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Acoma War Dancer

Artist:
Awa Tsireh, born San Ildefonso Pueblo, NM1898-died San Ildefonso Pueblo, NM ca. 1955  Search this
Medium:
watercolor, ink, and pencil on paperboard
Dimensions:
sheet: 10 3/4 x 7 1/8 in. (27.4 x 18.1 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
ca. 1920-1925
Topic:
Figure female\full length  Search this
Dress\ceremonial\Indian dress  Search this
Ceremony\dance\War Dance  Search this
Indian\Acoma  Search this
Object\musical instrument\castinets  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Corbin-Henderson Collection, gift of Alice H. Rossin
Object number:
1979.144.21
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/vk7fb40ae50-9007-43d7-a207-80d1b497af03
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1979.144.21

MS 4250 Frances Densmore papers

Creator:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Extent:
2.71 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Culture:
American Indians -- Music  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Diaries
Date:
1893-circa 1955
Summary:
Papers include: diaries and extracts from diaries, account books, a scrapbook, letters received, lectures, reminiscences and brief manuscripts, field and work reports, notes on recording techniques and the preservation of Native American music, musical transcriptions, bibliographic notes, library items, tone photographs, a mouth organ (pitch pipe), and a slide rule.
Scope and Contents:
The Frances Densmore papers, 1893-circa 1955 include: diaries and extracts from diaries, account books, a scrapbook, letters received, lectures, reminiscences and brief manuscripts, field and work reports, notes on recording techniques and the preservation of Native American music, musical transcriptions, bibliographic notes, library items, tone photographs, a mouth organ (pitch pipe), and a slide rule.
Biographical Note:
Frances Densmore was born on May 21, 1867 in Red Wing, Minnesota. Trained in piano, organ, and harmony at the Oberlin Conservatory and in counterpoint at Harvard University, Densmore began studying American Indian music in 1893 with the encouragement of Alice Fletcher. Under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology (B.A.E.) from 1907 to 1933 and from 1939 until her death, Densmore traveled around the United States recording and studying the music of various tribes. Her publications include Chippewa Music, Choctaw Music, Teton Sioux Music, and American Indians and their Music. She passed away on June 5, 1957 in Red Wing, Minnesota.
Separated Materials:
Frances Densmore's song recordings were transferred to the Library of Congress.

The numerous ethnographic manuscripts submitted to the B.A.E. at intervals by Frances Densmore are individually catalogued under the following tribal or geographic headings: Acoma, Alaska, Alibamu, British Columbia, Chippewa, Choctaw, Cuna, Dakota, Iroquois, Menominee, Omaha, Papago, Quileute, Seminole, Winnebago, Yuman, and Zunu.

Five photographic portraits of Densmore (previously Item 1) have been separated out and added to the Portraits of anthropologists collection (Photo Lot 33).

The following three photographic albums, received from the Densmore estate, circa 1962, have been filed by tribe in the Source Prints Collection under B.A.E. No. 4250 (pt.):

(1) "Photographs taken among the Northern Ute by F. Densmore," on two trips, 1914 and 1916. Includes notation by Densmore as to nature of her work and list of captions for photographs. Album, 34 pp. (Several of the photographs were published in B.A.E. Bull. 75, "Northern Ute Music".) Frances Densmore appears in group photograph, p. 23(b).

(2) "Photographs and postcards of a western trip by F. Densmore," from two trips, 1923 and 1926, among the Indians at Neah Bay, Washington. (Results of two trips presented in Nootka and Quileute Music, B.A.E. Bull. 124.) Album, 70 pp. (See pp. 55 and 61 for photgraphs of Frances Densmore.)

(3) "Photographs taken at Neah Bay, Washington, and in hop-picking camp near Chilliwack, B.C., " 1926. Includes photographs taken by Frances Densmore, by C.A. Clay (a newspaper man from Seattle, Washington), and several by Asahel Curtis. Notation by Densmore on nature of her work and various captions supplied by Densmore. (Results of trip presented in B.A.E. Bull. 124, op. cit. and B.A.E. Bull. 136, No. 27, "Music of the Indians of British Columbia.") Album, 45 pp. See page 39 for photograph of Densmore's sister Margaret and Indians).
Provenance:
Presented to the Bureau of American Ethnology (B.A.E.) by Frances Densmore at intervals, 1944-1955. Some materials received from the Densmore estate, circa 1962.
Restrictions:
The Frances Densmore papers are open for research.

Access to the Frances Densmore papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnomusicology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Diaries
Citation:
Manuscript 4250 Frances Densmore papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4250
See more items in:
MS 4250 Frances Densmore papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d393139f-4873-47f5-acf1-4de82c173d50
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4250

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Date:
July 1-4, 1967
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1967 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Fieldwork

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Audio

Series 5: Video
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1967 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 1966, Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley engaged James R. Morris to serve as Director of Museum Services, soon to become a new Division of Performing Arts. Ripley charged Morris to develop a full program of performances on the National Mall - sound and light show, readings and concerts, films, live demonstrations, and special exhibitions. Morris, who had previously organized the American Folk Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1963, proposed that the Smithsonian host a folk festival as the centerpiece of the outdoors activities. Through the Asheville festival, Morris had come into contact with key people involved in the Newport Folk Festival, among them Alan Lomax. It was Lomax who suggested that the Smithsonian hire Newport's then-director of field programs, Ralph C. Rinzler, to help plan a Smithsonian festival. The term "folklife", drawn from Scandinavian usage, was chosen over "folk" as the name of the new Festival.

The first Festival of American Folklife was held July 1-4, 1967 in two tents - one for crafts and one for sales - a music stage, and a performance area on the terrace of the Museum of History and Technology (later, the National Museum of American History). Fifty-eight traditional craftspeople and thirty-two musical and dance groups from throughout the United States demonstrated and performed at the first open-air event. Mountain banjo-pickers and ballad singers, Chinese lion dancers, Indian sand painters, basket and rug weavers, New Orleans jazz bands and a Bohemian hammer dulcimer band from east Texas combined with the host of participants from many rural and urban areas of the U.S. The entire event was free to the public, the expense of the production having been borne by the Smithsonian aided by numerous civic and cultural organizations, business enterprises and State Arts Councils.

The 1967 Festival drew a huge crowd - estimated at more than 400,000 - and strong interest from the press, Members of Congress, and Smithsonian leadership. In the Smithsonian's annual report for 1967, Ripley reflected on the success of the Festival:

Within - in the Museum - the tools, the products of craft work, the musical instruments hang suspended in cases, caught in beautifully petrified isolation. Without, for the space of a few hours they came alive in the hands of specialists from all over America.... It was a moving spectacle and one that underscored the principle that a museum, to be a museum in the best sense of the word, must live and breathe both within and without.

The 1967 Festival marked the inception of a fresh attempt at the evaluation, documentation and celebration of a hitherto unrecognized area of vigorous American expression. Concurrent with the first Festival, an American Folklife Conference was organized (with assistance from Henry Glassie) to address topics of American and international folklife studies, the relationship between folklife and history, applied folklife, and folklife in schools, museums, communities, and government agencies.

The Festival was organized by the Division of Performing Arts, under the direction of James R. Morris. Ralph Rinzler was the Applied Folklore Consultant and Festival Artistic Director, and Marian A. Hope was Project Assistant. No program book or schedule was published, but news articles, congressional remarks, letters from the public, and a list of participants were later compiled in lieu of a program book. That document can be viewed in Series 1.
Participants:
Crafts

Harry Belone, 1912-1986, Navajo sand painter, Arizona

Herman Benton, 1914-1994, scoop maker, New York

Mary Bowers, 1922-2002, Seminole patchwork, needlework, Florida

Marie Z. Chino, 1907-1982, Acoma pottery, New Mexico

Mildred Cleghorn, 1910-1997, Indian cloth dolls, Oklahoma

Maisy Coburn, apple face and corncob dolls, Arkansas

Margaret Coochwytewa, 1923-1995, Hopi, coil and yucca leaves basket maker, Arizona

Victor Coochwytewa, 1922-2011, Hopi silversmith, Arizona

Freedom Quilting Bee, Alabama

Taft Greer, 1908-1986, weaver, Tennessee

Joseph Grismayer, 1888-1970, willow basket maker, Pennsylvania

Dewey Harmon, 1900-1972, whittler, North Carolina

Bea Hensley, 1919-2013, blacksmith, North Carolina

Louise Jones, 1910-1973, coil basket making, South Carolina

Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Mrs. Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Norman Kennedy, 1934-, carder, spinner, weaver, Massachusetts

Clifford Lucas, Indian dolls, New Mexico

Lila Suzanne Marshall, 1908-1994, corn shuck dolls, North Carolina

Charles Mayac, 1906-1971, ivory carver, Alaska

Leo J. Meyer, scrimshaw carver, Maryland

Alice Merryman, 1906-2007, corn shuck dolls, Arkansas

Norman Miller, 1905-1972, southern pottery, Alabama

Mrs. Norman Miller, southern pottery, Alabama

Hazel Miracle, 1915-2001, apple face, corn shuck dolls, Kentucky

Homer Miracle, 1910-1980, hand-hewn bowls, carver, Kentucky

Ann Mitchell, corn shuck dolls, Maryland

Golda Porter, spinner, North Carolina

Edd Presnell, 1916-1994, dulcimer maker, North Carolina

Ambrose Roanhorse, 1904-1982, Navajo silversmith, Arizona

Garnet Claw Roanhorse, 1911-1999, Navajo rug weaver, Arizona

Georgianne Robinson, 1917-1985, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Lou Sesher, 1915-1989, model boat builder, Pennsylvania

Genevieve Tomey, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Elisia Trivett, rug hooker, North Carolina

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilting, North Carolina

Willard Watson, 1905-1994, toy maker, North Carolina

Music

The Baca Family Band, Czech-American polka music, Texas

Libba Cotten, Country guitarist, North Carolina, Washington, D.C.

Dejan's Olympia Brass Brand, New Orleans marching band, Louisiana

Jimmie Driftwood, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

First Maryland Regiment Fife and Drum Corps, martial music, Maryland

John Jackson, Songster and blues singer, Virginia

Bessie Jones (1902-1984) and the Georgia Sea Island Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, Georgia

Norman Kennedy, Scots ballad singer, Massachusetts

Clark Kessinger, 1896-1975, mountain fiddler, West Virginia

Vinice Lejeune (1919-1993) Group, Cajun band, Louisiana

The McGee Brothers with Sid Harkreader, String band, Tennessee

Sam McGee, 1894-1975

Kirk McGee, 1899-1983

Gene Meade, West Virginia

The Moving Star Hall Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, South Carolina

Glenn Ohrlin, cowboy singer, Arkansas

Grace Papakee, 1907-1982, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

John Papakee, 1895-1981, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

Billie Pierce (1907-1974) and De De Pierce (1904-1973) and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, New Orleans jazz, Louisiana

Almeda Riddle, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

Scottish Pipe Band, highland marching music, Washington, D.C.

Wade Ward (1892-1971) and the Buck Mountain Band, mountain string band, Virginia

Yomo Toro Band, Puerto Rican music, New York

Ed Young (1910-1972), G.D. Young and Lonnie Young (1903-1976), African American fife and drum group, Mississippi

Young People's Chorus from the Scripture of Church of Christ, gospel, Virginia

Dance

Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers, cloggers, North Carolina

Chinese Lion Group, Washington, D.C.

Maurice Flowers, square dance caller, Maryland

Los Gallegos d'Espana, Galician dance, New York

Glinka Dancers, Russian dance group, New Jersey

Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

Mrs. Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

McNeff Dancers, Irish dancing with Ceilidh band, New York

Henry Paterick, square dance caller, Virginia

St. Andrews Society Group, Scottish dancing, Washington, D.C.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections , Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1967
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk529e94ea3-000d-4513-b130-8a8ea3e935bd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1967

Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life

Creator:
Farber, Joseph C., 1903-  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) -- Exhibitions.  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Gorman, R. C. (Rudolph Carl), 1932-  Search this
Extent:
6,000 Contact prints (circa 6000 contact prints (proof sheets))
6,000 Acetate negatives (circa)
8 Color transparencies
1,000 Items (circa 1000 enlarged prints: silver gelatin (some mounted for exhibition))
Culture:
Arctic peoples  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Lummi  Search this
Haida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Miccosukee Seminole (Mikasuki)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Chehalis  Search this
Apache  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contact prints
Acetate negatives
Color transparencies
Photographs
Place:
North Carolina
New York
New Mexico
Montana
South Dakota
Oklahoma
Arizona
California
Florida
Minnesota
Alaska
Alberta
Washington (State)
Barrow, Point (Alaska)
Yuma County (Ariz.)
Taos (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1970-1975
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made as part of Joseph C. Farber's project to document modern NAtive American everyday life. Represented tribes include the Acoma, Apache, Blackfoot, Chehalis, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cocopa, Dakota, Eskimo, Haida, Kiowa, Kutenai, Lummi, Mohave, Mohawk, Navaho, Northern Athabascan, Onandaga, Pima, Pueblo, Quinalt, Seminole, Taos, Tlingit, and Zuni. Subject coverage is broad and varies from tribe to tribe. Included are portraits, as well as totem poles, carving, weaving, pottery, painitng, landscapes, boats and canoes, ceremonial regalia, camps, classes and vocational training, homes and traditional dwellings, construction projects, rodeos and powwows, dances, industries (including lumber), herding and ranching, agriculture, stores and storefronts, cliff dwellings, parades, crab cleaning, fishing, games, health care, legal processes, music, office work, sewing, vending, and a funeral. There are also photographs of R. C. Gorman (and a letter from Gorman to Farber) and Fritz Shoulder (some in color).

Farber's travels included Alaska (Point Barrow, Dead Horse, Glacier Bay, Haines, Hoona, Hydaberg, Ketchikan, Mount McKinley, Prudhoe Bay, Saxman, and Sitka); Alberta (Blackfeet Reservation); Arizona (Canyon de Chelly, Cocopa Reservation, Flagstaff, Kayenta, Monument Valley, Pima Reservation, Quechan Reservation, Mojave Reservation, and Yuma); California (Alcatraz, Oakland, and San Francisco); Florida (Big Cypress Reservation; Miccosukee Reservation); Minnesota (Minneapolis and Nett Lake); Montana (Northern Cheyenne Reservation); New Mexico (Acoma, Gallup, Navajo Forest, Picuris, Puye, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Santa Fe, Taos, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, and Tesuque); New York (New York City and Onandaga Reservation); North Carolina (Cherokee Reservation); Oklahoma (Anadarko, Apache, Lawton, Stilwell, and Tahlequah); South Dakota (Rosebud and Wounded Knee); and Washington (Lummi Reservation, Nisqually River, Puyallup River, and Quinalt Reservation).
Biographical/Historical note:
Joseph C. Farber (1903-1994) was a successful New York businessman and professional photographer. He studied with Edward Steichen at the New York Camera Club in the 1920s. The prints in this collection resulted from a five-year project that involved travelling to Native communities throughout the United States to document modern Native American life. The project resulted in a book, Native Americans: 500 Years After (1975), as well as exhibits, including one in the National Museum of Natural History in 1976-1977.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 78-1, NAA ACC 95-3
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Farber's photographs, previously located in Photo Lot 95-3 have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 78-1. These photographs were also made by Joseph C. Farber and form part of this collection.
The National Museum of American History Archives Center holds the Joseph Farber Papers and Photographs, circa 1962-1990.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Photographs published in Farber's books still under copyright. Reproduction permission from artist's estate.
Topic:
Dwellings  Search this
Vocational education  Search this
Canoes and canoeing  Search this
Boats and boating  Search this
Dance  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Rodeos  Search this
Building  Search this
handicrafts  Search this
Totem poles  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Livestock  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 78-1, Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.78-1
See more items in:
Joseph C. Farber photographs of Native American life
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw381bc3276-6acf-4c9a-ac8c-9b59ad173f56
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-78-1

Frances Densmore

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Biographical / Historical:
Frances Theresa Densmore (1867-1957) was born in Red Wing, Minnesota to Benjamin and Sarah Densmore. Densmore began piano lessons at an early age and became exposed to American Indian music when quite young, living close to Lakota people. Densmore attended the Oberlin Conservatory of Music where she studied the organ and harmony, in addition to the piano. After Oberlin, Densmore became a church organist and taught music. Around 1890, she move to Boston to continue her studies in music. There, she learnt about Alice Cunningham Fletcher's work among the Omaha Indians. Densmore wrote to Fletcher and Fletcher quickly became Densmore's mentor.

Densmore's first field work was among the Chippewa of Grande Portage, in 1905. In 1908 the Bureau of American Ethnology provided Densmore with a graphophone. Densmore's association with the BAE lasted fifty years. Densmore worked among the Cocopah, Makah, Winnebago, Lakota, Mandan and Hidatsa, Northern Ute, Nootka and Quileute, Ojibwa, Onondaga, Omaha, Apache and Navajo, Santo Domingo, Cheyenne and Arapaho, Maidu, Choctaw, Pawnee, Papago, Menominee, Chippewa, Yuma, Yaqui, Seminole, Acoma, Isleta, Cochiti, Zuni, Chitimacha and Alibamu Indian peoples. She also worked with the Tule Indians of Panama. Densmore served as a founding Officer and second Vice-President of the Society for Ethnomusicology in 1956. She recorded over 2,400 American Indian songs. She died at the age of 90.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40017d625-d859-402a-a7fb-9cfcb3326c6b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref15733

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Contracts
Notes
Video recordings
Videotapes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Negatives
Audiotapes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Business records
Photographic prints
Place:
Caribbean Area
Bermuda Islands
Date:
June 27-July 8, 2001
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Bermuda Connections

Series 3: Masters of the Building Arts

Series 4: New York City at the Smithsonian

Series 5: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
More so than monuments, buildings, museum-quality artifacts, historical facts, or even valued performances, the Festival celebrates the people who make them, hold them in esteem, and debate their meaning. The Festival represents a wonderful range and diversity of voices and human experiences. The 2001 Festival featured programs on the building arts, New York City, and Bermuda.

The Masters of the Building Arts program brought together expert craftspeople in the building trades, including many who use traditional arts to restore our monuments and historic sites. Among them visitors could find many of the artisans who have worked on the Washington Monument, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Acoma Pueblo, historic Charleston, and Native Hawaiian sites - all important monuments protected by the National Park Service, the Smithsonian's partner in the Festival since 1973.

The New York City program highlighted the way in which that city has become the global village. Broadway, the fashion industry, the Apollo Theater, and Wall Street were all featured. So too was the vital cultural creativity that has come about as people from the world over have settled in New York. The Festival provided a contemporary look at immigration and its importance to our culture. The fact that so many people from every corner of the earth have come to our shores through New York in order to build their lives and our nation has inspired generations, and the Festival offered the opportunity to encounter those communities and experience their cultural heritage.

Bermuda, though separated from the United States by hundreds of miles of ocean, has long played a role in our history. Bermuda was settled by colonists on their way to Jamestown, Virginia, where they rescued starving survivors of that colony. ln the last century, Bermuda, always entrepreneurial and self-reliant, has developed tourism and financial industries in a symbiotic relationship with the United States. Bermudians foster strong community connections within their own island society, as well as those of commerce, culture, and cooperation with the people of nations whose shores touch the Atlantic Ocean. Festival visitors could transport themselves to a tiny island of Bermuda within the Festival site on the National Mall, experiencing its cultural traditions through interaction with Bermudian participants.

The Festival always depends on solid research. Several dozen Bermudian scholars, educators, and artists working with Smithsonian curator Diana Baird N'Diaye interviewed hundreds of tradition-bearers, documenting everything from gardening to house-building to music-making. That documentary archive of tapes, photographs, field notes, and videos constitutes a snapshot of Bermudian culture and provided the basis for the Festival program, as well as a resource for the future. A similar effort took place New York City, where folklorist Nancy Groce directed the curatorial work - selecting the traditions to feature at the Festival and the people to present them - aided by cultural organizations in the city, among them the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, City Lore, and the Museum of American Financial History, a Smithsonian affiliate. Masters of the Building Arts grew from the vision of the Smithsonian's Marjorie Hunt, guided by her own long-term research on the stone carvers of the National Cathedral.

The 2001 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 27-July 1 and July 4-8) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs, with several special events including the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert.

The 2001 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Daniel Sheehy, Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordngs; James Early, Director, Cultural Heritage Policy; Olivia Cadaval, Chair, Research & Education; Jon Kertzer, Project Director, GlobalSound Network; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist Emeritus; Betty J. Belanus, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Frank Proschan, Project Director, Save Our Sounds; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Frank Bechter, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Rene Lopez, Jemima Pierre, Kate Rinzler, Ana Patricia Rodriguez, Fellows & Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council

Jane Beck, Kurt Dewhurst, Anthony Gittens, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Judy Mitoma, Bernice Johnson Reagon, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos

Folkways Advisory Board

Michael Asch, Phyllis Barney, Don DeVito, Ella Jenkins,

National Park Service

Denis P. Galvin, Acting Director; Jack Schamp, Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Contracts
Notes
Video recordings
Videotapes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Negatives
Audiotapes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Business records
Photographic prints
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d00f3613-f05c-4a87-9f1a-29b4d189b59f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2001

Footage of the Gallup Ceremonial

Collection Creator:
Wrather, William Embry, 1883-1963  Search this
Extent:
1 Film reel (35 minutes, black-and-white color silent; 965 feet, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
circa 1926-1932
Scope and Contents:
Footage shot of the annual ceremonial held in Gallup, New Mexico. Included are shots of Navajo, Pueblo, Apache, and Tewa parading through Gallup and around the fairgrounds on foot, on horseback and in wagons; American Indian band; dance performances at the fairgrounds including the Pueblo Eagle dance, Hopi Buffalo dance, Hopis performing the "Apache dance," an Evening Circle dance, and masked clowns; and rodeo activities such as foot and horse races, tug-o-war, and bow and arrow contests. Also included are shots of a Navajo encampment and herding goats, canyons, Mesa Verde, and Acoma.

Legacy Keywords: Language and culture ; Parade ; Dance ; Musical instruments ; Rodeos ; Horse racing ; Ceremony "indian ceremonial" Gallup, New Mexico
Local Number:
HSFA 1991.14.1
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William Wrather films of the Southwest, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William Wrather films of the Southwestern United States
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9da670439-0f4f-4d82-8233-13e1a2d70696
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1991-14-ref1

Music of Acoma, Isleta, Cochiti, and Zuni Pueblos

Author:
Densmore, Frances  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1957
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_89897

Always Becoming Sculpture Project - Episode Nine - "The Earth/ La Terra"

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2008-05-08T16:22:08.000Z
YouTube Category:
People & Blogs  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_SEA48CLRUYE

Rattle with turkey design

Culture/People:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Emma Lewis-Mitchell (Emma Lewis), Acoma Pueblo, b. 1931  Search this
Donor:
R. E. Mansfield (Richard E. Mansfield), Non-Indian, 1937-2007  Search this
Previous owner:
R. E. Mansfield (Richard E. Mansfield), Non-Indian, 1937-2007  Search this
Object Name:
Rattle with turkey design
Media/Materials:
Pottery, paint
Techniques:
Coiled/hand built, modeled, painted
Dimensions:
16.5 x 20 cm
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Place:
Acoma Pueblo, Acoma Reservation; Cibola County; New Mexico; USA
Date created:
1975-1990
Catalog Number:
26/4109
Barcode:
264109.000
See related items:
Acoma Pueblo
Music and Sound
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws62402de08-5b7b-4811-9f57-61ad7e7a2c69
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_280279
Online Media:

Pai'yatyamu (God of Flowers, Butterflys, and Music) kachina

Culture/People:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Artist/Maker:
J. Michael Bear (J. Bear/James Michael Byrnes/Jimmy Byrnes/Kyash Petrach/Hofyee), Acoma Pueblo/Laguna Pueblo/Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux), 1933-1998  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
IACB source:
Kohlberg's Antiques  Search this
Title:
Pai'yatyamu (God of Flowers, Butterflys, and Music) kachina
Object Name:
Kachina/Katsina (Image withheld)
Media/Materials:
Wood, cordage, wool yarn, feather/feathers, abalone/haliotis shell, cotton twine/string, paint
Techniques:
Carved, painted, wrapped, tied
Dimensions:
5.7 x 12.8 x 25.1 cm
Object Type:
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Place:
New Mexico; USA (inferred)
Date created:
1965
Catalog Number:
25/5592
Barcode:
255592.000
See related items:
Acoma Pueblo
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6e0695f2a-b9b8-43a5-b847-5f3da0bef4ac
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_271457

MS 3245 Manuscripts relating to the study of Alabama ("Alabamu") Indian music

Creator:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Depicted:
Thompson, Charles Martin, 1860-1935  Search this
Extent:
1 Portfolio
Culture:
Alibamu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Portfolios
Date:
1933, 1946
Scope and Contents:
Includes: "Alabama Music." Typed carbon copy of unpublished manuscript, pages 251-256. This manuscript is a brief resume of F. Densmore's work with Alabama (Alibamu) music. No date appears on the manuscript but it could not have been written before 1933 and probably was written ca. 1940's because the page numbers correspond to similar resumes for the Acoma and Winnebago. This carbon copy was received from the Densmore estate, ca. 1962. "Alabama Music" by F. Densmore, "based upon unpublished material in the possession of the Bureau of American Ethnology and used by permission," 28 pages typed carbon copy. No date appears on the title page of the manuscript but it was probably written after her return from field work among the Alabama Indians in 1933. Old Manuscript Number 3245 "Songs of the Alibamu Indians." 49 typed pages of text, including descriptive analysis of 35 songs. Submitted April 25, 1933. Old Manuscript Number 3246 "Alibamu songs of the Buffalo and other Dances." 12 typed pages of text including descriptive analysis of 12 songs. Submitted May 15, 1933. "Alabama Music by Frances Densmore." 69 typed pages of text and two portraits of the singer Charles Martin Thompson; tabulated analyses of 47 songs, and 18 pages of musical transcriptions. The text, illustrations and transcriptions are on microfilm in the Bureau of American Ethnology.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3245
Other Title:
Alabama Music
Songs of the Alibamu Indians
Alibamu songs of the Buffalo and other Dances
Alabama Music by Frances Densmore
Topic:
Dance -- Alibamu  Search this
Music -- Alibamu  Search this
Buffalo dance -- Alibamu  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3245, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3245
See more items in:
MS 3245 Manuscripts relating to the study of Alabama ("Alabamu") Indian music
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39a8bcd9d-5920-4b8d-8ce4-d82c9578dc85
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3245

Alabama Music

Creator:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Collection Creator:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Culture:
Alibamu  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Scope and Contents:
This manuscript is a brief unpublished resume of Frances Densmoreʼs work with Alabama (Alibamu) music. Includes pages 251-256.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3245 (part)
Local Note:
No date appears on the manuscript but it could not have been written before 1933 and probably was written ca. 1940's because the page numbers correspond to similar resumes for the Acoma and Winnebago. This carbon copy was received from the Densmore estate, ca. 1962.
Typed carbon copy
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 3245, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 3245 Manuscripts relating to the study of Alabama ("Alabamu") Indian music
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38f4c0fa7-7aa6-4d42-addf-4e4a74c7d18c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms3245-ref1

MS 3137 Material relating to the Music of Alaska, Acoma, and Yuma Indians

Creator:
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Chapman, John W. (John Wight), 1858-1939  Search this
Informant:
Fox, James  Search this
Culture:
Northern Athabascan  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Degexit'an (Ingalik)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Musical transcriptions
Date:
ca. 1929-37
Scope and Contents:
Includes: (1) "A Comparison between Yuma, Acoma, and Alaska Indian Songs" 19 pages. (2) Descriptive analysis of seven Acoma songs 7 pages. (3) Material relating to eight Alaska Indian songs sung by James Fox and recorded by the Reverend John W. Chapman at Anvik, Alaska. The songs are those of the waterspirit, crane, fox, owl, woodpecker, jay, porcupine, and crow. They have been identified as being Ingalik, perhaps on the basis of where they were recorded. The words, if there were any, have not been included in the transcriptions. (a) Descriptive analysis 2 pages. (b) Three sets of musical transcriptions (15 pages) plus a photostatic copy of one set. The three transcriptions differ in small but significant ways. (c) Forms used in analyzing the songs 16 pages. (d) Fragment of a note that includes information about Fox, Chapman, and the acquisition of the sound recordings by the Bureau of American Ethnology 1 page. (e) Fragment of a note about the songs and the quality of the recordings 1 page. (f) Fragment of a letter, Chapman to Densmore, May 11, 1931, including information incorporated in f, above 2 pages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3137
Other Title:
A Comparison between Yuma, Acoma, and Alaska Indian Songs
Topic:
Music -- Acoma  Search this
Music -- Ingalik  Search this
Music -- Yuma  Search this
Ingalik  Search this
Genre/Form:
Musical transcriptions
Citation:
Manuscript 3137, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3137
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c90f37af-8d0f-4e71-9aa4-bb4f722e73cb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3137

MS 4533 Descriptive list of recordings of Acoma songs

Creator:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Wilding, Anthony  Search this
Performer:
Sanchez, Philip  Search this
Translator:
Hunt, Wilbert Blue Sky Eagle, 1907-2007  Search this
Annotator:
White, Leslie A., 1900-1975  Search this
Extent:
1 Portfolio
Culture:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Portfolios
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Songs sung by Philip Sanchez, translated by Wilbert Hunt, and recorded by Anthony Wilding for M. W. Stirling, Washington, D. C., October, 1928. Songs numbered 1A-24A. Three copies of list, as follows: original, in handwriting of M. W. Stirling, Anthony Wilding, and ; typescript, annotated by Leslie A. White; typescript carbon, edited in writing of M. W. Stirling.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4533
Topic:
Acoma Indians  Search this
Music  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4533, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4533
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c55f84a5-817b-4d9b-8874-cd2934ea6a15
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4533

Drum and drumstick

Culture/People:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Previous owner:
William M. Fitzhugh (William MacPherson Fitzhugh), Non-Indian, 1853-1929  Search this
Seller:
Estate of William M. Fitzhugh  Search this
Object Name:
Drum and drumstick
Media/Materials:
Wood, hide, paint
Techniques:
Carved, stretched, painted
Object Type:
Music and Sound
Place:
Acoma Pueblo, Acoma Reservation; Cibola County; New Mexico; USA
Catalog Number:
19/3104
Barcode:
193104.000
See related items:
Acoma Pueblo
Music and Sound
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws621e2dd5d-78b5-414d-9492-7297e1ee256b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_206434
Online Media:

Bowl

Culture/People:
probably Zia Pueblo (attributed); collected at Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Previous owner:
Harrison Brockbank, Non-Indian, ca. 1867-1947  Search this
Donor:
Harrison Brockbank, Non-Indian, ca. 1867-1947  Search this
Object Name:
Bowl
Media/Materials:
Pottery
Techniques:
Painted
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Acoma Pueblo, Acoma Reservation; Cibola County; New Mexico; USA
Catalog Number:
18/1044
Barcode:
181044.000
See related items:
Zia Pueblo
Acoma Pueblo
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws608da7290-0694-4c2d-8457-04e074e7f11a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_193738
Online Media:

Jar

Culture/People:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Previous owner:
Harrison Brockbank, Non-Indian, ca. 1867-1947  Search this
Donor:
Harrison Brockbank, Non-Indian, ca. 1867-1947  Search this
Object Name:
Jar
Media/Materials:
Pottery
Techniques:
Painted
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Acoma Pueblo, Acoma Reservation; Cibola County; New Mexico; USA
Catalog Number:
18/1045
Barcode:
181045.000
See related items:
Acoma Pueblo
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6d730bf8d-c7d6-49f0-961c-5b5dd3db4db8
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_193739
Online Media:

Jar

Culture/People:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Collector:
John Louw Nelson (John L. Nelson), Non-Indian, 1895-1963  Search this
Seller:
John Louw Nelson (John L. Nelson), Non-Indian, 1895-1963  Search this
Object Name:
Jar
Media/Materials:
Pottery
Techniques:
Painted
Dimensions:
26.7 x 38.1 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Acoma Pueblo, Acoma Reservation; Cibola County; New Mexico; USA
Date created:
circa 1890
Catalog Number:
16/5827
Barcode:
165827.000
See related items:
Acoma Pueblo
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws612bc1aea-3983-40e3-9b48-720111757fb3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_177665
Online Media:

Jar

Culture/People:
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Collector:
John Louw Nelson (John L. Nelson), Non-Indian, 1895-1963  Search this
Seller:
John Louw Nelson (John L. Nelson), Non-Indian, 1895-1963  Search this
Object Name:
Jar
Media/Materials:
Pottery
Techniques:
Painted
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Acoma Pueblo, Acoma Reservation; Cibola County; New Mexico; USA
Catalog Number:
16/5828
Barcode:
165828.000
See related items:
Acoma Pueblo
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws65bff82b9-6a6e-4c6a-b9f5-2ab7092cdaa7
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_177666
Online Media:

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