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Chocolate City No More: Changing Demographics & Gentrification of Washington, D.C

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-12-08T00:59:58.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_feGIOEoBaGc

Representing Diaspora & Diverse Blackness in Museology - Revisiting Our Black Mosaic Symposium

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-19T15:24:16.000Z
YouTube Category:
People & Blogs  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_9hEea23XUEM

Black Mosaic of Wash DC: unpacking multiple “Black” identities

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-11-19T15:23:45.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museums Collections and Research
YouTube Channel:
Anacostia_Community_Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_aMCx6T_Fxos

Before Freedom Came: Exhibition Tour to Elementary School Students

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Traveling Exhibition Service  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
After reading a story about a little girl in Africa who was enslaved and taken to America, Robert Hall led a group of students on a tour of the exhibition 'Before Freedom Came: African American Life in the Antebellum South." Participating students attended Stanton Elementary School, 6th Grade; Af. Ctrd School, 3rd Grade; and Beginning Elementary School, 5th-6th Grade.
Exhibition tour. Related to exhibition 'Before Freedom Came: African American Life in the Antebellum South.' Dated 19931213.
Biographical / Historical:
'Before Freedom Came: African American Life in the Antebellum South' explored the world of African Americans, their families, and communities in the antebellum South. The exhibition was developed for circulation by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services (SITES) with the assistance of the Anacostia Museum and the National Museum of American History. It was adapted from an exhibition organized by the Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, Virginia. The exhibition was held at the Anacostia Museum from December 12, 1993 - March 1, 1994.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Fugitive slaves  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Education -- Museums  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Before Freedom Came: Exhibition Tour to Elementary School Students, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-032, Item ACMA AV002163
See more items in:
Before freedom came: African American life in the antebellum South exhibition records
Before freedom came: African American life in the antebellum South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-032: Before freedom came: African American life in the antebellum South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7df0123a9-c1af-483e-b3c2-fbed0c96a168
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-032-ref546

Opening of The Anacostia Story Exhibition

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon), 1913-2001  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Speeches
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1977
Scope and Contents:
S. Dillon Ripley introduces the opening of the new exhibition, The Anacostia Story; and speaks of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum on its 10th anniversary and the opening of Anacostia Historical Society in 1974. John Kinard introduces Ripley as the speaker. Footage of patrons viewing exhibition and talking to each other.
Speech. Part of Anacostia Story 1608 -1930 Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition, The Anacostia Story, presented the history and development of Anacostia between 1608 and 1930 told through artifacts, photographs, early prints, documents and memorabilia. Well-known residents of the area, including Frederick Douglass, Elzie Hoffman, Dr. Charles Nichols, and Solomon G. Brown, were featured. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from March of 1977 to March 1978.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
Museums  Search this
Communities  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Speeches
Citation:
Opening of The Anacostia Story Exhibition, Exhibition Records AV03-039, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-039, Item ACMA AV003274
See more items in:
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA 03-039: Anacostia Story:1608-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa787f95754-888c-4ae7-b944-f28344096599
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-039-ref921

Make an Invention

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Video recordings (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
During the workshop, students created three-dimensional models of original inventions or innovations after a guided tour of the museum's exhibition on African American inventors titled 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' Workshop was recommended for third and fourth grade students. The workshop was held at the Anacostia Museum on February 5, 1990.
Workshop. Related to exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' AV002113 and AV002116: dated 19900205. AV002058: undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002116

ACMA AV002058
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset and calendar of events for Jan/Feb 1990.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Education -- Museums  Search this
Children  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Make an Invention, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002113
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79a8c3d9e-c1cf-4810-9a89-699b7e2949e9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref508

Lorenzo Calendar: Storytelling about Afro-American Invention and Innovation

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1990
Scope and Contents:
To a group of children, Lorenzo Calender, professional storyteller and Griot, spoke of the African origin of the language of Swahili, agriculture, navigation, monotheism, and algebra. He led the children through a portion of the exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930,' and told stories.
Event. Related to exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Lorenzo Calendar: Storytelling about Afro-American Invention and Innovation, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002100_B
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa755ea90bb-8945-4646-abcc-5e9f5057c205
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref514

Storytelling about Afro-American Inventors

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1990
Scope and Contents:
To a group of children, a woman told stories about inventors, including Benjamin Banneker, Norbert Rillieux, Elijah McCoy, Lewis Latimer, and Madame CJ Walker.
Event. Related to exhibition 'The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation 1619-1930.' Transcribed from physical asset: 'Eraka.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 - focused on outstanding black inventors, as well as anonymous innovators, who, as slaves, craftsmen and workers, made important contributions to the United States. Included are actual inventions, such an Jan Matzelieger's "shoe-lasting" machine, which revolutionized shoe production, and Garrett Morgan's safety hood and automatic traffic signal, forerunners of the modern gas mask and traffic stop light. The exhibition examines such topics as African influences on Colonial technology and how the slave system stymied technological innovation. Individual inventors such as Lewis Temple, Elijah McCoy, James Forten, and Norbert Rillieux are profiled. Also featured are artifacts from some of the expositions of the late 19th-century, which celebrated this new surge of black inventiveness. The exhibition was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 - May 1990.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
Technology  Search this
Technological innovations  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Storytelling about Afro-American Inventors, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026, Item ACMA AV002100_B
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-026: The Real McCoy: Afro-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c9e6f144-c6ee-4a9f-987e-8e7b1ceb752c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-026-ref515

To Achieve These Rights: Discussion with Brookland Elementary School Students

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1992
Scope and Contents:
Museum educator Joanna Banks discussed the meaning of prejudice and marching for justice with Brookland Elementary School students. The students visited the museum to view the exhibition 'To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self Determination in D.C., 1791-1978'
Discussion. Related to exhibition 'To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self Determination in D.C., 1791-1978.' Dated 19920410.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Prejudices  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Students  Search this
African American students  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Collection Citation:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-033, Item ACMA AV002134
See more items in:
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records
To achieve these rights: the struggle for equality and self-determination in the District of Columbia, 1791–1978 exhibition records / Series 2: AudioVisual Materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bae770de-5496-4187-9de8-2d75f875a691
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-033-ref513

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Exhibition Tour for Students led by Brian Jones

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1984
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones led an interactive tour of the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall' for JHS students during February 1984.
Exhibiton tour - educational program. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dated 198402.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001363_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Students  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001363_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d127bd1a-918f-4492-877e-8590d3187edb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref84

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Exhibition Tour led by Brian Jones

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1984
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones led an interactive tour, possibly for students, of the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall.'
Exhibiton tour - educational program. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001366_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001366_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa73e0a8c29-ade9-4901-af28-d9fc855066f0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref85

Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Student Tests

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1982
Scope and Contents:
Instructions to be used for the pretest and the post-test given to student groups regarding the exhibition 'Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South.'
Instructions. Sound only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. Dated 19820416.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition - Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South - presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Anna J. Cooper Exhibit: Student Tests, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV001348_B
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7acb1bcd8-6fee-40b6-93d8-0ff6a95fdb19
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref911

Exhibition Programming and the Role of Objects in an Exhibition

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Zora Martin-Felton discusses planning entertainment and education programs which accompany exhibits. She details programming associated with the paintings of the Harmon collection, the Sage of Anacostia exhibition, and the Young People's Festival of the Arts. Additionally, Zora discusses the evolution of programming at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from the formation of the program planning committee into the exhibits, education, and research committee. Zora Martin-Felton, John Kinard, and another museum professional address questions during the question and answer session, which includes discussion on objects in exhibitions, particularly the role or significance of objects in an exhibition.
Presentation or discussion; question and answer session. Part of Professional Development and Museology Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Education -- Museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Exhibition Programming and the Role of Objects in an Exhibition, Record Group AV09-022, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.AV09-022, Item ACMA AV000787
See more items in:
Professional Development and Museology Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa745bb8139-e7e3-4497-80dc-5c68135486f0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-av09-022-ref504

Prologue to Evolution of a Community Part II

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Introductory narration for museum exhibit, Evolution of a Community, draws parallel between the greed and ignorance of Europeans enslaving and dehumanizing Africans beginning in 1442, and the racism and inequality of African Americans 500 years later. The museum exhibit examines the social ills - unemployment, feeble health care, starving bodies, poor housing, and deadly drugs - that daily plaque the community of Anacostia.
Narration. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Racism  Search this
Race discrimination  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Unemployment  Search this
Housing  Search this
Starvation  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Medical care  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Prologue to Evolution of a Community Part II, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003284
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74672090a-53c3-45d5-8980-4fb1a90f0465
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref555

Opening: Evolution of a Community Pt. 1

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Blackstone Rangers Band  Search this
Anderson, Stanley J.  Search this
Dale, Almore  Search this
Hope, Marion C.  Search this
Jackson, Samuel C. (Samuel Charles), 1929-1982  Search this
Jones, Alton  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon), 1913-2001  Search this
Smith, Helen Belding  Search this
Smith, Henry P., 1911-1995  Search this
Washington, Walter E., 1915-2003  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
The Smithsonian Institution president, Anacostia residents, and city politicians provide remarks for the official opening of the exhibition Evolution of a Community at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum. Their speeches cover the history, purpose, and growth of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum; an introduction to the exhibit; the role of museums, particularly the role of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum within in the community of Anacostia and the city of Washington, D.C.; a short history of the people of Anacostia, including the establishment of Anacostia and Barry Farms; the importance of recording history for the people of a community; the present state of Anacostia; and what Anacostia will be for future generations. Recording also includes footage of exhibit displays, museums visitors, and exterior of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum; and a musical performance by Blackstone Rangers Band.
Exhibition opening. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. AV003208: part 1. AV003182: part 2. AV003208: glitches/skips in video recording. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003208
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Unedited footage
Citation:
Opening: Evolution of a Community Pt. 1, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003182
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa76d159666-7d98-4134-bc67-3e8fd91f947b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref558

Down Memory Lane

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia ACs  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Greenwood Transfer Moving and Storage Company, Inc. (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Macedonia Baptist Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Southeast Neighborhood House (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Allen, Helen Greenwood  Search this
Dale, Almore  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Duckett, Ruth  Search this
Ellis, Martha  Search this
Greenwood, Benjamin O., Sr.  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
McKenzie, Walter  Search this
Taylor, Blakely  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1972
Scope and Contents:
Older residents of Anacostia share their experiences and memories growing up and living in the once tight knit community, Anacostia, to provide evidence of Anacostia's history with goal of understanding the history of the community for present and future generations and with the theory that if man does not know where he came from, he/she cannot know here he/she is, and has no direction for the future. Martha Ellis reminiscences about her work at the public schools, particularly Birney School. Ruth Duckett, Ellis' daughter, talks about her work with the youth group at the Southeast House; when it was safe to sit outside and walk down the street; the portrayal of Anacostia in the newspapers and media; successful people who grew up in Anacostia and moved to other parts of the city and country; the baseball club Anacostia ACs; and ministers and movement of churches in the area. Churches mentioned by Duckett and other residents include Macedonia Baptist Church, St. Teresa's Catholic Church, Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church, and Campbell A.M.E. Church. Residents speak about Anacostia's rich heritage of people doing things - the craftsmen, construction workers, business people, and entrepreneurs - including sign painter, automobile painter, and artist Walter McKenzie; the fish man Mr. Chapman; the Greenwood family and their family business, Greenwood Transfer Moving and Storage Company; and the Taylor family, specifically Blakely Taylor, who were brick layers. They reminiscence about how everyone knew everyone, how everyone helped each other and the community thrive, when mothers stayed home and took care of children, when children participated in programs at the recreation center, when police had closer tie to community; and when it is so quiet, residents could hear cars go across the 11th street bridge. Residents also talk about the present: movement of people from different communities into Anacostia, younger Anacostians forced away because of zoning and no housing besides apartments, dirty streets, and violence. Overall, residents do not feel as if everything is bad in Anacostia; they just wish something would be done to fix the problems before they become worse.
Community Program. Filmed during exhibit Evolution of a Community with introduction by John Kinard (transcribed from physical asset AV003581) and moderated by Almore Dale. AV003581: Part 1. AV003088: Part 2. AV003550: Part 3, poor image quality. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Dated 19720524. AV003383-3 and AV003383-4: sound only, content overlaps with video recordings, undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003088

ACMA AV003550

ACMA AV003383-3

ACMA AV003383-4
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Museums and community  Search this
Community museums  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Schools  Search this
Baseball teams  Search this
Recreation centers  Search this
Entrepreneurship  Search this
African American businesspeople  Search this
Business enterprises  Search this
African American business enterprises  Search this
Small business  Search this
Family-owned business enterprises  Search this
Crime  Search this
Police  Search this
Police-community relations  Search this
Migration, Internal  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Down Memory Lane, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003581
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7fa13516d-f889-420e-9460-c3d93e00fa0f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref562

Staff Seminar: Exhibition Planning for Evolution of a Community Part II

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Lorton Correctional Complex (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Neighborhood Youth Corps (U.S.)  Search this
Crawford, H.R.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Meetings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (ANM) staff discuss exhibition design and other details for Evolution of a Community Part II. They discuss how to best present each section of the exhibition: prologue, drug abuse, unemployment, crime, prison and rehabilitation, and education. The staff is particularly concerned with how children and youth will interact with and think about the drug abuse section; they discuss ways to further educate youth about drugs and how to emphasize the future can be different for the youth. Some of the staff is concerned that the exhibit addresses the problems, but not the solutions. They debate the role of the museum in the community, how to involve the Anacostia residents and community organizations further in the creation of exhibitions, and providing exhibition related activities and resources to the community. Additionally, the ANM staff discuss possible audiovisual components, graphics, photographs, three dimensional displays, and interactive elements to add to the exhibition. This recording also includes interviews with youth about their thoughts on the role of ANM and museums in general; and questions to ask H.R. Crawford, particularly in regards to his views on public housing.
Discussions (meeting) and interviews. Discussions related to exhibition, Evolution of a Community Part II. Interviews for Housing in Anacostia Video Project (transcribed from asset) and inquiries about role of museum. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. Poor audio quality (interference). Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003275-2
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Drug abuse  Search this
Drug abuse -- Treatment  Search this
Youth  Search this
Children  Search this
Housing  Search this
Public housing  Search this
Unemployment  Search this
Public welfare  Search this
Credit unions  Search this
African American business enterprises  Search this
Crime  Search this
Prisons  Search this
Social history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Meetings
Interviews
Citation:
Staff Seminar: Exhibition Planning for Evolution of a Community Part II, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003275-1
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa715730e48-4ece-4353-8469-ee07e2f00d4d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref563

Evolution of a Community: Tearing Down Exhibition Displays

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1972
Scope and Contents:
Footage of the taking down, or deconstruction, of the exhibit displays for Evolution of a Community. Footage of some of the displays prior to deconstruction.
Unedited or b-roll footage. Part of Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records. AV003188: tearing down exhibition displays from 000000 - 000518 and 000741 - 001026 and 001617 - 002725 [also on recording: Africa: Three Out of Many-Ethiopia, Ghana, Nigeria Development of Poster and Demonstration: Ice Cream Making]. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Evolution of a Community, an exhibit at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from January 1972 though December 1972, presented the history of Anacostia from post-World War II to the present through photos, text, drawings, video tape programs, and a slide/tape show. Evolution of a Community Part II, also known as Anacostia Today, was on display at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum from March 1973 though July 1973. The exhibitions developed as a result oral histories collected from Anacostia residents.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Community museums  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Evolution of a Community: Tearing Down Exhibition Displays, Exhibition Records AV03-040, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040, Item ACMA AV003188
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series ACMA AV03-040: Evolution of a Community Audiovisual Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c3a9cdd8-7645-474a-af55-856ceb50e58c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref566

Whose Art is it, Anyway? Children's Theatre Workshop

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
Actor, poet and educator Douglas Johnson led children in poetry reading, song, and dance. Johnson taught the meaning of the poems to the children.
Workshop. Related to exhibition 'Whose Art is it, Anyway?: The Arts in Public Places.' Dated 19900723.
Biographical / Historical:
'Whose Art is it, Anyway?: The Arts in Public Places' encouraged museum visitors to explore the role of visual and performing arts in their community. The exhibition was held at the Anacostia Museum from July 15, 1990 to September 16, 1990, and included murals and sculptures viewed in Washington, D.C. and also encompassed personal statements such as hairstyles, clothes, and jewelry.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Music  Search this
Dance  Search this
Children  Search this
Performing arts  Search this
Communities  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Collection Citation:
Whose Art is it, anyway? The Arts in Public Places exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-086, Item ACMA AV002158
See more items in:
Whose Art is it, anyway? The Arts in Public Places exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa777a2960f-3b1e-471f-a6db-73d210e6ee9b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-086-ref511

Juneteenth Celebration

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS, 1/2")
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
United States
Date:
1991
Scope and Contents:
On June 22, 1991, the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture's Juneteenth Celebration was held at the Anacostia Museum. Mayor Sharon Pratt Dixon and Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton greeted guests with remarks. Musical and dance performances included West African dance troupe Kan Kouran; bell ringers The Templeton Chimers; a capella group In Process; go-go band Junkyard Band; blues band Sonny Forriest; doo-wop singers The Orioles; Afro-pop group Liziba; St. Teresa of Avila Young Adult Choir; and jazz duo Yvonne and Phyllis. Arts and crafts demonstrations included hair braiding, kente weaving, wood carving, cartooning, wool spinning by Mirma Jones, and quilting by Daughter of Dorcas. The day also included games for children, Myklar the Magician, the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Reenactment Group, and screenings of 'Roots of Resistance: A Story of the Underground Railroad' and 'Gift of the Black Folk.' The theme for the Juneteenth Celebration 1991 was Freedom Revisited.
Celebration - festival. Part of Juneteenth Programs. Dated 1991.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Juneteenth  Search this
Celebrations  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Juneteenth Program Records 1989-1998, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.13, Item ACMA AV002093
See more items in:
Juneteenth Program Records, 1989-1998
Juneteenth Program Records, 1989-1998 / Series 2: Audiovisual Recordings
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72dcf356b-f149-4e4d-9f65-7f03f0afb8b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-13-ref3

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