and other correspondence; appraisals, inventories, consigments, and other registrar files; artist files consisting of resumes, correspondence, exhibition material, and photographs of artwork; institution files consisting of correspondence, consignments,and artwork inquiries with museums, galleries, and corporations; exhibition files consisting of loan agreements, press releases, and correspondence related to exhibitions shown at the gallery; invoices, price lists, and other financial records; clippings, press packets, newsletters, and other printed material; photographs, slides, and transparencies of exhibitions and artists works; and correspondence, photographs, awards, and other personal records of Virginia Zabriskie.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into twelve series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, 1969-2010 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 2: Guestbooks, 1954-1995 (1.3 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 3: Desk Diaries, 1968-1997 (3.4 linear feet; Boxes 3-7)

Series 4: Correspondence, 1958-2010 (7.3 linear feet; Boxes 7-14)

Series 5: Registrar Files, 1970-2010 (10.0 linear feet; Boxes 14-22, 110-111, OV 112)

Series 6: Artist Files, 1905-2010 (66.7 linear feet; Boxes 22-87, OV 113-114)

Series 7: Institution Files, 1951-2009 (5.5 linear feet; Boxes 88-93)

Series 8: Exhibition Files, 1955-2009 (6.3 linear feet; Boxes 93-99)

Series 9: Financial Records, 1960-2011 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 99-103)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1948-2010 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 103-104)

Series 11: Photographic Material, 1950-2006 (5.6 linear feet; Boxes 103-108, OV 112)

Series 12: Virginia Zabriskie Personal Records, 1943-2008 (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 108-109)
Biographical / Historical:
Zabriskie Gallery was founded by Virignia Zabriskie in 1954 when she purchased the Korman Gallery from Marvin Korman. The gallery featured works from artists such as Robert De Niro Sr., Lester Johnson, Mary Frank, and Pat Adams. Some of the more notable exhibitions included "Surrealism 1936 — Objects, Photographs, Collages and Documents" (1986), "Surrealism and the Book" (1991), and "André Masson in America" (1996). In 1977, Zabriskie opened Galerie Zabriskie in Paris to primarily show photography as there was only one gallery at the time doing so in Paris. Zabriskie closed the Galerie Zabriskie in 1998, but continued to operate the Zabriskie Gallery in New York unitl it closed in 2010.

Virginia Zabriskie (1927-2019) was an American art dealer who worked primarily in New York City and Paris. Zabriskie completed her studies in art history at New York University's Institute of Fine Art. Zabriskie became one of the youngest art dealers in New York in 1954 when she purchased the Korman Gallery. Zabriskie was also a founding member of the Art Dealers Association of America.
Related Materials:
Also included in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Virginia Zabriskie conducted by Paul Cummings, May 28-June 6, 1975.
Provenance:
The Zabriskie Gallery records were donated to the Archives of American Art in seven installments by Virginia Zabriskie between 1992-2011.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- France
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Citation:
Zabriskie Gallery Records, 1905-2011. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.zabrgall
See more items in:
Zabriskie Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a1494de5-aa0b-4dfb-ade0-49ac762190b2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zabrgall
Online Media:

Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999

Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Nauman, Bruce  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Johns, Jasper  Search this
Power, Alan  Search this
Parker, Raymond  Search this
Panza, Giuseppe  Search this
Paik, Nam June  Search this
Landsman, Stanley  Search this
Koons, Jeff  Search this
Klapheck, Konrad  Search this
Kiesler, Frederick  Search this
Morris, Robert  Search this
Marisol  Search this
Gorgoni, Gianfranco  Search this
Heller, Ben  Search this
Flavin, Dan  Search this
Judd, Donald  Search this
Daphnis, Nassos  Search this
Epstein, Ethel Steuer  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Barry, Robert  Search this
Artschwager, Richard  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Bloom, Barbara  Search this
Chryssa  Search this
Christo  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Warhol, Andy  Search this
Weiner, Lawrence  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Tremaine, Burton  Search this
Tremaine, Emily Hall  Search this
Twombly, Cy  Search this
Rowan, Carolyn  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Rowan, Robert  Search this
Powers, Kimiko  Search this
Powers, John  Search this
Rosenquist, James  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert  Search this
Starn, Doug  Search this
Starn, Mike  Search this
Scull, Ethel  Search this
Scarpitta, Salvatore  Search this
Serra, Richard  Search this
Scull, Robert C.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Multiples, Inc.  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ileana Sonnabend (Gallery)  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Castelli-Sonnabend Tapes and Films, Inc.  Search this
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Castelli Graphics (Firm)  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Sidney Janis Gallery  Search this
Amsterdam (Netherlands). Stedelijk Museum  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Theme:
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7351
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209504
AAA_collcode_leocast
Theme:
Art Gallery Records
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209504
Online Media:

Cleve Gray papers

Creator:
Gray, Cleve  Search this
Names:
Berry-Hill Galleries  Search this
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Connecticut. Commission on Arts, Tourism, Culture, History and Film  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Neuberger Museum of Art  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Princeton University  Search this
Rhode Island School of Design  Search this
Barzun, Jacques, 1907-  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Davis, Jim, 1901-1974  Search this
Dillenberger, Jane  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Gabo, Naum, 1890-1977  Search this
Grace, Louise N.  Search this
Gray, Francine du Plessix  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Richter, Hans, 1888-1976  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Villon, Jacques, 1875-1963  Search this
Weber, Nicholas Fox, 1947-  Search this
Extent:
9.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Date:
1933-2005
Summary:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam protest movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.
Scope and Content Note:
The Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005, measure 9.2 linear feet. Papers include biographical material, alphabetical files, writings, artwork, audio/visual records, artifacts, printed material, and photographs. Extensive alphabetical files contain personal and professional correspondence as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Especially well-documented are: Gray's involvement with the Vietnam movement; and Threnody, his best-known work composed of fourteen large panels lamenting the dead of both sides sides in Vietnam, commissioned by the Neuberger Museum of Art.

Among the biographical material are award and membership certificates, biographical notes, and personal documentation.

The alphabetical files contain Cleve Gray's personal and professional correspondence, as well as subject files relating to projects and interests. Correspondence is with friends and family, colleagues, publishers, museum curators and directors, art dealers, collectors, and fans. Among the correspondents of note are: Jacques Barzun, James E. Davis, Naum Gabo, Louise N. Grace, Hans and Fridel Richter, and Jacques and Gaby Villon. Other substantial correspondence includes: Berry-Hill Galleries, Betty Parsons Gallery, Connecticut Commission on the Arts, Jacques Seligmann and Co., Neuberger Museum of Art, Pratt Institute, Princeton University, and Rhode Island School of Design. Subject files mostly consist of correspondence, but include printed material and some photographs. Among the subject files are: Art Collection of Cleve and Francine Gray, Artist-Dealer Consignments and Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1989, Artists' Tax Equity Act of 1979, Promised Gifts to Museums, Threnody, Vestments, and Vietnam Protest. Of particular interest are files relating to the Estate of Hans Richter (Cleve Gray, executor), and Gray's research correspondence and illustrations for his Cosmopolitan article "Women-Leaders of Modern Art."

Writings are manuscripts and drafts, research materials, notes, and miscellaneous writings by Cleve Gray and other authors. Those by Gray include articles and catalog introductions on a wide range of art-related topics, as well as book and exhibition reviews. Also found are a book proposal, texts and notes for lectures and talks, miscellaneous notes, poems, political statements, and student papers. Of particular interest are autobiographical notes in the form of a chronology that his biographer, Nicholas Fox Weber, cited as an "autochronology."

Among the writings by other authors are pieces about Cleve Gray including Nicholas Fox Weber's manuscript Cleve Gray. A significant amount of material relates to three books edited by Gray: David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin. Research material survives for an unpublished volume, Naum Gabo. Also included are notes relating to his translation of A l'Infinitif by Marcel Duchamp. Jane Daggett Dillenberger is represented by a lecture, "The Resurrection in Art." The remaining items by other authors are unsigned; of particular interest is a small notebook of reminiscences and notes about Jackson Pollock.

Artwork by Cleve Gray consists mostly drawings and sketches, and a small number of paintings, prints, and watercolors. Works by other artists consist are an unsigned mobile of paper cut-outs, possibly by Alexander Calder, and a pencil drawing signed Dick (probably Richard Avedon).

Audio recordings are a radio broadcast featuring Cleve Gray, several lectures by Gray on John Marin, and a lecture titled "Meaning in the Visual Arts." Other recordings are of Hans Richter and an interview with Jimmy Ernst conducted by Francine du Plessix Gray. Also found is a videocassette of "Glenville School Students at SUNY (Lincoln Center Activity)."

Artifacts are a Chinese scroll representative of those that hung in Cleve Gray's studio, two of his paintbrushes, Aberdeen-Angus Breeders' Association blue ribbon, and Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

The vast majority of printed material - articles, clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, reproductions of art work, etc. - are about or by Cleve Gray. Miscellaneous items and publications mentioning Gray consist of annual reports, brochures, calendars, newsletters, programs, etc. Clippings about Vietnam and Vietnam protest memorabilia reflect his passionate involvement in the anti-war movement; a small number of these items mention Gray or were written by him.

Photographs are of artwork, events, people, places, and miscellaneous subjects. Most of the art work appearing in the photographs is by Cleve Gray and includes images of destroyed paintings. Also found is an original print of Photo Abstraction by Gray, circa 1934. Of particular note are photographs of Threnody, among them preparatory drawings and views of the work in progress. Photographs of artwork by other artists include Louise N. Grace, Jacques Lipchitz, John Marin, Hans Richter, and Jacques Villon.

Photographs of people are mainly portraits of Gray, and views of him with his wife and sons. Other individuals appearing in photographs are Hans Richter and some of Richter's descendants. Pictures of places consist of Gray's studio.

Events are an unidentified exhibition opening. Miscellaneous subjects are mostly exhibition installations. Illustrations consist of photographs published in David Smith by David Smith: Sculpture and Writings. Also found are small number of negatives and color transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 8 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1943-circa 2001 (Box 1; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 2: Alphabetical Files, 1936-2005 (Boxes 1-5, 9; 4.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings, 1935-2000 (Boxes 5-6; 0.85 linear ft.)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1933-1987 (Boxes 6, 9, OV 12; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 5: Audio/Visual Records, 1971-1989 (Box 6; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 6: Artifacts, 1957-1999 (Box 6, RD 11; 0.45 linear ft.)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1933-2005 (Boxes 7-8; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1934-2002 (Boxes 8-10; 1.15 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Abstract Expressionist painter, sculptor, and writer Cleve Gray (1918-2004) lived and worked in Connecticut where he was politically active in the Vietnam protest movement and other liberal causes.

Born Cleve Ginsberg in New York City (the family changed its name to Gray in 1936), he attended the Ethical Culture School and at a young age developed a fascination with color and paint. At the urging of friends, Cleve's parents allowed him to accompany a school friend for lessons with George Bellows' student Antonia Nell. She encouraged and inspired the young artist, and a still life he painted in her class was shown at the National Academy of Design's 1932 annual exhibition. Miss Nell also introduced him to Louise N. Grace, an artist who became a good friend and had a lasting influence on him. While a student at Phillips Academy, Cleve studied painting with Bartlett Hayes and aspired to paint in France. Upon his graduation in 1936, he was awarded the Samuel F. B. Morse Prize for most promising art student.

Gray's mother was always supportive of his career choice. His businessman father, who didn't understand his son's desire to be an artist, insisted on a college education. Cleve chose Princeton, where he majored in art and archaeology, and studied painting with James E. Davis. His senior thesis was on Chinese landscape painting; both Eastern philosophy and art were long-term influences on Gray's work and outlook. He graduated summa cum laude in 1940, and then spent several months painting while living at the farm of a family friend in Mendham, New Jersey.

When a doctor suggeted that a dry climate might relieve sinus and asthma problems, Gray moved to Tucson, Arizona. Once settled in the desert, he contacted Louise N. Grace, whom he had met as a young teenager through his art instructor. Miss Grace, an artist and daughter of the founder of W. R. Grace and Co., was a highly cultured and independent woman older than his parents. The summer before Gray entered Phillips Academy, she had hired him to brush ground color onto canvases for murals she was painting for "Eleven Arches," her home in Tuscon then under construction. Miss Grace invited Gray to visit "Eleven Arches" to see the completed murals, and despite the substantial age difference, their friendship deepened; Gray found in her intellectual and spiritual guidance that was lacking in his own family. He remained in Tucson until enlisting in the U. S. Army in 1942, and they corresponded frequently during the the war. When a stroke in 1948 prevented Miss Grace from participating in the extensive tour of Europe she was arranging for a small group of friends, including Gray, she provided sufficient funds and insisted he make the trip on his own. Another stroke, suffered while Gray was traveling, left her in a coma; he was not permitted to see her again. Upon her death in 1954, Gray inherited "Eleven Arches."

Between 1943 and 1946, Gray was stationed in England, France, and Germany, serving in Army Signal Intelligence. Most of his work was performed at night, and he spent his free time drawing. While in London, Gray produced many colored pencil drawings of buildings that had been bombed. In France, a Red Cross volunteered to introduce him to Jacques Villon; although unfamiliar with the artist, Gray knew of Villon's brother, Marcel Duchamp, and accepted the invitation. Jacques and Gaby Villon lived near Gray's billet and he became a frequent visitor. Their friendship was important to his development as an artist. After being discharged from the Army in 1946, Gray remained in France to work with Villon who introduced him to the study of color and the concept of intellectual quality in painting. Gray also studied informally with André Lhote, Villon's former teacher. "American Painters in Paris," an exhibition presented in 1946 at Galerie Durand-Ruel, included work by Cleve Gray.

He returned to New York City in 1946. In the tight post-war rental market Gray managed to find a small room upstairs from a grocery store on East 106th Street for use as a studio. He commenced painting the London Ruins series based on drawings he had made during the war, and began thinking about exhibiting in New York. Gray secured introductions to Pierre Matisse, Curt Valentin, and Dorothy Miller. They encouraged him, but no opportunities came his way until Germain Seligmann, whose gallery was expanding its scope to include contemporary art, followed the advice of Curt Valentin and looked at Gray's work. Gary's first solo exhibition, held at Jacques Seligmann and Co., included selections from the London Ruins series, paintings done in Maine and Arizona, and a few portraits. The New York Times called it "an auspicious first," and one of the London Ruins series was selected by Edward Alden Jewell for the "Critic's Exhibition" at Grand Central Gallery.

Gray found New York City too frenetic. In 1949 he bought a large, old house in Warren, Connecticut, and lived and worked at "Graystones" for the remainder of his life. Half of a 6-car garage was converted to a studio; many years later, his studio moved to a barn, its renovation and design planned by sculptor and architect Tony Smith.

He married Francine du Plessix in 1957. Always interested in literature and philosophy, in the 1960s Francine du Plessix Gray began contributing articles to The New Yorker and is still affiliated with the magazine. Her reviews and articles appeared in prominent publications, and she wrote several award-winning novels and biographies. Their sons, Thaddeus and Luke (now a painter), were born in 1959 and 1961. Francine's mother, Tatiana du Plessix (the hat designer Tatiana of Saks), and step-father, the sculptor Alexander Liberman (also former art director of Vogue and later editorial director of Condé Nast publications) became Cleve Gray's closest friends.

The paintings and drawings of Cleve Gray - first consisting of figures and portraits, and then abstract compositions - were often produced in series. The earliest series, London Ruins, grew from the colored pencil drawings made while stationed in London during World War II. Travels to France, Italy, Greece, Morocco, Hawaii, Spain, Egypt, Japan, and Czechoslovakia, inspired many series, among them: Etruscan, Augury, Ceres, Demeter Landscape, Hera, Morocco, Hawaii, Ramses, Perne, Hatshepsut, Roman Walls, Zen, and Prague. His hometown, the Holocaust, and musicians inspired other series: Warren, Sleepers Awake!, Bela Bartok, and Four Heads of Anton Bruckner. Some series were works on paper, others were collage canvases, and a few series later spawned prints. Gray began using acrylics in the 1940s. Although the medium offered many benefits, he did not always like its appearance and frequently returned to oils. Around 1966 Gray was painting almost exclusively with acrylic, and eventually developed a technique of thinning the paint and applying successive layers of color (sometimes by pouring or with a sponge) on cotton duck rather than traditional canvas.

Gray was attracted to sculpture, too, working in that medium at different points in his career. His first sculpture, in plaster, was completed in 1959. In the early 1960s he visited a commercial sand-casting foundry and became excited about learning to cast in bronze. He made about a dozen sculptures to cast in sand, but due to too much undercutting, their casting became too difficult a problem. Lava flows seen while in Hawaii during 1970 and 1971 inspired a return to sculpture. This time, he used wood, papier maché, and metal. Gray then decided these pieces should be cast in bronze, and he was determined to do it himself. Friends taught him the lost wax process and he began working at the Tallix Foundry in Peekskill, New York where, over the next year, he cast about forty bronzes.

Gray's best known work is Threnody, a lament for the dead of both sides in Vietnam. In 1972, Gray received a commission to fill a very large gallery of the soon-to-open Neuberger Museum of Art (State University of New York, College at Purchase) designed by Philip Johnson. Friends of the Neuberger Museum paid his expenses and Gray, who was enormously excited about the project he considered a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, donated his time. Developing plans for the execution of Threnody consumed most of his time during 1972 and 1973. Composed of a series of fourteen panels, each approximately twenty feet square, the piece presented a number of technical challenges. It was constructed and painted in situ during the summer and early fall of 1973. Since then, Threnody has been reinstalled at the Neuberger Museum of Art on several occasions.

Gray was commissioned to design liturgical vestments for two Episcopal churches in Connecticut in the 1970s. A chasuble, stoles, and a mitre were commissioned by the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut in 1984.

He won the "Outdoor Art at the Station Competition," for Union Station, Hartford, Connecticut. His very large porcelain enamel tile mural, Movement in Space, was installed on the façade of the transportation center in 1988.

Gray began writing occasional articles and exhibition reviews in the late 1940s. His concern with rational structure in art led him to question Abstract Expressionism and write "Narcissus in Chaos." This article, published in 1959 by The American Scholar, drew considerable attention. In 1960, Cosmopolitan published "Women - Leaders of Modern Art" that featured Nell Blaine, Joan Brown, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gretchoff, Grace Hartigan, Ethel Magafan, Louise Nevelson, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Between 1960 and 1970, Gray was a contributing editor of Art In America, producing numerous articles (a few co-authored with Francine) and reviews for the periodical. He edited three books, David Smith by David Smith: Scupture and Writings, Hans Richter, and John Marin, all published by Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, and translated Marcel Duchamp's A l'Infinitif.

During the early 1960s, Gray became intensely focused on the situation in Vietnam. His first artistic response came in 1963 with Reverend Quan Duc, painted to commemorate a Buddhist monk who had immolated himself. Francine, too, felt strongly about the issue and over time the couple became increasingly active in the anti-war movement. They joined a number of organizations and helped to found a local chapter of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The years 1968 and 1969 were an especially intense and active period for the Grays. They protested, wrote and spoke out against the war, raised funds to support anti-war political candidates, and on a few occasions were arrested and jailed. Writing for Art in America, editing the book series, and anti-war activities left little time for his art. In 1970 Gray refocused his attention on painting.

Beginning in 1947, Gray was always represented by a New York Gallery: Jacques Seligmann and Co. (1947-1959), Staempfli Gallery (1960-1965), Saidenberg Gallery (1965-1968), Betty Parsons Gallery (1968-1983), Armstrong Gallery (1984-1987), and Berry-Hill Galleries (1988-2003). He was represented by galleries in other cities, as well, but not as consistently or for such long periods.

He exhibited extensively in group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. In addition to numerous solo exhibitions presented by the dealers who represented Gray, there were retrospective exhibitions at: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Columbus Museum of Art, Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois, Champaign), Princeton University Art Museum, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Many museums' permanent collections include the work of Cleve Gray, among them: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Butler Institute of American Art, Columbus Museum of Art, Neuberger Museum of Art (SUNY, College at Purchase), the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Newark Museum, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Phillips Collection, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Smithsonian Institution, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Yale University Art Gallery.

Cleve Gray served as artist-in-residence at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in 1963 and at the Honolulu Academy of Arts in 1970, both sponsored by Ford Foundation programs. In 1980, he was appointed an artist-in-residence at the American Academy in Rome, where Francine concurrently served as a writer-in-residence; they returned for shorter periods during each of the subsequent seven years. Cleve Gray was presented the Connecticut Arts Award in 1987, and the Neuberger Museum of Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Hartford in 1992, and was elected a member of The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1998. In addition, he was a trustee of the Neuberger Museum of Art, New York Studio School, Rhode Island School of Design, and Wadsworth Atheneum.

Cleve Gray hit his head and suffered a massive subdural hematoma after falling on ice outside of his home. He died the following day, December 8, 2004.
Separated Material:
Exhibition catalogs and announcements and two scrapbooks donated to the Archives in 1967 and 1968 were microfilmed on reels D314-D315. Items on reel D315, transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library in 1975, are not described in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The Cleve Gray papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Mr. Gray in 1967 and 1968. The bulk of the collection was given by his widow, Francine du Plessix Gray, in 2007 and 2008.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordigs with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Connecticut  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Protest Movements -- United States  Search this
Designers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Poems
Articles
Photographs
Reviews (documents)
Notes
Illustrations
Notebooks
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Manuscripts
Paintings
Prints
Watercolors
Drawings
Lectures
Citation:
Cleve Gray papers, 1933-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grayclev
See more items in:
Cleve Gray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92d3d47d0-baa3-4085-80f2-9b5d1730c052
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grayclev
Online Media:

Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers

Artist:
Louis, Morris, 1912-1962  Search this
Names:
André Emmerich Gallery  Search this
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden  Search this
Robert Pierce/Films, Inc.  Search this
Bocour, Leonard, 1910-1993  Search this
Brenner, Marcella, 1912-2007  Search this
Faatz, Anita J. (Anita Josephine)  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Noland, Kenneth, 1924-2010  Search this
Truitt, Anne, 1921-2004  Search this
Extent:
17.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
circa 1910s-2007
bulk 1965-2000
Summary:
The Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers measure 17.8 linear feet and date from circa 1912-2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1965-2000. The collection documents Morris Louis' career as a Color Field painter and founding participant in the Washington Color School, as well as the subsequent administration of his estate by his wife Marcella Brenner. Found within Morris Louis' papers are biographical materials, correspondence, photographs, scattered financial records, notes, writings, printed materials, and a canvas sample. The Morris Louis Estate papers include records of gallery exhibitions, mostly André Emmerich Gallery; artwork inventories; legal records concerning the lawsuit Bernstein v. Brenner; financial records of the sale of Louis' artwork; printed materials; writings about Louis; photographs of exhibition installations and artwork; and project files which include documentation of film projects by Robert Pierce Productions, a catalog raisonne, documentation of PBS documentaries, video recordings of the exhibition "Morris Louis Now", and numerous sound recordings of interviews with artists discussing Morris Louis conducted by Anita Faatz.
Scope and Contents:
The Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers measure 17.8 linear feet and date from circa 1912-2007, with the bulk of the material dating from 1965-2000. The collection documents Morris Louis' career as a Color Field painter and founding participant in the Washington Color School, as well as the subsequent administration of his estate by his wife Marcella Brenner. Found within Morris Louis' papers are biographical materials, correspondence, photographs, scattered financial records, notes, writings, printed materials, and a canvas sample. The Morris Louis Estate papers include records of gallery exhibitions, mostly André Emmerich Gallery; artwork inventories; legal records concerning the lawsuit Bernstein v. Brenner; financial records of the sale of Louis' artwork; printed materials; writings about Louis; photographs of exhibition installations and artwork; and posthumous project files which include documentation of film projects by Robert Pierce Productions, a catalog raisonne, PBS documentaries, video recordings of the exhibition "Morris Louis Now", and numerous sound recordings of interviews with artists, many with transcripts, discussing Morris Louis and conducted by Anita Faatz.

Within the Morris Louis papers (circa 3 linear feet) are scattered biographical materials for Morris Louis and Marcella Brenner. Correspondence is with family friends, artists, and galleries, the bulk of which consists of photocopies. Of note are letters from Helen Frankenthaler, Clement Greenberg, Leonard Bocour, Kenneth Noland, and Anne Truitt. Business records include lists of artwork, receipts for art supplies, and scattered tax records. Six notebooks belonging to Morris Louis contain miscellaneous notes about students, studio rental payments, addresses, travel expenses, and a short list of paintings. There is one notebook of Marcella Brenner's containing notes about expenses and addresses. Also found are printed materials, one canvas sample, and one embossing stamp. Photographs are of Morris Louis, Marcella Brenner, and the Bernstein family.

The majority of the collection (circa 15 linear feet) consists of records created and maintained by Marcella Brenner in the course of managing Louis' estate and posthumous exhibitions and projects. There are numerous gallery exhibition records for many posthumous and retrospective exhibitions between 1965 through 2002, including those held at the Andre Emmerich Gallery, the Hirshhorn Museum, and numerous other U.S. and international galleries and museums. Louis' artwork is documented in highly detailed inventory lists and cards. Legal records document the lawsuit brought by the Bernstein family against Marcella Brenner which began in 1964 and ended in 1970 in favor of Brenner. Financial records document sales.

Printed materials include clippings, exhibition catalogs and announcements, and other miscellaneous materials. Writings include essays about Louis and manuscript copies of the book Trustee for the Human Race: Litigation over the Morris Louis Paintings written by Ruth S. Blau under contract for Marcella Brenner. Photographs are primarily of artwork depicted in exhibition installations. Project files are found for several posthumous documentary film projects and a catalog raisonne, and include a series of audio recordings of interviews of 27 artists conducted by Anita Faatz in 1970-1971. Artists interviewed include Clement Greenberg, Leonard Bocour, Andre Emmerich, Helen Frankenthaler, Kenneth Noland, and many others.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 2 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Morris Louis Papers, circa 1910s-1998 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 2: Morris Louis Estate Papers, 1947-2007 (14.9 linear feet; Boxes 3-19, OV 20)
Biographical / Historical:
Morris Louis (1912-1962) was one of the earliest American Color Field painters, and, along with other Washington, D.C., painters, formed the movement known as the Washington Color School.

Born in Baltimore, M.D., to Russian immigrants Louis Bernstein and Cecelia Luckman, Morris Louis attended the Maryland Institute of Fine and Applied Arts from 1927-1932 and served as president of the Baltimore Artists' Association in 1935. During the Depression, he worked in New York City on the steering committee of the Easel Division of the Federal Arts Projects of the Works Project Administration (WPA). He exhibited Broken Bridge at the WPA Pavilion of the New York World's Fair in 1939.

In 1947, Louis married Marcella (Siegel) Brenner, and moved to Silver Spring, Maryland, a close suburb of Washington, D.C., where he taught private art classes and continued painting, using his apartment bedroom as a studio. In 1948, Louis participated in the Maryland Artists, 16th Annual Exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, and began using Leonard Bocour's Magna acrylic paint, which he would use exclusively for the rest of his painting career.

In 1952, Morris Louis and Marcella Brenner moved to Washington, D.C. and set up a studio in his home where he would complete his most notable canvases. He began teaching at the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts and met artist Kenneth Noland who was also exploring Color Field painting. Through Noland, Louis met art critic Clement Greenberg in 1953, and they visited artist studios in New York City to study abstract expressionist works, including those by Helen Frankenthaler, Jackson Pollock, and Franz Kline. Louis and Noland were greatly influenced by Frankenthaler's staining technique, and Louis began experimenting with staining methods upon his return to Washington. Clement Greenberg became a life-long advocate for Louis and, in 1954, included Louis in the seminal group exhibition, "Emerging Talent," organized by Greenberg for the Kootz Gallery. In 1960, Andre Emmerich became his dealer in the United States and Lawrence Rubin represented him in Paris.

Using thinned Magna paint and unstretched, unprimed canvases, Louis created his works by rotating the canvas as the paint moved across and soaked in. Between 1958 and 1962 Louis produced three major series of paintings—the Veils, the Unfurleds, and the Stripes. Each series numbered more than one hundred canvases. Louis never documented his exact painting methods and would not allow anyone to watch him work, including his wife. His own worst critic, Louis destroyed many of his paintings that did meet his standards, including a large number of his earliest works and many created between 1954 and 1957. He also designated numerous surviving works for destruction prior to his death.

Louis was diagnosed with lung cancer on July 1, 1962 and died a few months later. The Andre Emmerich Gallery held a previously scheduled exhibition as planned, a month following Louis' death, as a memorial exhibition.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Marcella Brenner journals, 1962-2000. The Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) also holds papers of Morris Louis and the Morris Louis Estate in their Morris Louis Study Collection.
Provenance:
The Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers were donated by Marcella Brenner in several installments in 1976, 1986, and 1988. Subsequent donations in 2009 and 2012 were donated by Marcella Brenner via Ann M. Garfinkle, Executor. The Anita Faatz interviews were donated in 1976 by Marcella Brenner.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Many of the audio recordings and transcripts of interviews with 26 artists conducted by Anita Faatz in 1970-1971 are access restricted and written permission is required from the person interviewed. Please contact reference services for more information. Any use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Transcripts  Search this
Washington Color School (Group of artists)  Search this
Law and art -- United States  Search this
Color-field painting  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate Papers, circa 1910s-2007, bulk 1965-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.louimorr
See more items in:
Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ecc509be-66ed-4df5-9632-537bc9cf40ed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-louimorr
Online Media:

City Sunlight

Artist:
Edward Hopper, American, b. Nyack, New York, 1882–1967  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
28 3/16 x 40 1/8 in. (71.6 x 101.9 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
(1954)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of the Joseph H. Hirshhorn Foundation, 1966
Accession Number:
66.2505
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
Social Realism
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py2c3b43b8b-df9a-461d-ac33-772fb2194898
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.2505

Lucy R. Lippard papers

Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Names:
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Alliance for Cultural Democracy  Search this
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Printed Matter, Inc.  Search this
Studio International (Firm)  Search this
University of Colorado -- Faculty  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Henes, Donna  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
70.5 Linear feet
0.454 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1930s-2010
bulk 1960-1990
Summary:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

A small amount of biographical material comprises resumes and an address book.

Correspondence files document all aspects of Lippard's professional life including her relationships with artists such as Carl Andre, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ray Johnson, Sol LeWitt, and Henry Pearson; feminist artists including Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Donna Henes, and May Stevens; political and art-related activist groups such as Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Art Workers Coalition, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Printed Matter, and Women's Caucus for Art; galleries and museums including Addison Gallery of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and publishers including Art International and Art Forum. The series also traces the development of Lippard's involvement in activist causes including censorship and the rights of artists, Central America and the impact of U.S. policy on the region, and equality and reproductive rights for women, as well as her interest in conceptual and minimalist art. The series includes scattered artwork and photographs of artists.

Writings are primarily by Lippard and include correspondence, manuscript drafts, extensive notes, and publication records for some of her best-known books such as The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood (1966), Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973), Eva Hesse (1976), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), as well as essays for publications such as Art Forum and Studio International and contributions to exhibition catalogs. Also found are edited transcripts from conferences, symposia and interviews conducted by and of Lippard, some audio recordings of interviews and symposia, including an interview with Donald Judd, and notes and typescripts for lectures and speeches.

A small number of files document Lippard's teaching work during the 1970s and 1980s, primarily at the University of Colorado, Boulder where she taught several courses and seminars.

Exhibition files document Lippard's involvement with exhibitions she helped to organize or curate such as A Different War: Vietnam in Art (1989-1991) 557,087 and 955,000 (1969, 1970), 2,972, 453 (1971) c.7,500 (1973-1974) and those for which she wrote catalog contributions.

Printed material includes a collection of articles written by Lippard and a small amount of material concerning events, such as speaking engagements, in which Lippard was involved. Other printed material reflects Lippard's wide range of artistic, political and activist interests and documents exhibitions and performances and the activities of art-related and political groups. Material includes many exhibition catalogs, announcements, invitations, printed posters, news clippings, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets and other publications.

Artwork includes sixteen items by unidentified artists, including two by children. Photographs consist primarily of photographs of works of art in addition to a small number of photos of exhibition installations.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960s-circa 1980s (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950s-2006 (Boxes 1-28, 51, OVs 54-63; 28.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1930s-1990s (Boxes 28-41, 51-52, OVs 64-66; 13.24 linear feet, ER01; 0.454 GB)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1966-1993 (Boxes 41, 52; 0.76 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibitions, 1960s-1990s (Boxes 42-45, 52, OVs 67-68; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940s-2007 (Boxes 45-49, 52, OVs 69-77; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork and Ephemera, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53; 4 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1950s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53, OV 71; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1965-2010, (Boxes 78-94; 17.0 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
New York and New Mexico writer and art critic, Lucy R. Lippard, is the curator of numerous exhibitions and the author of over twenty-four books and other writings that trace the emergence of minimalist and conceptual art and document Lippard's commitment to feminism and political activism.

Born in New York City in 1937, Lippard earned a B.A. from Smith College in 1958 and an M.A. in 1962 from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. In the 1960s she began writing art criticism for the journals Art International and Artforum. In 1966 she curated the landmark exhibition Eccentric Abstraction at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City. Lippard then curated the first of four defining conceptual art exhibitions that became known as her "numbers" shows, each titled after the populations of the cities in which they took place, with catalogs in the form of a set of 10 x 15 cm index cards. Opening at the Seattle Art Museum in 1969, 557,087 was followed by 955,000 in Vancouver, Canada, a few months later. 2,972,453 was held at the Centro de Arte y Comunicacíon in Buenos Aires in 1971 and c.7500 opened in Valencia, California, in 1973-1974 before traveling to several other venues in the United States and Europe.

Lippard's first book, The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood was published in 1966, followed by Pop Art the same year, and a collection of her early essays, Changing, in 1971. Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973) and From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976) documented the emergence of conceptual art and the early years of feminist art respectively. In 1976 Lippard published her seminal book on the life and work of Eva Hesse.

Between 1977 and 1978 Lippard lived on a farm in Devon, England, and worked on a novel, The First Stone, about the role of politics in the lives of three generations of women. During her walks across the English countryside she became interested in landscape art and conceived of her book Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory which was subsequently published in 1983. Other books include Get the Message?: A Decade Of Art For Social Change (1984), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990). Lippard has also written regular columns on art and politics for the Village Voice, In These Times and Z Magazine, and has been a contributing editor of Art in America.

Lippard was radicalized during a trip to Argentina in 1968 when she was invited to be a juror at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. On her return to the United States she became heavily involved in anti-war activities and the Art Workers Coalition. She is a co-founder of several feminist and artist organizations including the feminist collective Heresies, which produced Heresies: A Feminist Journal on Art and Politics from 1977-1992, Ad Hoc Women Artists, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Women's Action Coalition, and Women's Art Registry. In 1976 she was a founder of Printed Matter, a New York nonprofit dedicated to producing artists' publications. She also worked closely with Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space devoted to the promotion of artists' books, installation art, and video and performance art, and served on the organization's International Committee.

Lippard has been a visiting professor at the School of Visual Arts, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the University of Queensland, Australia, and was Eminent Artist in Residence at the University of Wyoming Department of Art in 2015. She has received honorary doctorates in fine arts from Maine College of Art, the Massachusetts College of Art, Moore College of Art, San Francisco Art Institute, and others, and awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Smith College Medal, the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts, and the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Excellence.

Lippard has lived in New Mexico since 1992 and works as a freelance writer and speaker.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lucy Lippard conducted in 2011 March 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
Provenance:
Lucy R. Lippard donated her papers in several increments between 1972-1995, 2006, 2015 and 2021.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- Political activity  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9101c6a69-dde9-42ed-94cc-d03650c249ed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipplucy
Online Media:

Myron Bement Smith Collection

Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement, 1897-1970  Search this
Names:
Aga-Oglu, Mehmet, 1896-1949  Search this
Ettinghausen, Richard  Search this
Field, Henry  Search this
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Kuban, Dogan  Search this
Moe, Henry Allen  Search this
Pope, Arthur Upham, 1881-1969  Search this
Former owner:
Blake, Marion Elizabeth  Search this
Extent:
192 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1910-1970
Summary:
The Myron Bement Smith collection consists of two parts, the papers of Myron Bement Smith and his wife Katharine and the Islamic Archives. It contains substantial material about his field research in Italy in the 1920s and his years working on Islamic architecture in Iran in the 1930s. Letters describe the milieu in which he operated in Rochester NY and New York City in the 1920s and early 1930s; the Smiths' life in Iran from 1933 to 1937; and the extensive network of academic and social contacts that Myron and Katharine developed and maintained over his lifetime. The Islamic Archives was a project to which Smith devoted most of his professional life. It includes both original materials, such as his photographs and notes, and items acquired by him from other scholars or experts on Islamic art and architecture. Smith intended the Archives to serve as a resource for scholars interested in the architecture and art of the entire Islamic world although he also included some materials about non-Islamic architecture.
Scope and Contents:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection consists of two parts, the papers of Myron Bement Smith and his wife Katharine and the Islamic Archives. The papers include some biographic material about Myron but little about his wife. Information on his academic and professional experience is sketchy and his diaries and appointment books often contain only sporadic entries. The papers contain substantial material about his field research in Italy in the 1920s and his years working on Islamic architecture in Iran in the 1930s. Correspondence comprises the largest and most potentially useful part of the papers. Letters describe the milieu in which he operated in Rochester, NY and New York City in the 1920s and early 1930s; the Smiths' life in Iran from 1933 to 1937; and the extensive network of academic and social contacts that Myron and Katharine developed and maintained over his lifetime.

The Islamic Archives, formally entitled The Archive for Islamic Culture and Art, was a project to which Smith devoted most of his professional life. It includes both original materials, such as his photographs and notes, and items acquired by him from other scholars or experts on Islamic art and architecture. Most of the latter consists of photographs and slides. Smith intended the Archives to serve as a resource for scholars interested in the architecture and art of the entire Islamic world although he also included some materials about non-Islamic architecture. The core collection of the Archives consists of Smith's original photographs and architectural sketches of Iranian Islamic monuments made during his field research in the 1930s. He meticulously photographed the interior and exterior of monuments, including their decorative detail. Some of the photographic materials subsequently loaned, purchased, or donated to the Archives may enable scholars to document sites over time but in many cases the materials are poorly preserved or reproduced. A notable exception to this is the glassplate negatives and prints of 19th century Iranian photographer Antoin Sevruguin.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 2 major series with further subseries. A third series inventories the outsized and miscellaneous materials.

Series 1: Papers

Subseries 1.1: Biographic Materials

Subseries 1.2: Professional Experience

Subseries 1.3: Notebooks, Journals and Appointment Books

Subseries 1.4: Correspondence

Subseries 1.5: Published and Unpublished Materials

Subseries 1.6: Italy Research 1925, 1927-1928

Subseries 1.7: Iran Research 1933-1937

Subseries 1.8: Katharine Dennis Smith Papers and Correspondence

Series 2: The Islamic Archives

Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information

Subseries 2.2: Resource Materials Iran

Subseries 2.3: Resource Materials Other Islamic World and General

Subseries 2.4: Myron Bement Smith Architectural Sketches, Plans and Notes, Iran, 1933-1937

Subseries 2.5: Myron Bement Smith Iran Photographs, Notebooks and Negative Registers

Subseries 2.6: Country Photograph File

Subseries 2.7: Lantern Slide Collection

Subseries 2.8: Myron Bement Smith 35 mm Color Slides

Subseries 2.9: Country 35 mm Color Slide File

Subseries 2.10: Myron Bement Smith Negatives

Subseries 2.11: Country Photograph Negatives

Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs

Series 3: Outsize and Miscellaneous Items

Subseries 3.1: Map Case Drawers

Subseries 3.2: Rolled Items

Subseries 3.3 Items in Freezer

Subseries 3.4 Smithsonian Copy Negatives
Biographical Note:
Myron Bement Smith was born in Newark Valley, New York in 1897 and grew up in Rochester, New York. He died in Washington D.C. in 1970. He showed an early interest in drawing, and after graduation from high school, he worked as a draftsman for a Rochester architect. He served in the US Army Medical Corps in France during World War I and on return again worked as an architectural draftsman. He studied at Yale University from 1922 to 1926, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. During summer vacations, he worked as draftsman or designer for architectural firms in New York City. After graduation, he received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation grant and spent two years in Italy doing research on northern Italian brick and stone work. He used photography as an tool for his research and published several well-illustrated articles. On return he joined an architectural firm in Philadelphia and in 1931 became a registered architect in New York. He enrolled in Harvard University graduate school in 1929 pursuing a Master of Fine Arts degree.

In April 1930, Smith was appointed Secretary of the newly created American Institute for Persian Art and Archaeology founded by Arthur Upham Pope and located in New York City. He had no prior academic or work experience in Islamic art or architecture, and his job entailed designing publications, arranging lectures, organizing exhibitions and fund raising. That summer he arranged an independent study course at Harvard University on Persian art and subsequently studied Persian language at Columbia University and attended graduate courses at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. His work and academic credentials enabled him to compete successfully for a research fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies in 1933 to study Iranian Islamic architecture.

Accompanied by his new bride Katharine Dennis, Smith left for Iran in 1933. They suffered a horrendous motor vehicle accident in Iraq en route and required a lengthy recuperation in Lebanon and Cyprus. The Smiths eventually arrived in Isfahan, Iran, where they established their "Expedition House," as Smith called it, in a rented faculty house at Stuart College. Smith's research consisted of meticulous photographic documentation of Islamic monuments and architectural sketches and drawings of many of them. He concentrated on the Isfahan area but also documented monuments elsewhere in Iran. Smith outfitted his station wagon as a combination camper and research vehicle in which he and his staff traveled widely. Katharine sometimes traveled with him but generally she remained in Isfahan managing the household and logistics for the "expedition." The Smiths left Iran in 1937.

Smith published several articles about Iran's Islamic monuments based on his field research and in 1947 completed his PhD thesis for The Johns Hopkins University on the vault in Persian architecture. His professional career from 1938 until his death in 1970 consisted of a series of temporary academic positions, contract work and government or academic sponsored lecture tours and photographic exhibits. He had a long lasting relationship with the Library of Congress where he served as an Honorary Consultant from 1938 to 1940 and again from 1948 to 1970; from 1943 to 1944 he was Chief of the Iranian Section at the Library. Despite his lack of published material, Smith was well-known among academic, government and private citizens who worked, traveled or were otherwise interested Iran and the Islamic world.

Smith developed an extensive network of professional and social contacts that dated from his early student days and increased markedly during his time at the Persian Institute and later in Iran. He kept in touch with them and they touted him to others who were interested in Iran or Islamic art and architecture. This network served him well in realizing his ambition of creating a resource for scholars that relied on photographs to document Islamic architecture. The Islamic Archives began with his own collection of photographs from his Iran research and grew to include all manner of photographic and other materials not only on the Islamic world but also other areas. Creating and managing the Archives became the main focus of Smith's professional life and career. In 1967 he received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to revise his PhD thesis as a publishable manuscript but died before he could complete it.
Related Materials:
The Antoin Sevruguin Photgraphs

Ernst Herzfeld Papers

Lionel B. Bier Drawings

Lionel D. Bier and Carol Bier Photographs
Provenance:
Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, transfered from National Anthropological Archives.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Islamic architecture  Search this
Islamic Architecture-Turkey  Search this
Iran-description and travel  Search this
Iran-History 20th Century  Search this
Islamic Architecture-Middle East  Search this
Iran-social life and customs  Search this
United States-Social life and customs  Search this
Mosques  Search this
Architecture -- Iran  Search this
Citation:
The Myron Bement Smith Collection. FSA.A.04. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith.
Identifier:
FSA.A.04
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith Collection
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3c8c950fe-250b-40df-b8c7-bcf788073968
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a-04
Online Media:

R. E. G. (Ron) Davies Air Transport Collection

Creator:
Davies, R. E. G. (Ronald Edward George)  Search this
Extent:
61.38 Cubic feet (143 document boxes; 4 cassette boxes; 10 shoeboxes; 1 oversize box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Timetables
Annual reports
Memorabilia
Notebooks
Date:
bulk 1910s to 2010
1847 to 2011
Summary:
R. E. G. (Ron) Davies (1921 -2011) was an English airline historian, who worked in airline marketing research before joining the National Air and Space Museum in 1981. He served as a curator until his retirement in 2011. This reference collection was compiled by Davies during his career and consists of historical data and materials—including photographs, timetables, and memorabilia—from the airlines of the world.
Scope and Contents:
This reference collection was compiled by Ron Davies throughout his career both as a market researcher and an academic and curator. Materials consist of 63 loose-leaf binders (called dossiers), each containing historical data on the airlines of a country or region, hand-drawn maps, chronologies, articles and marketing materials; over 5000 aviation prints; over 3500 airline timetables; and miscellaneous airline memorabilia. The collection also contains oral history materials, both transcripts and audio cassettes, and four catalogued videotapes.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in six series:

Series 1: Dossiers

Series 2: Photographs

Series 3: Timetables

Series 4: Oral History

Series 5: Personal Materials

Series 6: Motion Picture Materials

Additional title information has been added by the processing archivist in brackets.
Biographical / Historical:
R. E. G. (Ron) Davies (1921-2011) was born in England and educated in Shaftesbury, Dorset. After spending six and a half years in the British Army, Davies joined the newly formed Ministry of Civil Aviation. Davies then spent six years in economic research with British European Airways, before joining British Aeroplane Company in 1957, where he set up a market research department. Davies worked in various manufacturing companies, specializing in market research and traffic analysis.

In 1968, Davies went to work in the United States for Douglas Aircraft, where he remained for 13 years as head of market research. In 1981, Davies was appointed as the Charles Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History at the National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC. After his appointment as Lindbergh Chair ended, Davies became a curator in the Aeronautics Division of the Museum. He retired in 2011.

Davies wrote 26 books about airlines, airline personalities and aspects of air transport, including the reference standards: A History of the World Airlines, Airlines of the United States since 1914, Airlines of Latin America since 1919, Airlines of Asia, and Airlines of the Jet Age: A History. He also founded Paladwr Press in 1987, publishing a series of books on various airlines and their aircraft.

Davies was a Fellow of three Royal Societies: Aeronautics, Arts, and Geographical and was an Associate of the Academe National de L'Air et de l'Espace. He was a Fellow National of the Explorers Club and a member of the New York's Wings Club and Washington's Cosmos Club. He received Brazil's Santos Dumont Medal and the Aeronautics Order of Merit.
Provenance:
R. E. G. (Ron) Davies, Gift, 1981, NASM.XXXX.0604.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Airlines  Search this
Air travel  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Timetables
Annual reports
Memorabilia -- 20th century
Notebooks
Citation:
R. E. G. (Ron) Davies Air Transport Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0604, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0604
See more items in:
R. E. G. (Ron) Davies Air Transport Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg29424ca5a-d1c8-4305-a392-1808a01b1255
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0604
Online Media:

Aaron Goodelman papers

Creator:
Goodelman, Aaron J., 1890-1978  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Union of American Hebrew Congregations  Search this
Goodelman, Sarah  Search this
Extent:
7.1 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 7 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1909-1980
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material, correspondence, writings, project files, works of art, photographs, and printed material documenting Goodelman's work as a sculptor, his participation in the Jewish community, and his interest in socialism.
Personal and professional correspondence is with artists, art associations, museums, galleries and relief organizations, documenting Goodelman's education in Rome, New York and at L'Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris; his teaching career in New York, particularly with the Jefferson School of Social Sciences; and his participation in art, political and Jewish organizations, such as American Artists' Congress and the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Writings by Goodelman, undated and 1934, include notes, notebooks, and typescripts. There is also a typescript of Elizabeth McCausland's speech "Art and the Atom," 1947. Project files contain information regarding Goodelman's sculpting of memorial gravestones, Passover art, and the Week of Jewish Culture. Works of art by Goodelman, ca. 1920-1930's, include illustrations for the children's journals "Young Israel," "Kinder Journal" and Joseph Gaer's books "the Burning Bush" and "the Unconquered," sketches, portraiture, and figure drawings.
Photographs are of Goodelman, working and teaching sculpture; his childhood in Russia; his family, friends, and students; memorial gravestones, and works of art.
Printed material includes exhibition anouncements and catalogs, entry cards, invitations, clippings, political and art organizations information, adult and art education flyers, clippings and a photocopy of Goodelman's privately microfilmed scrapbook containing letters and printed material.
Also included are files on Goodelman's wife, Sarah, on Jewish children's schools, 1949-1950.
UNMICROFILMED: Two scrapbooks compiled by Sarah Goodelman, containing newspaper clippings, exhibition catalogs and photographs regarding the career of Aaron Goodelman, as well as business cards, addresses, scattered receipts, negatives, and miscellany.
Biographical / Historical:
Sculptor, illustrator, lecturer, teacher; New York, N.Y. Another apparent name spelling is Aharon Gudlman.
Provenance:
Donated 1977 by Goodelman, and in 1984 by his heir, Connie Weinstock and microfilmed in 1994 with funds provided by the Philip Birnbaum Foundation. Additional scrapbooks were donated in 2008 by Weinstock and do not appear on microfilm.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art, Jewish  Search this
Jewish art and symbolism  Search this
Jewish artists  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Italy -- Rome  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.goodaaro
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d4211113-061c-483d-a88f-3452e40dadf2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goodaaro

Esther McCoy papers

Creator:
McCoy, Esther  Search this
Names:
Historic American Buildings Survey  Search this
Society of Architectural Historians  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles. School of Architecture and Urban Planning  Search this
Ain, Gregory, 1908-1988  Search this
Barragán, Luis, 1902-  Search this
Bradbury, Ray, 1920-2012  Search this
Davidson, Julius Ralph, b. 1889  Search this
Dreiser, Theodore, 1871-1945  Search this
Ellwood, Craig  Search this
Gill, Irving, 1870-1936  Search this
Grotz, Dorothy  Search this
Hollein, Hans, 1934-2014  Search this
Jones, A. Quincy (Archie Quincy), 1913-1979  Search this
Maybeck, Bernard R.  Search this
Neutra, Richard Joseph, 1892-1970  Search this
O'Gorman, Juan, 1905-  Search this
Rand, Marvin  Search this
Schindler, R. M. (Rudolph M.), 1887-1953  Search this
Shulman, Julius  Search this
Soriano, Rafael, 1920-  Search this
Watanabe, Makoto  Search this
Worlidge, T. (Thomas), 1700-1766  Search this
Extent:
44 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Etchings
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Drawings
Memoirs
Date:
circa 1876-1990
bulk 1938-1989
Summary:
The papers of Southern California architectural historian, critic, and writer Esther McCoy measure 44.0 linear feet and date from 1876 to 1990 (bulk 1938-1989). McCoy was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. The collection documents McCoy's career, as well as her family and personal life through biographical material, extensive correspondence, personal and professional writings, project files, Southern California architects' files, clippings and other printed material, a large collection of photographs and slides, and taped interviews of Southern California modern architects.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Southern California architectural historian, critic, and writer Esther McCoy measure 44.0 linear feet and date from 1876 to 1990 (bulk 1938-1989). McCoy was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. The collection documents McCoy's career, as well as her family and personal life through biographical material, extensive correspondence, personal and professional writings, project files, Southern California architects' files, clippings and other printed material, a large collection of photographs and slides, and taped interviews of Southern California modern architects.

Biographical and family material consists of awards, resumes, identification documents, and other documentation of McCoy's personal life. Included are a transcript of a 1984 interview of McCoy by Makoto Watanabe and material relating to her friend, Theodore Dreiser.

Correspondence focuses on her personal relationships with family, friends, and lovers, and general correspondence relating primarily to her work as a writer. McCoy's personal correspondence is valuable to researchers who are interested in her personal life, her struggles as a young writer, and the way in which her family, friends, lovers, mentors, and colleagues helped to shape her work and career. As documented in this correspondence, her life offers a glimpse into twentieth-century American social and political history, especially the radical leftist movements of the 1920s and 1930s. Researchers interested in the roots of feminism in the United States should also find these papers useful in documenting the life of a creative and productive woman who was successful in a field then almost entirely dominated by men. Correspondents of note include her husband Berkeley Tobey, lovers Geoffrey Eaton and Albert Robert, writers Ray Bradbury and Theodore Dreiser, and artists and architects, such as Dorothy Grotz, Craig Ellwood, A. Quincy Jones, Hans Hollein, and J. R. Davidson. General correspondence is primarily with researchers, professors, architects, publishers, and professional organizations.

Personal writings include McCoy's diaries, notebooks, and memoirs, and writings by others including friends, lovers, and colleagues. Also included are drafts of McCoy's fictional works, both published and unpublished, including short stories, teleplays, and novels.

The collection contains in-depth documentation of McCoy's pioneering study of the modernist work of twentieth-century architects in Southern California. The bulk of her papers consist of her writing files for books, exhibition catalogs, articles, and lectures on architecture. Because many of the architects about whom McCoy wrote were her contemporaries, she developed personal relationships with several of them through her research and writing. Her writing files include drafts, notes, research material, photographs, and correspondence. McCoy also traveled extensively, particularly in Italy and Mexico, and wrote about architecture, craft, and culture in those countries. Project files document McCoy's other activities related to architectural history, such preservation projects, juries, grants, the Dodge House Preservation Campaign and related film project, her work for the Society of Architectural Historians and the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), and her work at the UCLA School of Architecture and Urban Planning, compiling a slide library and cataloging the Richard Neutra's papers. McCoy also maintained architect files which may contain correspondence, notes, photographs, research material, interview transcripts, about architects and their works. Among these extensive records, the files documenting the careers of R. M. Schindler, Irving Gill, Richard Neutra, and Juan O'Gorman are particularly rich.

Printed material in this collection documents McCoy's career as well as her personal interests. Included are books, clippings, magazines, newsletters, press releases, as well as publications arranged by subject such as architecture, art, Italy, and Mexico. McCoy also collected literary and leftist publications. The small amount of artwork in this collection consists of artwork sent to her by friends, including a drawing of her by Esther Rollo and etchings by various artists including Thomas Worlidge.

There are personal photographs of family and friends and of McCoy at different times in her life, as well as photographs gathered during the course of her research on architecture. Found here are photographs of architects and their works, including a large number depicting the work of Gregory Ain, Luis Barragan, J. R. Davidson, Irving Gill, Bernard Maybeck, Juan O'Gorman, R. M. Schindler, and Raphael Soriano. Many of these photographs were taken by notable architectural photographers Julius Shulman and Marvin Rand. Also found are photographs of architecture designed for the Case Study House program of Arts & Architecture magazine; exhibition photographs, primarily for the exhibition "Ten Italian Architects" in 1967; and other research photographs primarily documenting architecture and craft in other countries and the history of architecture in California. This series also includes approximately 3,600 slides of architecture.

Audio and video recordings include a videocassette of McCoy's 80th birthday party and 55 taped interviews with architects, people associated with architectural projects, and artists.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 10 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical and Family Material, 1881-1989 (boxes 1, 48; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1896-1989 (boxes 1-6, 4.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Writings, 1919-1989 (boxes 6-14; 8.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Architectural Writings, 1908-1990 (boxes 14-24, 42, 49, 50; 10.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Projects, circa 1953-1988 (boxes 24-26, 47, FC 53-56; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Architect Files, 1912-1990 (boxes 26-28, 42; 2.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, circa 1885-1990 (boxes 28-31, 42; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 8: Artwork, 1924-1967, undated (box 31; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs and Slides, circa 1876-1989 (boxes 31-38, 41-46, 51; 8.3 linear feet)

Series 10: Audio and Video Recordings, 1930-1984 (boxes 38-40, 47; 2.5 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Esther McCoy (1904-1989) is remembered best for her pioneering work as an architectural historian, critic, and proponent of Southern California modern architecture of the early to mid-twentieth century. McCoy was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. Although her professional interests ranged from writing fiction to studying the folk architecture and crafts of Mexico, McCoy achieved her most notable success for her numerous articles, books, and exhibitions about Southern California architecture and the architects associated with the modernist movement.

Born in Arkansas in 1904, Esther McCoy grew up in Kansas and attended various schools in the Midwest. In 1926 she left the University of Michigan to launch a writing career in New York, where she moved in avant-garde literary circles and conducted research for Theodore Dreiser. She began writing fiction in New York and continued to write after moving to Los Angeles in 1932, working on short stories, novels, and screenplays. She published numerous short stories between 1929 and 1962, with works appearing in the New Yorker, Harper's Bazaar, and university quarterlies. Her short story, "The Cape," was reprinted in Best Short Stories of 1950. Many of the novels that she wrote from the mid-1960s through the 1980s were related thematically to architects and architecture.

During the late 1920s and throughout the 1930s, McCoy participated in the politically radical movements of the period and wrote for leftist publications. Her interest in the lowcost housing projects of modern architects was prompted by one of her articles about slums for Epic News. During World War II she entered a training program for engineering draftsmen at Douglas Aircraft and in 1944 was hired as an architectural draftsman for the architect R.M. Schindler. As she became increasingly interested in modern architecture and design, she combined her two major career interests and began to focus her energies on architectural research, writing, and criticism. Her first article on architecture, "Schindler: Space Architect," was published in 1945 in the journal Direction.

McCoy began writing about architecture in earnest in 1950 as a free-lance contributor to the Los Angeles Times. From then until her death in 1989, she wrote prolifically for Arts & Architecture magazine, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Herald Examiner, Architectural Record, L'Architectura, Zodiac (Italy), Progressive Architecture, Lotus (Italy), and Architectural Forum. In addition to her numerous articles, McCoy wrote several books on Southern California modern architecture and architects. Her first major work, Five California Architects, published in 1960, is now recognized as a classic work in modern architectural history. It promoted a serious study of modern architecture in Southern California and introduced to the world several leading California architects and their work: Bernard Maybeck, Irving Gill, Charles and Henry Greene, and R.M. Schindler. That same year, she published another important book focusing on the work of the California architect Richard Neutra. Other books by McCoy include Modern California Houses: Case Study Houses (1962), Craig Ellwood (1968), Vienna to Los Angeles: Two Journeys (1979), and The Second Generation (1984).

In addition to these books, McCoy organized and wrote catalogs for several significant exhibitions focusing on contemporary architects. Her first was the R.M. Schindler Retrospective, a 1954 exhibition at the Landau Art Gallery in Los Angeles. Her other exhibitions and accompanying catalogs include Roots of California Contemporary Architecture, 1956, Los Angeles Municipal Art Department; Felix Candela, 1957, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Irving Gill, 1958, Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Juan O'Gorman, 1964, San Fernando Valley State College; and Ten Italian Architects, 1967, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Moreover, McCoy contributed numerous essays to other exhibition catalogs and publications, lectured at the University of Southern California, participated in preservation projects, organized tours for the Society of Architectural Historians, and contributed to a number of documentary films. Her energy and interests also led her to catalog and transcribe Richard Neutra's papers at the University of California Los Angeles Archives.

McCoy received national recognition from the American Institute of Architects for her seminal and prolific work in the field of Southern California modern architectural history and criticism. Her interests, however, were not exclusively bound to California. She traveled the world and was interested in both Italian and Mexican architecture as well as the folk art and crafts of Mexico and South America. She made five extended trips to Italy during the 1950s and 1960s, publishing regularly about the architecture there and curating the exhibition Ten Italian Architects. She was a contributing editor to two Italian journals, Zodiac and Lotus, and was awarded the Star of Order of Solidarity in 1960 by the Republic of Italy for her research and writing.

Esther McCoy died of emphysema on December 30, 1989, at the age of eighty-five. Her last contribution was an essay for the exhibition catalog Blueprints for Modern Living: History and Legacy of the Case Study House. The show opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles one month before her death.

Missing Title

1904 -- Born November 18 in Horatio, Arkansas. Raised in Kansas.

1920 -- Attended preparatory school at Central College for Women, Lexington, Missouri.

1922-1925 -- College education: Baker University, Baldwin City, Kansas; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri; University of Michigan.

1924 -- Visited Theodore Dreiser in Michigan.

1926-1938 -- Began writing in New York City.

1926-1938 -- Researched and read for Theodore Dreiser.

1926-1938 -- Worked for editorial offices and publishers.

1926-1938 -- Traveled to write in Paris (1928), Key West, Florida (1930), and Los Angeles, California (1932-1935).

1938 -- Moved to Santa Monica, California.

1941 -- Married Berkeley Greene Tobey.

1942-1944 -- Employed as engineering draftsman at Douglas Aircraft.

1944-1947 -- Worked as architectural draftsman for R.M. Schindler.

1945 -- Began architectural writing career.

1950 -- Wrote script for film Architecture West.

1950 -- Joined editorial board of Arts & Architecture.

1950-1968 -- Worked as free-lance writer for the Los Angeles Times.

1951-1955 -- Traveled to, researched, and wrote about Mexico and Mexican art and architecture.

1954 -- R.M. Schindler Retrospective exhibition at the Landau Art Gallery, Los Angeles.

1956 -- Roots of California Contemporary Architecture exhibition, Los Angeles Municipal Art Department.

1957 -- Felix Candela exhibition, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

1958 -- Irving Gill exhibition, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Traveled to Italy.

1959-1968 -- Contributing editor to Italian periodicals Zodiac and Lotus.

1960 -- Five California Architects (New York: Reinhold).

1960 -- Richard Neutra (New York: G. Braziller).

1960 -- Awarded Star of Order of Solidarity by the Republic of Italy for reporting on arts and crafts in Italy.

1962 -- Death of Berkeley Greene Tobey.

1962 -- Modern California Houses: Case Study Houses (New York: Reinhold) (reprinted as Case Study Houses, Los Angeles: Hennessey and Ingalls, 1978).

1963 -- Resident Fellow at Huntington Hartford Foundation.

1964 -- Juan O'Gorman exhibition, San Fernando Valley State College, Northridge, Calif.

1965 -- Consultant for the California Arts Commission.

1965-1966 -- Wrote and produced the film Dodge House.

1965-1968 -- Lecturer at University of California at Los Angeles, School of Architecture and Urban Planning.

1966 -- Resident Fellow at MacDowell Colony, New Hampshire.

1967 -- Ten Italian Architects exhibition, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

1967 -- Honorary Associate of the Southern California Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

1967 -- Regents' Lecturer at University of California, Santa Barbara.

1968 -- Craig Ellwood (New York: Walker).

1968 -- Distinguished Service Citation from the California Council of AIA.

1969-1970 -- Lecturer at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

1969-1989 -- Contributing editor of Progressive Architecture.

1971-1978 -- Graham Foundation Grants.

1974 -- Regents' Lecturer at the University of California,Santa Cruz.

1979 -- Vienna to Los Angeles: Two Journeys (Santa Monica, Calif.: Arts & Architecture Press).

1979 -- Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.

1981 -- Los Angeles Chapter Women's Architectural League Honorary Member.

1982 -- Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Modern and Contemporary Art Council Award for Distinguished Achievement.

1983 -- Home Sweet Home: The California Ranch House exhibition at California State University.

1984 -- The Second Generation (Salt Lake City: Peregrine Smith Books).

1985 -- American Institute of Architects, Institute Honor.

1986 -- High Styles exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

1987 -- Vesta Award for outstanding scholarship.

1989 -- Award from the Historical Society of Southern California.

1989 -- Award from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs.

1989 -- Blueprints for Modern Living: History and Legacy of the Case Study House exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Died in Santa Monica, California, December 30.
Related Material:
Also in the Archives of American Art are eight sound cassettes of a transcribed interview with Esther McCoy conducted by Joseph Giovannini, June 8-November 14, 1987.
Provenance:
The collection was given to the Archives of American Art by Esther McCoy in 1986. Before her death in 1989, McCoy assisted in the organization and identification of the papers. Original pre-print film elements for Dodge House 1916 were donated to the Archives of American Art by the Academy Film Archive in 2018.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of audiovisual recordings without access copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Architectural historians -- California  Search this
Art critics -- California  Search this
Topic:
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- Mexico  Search this
Architects -- Italy  Search this
Architecture, Domestic -- California  Search this
Authors -- California  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- California  Search this
Architecture, Modern -- 20th century -- Europe  Search this
Architects -- California  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Etchings
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Drawings
Memoirs
Citation:
Esther McCoy papers, circa 1876-1990, bulk 1938-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccoesth
See more items in:
Esther McCoy papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93ee58e3b-f2fc-4d98-acf9-de6f76bfed63
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccoesth
Online Media:

Heinz Warneke papers

Creator:
Warneke, Heinz (Heinrich), 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Corcoran School of Art (Washington, D.C.) -- Faculty  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
Archer, Edmund, 1904-  Search this
Diederich, William Hunt, 1884-1953  Search this
Hancock, Walker Kirtland, 1901-1998  Search this
Hopper, Inslee  Search this
Zigrosser, Carl, 1891-  Search this
Extent:
6.25 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Date:
1928-1987
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material, financial material, correspondence, notes, writings, art work, photographs, printed material, and project files document the career of sculptor and educator, Heinz Warneke. Also included are some writings, art work, photographs, and printed material related to his wife, Jessie Warneke.
Biographical materials include autobiographical and biographical sketches about Warneke, and certificates, including his membership card to the Kunstler-Bund-Bremen, 1922-1923; personal financial materials, ca. 1931-1937, include household records for his East Haddam, Connecticut home, "The Mowings."
Correspondence, 1930-1987, with his wife, Jessie, friends, colleagues, clients, gallery owners, museum and art school administrators, various art guilds and societies, and foundries. Among the correspondents are Edmund (Ned) Archer, William Hunt Diederich, Walker Hancock, Dick and Julia Helms, Inslee A. Hopper, Rena T. Magee, Jessalee Sickman, Henry Vam Wolf, and Carl Zigrosser. The correspondence discusses exhibitions and sales of Warneke's sculptures, the Corcoran School of Art, and invitations to various White House and Embassy functions in Washington, D.C. Also included are illustrated letters from Henry Kriess and Jessie Warneke.
Notes are by Heinz Warneke, ca. 1928-1979, and others and include 5 address books, 2 notebooks, one regarding the Warneke School of Sculpture, ca. 1935-1937, scattered notes regarding Warneke's sculpture classes at the Corcoran School of Art, ca. 1950-1963, his formulas and processes for sculpting, and price lists for his art works. Notes by ohters include a guest book from the exhibition, "Heinz Warneke Looks Back," 1967 and research notes by Mary Mullen Cunningham, undated. Writings, ca. 1923-1977, by Heinz Warneke and others, include lectures, forewords to exhibition catalogs, and a statement of "Opinion regarding the Philosophy of the Corcoran School of Art and the Direction it should take."
Art works, ca. 1929-1932, include 2 sketchbooks, studies of figures, animals, and plant life, watercolors, several chalk sketches for a work possibly depiction life at "The Mowings," by Warneke, several sketches by Jessie Warneke, an etching, and three engravings by others. Photographs, ca. 1918-1983, are of Heinz, family and friends including Edmund Archer, Inslee Hopper, Roderick Seidenberg, Carl Zigrosser, his pet dogs, his homes and studios in Connecticut, New York, and Washington, D.C., students, travels, art works by Heinz and Jessie, exhibition installations, and source material.
Printed material include exhibition announcements and catalogs and clippings, and other materials for Heinz, Jessie, and others, ca. 1923-1981. There is a file regarding Warneke's participation on the jury for the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Committee, 1939-1940, and circa 136 project files for completed and proposed sculpture works for public and private commissions which include various works for the National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., an African cow elephant and calf for the Philadelphia Zoo, the Nittany Lion for Pennsylvania State University, and several Works Project Authority (WPA), and other federal projects, ca., 1911-1971.
Biographical / Historical:
Heinz Warneke (1895-1983) was a sculptor, animal sculptor and educator in East Haddam, Connecticut. Born and trained in Germany, Warneke worked on sculpture projects for WPA and was the head of the sculpture department at the Corcoran School of Art from the early 1940's to 1970.
Related Materials:
Heinz Warneke papers also at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
Donated 1977 by Warneke, and in 1983-1984, and 1994 by his stepdaughter and executrix of his estate, Priscilla Norton. The 1994 installment had been used by Micky Cunningham in her book, "Heinz Warneke, 1895-1983: A Sculptor First and Last" (University of Delaware Press, 1994). Additional photograph of Warneke by his stepson Edward Hall transferred 2013 from SAAM via George Gurney, Curator. Gurney received the photograph from Priscilla Norton.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Animal sculptors -- Connecticut -- East Haddam  Search this
Sculptors -- Connecticut -- East Haddam  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture -- Study and teaching  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.warnhein
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90536c46a-164a-4b1b-9986-1477624f9337
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-warnhein

Western Union Telegraph Company Records

Creator:
United Telegraph Workers.  Search this
Western Union Telegraph Company  Search this
Extent:
452 Cubic feet (871 boxes and 23 map folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs
Patents
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks
Specifications
Technical documents
Date:
circa 1820-1995
Summary:
The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Scope and Contents:
The collection is divided into twenty-six (26) series and consists of approximately 400 cubic feet. The collection documents in photographs, scrapbooks, notebooks, correspondence, stock ledgers, annual reports, and financial records, the evolution of the telegraph, the development of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the beginning of the communications revolution. The collection materials describe both the history of the company and of the telegraph industry in general, particularly its importance to the development of the technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The collection is useful for researchers interested in the development of technology, economic history, and the impact of technology on American social and cultural life.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into twenty-seven series.

Series 1: Historical and Background Information, 1851-1994

Series 2: Subsidiaries of Western Union, 1844-1986

Series 3: Executive Records, 1848-1987

Series 4: Presidential Letterbooks and Writings, 1865-1911

Series 5: Correspondence, 1837-1985

Series 6: Cyrus W. Field Papers, 1840-1892

Series 7: Secretary's Files, 1844-1987

Series 8: Financial Records, 1859-1995

Series 9: Legal Records, 1867-1968

Series 10: Railroad Records, 1854-1945

Series 11: Law Department Records, 1868-1979

Series 12: Patent Materials, 1840-1970

Series 13: Operating Records, 1868-1970s

Series 14: Westar VI-S, 1974, 1983-1986

Series 15: Engineering Department Records, 1874-1970

Series 16: Plant Department Records, 1867-1937, 1963

Series 17: Superintendent of Supplies Records, 1888-1948

Series 18: Employee/Personnel Records 1852-1985

Series 19: Public Relations Department Records, 1858-1980

Series 20: Western Union Museum, 1913-1971

Series 21: Maps, 1820-1964

Series 22: Telegrams, 1852-1960s

Series 23: Photographs, circa 1870-1980

Series 24: Scrapbooks, 1835-1956

Series 25: Notebooks, 1880-1942

Series 26: Audio Visual Materials, 1925-1994

Series 27: Addenda
Biographical / Historical:
In 1832 Samuel F. B. Morse, assisted by Alfred Vail, conceived of the idea for an electromechanical telegraph, which he called the "Recording Telegraph." This commercial application of electricity was made tangible by their construction of a crude working model in 1835-36. This instrument probably was never used outside of Professor Morse's rooms where it was, however, operated in a number of demonstrations. This original telegraph instrument was in the hands of the Western Union Telegraph Company and had been kept carefully over the years in a glass case. It was moved several times in New York as the Western Union headquarters building changed location over the years. The company presented it to the Smithsonian Institution in 1950.

The telegraph was further refined by Morse, Vail, and a colleague, Leonard Gale, into working mechanical form in 1837. In this year Morse filed a caveat for it at the U.S. Patent Office. Electricity, provided by Joseph Henry's 1836 "intensity batteries", was sent over a wire. The flow of electricity through the wire was interrupted for shorter or longer periods by holding down the key of the device. The resulting dots or dashes were recorded on a printer or could be interpreted orally. In 1838 Morse perfected his sending and receiving code and organized a corporation, making Vail and Gale his partners.

In 1843 Morse received funds from Congress to set-up a demonstration line between Washington and Baltimore. Unfortunately, Morse was not an astute businessman and had no practical plan for constructing a line. After an unsuccessful attempt at laying underground cables with Ezra Cornell, the inventor of a trench digger, Morse switched to the erection of telegraph poles and was more successful. On May 24, 1844, Morse, in the U.S. Supreme Court Chambers in Washington, sent by telegraph the oft-quoted message to his colleague Vail in Baltimore, "What hath God wrought!"

In 1845 Morse hired Andrew Jackson's former postmaster general, Amos Kendall, as his agent in locating potential buyers of the telegraph. Kendall realized the value of the device, and had little trouble convincing others of its potential for profit. By the spring he had attracted a small group of investors. They subscribed $15,000 and formed the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Many new telegraph companies were formed as Morse sold licenses wherever he could.

The first commercial telegraph line was completed between Washington, D.C., and New York City in the spring of 1846 by the Magnetic Telegraph Company. Shortly thereafter, F. O. J. Smith, one of the patent owners, built a line between New York City and Boston. Most of these early companies were licensed by owners of Samuel Morse patents. The Morse messages were sent and received in a code of dots and dashes.

At this time other telegraph systems based on rival technologies were being built. Some companies used the printing telegraph, a device invented by a Vermonter, Royal E. House, whose messages were printed on paper or tape in Roman letters. In 1848 a Scotch scientist, Alexander Bain, received his patents on a telegraph. These were but two of many competing and incompatible technologies that had developed. The result was confusion, inefficiency, and a rash of suits and counter suits.

By 1851 there were over fifty separate telegraph companies operating in the United States. This corporate cornucopia developed because the owners of the telegraph patents had been unsuccessful in convincing the United States and other governments of the invention's potential usefulness. In the private sector, the owners had difficulty convincing capitalists of the commercial value of the invention. This led to the owners' willingness to sell licenses to many purchasers who organized separate companies and then built independent telegraph lines in various sections of the country.

Hiram Sibley moved to Rochester, New York, in 1838 to pursue banking and real estate. Later he was elected sheriff of Monroe County. In Rochester he was introduced to Judge Samuel L. Selden who held the House Telegraph patent rights. In 1849 Selden and Sibley organized the New York State Printing Telegraph Company, but they found it hard to compete with the existing New York, Albany, and Buffalo Telegraph Company.

After this experience Selden suggested that instead of creating a new line, the two should try to acquire all the companies west of Buffalo and unite them into a single unified system. Selden secured an agency for the extension throughout the United States of the House system. In an effort to expand this line west, Judge Selden called on friends and the people in Rochester. This led, in April 1851, to the organization of a company and the filing in Albany of the Articles of Association for the "New York and Mississippi Valley Printing Telegraph Company" (NYMVPTC), a company which later evolved into the Western Union Telegraph Company.

In 1854 there were two rival systems of the NYMVPTC in the West. These two systems consisted of thirteen separate companies. All the companies were using Morse patents in the five states north of the Ohio River. This created a struggle between three separate entities, leading to an unreliable and inefficient telegraph service. The owners of these rival companies eventually decided to invest their money elsewhere and arrangements were made for the NYMVPTC to purchase their interests.

Hiram Sibley recapitalized the company in 1854 under the same name and began a program of construction and acquisition. The most important takeover was carried out by Sibley when he negotiated the purchase of the Morse patent rights for the Midwest for $50,000 from Jeptha H. Wade and John J. Speed, without the knowledge of Ezra Cornell, their partner in the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company (EMTC). With this acquisition Sibley proceeded to switch to the superior Morse system. He also hired Wade, a very capable manager, who became his protege and later his successor. After a bitter struggle Morse and Wade obtained the EMTC from Cornell in 1855, thus assuring dominance by the NYMVPTC in the Midwest. In 1856 the company name was changed to the "Western Union Telegraph Company," indicating the union of the Western lines into one compact system. In December, 1857, the Company paid stockholders their first dividend.

Between 1857 and 1861 similar consolidations of telegraph companies took place in other areas of the country so that most of the telegraph interests of the United States had merged into six systems. These were the American Telegraph Company (covering the Atlantic and some Gulf states), The Western Union Telegraph Company (covering states North of the Ohio River and parts of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Minnesota), the New York Albany and Buffalo Electro-Magnetic Telegraph Company (covering New York State), the Atlantic and Ohio Telegraph Company (covering Pennsylvania), the Illinois & Mississippi Telegraph Company (covering sections of Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois), and the New Orleans & Ohio Telegraph Company (covering the southern Mississippi Valley and the Southwest). All these companies worked together in a mutually friendly alliance, and other small companies cooperated with the six systems, particularly some on the West Coast.

By the time of the Civil War, there was a strong commercial incentive to construct a telegraph line across the western plains to link the two coasts of America. Many companies, however, believed the line would be impossible to build and maintain.

In 1860 Congress passed, and President James Buchanan signed, the Pacific Telegraph Act, which authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to seek bids for a project to construct a transcontinental line. When two bidders dropped out, Hiram Sibley, representing Western Union, was the only bidder left. By default Sibley won the contract. The Pacific Telegraph Company was organized for the purpose of building the eastern section of the line. Sibley sent Wade to California, where he consolidated the small local companies into the California State Telegraph Company. This entity then organized the Overland Telegraph Company, which handled construction eastward from Carson City, Nevada, joining the existing California lines, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Sibley's Pacific Telegraph Company built westward from Omaha, Nebraska. Sibley put most of his resources into the venture. The line was completed in October, 1861. Both companies were soon merged into Western Union. This accomplishment made Hiram Sibley leader of the telegraph industry.

Further consolidations took place over the next several years. Many companies merged into the American Telegraph Company. With the expiration of the Morse patents, several organizations were combined in 1864 under the name of "The U.S. Telegraph Company." In 1866 the final consolidation took place, with Western Union exchanging stock for the stock of the other two organizations. The general office of Western Union moved at this time from Rochester to 145 Broadway, New York City. In 1875 the main office moved to 195 Broadway, where it remained until 1930 when it relocated to 60 Hudson Street.

In 1873 Western Union purchased a majority of shares in the International Ocean Telegraph Company. This was an important move because it marked Western Union's entry into the foreign telegraph market. Having previously worked with foreign companies, Western Union now began competing for overseas business.

In the late 1870s Western Union, led by William H. Vanderbilt, attempted to wrest control of the major telephone patents, and the new telephone industry, away from the Bell Telephone Company. But due to new Bell leadership and a subsequent hostile takeover attempt of Western Union by Jay Gould, Western Union discontinued its fight and Bell Telephone prevailed.

Despite these corporate calisthenics, Western Union remained in the public eye. The sight of a uniformed Western Union messenger boy was familiar in small towns and big cities all over the country for many years. Some of Western Union's top officials in fact began their careers as messenger boys.

Throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century the telegraph became one of the most important factors in the development of social and commercial life of America. In spite of improvements to the telegraph, however, two new inventions--the telephone (nineteenth century) and the radio (twentieth century)--eventually replaced the telegraph as the leaders of the communication revolution for most Americans.

At the turn of the century, Bell abandoned its struggles to maintain a monopoly through patent suits, and entered into direct competition with the many independent telephone companies. Around this time, the company adopted its new name, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T).

In 1908 AT&T gained control of Western Union. This proved beneficial to Western Union, because the companies were able to share lines when needed, and it became possible to order telegrams by telephone. However, it was only possible to order Western Union telegrams, and this hurt the business of Western Union's main competitor, the Postal Telegraph Company. In 1913, however, as part of a move to prevent the government from invoking antitrust laws, AT&T completely separated itself from Western Union.

Western Union continued to prosper and it received commendations from the U.S. armed forces for service during both world wars. In 1945 Western Union finally merged with its longtime rival, the Postal Telegraph Company. As part of that merger, Western Union agreed to separate domestic and foreign business. In 1963 Western Union International Incorporated, a private company completely separate from the Western Union Telegraph Company, was formed and an agreement with the Postal Telegraph Company was completed. In 1994, Western Union Financial Services, Inc. was acquired by First Financial Management Corporation. In 1995, First Financial Management Corporation merged with First Data Corporation making Western Union a First Data subsidiary.

Many technological advancements followed the telegraph's development. The following are among the more important:

The first advancement of the telegraph occurred around 1850 when operators realized that the clicks of the recording instrument portrayed a sound pattern, understandable by the operators as dots and dashes. This allowed the operator to hear the message by ear and simultaneously write it down. This ability transformed the telegraph into a versatile and speedy system.

Duplex Telegraphy, 1871-72, was invented by the president of the Franklin Telegraph Company. Unable to sell his invention to his own company, he found a willing buyer in Western Union. Utilizing this invention, two messages were sent over the wire simultaneously, one in each direction.

As business blossomed and demand surged, new devices appeared. Thomas Edison's Quadruplex allowed four messages to be sent over the same wire simultaneously, two in one direction and two in the other.

An English automatic signaling arrangement, Wheatstone's Automatic Telegraph, 1883, allowed larger numbers of words to be transmitted over a wire at once. It could only be used advantageously, however, on circuits where there was a heavy volume of business.

Buckingham's Machine Telegraph was an improvement on the House system. It printed received messages in plain Roman letters quickly and legibly on a message blank, ready for delivery.

Vibroplex, c. 1890, a semi-automatic key sometimes called a "bug key," made the dots automatically. This relieved the operator of much physical strain.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Additional moving image about Western Union Telegraph Company can be found in the Industry on Parade Collection (AC0507). This includes Cable to Cuba! by Bell Laboratory, AT & T, featuring the cable ship, the C.S. Lord Kelvin, and Communications Centennial! by the Western Union Company.

Materials at Other Organizations

Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Delaware.

Western Union International Records form part of the MCI International, Inc. Records at the First Data Corporation, Greenwood Village, Colorado.

Records of First Data Corporation and its predecessors, including Western Union, First Financial Management Corporation (Atlanta) and First Data Resources (Omaha). Western Union collection supports research of telegraphy and related technologies, and includes company records, annual reports, photographs, print and broadcast advertising, telegraph equipment, and messenger uniforms.

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1865-1867

This collection includes correspondence, mostly to Spencer F. Baird, from members of the Scientific Corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, including Kennicott, Dall, Bannister, and Elliott; copies of reports submitted to divisional chiefs from expedition staff members; newspaper clippings concerning the expedition; copies of notes on natural history taken by Robert Kennicott; and a journal containing meteorological data recorded by Henry M. Bannister from March to August, 1866.
Separated Materials:
Artifacts (apparatus and equipment) were donated to the Division of Information Technology and Society, now known as the Division of Work & Industry, National Museum of American History.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Western Union in September of 1971.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but Series 11 and films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made to view some of the audiovisual materials. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Communications equipment  Search this
Communication -- International cooperation  Search this
Electric engineering  Search this
Electric engineers  Search this
Electrical equipment  Search this
Electrical science and technology  Search this
Telegraphers  Search this
Telegraph  Search this
Genre/Form:
Administrative records
Articles
Books
Clippings
Contracts
Drawings
Photographs -- 19th century
Patents
Photographs -- 20th century
Newsletters
Photograph albums
Scrapbooks -- 19th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Specifications
Technical documents
Citation:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0205
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8b72e8493-288c-4bd0-84d5-011155da30a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0205
Online Media:

Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State of Maryland Collection

Author:
Maryland. Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State  Search this
Collector:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Medical Sciences  Search this
Extent:
0.33 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Maps
Clippings
Patents
Pamphlets
Prescriptions
Paintings
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Notebooks
Correspondence
Certificates
Papers
Diplomas
Place:
Maryland
Date:
1740-1965
Scope and Contents:
18th, 19th, and 20th century material deposited with the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State of Maryland, chiefly relating to the practice of medicine in the state. Includes correspondence, papers, certificates, diplomas, patents, maps, notebooks, clippings, prescriptions, pamphlets, photocopies of documents, scrapbooks, photographs, and paintings.
Arrangement:
Divided into four series: (1) Correspondence, (2) Biographical, (3) Photographs, (4) Certificates.
Provenance:
Immediate source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Surgeons  Search this
Topic:
Physicians  Search this
Medicine -- Societies, etc.  Search this
Medical sciences  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Clippings
Patents
Pamphlets
Prescriptions
Paintings
Photographs -- 20th century
Scrapbooks -- 19th century
Notebooks
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Certificates
Papers
Diplomas
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Citation:
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State of Maryland Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0114
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8680edc35-f7df-44c8-a0f8-2576164c246c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0114

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Music

Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Extent:
8.45 Cubic feet (consisting of 18 boxes, 5 folders, 8 oversize folders, 1 map case folder, 1 flat box (partial).)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ephemera
Business ephemera
Date:
circa 1778-1968
Summary:
A New York bookseller, Warshaw assembled this collection over nearly fifty years. The Warshaw Collection of Business Americana: Music forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Subseries 1.1: Subject Categories. The Subject Categories subseries is divided into 470 subject categories based on those created by Mr. Warshaw. These subject categories include topical subjects, types or forms of material, people, organizations, historical events, and other categories. An overview to the entire Warshaw collection is available here: Warshaw Collection of Business Americana
Scope and Contents:
This material consists of sheet music covers, concert programs, bills, receipts, printed advertisements, import/export documents, business cards, catalogues, songbooks, journals, newsletters, information on music schools and instructors, scattered correspondence on letterhead stationary, photographs, caricatures and lithographs of individual musicians, composers and lyricists of the late 19th and early 20th century. There is material pertaining to Gilbert & Sullivan; images, concert programs, and advertisements for their operettas, including Japanese images from the Mikado. There is biographical information on the Arthur Tams Music Library with catalogues from his collection, business correspondence with G. Schirmer and others and the James Madison Americana Collection. There are unique images of musical instruments, catalogues and advertisements for their manufacturers; mechanical musical instruments, music boxes, phonographs and even a few radio and Muzak programs. This material spans a century, beginning in the 1840's. Its images chronicle the inventions of the automobile and the airplane, and the rapid industrial and life-style changes of that time period.
Arrangement:
The bulk of the material is arranged topically, the rest is organized by company name. Sheet music publishers and musical and mechanical music instrument manufacturers, dealers and importers are in Boxes 1- 7. Boxes 6-7 contain a large amount of information from one particular dealer, the Arthur W. Tams Music Library. Box 8 contains information on manufacturers and dealers of Phonographs and records. Boxes 1-8 are arranged by company name. In the remainder of Box 8 and in Boxes 9- 10, there are programs, concerts tickets and curriculum pertaining to music schools, private instructors of music and voice, music clubs, societies and unions. Boxes 10-13 contain concert programs of musical performances that are organized by their geographic location or type of performance. Under the topic heading solo performances in Boxes 12-13 are handbills , programs and ads for individual performances and music luminaries including Gilbert & Sullivan and Stephen Foster. Box 14 holds general works which consists of images of musical instruments and musicians, correspondence trade cards, patents, import/export documents and hand-written music notation. Related publications are in Boxes 15-17 and are organized by type of material. Songbooks and lyric sheets are in Box 15. Periodical publications including journals and catalogues are in Box 16. The remainder of the related publications are divided by size and grouped into books, notebooks, essays and pamphlets in Box 17.
Materials in the Archives Center:
Archives Center Collection of Business Americana (AC0404)
Forms Part Of:
Forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana.

Series 1: Business Ephemera

Series 2: Other Collection Divisions

Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers

Series 4: Photographic Reference Material
Provenance:
Music is a portion of the Business Ephemera Series of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Accession AC0060 purchased from Isadore Warshaw in 1967. Warshaw continued to accumulate similar material until his death, which was donated in 1971 by his widow, Augusta. For a period after acquisition, related materials from other sources (of mixed provenance) were added to the collection so there may be content produced or published after Warshaw's death in 1969. This practice has since ceased.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Genre/Form:
Ephemera
Business ephemera
Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Music, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0060.S01.01.Music
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Music
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8682a819c-3ef7-4d6b-b297-8aa326d574eb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-music
Online Media:

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