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Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Temperance

Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Names:
Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924  Search this
Extent:
3.66 Cubic feet (consisting of 5.5 boxes, 1 folder, 9 oversize folders.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lectures
Fliers (printed matter)
Booklets
Advertisements
Broadsides
Fans
Realia
Poems
Clippings
Printed ephemera
Songs
Pamphlets
Correspondence
Ephemera
Newsclippings
Poetry
Programs
Posters
Newspaper clippings
Date:
1811-1937
Summary:
A New York bookseller, Warshaw assembled this collection over nearly fifty years. The Warshaw Collection of Business Americana: Accounting and Bookkeeping forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Subseries 1.1: Subject Categories. The Subject Categories subseries is divided into 470 subject categories based on those created by Mr. Warshaw. These subject categories include topical subjects, types or forms of material, people, organizations, historical events, and other categories. An overview to the entire Warshaw collection is available here: Warshaw Collection of Business Americana
Scope and Contents:
Temperance contains material documenting perspectives on alcohol use and regulation as well as the impact of various temperance movements on society and the government. The collection covers the issues related to these movements through multiple eras and social lenses, and addresses both pro and anti-temperance perspectives though there is significantly more material that supports the temperance and prohibition movements.

Materials represent a sampling of newsclippings, realia (ribbons, fans, and pendants), artwork in various mediums, and educational resources. No extensive records of any particular group or region exist, and no particular depth is present for any singular subtopic. The subject of temperance often overlaps with news and developments about the women's suffrage movement, elections, and wars.

While newsclippings are divided into specific subject categories, there may be significant overlap between regional issues and files pertaining to legislation and elections due to newsclippings frequently addressing multiple issues.
Arrangement:
Temperance is arranged in four subseries.

Perspectives

Organizations

Regional Issues

Political Parties

Individuals

Genre

Cigarette and Tobacco Documentation

Event Documentation

Images, Writings, and Music

Realia

Serial Publications

Subject

Medicinal Uses

Temperance and Government

Temperance and Religion

Temperance and Society

Temperance and War

Oversize

Miscellaneous
Related Materials:
Forms part of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana.

Series 1: Business Ephemera

Series 2: Other Collection Divisions

Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers

Series 4: Photographic Reference Material
Provenance:
Temperance is a portion of the Business Ephemera Series of the Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Accession AC0060 purchased from Isadore Warshaw in 1967. Warshaw continued to accumulate similar material until his death, which was donated in 1971 by his widow, Augusta. For a period after acquisition, related materials from other sources (of mixed provenance) were added to the collection so there may be content produced or published after Warshaw's death in 1969. This practice has since ceased.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
War  Search this
Women's suffrage -- United States  Search this
Clergy  Search this
Suffragists  Search this
Women -- Suffrage  Search this
Government and politics  Search this
Presidential campaigns  Search this
Presidents -- United States  Search this
Elections  Search this
Political literature  Search this
Political cartoons  Search this
Political activists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Political activists  Search this
Cigarette industry -- 20th century  Search this
Temperance  Search this
Political clubs  Search this
Tobacco  Search this
Alcohol  Search this
Alcoholism  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Drinking of alcoholic beverages -- Law and legislation  Search this
Politics -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Legal History, U.S.  Search this
Tobacco -- 20th century  Search this
Cigarettes -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lectures
Fliers (printed matter)
Booklets
Advertisements
Broadsides
Fans
Realia
Poems
Clippings
Printed ephemera
Songs
Pamphlets
Correspondence
Ephemera
Newsclippings
Poetry
Programs
Posters
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Temperance, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0060.S01.01.Temperance
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Temperance
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-temperance
Online Media:

Rex Stewart Papers

Author:
Stewart, Rex (William), Jr., 1907-1967 (cornetist)  Search this
Names:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Henderson, Fletcher, 1897-1952  Search this
Extent:
2.4 Cubic feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Manuscripts
Photograph albums
Photographs
Date:
circa 1875-1890s, 1924-1988
Scope and Contents:
The Rex Stewart Papers consist of book manuscripts, scrapbooks, photographs, correspondence, genealogical records, newsclippings, periodicals, and ephemera materials that document the life and career of Rex Stewart, as well as the history of jazz from the perspective of one who witnessed first-hand the genre's "golden era". The collection is organized into four series: Series 1: Book Manuscripts, circa 1950-1972; Series 2: Scrapbooks and Photo Albums, c.1930-1959; Series 3: Photographs, c.1875 and circa 1920-1967; and Series 4: Memorabilia, 1880-1905 and 1924-1988.

Of particular interest are the book manuscripts that were produced from the 1950's until Stewart's death in 1967. These document Stewart's impressions of and interactions with such jazz legends as Fletcher Henderson, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington. Interesting photographic images include "A Great Day in Harlem", taken in 1958, portraits and candid shots of Rex Stewart, Duke Ellington, Benny Carter and others jazz greats, photographs autographed by Rex Stewart, a portrait of the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra at Danceland, tintypes of Stewart's family, a photo album and scrapbook documenting Stewart's 1948 tour in Berlin, Germany, and a photo album containing candid photographs of Ellington and Stewart's family. Other materials of interest include Stewart's cabaret card from 1959-1962 and some Stewart family genealogy records from 1880 to 1905.

Overall, the Rex Stewart Papers exist as a unique look into the creative process and life of a leading jazz figure of the 1930's through the 1960's. Stewart's colorful and poetic writing allows the reader to experience first-hand the excitement and honesty of jazz.
Arrangement:
the collection is arranged into four series.

Series 1:

Series 2:

Series 3:

Series 4:
Biographical / Historical:
Rex William Stewart Jr.(1907-1967) was born in Philadelphia on February 22, 1907. He received musical inspiration from his parents, who played piano and sang in both religious and social settings, and from his maternal grandmother, Angelina Denby Johnson, who wrote poetry and hymns. Stewart took up the cornet as a teenager, playing in several small time bands in Washington D.C. and New York. His first big break came in 1926 when he was invited to join the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra as a replacement for Louis Armstrong. However, he did not become a regular member of the orchestra until 1928. Stewart remained with Fletcher Henderson until 1933 when he unsuccessfully tried to form his own band. In 1934, he worked briefly for Louis Russell before being invited to join the Duke Ellington Orchestra. As Ellington's lead cornetist, Stewart became widely known for his Aunique conversational style of playing and experimentation with half-valve effects. He also co-composed several numbers with Ellington including "Boy Meets Horn" and "Morning Glory". In addition, Stewart led small-group recording sessions during the late thirties with Ellington and his fellow sidemen, including Johnny Hodges and Harry Carney.

Rex Stewart left Ellington's orchestra in 1945 and briefly played with Jazz at the Philharmonic. He toured Europe as a soloist and leader of several bands between 1947 and 1951. It was also during this period that Stewart began to lecture and write about jazz. In the fifties and sixties, he entered into semi-retirement in order to concentrate on his writing. Stewart continued to perform periodically with numerous small jazz ensembles on the festival circuit. He was instrumental in the organization and recording of the Fletcher Henderson Reunion band in 1958 and 1959. Stewart died on September 7, 1967 in Los Angeles. A collection of his essays, Jazz Masters of the 30's, was published posthumously in 1972 by Macmillan Publishing Company.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Anne Kennedy Collection, 1959-1967 (AC 506)

Duke Ellington Collection, 1927-1982 (AC 301)
Provenance:
Mrs. Claire Gordon, Stewart's companion, co-writer, and recipient of his estate, donated the Rex Stewart Papers to the National Museum of American History on January 3, 1992 and July 18, 1994.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Reproduction fees for commercial use. All rights transferred to Museum in Deed of Gift.
Topic:
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Cornet music (Jazz) -- 1920-1970  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Manuscripts -- 1920-1970
Photograph albums -- 1920-1970
Photographs -- 20th century
Citation:
Rex Stewart Papers, ca. 1875-1890s, 1924-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0424
See more items in:
Rex Stewart Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0424

Scrapbooks and Photo Albums

Collection Author:
Stewart, Rex (William), Jr., 1907-1967 (cornetist)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1930-1959
Scope and Contents:
Series two consists of two scrapbooks and one photo album that contain photographs, newsclippings, and other ephemera documenting the performing career and personal life of Rex Stewart. Due to the fragile condition of these materials, please consult the Archives Center staff about handling them for research.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Reproduction fees for commercial use. All rights transferred to Museum in Deed of Gift.
Collection Citation:
Rex Stewart Papers, ca. 1875-1890s, 1924-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0424, Series 2
See more items in:
Rex Stewart Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0424-ref18

Albert Henry Krehbiel papers, 1893-1985

Creator:
Krehbiel, Albert Henry, 1873-1945  Search this
Subject:
Krehbiel, Dulah Evans  Search this
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago. School  Search this
Topic:
Muralists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8912
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211097
AAA_collcode_krehalbe
Theme:
Diaries
Lives of American Artists
Chicago's Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211097

Magda Heuermann papers, 1876-1962

Creator:
Heuermann, Magda Margareta, 1858-1962  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Topic:
Women painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9550
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211750
AAA_collcode_heuemagd
Theme:
Women
Lives of American Artists
Chicago's Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211750

Women's Auxiliary, National Association of Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors Records

Creator:
Women's Auxiliary, National Association of Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors  Search this
Extent:
14 Cubic feet (37 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Ledgers (account books)
Proceedings
Programs
Correspondence
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Date:
1919 - 2015
Summary:
This collection documents the activities of the Women's Auxiliary, National Association of Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling Contractors through financial materials, photographs, convention and scrapbook materials.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of the organizational records of the Women's Auxiliary of the National Association of Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling Contractors. The materials include financial records; by-laws; charter books for state and local chapters and for committees; ledger books detailing financial expenditures convention proceedings, auxiliary newsletters, informational brochures, and convention programs; scrapbooks compiled by presidents, and photograph albums. The scrapbooks relate to convention activities and include photographs taken at conventions. The scrapbooks cover almost every year of the Auxiliary's existence.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into six series.

Series 1: Historical Background, 1919-2015

Series 2: Financial Materials, 1979-1999

Series 3: Convention Materials, 1934; 1940-2010

Series 4: Publications, 1953-2010

Series 5: Photographs, 1950s-2003

Series 6: Publicity, 1965; 1976; 1982

Series 7; Addenda, 2015-2019
Historical:
NAPHCC was originally called the National Association of Master Plumbers (NAMP). In 1953 it became the National Association of Plumbing Contractors; in 1963 it became the National Association of Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors (NAPHCC). In the years before the organization was started and during its early years, most plumbers were self-employed individuals rather than employees of larger contracting companies. Their wives were likely to be involved in the business. Often wives answered inquiries, kept the books, made appointments, and performed other duties in addition to their own domestic tasks.

NAMP was founded in 1882 to promote the interests of plumbers who considered themselves "true craftsmen" at a time of rapid transition from outdoor to indoor plumbing and of major technological improvements in residential and commercial buildings. These master plumbers tended to be specialists in metal work or gas fitting. They saw their mission as ensuring a safe and sanitary public plumbing system, and this remains their mission. They also promoted what was termed "trade protection" and opposed the sale of plumbing materials to anyone other than master plumbers. They foresaw, accurately, a time when there would be stringent governmental regulations on public sanitation facilities.

NAMP's Women's Auxiliary was founded at the 1919 NAMP convention by Emily Hornbrook (b. 1857). A year later the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving American women the right to vote. However, this auxiliary was not allowed to use the name and seal of the Association until 1921. In these early years, the Auxiliary was involved in scholarships for the children of members, raising the profile of the plumbing profession, discovering ways to help their husbands' businesses, and advocating for better public sanitation.

Over time the Auxiliary's activities expanded, and these activities are extremely well documented in the scrapbooks in the collection. For example, in response to the increasing governmental regulation of public sanitation, the Auxiliary formed a very active Sanitation Committee. In 1938, Anna Corcoran, the Chair of this committee, reported, "The Sanitation Program has become a march of progress for the Auxiliary…The women are now demanding, and in some cases getting, clean and sanitary restrooms, lavatory and toilet facilities in public theaters, restaurants, stores, parks and filling stations." They worked with Texaco to set standards of sanitation in their gas station restrooms. Texaco used these changes to their benefit in their ad campaigns, and other oil companies followed suit. During the World War II years, the Auxiliary promoted educational efforts to spread the word about the transmission of water-borne diseases including polio, typhoid, TB, and diphtheria, and advocated for the need for proper sanitary systems to reduce the incidence of diseases. In the decades that followed, the Auxiliary was active in promoting such issues as water pollution, labor practices (such as the Family Medical Leave Act), civil rights, pipeline safety, fuel economy standards, conservation, and recycling. They continued to fund scholarships for the education of the children of members, and they also had a loan program for members in need.

The mission of the Auxiliary today is to work in partnership with the National Association and the industry through cooperation, communication, and education. More specifically, its goals include promoting the industry to the public; drawing more young people into the industry through educational programs in an effort to address the shortage of people with these essential skills and filling a gap once filled by trade and vocational high schools; and protecting the nation's health through advocacy and grass roots efforts to improve public sanitation and the water supply.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Series: Plumbing (AC0060)

Estelle Ellis Collection (AC0423)

Earl S. Tupper Papers (AC0470)

Priscilla of Boston Collection (AC0557)

Dorothy Shaver Collection (AC0631)

Stanley Home Products (AC0788)

Spokeswoman Magazine Printed Materials Collection (AC0931)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling Contractors National Auxiliary, through Sandy Stack, President on February 20, 2012.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Public health  Search this
Heating and ventilating  Search this
Heating  Search this
Plumbing  Search this
Trade associations  Search this
Sanitation  Search this
Women  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Ledgers (account books)
Proceedings
Programs
Correspondence
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Citation:
Women's Auxiliary, National Association of Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1304
See more items in:
Women's Auxiliary, National Association of Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1304

Ray McKinley Music and Ephemera

Collector:
McKinley, Ray, 1910-1995 (musician, bandleader)  Search this
Names:
Dorsey, Jimmy, Orchestra  Search this
McKinley, Ray, Orchestra  Search this
Miller, Glenn, Orchestra  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Cubic feet (56 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Ephemera
Music
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Date:
1945-1994
Scope and Contents:
The Ray McKinley Music and Ephemera consists of music, scores, sideman books, photographs, correspondence, news clippings and magazine articles, business records, awards, audio and videotapes, 45 rpm commercial recordings, and miscellaneous biographical notes. The records date from the the late nineteenth century to 1996 and document the professional music career and personal life of Ray McKinley (drummer, band leader, and vocalist). The collection is organized into three series; Series 1: Music ca. 1942-1990, Series 2: Ephemera ca. 1870-1996, and Series 3: Miscellaneous ca. 1943-1993. Materials in each series are arranged either alphabetically by music title or chronologically by date.

The following reference abbreviations are used in the container list to facilitate cross-referencing of materials in different subseries:

see: look for this title or material in the following location sa: see also: additional or related material is available in the following location aka: also known as OS: oversize score OP: oversize photograph
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into three series.

Series 1: Music

Series 2: Ephemera

Series 3: Audio Visual Materials
Biographical / Historical:
Ray McKinley was born on June 18, 1910 in Fort Worth, Texas, the son of Flora Newell McKinley and Raymond Harris McKinley, Sr. McKinley, Jr. entertained himself at an early age by "drumming" on whatever was available, and he received his first drum set at age nine from a family friend. His performing career had begun even earlier, at age six, with a snare drum solo for several thousand at the Elks Circus in the North Fort Worth Coliseum. At twelve he started playing professionally with local bands and orchestras. In an April, 1986 article in Modern Drummer, McKinley commented, "I wasn't that terrific, but everyone thought I was" (see Subseries 2B: Newsclippings and Magazine Articles). Whether deserved or not, his reputation was good enough that when the Jimmy Joy Orchestra came to town and was strapped for a substitute drummer, twelve-year-old McKinley got the job.

McKinley left town for the first time on a tour with the Duncan-Marin band in 1926. While performing in a Chicago nightclub, he was caught in the crossfire of a gang shoot-out and shot in the leg. During his convalescence, he wandered the clubs and listened in on sets. He met "Benny Pollack, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller and others" (Ray McKinley, see Subseries 2F: Biographical Materials). He left the Duncan-Marin group in 1927 for the Beasley Smith orchestra, and joined the Tracy-Brown Orchestra in 1929. He played with Milt Shaw's Detroiters for a time in 1930, followed by a stint with Dave Bernie's band. With Bernie, he made two trips to England, "where he acquired a set of neckties and a Southern accent" (McKinley, Biographical Materials).

Glenn Miller asked McKinley to join him in Smith Ballew's band in 1932, and Miller later placed McKinley and four others with the Dorsey Brothers' Orchestra. When the Dorseys split, McKinley stayed with Jimmy Dorsey, although he was heavily recruited by other band leaders, including Tommy Dorsey and Benny Goodman. He became known as a vocalist as well as drummer in Jimmy Dorsey's band, and had Bing Crosby name him "one of the ten best vocalists in the country" (All-American Band Leaders, July, 1942). In 1939, at the suggestion of booking agent Willard Alexander, McKinley joined forces with Will Bradley (formerly Wilber Schwitsenberg) to form the "Will Bradley Orchestra featuring Ray McKinley." With McKinley on vocals and drums, the band's several hits included Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar, Down the Road Apiece and Celery Stalks at Midnight. McKinley left in 1942 to form his own group, The Ray McKinley Orchestra. The band was very well-recieved, but broke up after only 8 months due to external factors including the outbreak of the second World War. McKinley placed many of his players with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra just before he was drafted.

McKinley's old association with Glenn Miller paid off when Glenn took him on for his famous Army Air Force Band. McKinley says that Glenn Miller's band "was one of the two best musical organizations I had anything to do with as a player" (Modern Drummer). The Glenn Miller Band was sent to England in June, 1944. After Miller disappeared in 1944, McKinley fronted the band until its return to the United States in 1945. At this point, McKinley handed the reins to Tex Benecke and formed a new Ray McKinley Orchestra.

McKinley's new orchestra enjoyed great success, partially due to its young talent, including that of arrangers Eddie Sauter and Deane Kincaide. McKinley's showmanship and skills as leader, vocalist, and drummer also earned the band many fans. Some of their hits included Red Silk Stockings and Green Perfume, You Came a Long Way From St. Louis, and Arizay. Unfortunately, the group's inception coincided with the end of the big band era. McKinley adjusted the size and style of the band in attempts to satisfy public demand, but he finally disbanded the group when he suffered an attack of amoebic dysentery in 1951.

After his recovery, McKinley freelanced with different bands and in radio and television, mostly accepting appearances that kept him near his home in Connecticut. His last extended stint with any band came in 1956, when Willard Alexander persuaded the Glenn Miller Estate to sponsor a New Glenn Miller Orchestra with McKinley as its leader. The band played arrangements of old Miller favorites from the original music as well as more contemporary hits. This orchestra, like McKinley's earlier ones, was very successful, performing on television and travelling all over the world. In 1966, McKinley tired of the road and "retired". For the next thirty years, McKinley again stayed close to home, playing "gigs" with various bands, working as a musical consultant for Walt Disney World in 1971, and doing some television and recordings.

McKinley is remembered as a loving family man, screwball showman, and dedicated musician. In January, 1950,InternationalMusician said that McKinley was "known in the trade as a 'drummer's drummer'--just about the highest accolade one can receive." Many of his fellow musicians attest that his clean, energetic style of drumming provided the drive behind many of the bands he played with, while his technical skill and sense of humor produced the exciting solos that made him popular with the public. According to drummer Cliff Leeman, "Unlike many of the highly technical, showman drummers, McKinley combined elements of showmanship and thoughtful, feeling performance. He never ignored his timekeeping duties" (Modern Drummer, 1986). Both on the drums and as band leader, McKinley was a bit of a clown. For instance, the "vocal" in Celery Stalks at Midnight originated when McKinley, for no particular reason, "instead of playing a two bar solo on the drums...just yelled out, 'Celery Stalks along the highway!'" (McKinley, Big Band Jump Newsletter). Still, despite his antics and the fun he obviously had while on the stand, McKinley was deadly serious about music. His thoughts on drumming are evidence of this: "Once you have the techniques down and combine them with an inherent sense of rhythim--I believe you have to be born with it--you're well on your way to becoming a good drummer. If you don't have that bone-deep rhythmic sense, or 'feel', you should be doing something else. That may sound autocratic. But that's the way it is, as far as I'm concerned"( ModernDrummer).

McKinley was married in 1937 but divorced by 1942. He then married ballet dancer Gretchen Havemann in 1943, a few months into his tenure with the Glenn Miller Band. On April 7, 1949, they had daughter for whom Gretchen coined the name Jawn. A loving, happy couple, he and Gretchen celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary in 1993. In 1983, he and Gretchen began spending half of their year in a home in Florida and half in Canada. He died in 1995.
Separated Materials:
Ray McKinley drumset and two band stands are located in the Division of Music History.
Provenance:
Donated by Gretchen McKinley and Jawn McKinley Neville on February 2, 1998.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions. Contact the Archives Center for information.
Topic:
Big band music -- 1940-2000  Search this
Jazz musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 20th century
Ephemera -- 20th century
Music -- 1940-2000
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Clippings -- 20th century
Citation:
Ray McKinley Music and Ephemera, ca 1945-1994, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0635
See more items in:
Ray McKinley Music and Ephemera
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0635
Online Media:

Erle Loran papers

Creator:
Loran, Erle, 1905-1999  Search this
Names:
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco  Search this
Friends of Ethnic Art  Search this
San Francisco Art Institute  Search this
University of California, Berkeley -- Faculty  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Haley, John, 1905-1991  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hatfield, Dalzell, 1893-1963  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Levinson, Harry  Search this
Sabean, Samuel  Search this
Schaefer, Bertha, 1895-1971  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-  Search this
Wilke, Ulfert, 1907-1987  Search this
Extent:
12.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Watercolors
Sketches
Photographs
Writings
Date:
1912-1999
Summary:
The papers of California painter, writer, and teacher Erle Loran measure 12.6 linear feet and date from 1912 to 1991. Found are biographical materials; two linear feet of personal and professional correspondence; personal business records; writings which include extensive drafts and notes for Loran's book Cezanne's Composition; over 400 items of artwork that include watercolors, drawings, charcoal, and pastel studies; printed materials; photographs of Loran, family, and friends, and artwork; and one audio recording of a lecture by Loran on Cezanne.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of California painter and teacher Erle Loran measure 12.6 linear feet and date from 1912 to 1991. Found are biographical materials; two linear feet of personal and professional correspondence; personal business records; writings which include extensive drafts and notes for Loran's book Cezanne's Composition; over 400 items of artwork that include watercolors, drawings, charcoal, and pastel studies; printed materials; photographs of Loran, family, and friends, and artwork; and one audio recording of a lecture by Loran on Cezanne.

Biographical materials include biographical sketches, curriculum vita, a will, notes and a notebook, and an appointment book for 1987. Also found is an anniversary invitation, a certificate from the University of California, and the Pepsi-Cola award for 1948.

Two linear feet of correspondence is with artists, critics, galleries, and universities. Correspondents inlcude Romare Bearden, Andrew Dasburg, Clement Greenberg, John Haley, Dalzell Hatfield, Hans Hofmann, Harry Levinson (president of Permanent Pigments), Sam Sabean, Bertha Schaefer, Clyfford Still, and Ulfert Wilke. There is also correspondence with the University of California.

Personal business records include exhibition files, price and consignment lists, teaching materials, University of California Press records, and records relating to the publication of his book on Cézanne. Some of these records also document Loran's involvement with the Fine Arts Museum, Friends of Ethnic Arts, and the San Francisco Art Institute. In addition, there are records related to Loran's role in a donation of forty-five paintings by Hans Hofmann to the University Art Center. Also found are materials related to Loran's activities as an art collector including sales receipts, auction catalogs, and photographs of artwork owned by Loran.

Writings by Loran include a complete manuscript version of Cézanne's Composition along with additional notes and drafts, and numerous other short essays on Cézanne's life and art. Loran's other writings include essays about Hans Hofmann, Marsden Hartley, symbology in abstract art, and contemporary art.

Loran's career as an artist is extensively documented by four linear feet of original artwork, mostly preliminary sketches. The work demonstrates a variety of techniques including watercolor, pastel, pencil, pen, gouache, and oil sketches. Content includes landscapes, portraits, fantasy scenes, urban scenes, and rural scenes.

Printed materials include extensive newsclippings from seven decades, exhibition announcements, and exhibition catalogs. Photographs are of Loran, his second wife Clyta, the Loran family, friends and colleagues, artwork, and source materials. Also found within the papers is an audio recording on cassette of a lecture by Loran on Cézanne.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1930s-1990s (Box 1; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1912-1992 (Boxes 1-3; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1930s-1992 (Box 3; 0.25 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1921-1999 (Boxes 3-4; 1.25 linear feet)

Series 5: Artwork, 1920s-1980s (Boxes 4-8, 13-14; 4.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1925-1999 (Boxes 8-10, 14; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1910s-1990s (Boxes 10-12, 14; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Audio Recording, 1982 (Box 12; 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
California painter, writer, and teacher Erle Loran was born on October 2, 1905 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He attended the Minneapolis School of Art and graduated in 1926. That same year, Loran won the Paris Prize from the Chaloner Foundation which enabled him to study in France for the next three years. Here, he immersed himself into the world of Paul Cezanne. He lived for two years in Cézanne's studio, meeting many who knew Cezanne, including painter Emile Bernard, and art dealer Ambroise Vollard. This experience was critical to the development of Loran's artistic vision and his later writings and lectures about Cézanne.

In 1929, Loran returned to the United States, and published the article "Cézanne's Country" in The Arts in 1930. He then spent the early 1930s in Minnesota, after returning to Minneapolis to be treated for tuberculosis. There, Loran began to paint in a regionalist style, producing landscapes and scenes of life in rural Minnesota. In 1931, Loran was given his first one-man show at the Kraushaar Gallery in New York. During the depression, Loran began teaching art and was given painting commissions as part of the federal arts programs of the WPA.

Loran moved to California in 1937 and accepted a position as professor in the art department at the University of California, Berkeley. There he taught until retiring in 1973, serving as the department's chair in the 1950s. He established a program to invite east coast artists to teach at the university, and participants included Conrad Marca-Relli and Milton Resnick. Loran's students included Jay DeFeo, Richard Diebenkorn, and Sam Francis. In 1941 Loran began to write the synthesis of his research and interpretations about Cézanne's work, culminating in his pioneering book Cézanne's Composition published in 1943 by the University of California Press.

During this period Loran associated himself with modernist Hans Hofmann. Loran's early paintings were lyrical abstractions in primary colors; however, his style constantly changed with the times. Watercolor was Loran's medium of choice because it lent itself to his often-remote plein air locations, such as the ghost towns of California and Nevada. With John Haley and Worth Ryder he formed the "Berkeley Group," whose paintings consisted of scenes of the California and southwestern landscape painted in flat, open areas of color. During the war, painting in the open became increasingly difficult and Loran transitioned from plein-air painting to studio work. Shortly thereafter he began to focus his painting on abstraction.

Loran's artwork during the 1950s consisted primarily of abstractions based on natural forms like crystal and driftwood. In 1955, he spent six weeks studying with Hans Hofmann, whom he later called, along with Cézanne, a second "great father figure." In 1960, he was instrumental in securing a gift of forty-five paintings by Hans Hofmann for Berkeley's University Art Center. In the late 1960s, his work became a fusing of Op, Pop, and Hard Edge. From this he moved to figurative painting and later to geometric designs and symbols.

Loran continued to paint throughout the rest of his life in a variety of styles, including nudes, abstractions, and landscapes. Besides being an artist and a teacher, Loran was also a lifelong collector of ethnic art who specialized in African, Asian, Native American, and pre-Columbian tribal art. Many works from his collection are presently housed at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. Loran died in 1999 in Berkeley, at the age of 93.
Related Material:
Found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Erle Loran conducted by Herschel Chipp, June 18, 1981, and a 1981 interview with Erle and Clyta Loran in the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco Interviews With Artists collection. Also found is a letter from Loran to Richard Wattenmaker, 1975.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 906) including photographs of artwork by Erle Loran and two clippings of reproductions of Loran's artwork. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Erle Loran lent the Archives of American Art materials for microfilming and donated papers in 1975. In 1999 Mrs. Ruth Schora-Loran, Loran's widow, donated additional material, including artworks.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Painters -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Topic:
Art, Abstract  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- California -- Berkeley  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Watercolors
Sketches
Photographs
Writings
Citation:
Erle Loran Papers, 1912-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.loraerle
See more items in:
Erle Loran papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-loraerle
Online Media:

Russell E. Train Africana collection

Creator:
Train, Russell E., 1920-2012  Search this
Russell E. Train Africana Collection (Smithsonian. Libraries)  Search this
Names:
Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (1887-1889)  Search this
Akeley, Carl Ethan, 1864-1926  Search this
Baines, Thomas, 1820-1875  Search this
Baker, Samuel White, Sir, 1821-1893  Search this
Burton, Richard Francis, Sir, 1821-1890  Search this
Du Chaillu, Paul B. (Paul Belloni), 1835-1903  Search this
Dugmore, A. Radclyffe (Arthur Radclyffe), 1870-1955  Search this
Glave, E. J. (Edward James)  Search this
Heller, Edmund, 1875-1939  Search this
Livingstone, David, 1813-1873.  Search this
Nelson, Robert Henry, 1853-1892  Search this
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919  Search this
Selous, Frederick Courteney, 1851-1917  Search this
Stanley, Henry M. (Henry Morton), 1841-1904.  Search this
Train, Russell E., 1920-2012  Search this
Windsor, Edward, Duke of, 1894-1972  Search this
Extent:
6,500 Items (estimated)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Africa -- Maps
Africa -- description and travel
Africa -- Discovery and exploration
Africa -- In art
Date:
1663-2004
Summary:
Manuscript and printed textual material, photographic prints and negatives, slides, audio tapes, film, original and reproduction artwork, maps, scrapbooks, and historical and natural artifacts related to the history of African exploration and natural history, dating primarily from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Includes correspondence, drafts of publications, diaries, account books, ephemera, posters, newsclippings, biographies, memoirs, portraits, and the former personal property of selected explorers, big game hunters, missionaries, pioneers, and naturalists in Africa.
Scope and Contents note:
Manuscript and printed textual material, photographic prints and negatives, slides, audio tapes, film, original and reproduction artwork, maps, scrapbooks, and historical and natural artifacts related to the history of African exploration and natural history, dating primarily from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Includes correspondence, drafts of publications, diaries, account books, ephemera, posters, newsclippings, biographies, memoirs, portraits, and the former personal property of selected explorers, big game hunters, missionaries, pioneers, and naturalists in Africa. The Train Collection is particularly strong in archival materials on the following topics: the search for the source of the Nile and the progress of other exploring expeditions in Africa; the collecting of specimens of African animals, plants, and ethnological materials for zoos and museums (including a significant body of correspondence and photographs from the Smithsonian African Expedition in 1909-1910, led by President Theodore Roosevelt); and the growth of the African wildlife conservation movement. Besides Roosevelt, the major persons represented in the Collection include the journalist and explorer Henry Morton Stanley and members of his Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (Thomas Heazle Parke, Robert H. Nelson, James S. Jameson, John Rose Troup, William Bonny, William G. Stairs, Edmund Barttelot, and Arthur J. M. Jephson); the medical missionary Dr. David Livingstone and his father-in-law Robert Moffat; taxidermist Carl Akeley; zoologist Edmund Heller; hunter Frederick Courtenay Selous; artist and adventure writer A. Radclyffe Dugmore; explorers Samuel White Baker, Thomas Baines, Richard Francis Burton and E.J. Glave; anthropologist Paul Belloni du Chaillu; and royal traveler Edward VIII (later Duke of Windsor). Consult the finding aid for more specific information on materials relating to these persons and other people and organizations represented in the Collection.
Arrangement note:
Organized into ten series, primarily based on format or creator: I. Artifacts, 1663-1999; II. Works of Art, 1663-1999; III. Books, 1900-1986; IV. Edmund Heller personal papers, 1875-1939; V. Manuscripts, 1663-1992; VI. Maps, 1878; VII. Newspapers, 1888-1987; VIII. Robert Henry Nelson personal papers, 1795-1912; VIII. Photographs, 1874-1963; IX. Posters and broadsides, 1814-1955; X. Russell E. Train personal papers, 1956-2004.
Separated Materials note:
In addition to these archival and non-book materials, the Smithsonian Institution Libraries acquired more than 1500 printed books as part of the Russell E. Train Collection; these books are listed individually in the SIRIS (Smithsonian Institution Research Information System) online catalog.
Provenance:
Originally assembled by the Honorable Russell E. Train, a former judge, top administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, and a past president of the World Wildlife Fund, this collection was acquired by the Smithsonian Institution Libraries in 2004.
Rights:
The collection is housed in the Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library of Natural History, which is open to researchers Monday through Friday in the afternoons, from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m.; morning visits are by appointment only. Please call (202) 633-1184 or email AskaLibrarian@si.edu for an appointment.
Topic:
Zoological specimens -- Collection and preservation -- Africa  Search this
Wildlife conservation -- Africa  Search this
Natural history -- Technique  Search this
Natural history -- Africa  Search this
Hunting -- Africa  Search this
Explorers -- Africa  Search this
Identifier:
SIL-CL.XXXX-0014
See more items in:
Russell E. Train Africana collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sil-cl-xxxx-0014
Online Media:

Peratrovich family papers

Creator:
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Names:
Alaska Native Brotherhood  Search this
Alaska Native Sisterhood  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Extent:
0.42 Linear feet
Container:
Box 1
Culture:
Tlingit  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Alaska
Date:
1929-2001
bulk 1939-2001
Summary:
The Peratrovich family papers include correspondence, personal papers, and newsclippings related to civil rights work done by Elizabeth and Roy Peratrovich in Alaska in the mid-twentieth century.
Scope and Contents:
The Peratrovich family papers include correspondence, personal papers, and newsclippings related to civil rights work done by Elizabeth and Roy Peratrovich, Sr. in Alaska circa 1940-1960. Particular materials include draft legislation related to the 1945 Alaska anti-discrimination law providing for equal accommodation privileges to all citizens, the 1988 establishment of Elizabeth Wanamaker Peratrovich Day (February 16) in Alaska, and activities by Elizabeth and Roy on behalf of the Alaska Native Sisterhood and Alaska Native Brotherhood organizations. In addition to manuscript materials, two CDs of audio recordings include radio interviews about the life and work of Elizabeth. Most of the photographic materials in this collection are photocopies made by Roy Peratrovich, Sr.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection were removed from three-ring binders and placed in 7 folders. Original order was maintained.
Biographical / Historical:
Elizabeth Wanamaker Peratrovich (1911-1958) and her husband Roy Peratrovich, Sr. (1908-1989), both members of the Tlingit Nation, were prominent civil rights activists in Alaska. They worked on behalf of Alaska Natives, advocating for equality of all citizens, regardless of race. Both were influential in this work, with Elizabeth being credited with the passage of the 1945 Anti-Discrimination Act, and later honored posthumously by the Alaska Legislature when February 16 was established as Elizabeth Peratrovich Day. Both Elizabeth and Roy additionally served as leaders of the Alaska Native Sisterhood and Alaska Native Brotherhood, promoting Native rights and culture. After Elizabeth's death in 1958, Roy continued his and his wife's advocacy for Alaska Natives, as he worked with the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 38 years, eventually becoming superintendent of the BIA office in Anchorage.
Related Materials:
A similar manuscript holding, absent the two CDs of audio recordings, is held at the Alaska State Library Historical Collections in Juneau, Alaska, as MS 129: Peratrovich Family Papers.
Separated Materials:
A bust of Elizabeth Peratrovich, made of cast bronze on a walnut wood base, sculpted by her son Roy Peratrovich, Jr., was gifted to the NMAI along with the Peratrovich family papers. The bust of Elizabeth Peratrovich was assigned object number 25/5195, and is housed with the NMAI Object Collections.

A bust of Roy Peratrovich, made of cast bronze on a walnut wood base with plaque reading "Roy Peratrovich ANB Grand President Emeritus," sculpted by his son Roy Peratrovich, Jr., was gifted to the NMAI in 2003. The bust of Roy Peratrovich was assigned object number 26/1569, and is housed next to the bust of his wife in the NMAI Object Collections.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Roy Peratrovich, Jr., in 2001.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Race discrimination -- Law and legislation  Search this
Alaska Natives -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century  Search this
Indians of North America -- Civil rights  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Peratrovich family papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.078
See more items in:
Peratrovich family papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-078
Online Media:

Correspondence, papers, newsclippings

Collection Creator:
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1939-1958
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Peratrovich family papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Peratrovich family papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-078-ref13

Correspondence, papers, newsclippings

Collection Creator:
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1958-1988
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Peratrovich family papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Peratrovich family papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-078-ref16

Correspondence, papers, newsclippings

Collection Creator:
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1988-1989
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Peratrovich family papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Peratrovich family papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-078-ref17

Correspondence, papers, newsclippings

Collection Creator:
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1990-1992
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Peratrovich family papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Peratrovich family papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-078-ref18

Correspondence, papers, newsclippings

Collection Creator:
Peratrovich, Roy, Sr., 1908-1989  Search this
Peratrovich, Elizabeth, 1911-1958  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1993-2001
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Peratrovich family papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Peratrovich family papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-078-ref19

Chevalier Jackson Papers

Source:
Medical Sciences, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Creator:
Jackson, Chevalier, Dr,, 1865-1958 (physician)  Search this
Names:
Jefferson Medical College.  Search this
Temple University.  Search this
University of Pennsylvania  Search this
University of Pittsburgh.  Search this
University of Western Pennsylvania.  Search this
Western Medical College.  Search this
Women's College of Pennsylvania.  Search this
Foster, Gilmore  Search this
Jackson, William Stanford  Search this
Mackenzie, Morell  Search this
Morage, Katherine Ann  Search this
Former owner:
Medical Sciences, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Extent:
3 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Legal documents
Clippings
Biographies
Autobiographies
Books
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers
Place:
Philadelphia (Pa.)
Date:
1883-1955
Summary:
Collection documents Chevalier Jackson, a physician and an American pioneer in the field of endoscopy.
Scope and Contents:
The Jackson papers include autobiographical notes, a draft of a brief biography for the National Cyclopedia of America Biography, some business papers among which are correspondence relating to a mill and to repairs to a dam, several legal papers including those concerned with real estate mortgages, and letters to and from Mrs. Jackson and household servants.

There are mementos such as dried flowers, family snapshots, final notes from Dr. Jackson to his wife, advising her of actions to be taken upon his death, and drafts of his obituary. There are a number of photographs, and negatives, primarily of Dr. Jackson.

The articles, reports and reprints are primarily by Dr. Jackson but include a few by or with his son and a few by other physicians. The papers include proofs and color proofs of equipment and procedures relating to Jackson publications and four books, one of which is by Dr. Jackson.

The material, most of which is relatively recent, is in good condition. Some of the notes are in pencil but are legible.

In addition to the papers in the Archives Center, the Division of Medical Sciences has a large number of surgical instruments including Dr. Jackson's bronchoscopes, esophagoscopes, laryngoscopes and microscopes, awards and medals, items of furniture from Dr. Jackson's study and oil paintings by him. The list of instruments is seven single-spaced pages. There are many Chevalier Jackson papers and memorabilia in the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, the Library and Museum of the College of Physicians, Philadelphia and the Library of Temple University.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into nine series.

Series 1: Personal Papers

Series 2: Correspondence

Series 3: Legal Papers (including mortgages)

Series 4: Newsclippings, Articles and Book Reviews

Series 5: Photographs

Series 6: Chronological Journal

Series 7: Reports and Reprints

Series 8: Illustrations and Proofs

Series 9: Books
Biographical / Historical:
Chevalier Jackson, a physician and an American pioneer in the field of endoscopy, was born November 14, 1865 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and died August 16, 1958 in Philadelphia. His father, William Stanford Jackson, was a stock raiser and veterinarian. His mother was Katherine Ann Morage. Family financial reverses forced a move to Crafton, Pennsylvania, a working class community. Young Chevalier was not readily accepted by his classmates and seemed to have had a difficult time during his school years there. Money earned by decorating glass and pottery enabled Chevalier Jackson to attend the University of Western Pennsylvania (University of Pittsburgh) from 1878 to 1882. He then apprenticed himself to a local physician, Gilmore Foster. Continuing to paint china at night he earned enough to enroll at the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia in 1884, from which he graduated in 1886. During vacations he sold medical books and served as a cook on a fishing boat. Following his graduation from Jefferson Dr. Jackson went to England to pursue his interest in laryngology under a world-famous authority, Morell Mackenzie.

Upon his return to Pittsburgh, Dr. Jackson opened an office limited to the practice of laryngology. His patients were mostly indigent and income from the practice was limited. In 1890 he devised an instrument to remove a dental plate that a patient had swallowed. The news of this meant referral of other patients with similar problems that caused obstruction of the esophagus, including blockages in children from swallowing lye. From that time on Dr. Jackson carried on an unremitting campaign to have lye bottles labeled as poison, until in 1927 Congress passed the Federal Caustic Labeling Act.

On July 9, 1899, Chevalier Jackson and Alice Bennett White were married. They had one child, Chevalier Lawrence Jackson, who also became a surgeon. In the year of his marriage, Dr. Jackson developed a bronchoscope that could be passed through the larynx to visualize the bronchi. He became chief of laryngology at Western Medical College in 1900. In 1902 he adapted a suggestion of placing a light carrier at the far ends of the scopes used in bronchscopy and esophagoscopy, thus making those procedures relatively safe. He and a machinist friend built the instruments in the friend's shop in Pittsburgh.

Dr. Jackson developed tuberculosis in 1911. He spent the two years of convalescence writing an important text book, Peroral Endoscopy and Laryngeal Surgery, published in 1915, the year he was made head of the Department of Laryngology at Jefferson Medical College. Appointments at the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania followed, and his 1930 appointment to the faculty at Temple meant that Chevalier Jackson held simultaneous appointments at five Philadelphia schools. He later relinquished all appointments except the chair at Temple from which he retired in 1938 to be succeeded by his son, Chevalier Lawrence Jackson. From 1935 to 1941 Chevalier Jackson was president of the Women's College of Pennsylvania. An early advocate of equal rights, he championed the role of women in medicine.

During his noted career Dr. Jackson wrote 250 papers, twelve text books, chapters in a number of other books, and an autobiography (1938). He was somewhat eccentric. He protected his hands by wearing silk gloves, even in summer, turned doorknobs by placing his hand in his coat pocket, preferred bowing to shaking hands, and developed a reputation for social aloofness.
Materials at the National Museum of American History:
The Division of Medicine and Science has surgical instruments, awards, medals, furniture, and oil paintings owned by Chevalier Jackson. See accession numbers are 300428.338 through .343.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Mrs. Joan Bugbee (a granddaughter of Dr. Jackson), date unknown.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Surgeons  Search this
Topic:
Laryngoscopy  Search this
Esophagus  Search this
Esophagoscopy  Search this
Endoscopy  Search this
Bronchoscopy  Search this
Physicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Legal documents
Clippings
Biographies
Autobiographies
Books
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 19th-20th century
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Personal papers
Citation:
Chevalier Jackson Papers, 1883-1960, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0023
See more items in:
Chevalier Jackson Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0023
Online Media:

Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records

Creator:
Wilbur H. Burnham Studios  Search this
Names:
American Art Expositions (Firm)  Search this
Joseph G. Reynolds Associates  Search this
Reynolds, Francis, and Rohnstock  Search this
Stained Glass Association of America  Search this
Burnham, Wilbur Herbert, 1887-1974  Search this
Burnham, Wilbur Herbert, Jr., 1913-1984  Search this
Connick, Charles J., 1875-1945  Search this
Portanova, Joseph Domenico, 1909-1979  Search this
Reynolds, Joseph G., 1886-1972  Search this
Extent:
38.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Photographs
Watercolors
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1901-1991
Summary:
The records of nationally renowned Boston, Massachussetts, stained glass design company, Wilbur H. Burnham Studios, measure 38.5 linear feet and date from circa 1904-1991. The majority of the collection consists of project files for the studio's stained glass window contracts throughout the United States from the 1920s-1980s. In addition to project files, records include biographical material for the owners, correspondence relating to personal and studio business, general business and financial records, writings such as published articles by Wilbur H. Burnham, scrapbooks and other printed material documenting the history of the company, artwork including extensive watercolor design studies for stained glass, and photographic material. There is a 2.6 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2021 that includes includes awards, printed material, passports, biographical material, Christmas cards, photographs, slides and postcards of stained lass windows, posthumous material, a bound ledger, legal papers, invoices and receipts, project files and glass plate negatives. Materials date from circa 1901-1991.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of nationally renowned Boston, Massachussetts, stained glass design company, Wilbur H. Burnham Studios, measure 38.5 linear feet and date from circa 1904-1991. The majority of the collection consists of project files for the studio's stained glass window contracts throughout the United States from the 1920s-1980s. In addition to project files, records include biographical material for the owners, correspondence relating to personal and studio business, general business and financial records, writings such as published articles by Wilbur H. Burnham, scrapbooks and other printed material documenting the history of the company, artwork including extensive watercolor design studies for stained glass, and photographic material. There is a 2.6 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2021 that includes includes awards, printed material, passports, biographical material, Christmas cards, photographs, slides and postcards of stained lass windows, posthumous material, a bound ledger, legal papers, invoices and receipts, project files and glass plate negatives. Materials date from circa 1901-1991.

Biographical material includes resume details and autobiographical notes for Burnham and Burnham, Jr., in addition to membership and fellow certificates.

Correspondence documents general studio business and includes correspondence with current and prospective clients, correspondence related to exhibitions, Burnham, Jr.'s activities on the Executive Committee of the America Arts Exposition, Inc., and the 1940 annual meeting of the Stained Glass Association of America and related business. Also found is some personal correpondence with friends and colleagues. Of note are 4 letters from stained glass artist Charles J. Connick giving his opinions on other stained glass artists, including Burnham, and a letter written by sculptor and designer, Joseph D. Portanova.

General business files include personnel records, records relating to a studio apprenticeship in stained glass design, a 1932 inventory of the studios, and leases and other legal documentation.

Writings include published articles by Burnham, in addition to draft typescripts for a book on stained glass which was never published, and research notes used as background material for stained glass studies. These notes include a number of pencil sketches.

19 diaries and journals consist of travel diaries and date books containing notes on daily appointments, financial notes, and addresses.

Project files form the bulk of the collection and document projects in circa 250 locations throughout the United States and Bellau, France, from the 1920s-1980s through correspondence with clients, architects and builders, contracts, purchase orders, building plans, sketches, scattered photographs and some printed material. Of particular note are extensive files on stained glass for New York's Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, Saint Mary's Cathedral in Peoria, Illinois, Saint Martin's Church in Providence, Rhode Island, and the National Cathedral in Washington D. C. The series also includes a group of contract files for the company Reynolds, Francis & Rohnstock (later Joseph G. Reynolds), a contemporary of Wilbur H. Burnham Studios.

Financial records include payment and receipt journals, expense reports, bills, account books and general ledgers which provide finanical documentation from the 1930s to the 1980s.

Printed material includes news clippings about Burnham studios and stained glass in general, in addition to source material used in subject research.

Additional newsclippings about Burnham Studios can be found in three scrapbooks which also house announcements and invitations, and scattered photographs. One scrapbook contains photographs of windows designed by the studios for the Church of Saint Vincent De Paul in Los Angeles, California.

Artwork and sketchbooks include some artwork by Burnham, Jr., such as pencil and ink sketches, life drawings, and some watercolors. The bulk of the series consists of watercolor design studies on board for many of the studio's projects documented in the project files. Also found are some stained glass design sketches and cartoons, primarily in pencil and charcoal with scattered watercolors, as well as seven folders of material used in creating stained glass patterns and templates.

Photographic material includes photos of Burnham and Burnham, Jr., and of studio work in progress, as well as photographs of artwork, primarily of stained glass created for a significant number of the studio's contracts.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 12 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, circa 1930s-circa 1970s (Boxes 1, 27; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920s-1991 (Box 1; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 3: General Business Files, 1930s-1970 (Box 2; 0.38 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, 1920s-1950s (Box 2; 6 folders)

Series 5: Diaries and Journals, circa 1920s-circa 1960s (Box 2; 4 folders)

Series 6: Project Files, 1916-1980s (Boxes 2-12, 42; 10.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1928-1982 (Boxes 13-14; 1.14 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, circa 1920s-1980s (Boxes 14-15, 27-28; 1.89 linear feet)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, circa 1920s-circa 1970s (Boxes 15-16, 28, OVs 48-49, BV 84; 1.05 linear feet)

Series 10: Artwork and Sketchbooks, circa 1920s-circa 1980s (Boxes 16-23, 29-39, OVs 50-73, 85, RD 83; 13.15 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographic Materials, circa 1904-circa 1980s (Boxes 23-26, 29, 40-41, 43-47, OVs 74-82; 5.8 linear feet)

Series 12: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1901-1991 (Boxes 86-88, 91, OVs 89-90; 2.6 linear feet)
Historical Note:
Boston, Massachussets stained glass design firm, Wilbur H. Burnham Studios, was founded by master stained glass craftsman Wilbur H. Burnham, in 1922. Together with Charles J. Connick and Joseph G. Reynolds, Burnham studios became recognized as one of the most prominent stained glass design companies in the United States. Burnham took early commissions from influential American architect Ralph Adams Cram, and believed strongly in the medieval stained glass tradition. In the late 1930s his son, Wilbur H. Burnham, Jr., who had received an informal education on tours of Europe with his family, and a BFA from Yale University, joined the firm.

Some of the studio's most notable commissions included seventeen windows for the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D. C., all the windows and murals for Saint Mary's Cathedral, Peoria, Illinois, ten windows for the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York City, and five for the Riverside Church, also in New York City.

Both Burnham and Burnham, Jr., served as presidents of the Stained Glass Association of American from 1938-1941 and 1956-1957 respectively. Burnham, Jr., took over the studio in 1968 when his father retired, and sold the studios in 1982.
Provenance:
The Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records were donated in 8 accessions by Wilbur H. Burnham, Jr., from 1977-1981 and by Wilbur C. Burnham, grandson of the founder, in 1990-1991 and 2021. Scott McDaniel, co-owner of the firm, contributed to the 1990 donation.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Stained glass artists -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Church architecture -- United States  Search this
Church decoration and ornament -- United States  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Glass painting and staining -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Photographs
Watercolors
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records, circa 1901-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.wilbhbur
See more items in:
Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wilbhbur
Online Media:

Moses Soyer papers

Creator:
Soyer, Moses, 1899-1974  Search this
Names:
Baskin, Leonard, 1922-2000  Search this
Bishop, Isabel, 1902-1988  Search this
Burliuk, David, 1882-1967  Search this
Cikovsky, Nicolai, 1894-  Search this
Dobkin, Alexander, 1908-  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Gross, Chaim, 1904-1991  Search this
Soyer, David, 1928-  Search this
Soyer, Ida  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Photographer:
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Extent:
3.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
circa 1905-1974
Summary:
The papers of realist painter Moses Soyer date from circa 1905 to 1974 and measure 3.8 linear feet. Within the papers are scattered biographical materials, general correspondence with friends, artists, galleries, art organizations, and others, as well as correspondence with his family, including his son David, writings and notes by Soyer and others, exhibition materials, news clippings, and other printed material, numerous photographs of Soyer, his family, fellow artists, friends and his artwork. Also found are book illustrations and loose sketches by Soyer.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of realist painter Moses Soyer date from circa 1905 to 1974 and measure 3.8 linear feet. Within the papers are scattered biographical materials, general correspondence with friends, artists, galleries, art organizations, and others, as well as correspondence with his family, including his son David, writings and notes by Soyer and others, exhibition materials, news clippings, and other printed material, numerous photographs of Soyer, his family, fellow artists, friends and his artwork. Also found are book illustrations and loose sketches by Soyer.

Biographical materials include awards, business documents such as records for the loan of his artwork, passports, his marriage certificate, and other official documents. Soyer's 1966 membership to the National Institute of Arts and Letters and several awards from the National Academy of Design are found here as well. Correspondence is with friends and artists such as Leonard Baskin, Isabel Bishop, Alex Dobkin, Philip Evergood, Chaim Gross, and his brother Raphael Soyer, as well as with students, galleries, art organizations, museums, universities, and others. Also found is correspondence with his son David and his grandchildren that include many letters illustrated by Soyer.

Writings and notes include Soyer's draft writings for his book Painting the Human Figure, autobiographical essays, desk diaries, and miscellaneous writings and notes. There are also writings by Ida and David Soyer, artist Philip Evergood, and others. Printed material consists of exhibition catalogs and announcements, news clippings about Soyer's career and realist painting, and scattered material such as newsletters, programs, and magazines.

The papers contain numerous photographs of Soyer, including photographs of him working in his studio, with models, with family, and with fellow artists such as David Burliuk, Nicolai Cikovsky, Chaim Gross, Raphael Soyer, and many others. Additional photographs are of Soyer's family, fellow artists, friends, events, and his artwork. Among the photographers is Arnold Newman. Original artwork includes book illustrations for First Book of Ballet and loose sketches by Soyer.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1925-1974 (Box 1, 5, OV 6; 12 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1928-1974 (Box 1-2, 5; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 3: Writings & Notes, circa 1930s-1968, undated (Box 2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1926-1974 (Box 2-3, 5, OV 6; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1905-1974 (Box 3-5, OV 6; 1.1 linear foot)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1940s-1960s (Box 4-5; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Moses Soyer (1899-1974) and his twin brother Raphael (1899-1987) were born on December 25, 1899, in the Russian town Borisoglebsk. Their father Abraham was a scholar and Hebrew teacher who encouraged all of his children to sketch and paint. After the family was deported from Russia, they settled in the Bronx, New York, in 1912. Moses and Raphael briefly attended school, but at 16 they began working various jobs to help support their family. They also began taking free art classes at Cooper Union and for a brief time at the National Academy of Design. Moses then enrolled at the Educational Alliance Art School where he met close friend Chaim Gross. He participated in his first exhibition in 1923 and also taught classes at the Education Alliance Art School until 1926 when he received a traveling scholarship to Europe.

Before leaving for Europe, Soyer married Ida, a former student and dancer. They spent most of their time during the next two years in France. Their son David was born in 1928. Shortly after his birth they returned to the New York City where Moses found greater inspiration for his social-realist paintings. During the Depression, he was commissioned to do artwork for the WPA and for the Federal Arts Project, depicting people doing everyday tasks. During this time Soyer also taught classes at the Contemporary Art School and the New School for Social Research.

Throughout the 1940s and 1950s Soyer continued with this subject matter, even as the abstract art movement became more prominent. Speaking out against abstract art as well as regionalism, he exhibited his work constantly, becoming a significant figure in the social realist movement. His work was represented by the American Contemporary Art (ACA) Gallery beginning in 1944, and he was also a member of several art organizations, including the Artists Equity Association. He was elected to the National Academy of Design in 1963 and to the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1966. Soyer's later work focused on more sensitive portrayals of the female figure, especially dancers. He also painted portraits, including many of his artist friends such as Chaim Gross, Joseph Stella, and David Burliuk. He illustrated several books, including the First Book of Ballet and wrote Painting the Human Figure, which was published in 1964. Soyer continued to paint until his death in 1974.
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Abe Lerner papers concerning the book Moses Soyer, 1961-1970, a Moses Soyer letter to Herbert S. Schimmel, and a Moses Soyer letter and two photographs, donated by Marilyn Mark. Also available at the Archives are the papers of Raphael Soyer, Moses Soyer's twin brother.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel D176), the majority of which was later donated. Loaned materials not donated at a later date are not described in the container listing of this finding aid.
Provenance:
Moses Soyer first lent the Archives of American Art material for microfilming in 1965. Some of these papers, along with additional material, were donated by Soyer between 1966 and 1969. His son, David Soyer, gave more material in 1974 and 1975.
Restrictions:
Use of the original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Artists' studios -- New York (State) -- New York -- Photographs  Search this
Social realism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Moses Soyer papers, circa 1905-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.soyemose
See more items in:
Moses Soyer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-soyemose
Online Media:

Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin papers

Creator:
Sanford, Marion  Search this
Names:
Chapin, Cornelia, 1893-1972  Search this
Hernández, Mateo, 1884-1949  Search this
Extent:
2.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Drawings
Date:
1929-1988
Summary:
The papers of sculptors and close companions Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin measure 2.5 linear feet and date from 1929-1988. The papers include scattered materials created by and about both women, including biographical materials, one folder of correspondence for each woman, a few writings and essays, newsclippings, exhibition catalogs, other printed materials, and four scrapbooks (three about Chapin and one about Sanford). Photographs are of Chapin only and of artwork of both women. There is also one phonograph album transferred onto cassette of a radio interview with Chapin and several motion picture films of Chapin's home movies shot in upstate New York and Paris.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptors Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin measure 2.5 linear feet and date from 1929-1988. Sanford and Chapin were close companions and shared a studio in New York City. The papers include scattered materials created by and about both women, including biographical materials, one folder of correspondence for each woman, a few writings and essays, newsclippings, exhibition catalogs, other printed materials, and four scrapbooks (three about Chapin and one about Sanford). Photographs are of Chapin only and of artwork of both women. There is also one sound recording of a radio interview with Chapin and several motion picture films of Chapin's home movies shot in upstate New York and Paris.

Biographical material consists of scattered items documenting the careers of Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin. Included are a small amount of correspondence of both women, membership certificates, an index card file of Sanford's artwork, Chapin's written description of her sculpting process, and writings by others about Chapin. The sound recording is a radio interview of Chapin after she sculpted a bear for the National Zoo. Films include several home movies of Chapin from 1932-1936, showing Chapin at a summer home in Harpursville, NY, working in her studio, and working in Paris with teacher Mateo Hernandez.

Printed material includes exhibition announcements and catalogs for many group and solo shows of both women, news clippings about Chapin and Sanford, and a few reproductions of their artwork. Source files consist of postcards and clippings of various images that were most probably used as references or inspiration for their artwork.

The collection includes four scrapbooks compiled by Sanford and Chapin documenting their careers through news clippings, a few exhibition materials, and photographs of their artwork. There are three scrapbooks about Chapin, and one about Sanford. Also found are two additional scrapbooks on the subject of bas-relief and sculpture. Photographs include several of Cornelia Chapin in her studio and with her teacher Mateo Hernandez. There are numerous photographs of artwork by Chapin and Sanford. Artwork includes drawings of animals, architectural elements, coins, and people, by either Sanford or Chapin.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1930-1986 (Box 1, 6, 8; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 2: Printed Material, 1931-1972 (Box 1-2; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Source Files, 1940s-1960s (Box 2-3; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Scrapbooks, 1932-1949 (Box 3-7; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1930-1962 (Box 4, 7; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Artwork, 1929-circa 1960s (Box 4; 5 folders)
Biographical Note:
Marion Sanford was born in 1904 in Ontario, Canada and was raised in Warren, Pennsylvania. She studied painting at the Pratt Institute in New York, and worked for a period of time as a stage and costume designer. She developed an interest in sculpture, and studied the direct-carving method briefly at the Art Students League, but was largely self-taught. In 1937 she had her first exhibition of sculptures depicting women performing household chores and everyday tasks. She later created a series called "Women at Work" and her imagery of women would be the subject for which she would become best known, although she also completed bronze portraits and bas-reliefs. In 1941 and 1943 she worked as a Guggenheim Fellow, and became a member of the National Academy of Design, National Sculpture Society, and the National Association of Women Artists. Sanford won many awards and medals for her works and also created sculptures on commission, including a carved altar panel for the First Methodist Church in Warren, Pennsylvania. Marion Sanford died in 1987.

Cornelia Van Auken Chapin was born in 1893 in Waterford, Connecticut. After exploring other interests, including aeronautics, she decided to become a sculptor in the 1920s. She studied with Gail Corbett and in the early 1930s began exhibiting her sculptures of animals. In 1934 she moved to Paris, France and studied with Mateo Hernandez as his only student. Under Hernandez, she learned the technique of direct-carving from life in stone and wood and won the 2nd grand prize at the Paris Exposition in 1937. In 1936, Chapin was the only foreign and woman sculptor elected to the Societaire Salon d'Automne in Paris. The threat of World War II brought her back to the United States in 1939. Chapin won many awards for her sculptures and became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1945 and the National Sculpture Society. She was also one of the founding members of Artists' for Victory, Inc. and a participant in the women's artist group known as "The Philadelphia Ten," a unique and progressive group of women painters and sculptors who often exhibited together in the Philadelphia area.

In the late 1930s Chapin purchased a studio in New York City which had formally belonged to sculptor Gutzon Borglum. She shared the studio with her fellow sculptor Marion Sanford, and often modeled for Sanford's work. Sanford and Chapin remained close companions until Chapin's death in 1972.
Related Material:
Harvard University Library houses the the bulk of Cornelia Van Auken Chapin's papers, 1877-1959.
Provenance:
A portion of the Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin papers were donated by Marion Sanford in 1974. Additional materials were donated by Sanford's caretaker, Brenda Brenwell-Lejeune, in 1999.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Sculpture -- Technique  Search this
Women sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Bas-relief  Search this
Sculpture, American -- 20th century  Search this
Artists' studios  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Drawings
Citation:
Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin papers, 1929-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sanfmari
See more items in:
Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sanfmari
Online Media:

Charles Lang Freer selected papers

Creator:
Freer, Charles Lang, 1856-1919  Search this
Names:
Freer Gallery of Art  Search this
M. Knoedler & Co.  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Yamanaka & Company  Search this
Bacher, Otto H. (Otto Henry), 1856-1909  Search this
Berenson, Bernard, 1865-1959  Search this
Bing, Siegfried, 1838-1905  Search this
Binyon, Laurence, 1869-1943  Search this
Bixby, William K. (William Keeney), 1857-1931  Search this
Bosch-Reitz, Sigisbert Chretien, 1860-  Search this
Caffin, Charles Henry, 1854-1918  Search this
Campbell, Colin, Lady, 1857-1911  Search this
Campbell, Colin, Lord, 1853-1895  Search this
Canfield, Richard A. (Richard Albert), 1855-1914  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Church, Frederick S. (Frederick Stuart), 1842-1924  Search this
Churchill, Alfred Vance, 1864-1949  Search this
Coburn, Alvin Langdon, 1882-1966  Search this
Dewing, Thomas Wilmer, 1851-1938  Search this
Dow, Arthur W. (Arthur Wesley), 1857-1922  Search this
Fenollosa, Ernest Francisco, 1853-1908  Search this
Gallatin, A. E. (Albert Eugene), 1881-1952  Search this
Gellatly, John, 1853-1931  Search this
Gookin, Frederick William  Search this
Hartmann, Sadakichi, 1867-1944  Search this
Hecker, Frank J. (Frank Joseph), 1846-1927  Search this
Kelekian, Dikran, 1868-1951  Search this
Laufer, Berthold, 1874-1934  Search this
Matsuki, Bunkio, 1867-1940  Search this
McCormick, Frederick, 1870-  Search this
Melchers, Gari, 1860-1932  Search this
Meyer, Agnes Elizabeth Ernst, 1887-1970  Search this
Meyer, Eugene, 1875-1959  Search this
Moore, Charles, 1855-1942  Search this
Nomura, Yozo  Search this
Philip, Rosalind Birnie, 1873-1958  Search this
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Reid, Alexander  Search this
Rhoades, Katharine N., 1885-1965  Search this
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Augustus, 1848-1907  Search this
Steichen, Edward, 1879-1973  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Thayer, Abbott Handerson, 1849-1921  Search this
Tryon, Dwight William, 1849-1925  Search this
Walcott, Charles D. (Charles Doolittle), 1850-1927  Search this
Warring, Joseph Stephens, 1863?-1944  Search this
Way, Thomas R. (Thomas Robert), 1861-1913  Search this
Whistler, Beatrix Philip Godwin, d. 1896  Search this
Whistler, James McNeill, 1834-1903  Search this
Wong, K. T.  Search this
Yue, Seaouke  Search this
Extent:
34 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1876-1931
Scope and Contents:
Papers concerning Freer's art collecting activities, including correspondence, diaries, art inventories, scrapbooks of clippings on James McNeil Whistler and other press clippings, and photographs. In addition to Freer's own correspondence, the papers include correspondence collected by Freer of James McNeill Whistler and of Whistler collector Richard A. Canfield, correspondence of Freer's assistant Katharine Nash Rhoades, and correspondence regarding Freer's bequest to the Smithsonian Institution.
Correspondence, ca. 1860-1921, includes Freer's correspondence, 1876-1920, with artists, dealers, collectors, museums, and public figures; 30 v. of letterpress books containing copies of letters sent, 1892-1910; correspondence collected by Freer of James McNeill Whistler, and his wife Beatrix, 186?-1909, with Lady Colin Campbell, Thomas R. Way, Alexander Reid, Whistler' mother, Mrs. George W. Whistler, and others; correspondence of Whistler collector Richard A. Canfield, 1904-1913, regarding works in Canfield's collection; and correspondence of Freer's assistant, Katharine Nash Rhoades, 1920-1921, soliciting Freer letters and regarding the settlement of his estate.
Also included are twenty-nine pocket diaries, 1889-1890, 1892-1898, 1900-1919, recording daily activities, people and places visited, observations, and comments; a diary kept by Freer's caretaker, Joseph Stephens Warring, recording daily activities at Freer's Detroit home, 1907-1910;
Inventories, n.d. and 1901-1921, of American, European, and Asian art in Freer's collection, often including provenance information; vouchers, 1884-1919, documenting his purchases; five volumes of scrapbooks of clippings on James McNeill Whistler, 1888-1931, labeled "Various," "Peacock Room," "Death, etc.," "Paris, etc.," and "Boston...London" ; three volumes of newsclippings, 1900-1930, concerning Freer and the opening of the Freer Gallery of Art;
correspondence regarding Freer's gift and bequest to the Smithsonian Institution, 1902-1916; and photographs, ca. 1880-1930, of Freer, including portraits by Alvin Langdon Coburn and Edward Steichen, Freer with others, Freer in Cairo, China and Japan, Freer's death mask, and his memorial service, Kyoto, 1930; photographs of artists and others, including Thomas Dewing, Ernest Fenellosa, Katharine Rhoades taken by Alfred Stieglitz, Rosalind B. Philip, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Abbott H. Thayer, Dwight Tryon, and Whistler; and photographs relating to Whistler, including art works depicting him, grave and memorial monuments, works of art, the Peacock Room, and Whistler's memorial exhibition at the Copley Society.
Among Freer's correspondents are: Otto Bacher, Bernard Berenson, Siegfried Bing, Laurence Binyon, W.K. Bixby, Sigisbert Chretien Bosch-Reitz, Charles H. Caffin, Colin Campbell, Richard Canfield, William Merritt Chase, Frederick Stuart Church, Alfred Vance Churchill, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Arthur Wesley Dow, Ernest Fenollosa, Albert Gallatin, John Gellatly, Frederick W. Gookin, Sadakichi Hartmann, Frank J. Hecker, Dikran Kelekian, M. Knoedler & Co., Berthold Laufer, Lien Hui Ching Collection, W.A. Livingstone, Frederick McCormick, Bunkio Matsuki, Gari Melchers, Agnes Meyer, Eugene Meyer, Charles Moore, Yozo Nomura, Rosalind Birnie Philip, Charles A. Platt, Theodore Roosevelt, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, the Smithsonian Institution, Joseph Stephens Warring, Thomas Way, Abbott Handerson Thayer, Dwight W. Tryon, Charles Walcott of the Smithsonian Institution, Beatrix Whistler, James McNeill Whistler, K.T. Wong, Yamanaka & Co., and Seaouke Yue.
Arrangement:
All correspondence except letterpress books: arranged alphabetically by correspondent; letterpress books are chonological.
Biographical / Historical:
Art collector; Detroit, Michigan. Collected Asian, American, and European art, including a large collection of works by James McNeill Whistler. Founded the Freer Gallery of Art, which is now part of the Smithsonian Institution.
Provenance:
Selected for microfilming from the Charles Lang Freer papers at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Microfilmed 1992 by the Archives of American Art with funding provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Fellowships and Grants Research Resources Program. Portions of the correspondence and the letterpress books were previously filmed by the Freer in the 1970 (AAA reels 77, 453-456, and 1217-1232); those reels have been replaced by this microfilming project. See Finding Aid for information on papers not selected for microfilming.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Topic:
Art, Asian -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, American -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.freechar
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-freechar

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