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Thomas T. Waterman negatives and photographs

Creator:
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
12 Photographic prints (black and white)
12 Negatives (photographic) (black and white)
Culture:
Haida  Search this
Duwamish (Dwamish)  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Coast Salish  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Guatemala
California
Alaska
Washington
Date:
1921-1924
Summary:
These images were shot in California, Alaska, Washington, and Guatamala and feature images of Tolowa, Haida, Salish, and Quiché Maya (Quiché) Indians. Images include group portraits, daily activities, village scenes, and petrogylphs.
Scope and Contents:
The Waterman collection consists of photographic materials made by Waterman from 1921 to 1924 in California, Alaska, Washington State, and Guatemala. He made the bulk of the materials on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation while working in 1921 in California among the Tolowa and in Washington State among the Southern Coast Salish and Duwamish (Dwamish) and in 1922 in Alaska at Kasaan (Haida) village. Of particular note are the series of photographs of a Tolowa fisherman. The few remaining photographs date from 1923 and 1924 and depict Quiché Maya (Quiche) Indians in the Quetzaltenango Guatemalan highlands and an illustration from Waterman's contribution to the 1924 Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Arrangement:
Negatives Arranged by negative number (N07288-N07289, N07291, N07295-N07300, N10859, N35256, N35848)

Photographs Arranged by photograph number (P04035-P04040, P04428-P04429, P05515, P05521, P37455, P37456)
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in Hamilton, Missouri, in 1885, Thomas Talbot Waterman grew up in Calfornia and was expected, like his father, to become an Episcopalian clergyman. After taking courses in phonetics and fieldwork with P.E. Goddard, Waterman instead chose to study anthropology and in 1913 received his Ph.D in anthropology at Columbia University under the direction of Franz Boas. From 1907 to 1921, he held both teaching and curatorial positions at the University of California and the University of Washington and from 1921 to 1922 briefly joined the staff of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation as a field collector. Waterman went on to hold positions at the National Museum of Guatemala, Fresno State College, University of Arizona, Territorial Normal College (Hawaii), and University of Hawaii. He is best known for bringing Ishi, the last surviving member of the Yahi people, from the town of Oroville, California, to the University of California Museum of Anthropology. Waterman died in Honolulu at the age of 50.
Provenance:
Historically, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation managed all photographic and related manuscript collections separately. This collection description represents current management practices of organizing and contextualizing related archival materials.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Petroglyphs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Thomas T. Waterman negatives and photographs, 1921-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.021
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-021

Donald Bush Cordry photographs of Indians of Mexico

Creator:
Cordry, Donald Bush  Search this
Names:
Cordry, Donald Bush -- Exhibitions  Search this
Extent:
8 Color transparencies
93 Mounted photographs (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Mixe Indians  Search this
Amuzgo (Amusgo)  Search this
Zapotec Indians  Search this
Mestizos  Search this
Tarasco Indians  Search this
Tepehuan Indians  Search this
Totonac Indians  Search this
Mazatec Indians  Search this
Nahuas  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Huichol Indians  Search this
Seri Indians  Search this
Huave Indians  Search this
Chiapanec  Search this
Mixtec Indians  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Mayo Indians  Search this
Cuicatec Indians  Search this
Zoque Indians  Search this
Tzotzil Indians  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color transparencies
Mounted photographs
Place:
Mexico
Date:
1937-1972
Scope and Contents note:
Enlargements of photographs made by Donald Bush Cordry during his time in Mexico. These were mounted for a 1970s Bellas Artes-sponsored traveling exhibit based on Cordry's collection of Mexican Indian costumes. Included are images of Mexican Indians, fiestas and dances, pottery, boats, weaving, spinning, masks, vendors and markets, churches, and shrines. Depicted tribes include the Huichol, Mestizo, Tarascan, Seri, Mayo, Tepehua, Totonac, Nahua, Mazatec, Cuicatec, Chinantec, Zapotec, Mixe, Amusgo, Huave, Mixtec, Chapanec, Zoque, Tzotzil, and Maya. Additionally, there are some self portraits of Donald Cordry and his wife Dorothy.
Biographical/Historical note:
Donald Bush Cordry (1907-1978) was an artist and photographer who studied the art of Mexican Indians. In 1931, Cordry made his first trip to Guerrero, Mexico, where he became interested in contemporary mask making. In 1934, Cordry moved to New York to work as a marionette designer for puppeteer Tony Sarg. While there, he contacted George G. Heye to learn more about Mexican Indian art. This led to a series of collecting expeditions from 1935 to 1938, during which Cordry collected Mexican masks and other artifacts for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-38, USNM ACC 361232
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs made by Cordry can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 82-14.
Donald Cordry and his wife, Dorothy Mann Cordry, also donated clothing and musical instruments from Mexico to the Department of Anthropology in accessions 361232 and 355866.
The National Museum of the American Indian Archives holds the Donald Bush Cordry collection of photographs and negatives, 1933-1940, as well as artifacts collected by Cordry.
Photographs of the Donald Cordry Mexican mask exhibit can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 80-3.
The Donald Cordry Mexican mask collection can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 355867.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pottery -- Mexico  Search this
Dances -- Mexico  Search this
Weaving -- Mexico  Search this
Markets -- Mexico  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Spinning -- Mexico  Search this
Masks -- Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 87-38, Donald Cordry photographs of Indians of Mexico, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-38
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-38

The geologic relations of the human relics of Lansing, Kansas with an editorial on the antiquity of man in America : and a review on Kakabikansing J.V. Brower ; T.C. Chamberlin

Author:
Chamberlin, Thomas C (Thomas Chrowder),) 1843-1928  Search this
Author:
Chamberlin, Thomas C (Thomas Chrowder) 1843-1928einscriber  Search this
Saville, Marshall H (Marshall Howard),) 1867-1935  Search this
Huntington Free Library  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Subject:
Brower, J. V (Jacob Vradenberg) 1844-1905 Kakabikansing  Search this
Physical description:
745-793 pages illustrations 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Kansas
Lansing
Lansing (Kan.)
Date:
1902
Topic:
Archaeological geology  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Human remains (Archaeology)  Search this
Antiquities  Search this
Call number:
F683 .C43 1902
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1012063

Lyda Averill Taylor Photographs (Series 13)

Creator:
Taylor, Lyda Averill  Search this
Names:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Creator:
Taylor, Lyda Averill  Search this
Culture:
Alibamu  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Clippings
Scope and Contents:
Some relate to the green corn celebration, Livingston, Texas, July 1938. Others are photographs of Alibamu from the collection of the Museum of the American Indian, taken in 1909. Photographs not viewable online.
Arrangement:
50 items
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4658 (13)
Place:
Texas Livingston
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Clippings
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 4658, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 4658 Field notes and ethnographic material on Alabama, Choctaw, and Koasati (latter incomplete), plus a partial Southeast comparative ethnology of southeastern U.S.
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms4658-ref13

Logie Family Yakama (Yakima) land grants

Creator:
United States. General Land Office  Search this
Donor:
Duke, Hattie Logie  Search this
Duke, Hattie Logie  Search this
Names:
McKinley, William, 1843-1901 (President)  Search this
Extent:
0.1 Linear feet
Culture:
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1897
Summary:
This collection includes five land grants given to the Logie family on the Yakama (Yakima) reservation and signed by President McKinley in 1897.
Content Description:
This collection consists of five land grants given to the Logie family on the Yakama (Yakima) reservation and signed by President McKinley in 1897. This includes grants issued to James Logie, Mary Logie, Alvin Logie, Jessie Logie and Susan Hox-Li, all members of the Yakama (Yakima) tribe.
Biographical Note:
The Logie family (Yakama) was living on the Yakima Indian reservation in Washington State when they were allotted their land in 1897. The family consisted of James Logie, his wife Mary Logie (nee Stones), their son Alvin Logie and daughter Jessie Logie. Alvin and Jessie were young children at the time. Mary's mother Susan Hox-li also appeared to be living with the family at the time. Each member of the family was given a land grant. Alvin Logie married Hattie Logie (later Hattie Logie Duke) sometime in the early 1920's which is how she came to possess the Logie family land grants.
Historical Note:
Land grants were issued by the General Land office from the commissioner of Indian Affairs, in the department of the Interior. These land grants, or allotments, were issued as a result of the Dawes Act of 1887 also known as the "General Allotment Act" or the "Dawes Severalty Act." The Dawes act was enacted as a method to assimilate Native American individuals into what was considered mainstream American society in an effort to abolish communal rights and tribal sovereignty. Individual land allotments were granted to Native American families and held in trust by the United States government for 25 years. If the family did not succeed at farming on the allotment, the land reverted back to the federal government for sale, often to non-native settlers. Land allotment was not ended until 1934 under President Roosevelt.
Related Materials:
Copies of these land grants can be found at the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management in the General Land Office Records.
Provenance:
Purchased from Hattie Logie Duke by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1969.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Land grants -- Washington (State)  Search this
United States. General Allotment Act (1887)  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Logie Family Yakama (Yakima) land grants; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.123
See more items in:
Logie Family Yakama (Yakima) land grants
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-123
Online Media:

Photographs of Princess Atalie Unkalunt collection

Source:
C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa  Search this
Creator:
Hall, Dale, Mrs.  Search this
Former owner:
C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa  Search this
Names:
Curtis, Charles, 1860-1936  Search this
Thorpe, Jim, 1887-1953  Search this
Unkalunt, Princess Atalie, 1895-1954  Search this
Extent:
75 Photographic prints
Culture:
Oklahoma Cherokee  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Date:
1900-1950
Summary:
The photographs of Princess Atalie Unkalunt collection includes 75 photographic prints and postcards of Princess Atalie Unkalunt (Oklahoma Cherokee) taken by various photographers throughout her life and career. Princess Atalie Unkalunt, nee Iva J. Rider, (1895 – 1954) was a Cherokee opera singer, artist, author, and community activist.
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of the collection contains photographic prints and postcards of Princess Atalie Unkalunt (Oklahoma Cherokee) taken by various photographers throughout her life and career. Many of the photographs are undated but it is likely that most were taken between 1920 and 1950.

Included in the collection are studio portraits of Princess Atalie, both headshots and full length shots. In many of the studio shots Princess Atalie is wearing a beaded headband, or a full headdress, a hide dress and moccasins and is frequently posed with additional props. However there are a number of studio portraits where she is wearing non-native dress, often wearing a hat and stole. Princess Atalie was also photographed at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, circa 1920, modeling hide dresses and moccasins from the collection (see related materials note). There are also photographs of Princess Atalie posed with groups or individuals she met throughout her career. This includes photographs with Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox), famed Olympian and athlete; Charles Curtis (Kaw), Vice President to Herbert Hoover; the Girl Scouts of East Orange, Oklahoma; as well as several groups of unidentified children.

Of note are several postcards from Princess Atalie (signed Iva) written to her sisters from her time in the Business Women's Unit of the Y.M.C.A during WWI. There are also photographs that include a note to Atalie's sister Mary as well as a portrait of Mary that had previously been mis-identified as Atalie. In addition to photographs of Princess Atalie, there are portraits of other opera performers who were contemporaries of Princess Atalie. These include portraits of Chief Yowlachie (Yakama), a bass singer and soloist with the Seneca Orchestra; and Yma Sumac, a Peruvian-American soprano.

Known photographers and photo studios include—Albert R. Dupont, Jack Gordon, Del Ankers, Bryant E. Sherman, Albert Green Heath, Pierson Studio, Strand Studio, Chdnoff Studio, Underwood and Underwood Co., Watton Studio (Oklahoma City), Apeda Studio, Sands Studio and Roege Photo.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number P23844-P23911.
Biographical / Historical:
Princess Atalie Unkalunt, nee Iva J. Rider, (1895 – 1954) was a Cherokee opera singer, artist, author, and community activist. Also known as Sunshine Rider, Atalie was born in Stilwell, Oklahoma to Thomas L. Rider (Domgeske Unkalunt), a Cherokee state senator and chairman of Indian affairs, and Josephine Pace Rider. As a child attending Indian schools, Atalie saw the need for a cultural missionary to educate the world about Native people and their place in history. She developed a gift for song at a young age and after finishing her high school studies spent time in California where she gained experience in film and then moved to Boston to begin vocal studies. After the U.S. entered World War I, Atalie joined the Business Women's Unit of the Y.M.C.A. secretly advancing her age several years in order to meet the age requirements. She served 18 months overseas working as an entertainer and secretary. Upon her return to the United States, she settled in New York City to continue her vocal studies and quickly became an acclaimed opera singer. She sang at concert venues around the country and performed at the White House.

Her desire to be a cultural missionary never wavered and she became a lecturer for the New York Board of Education where she spoke to audiences about Native American customs and songs. She broadcasted a radio program to countries in Europe singing both classical arias as well as Native songs. She founded the Society of the First Sons and Daughters of America Foundation whose mission was to recognize and promote the contributions of Native people and give them opportunities to promote their talents in the arts. In addition to her vocal talents, she was a skilled painter and designer and in 1942, she wrote and illustrated the book "The Earth Speaks", a collection of tales adapted from Cherokee legends. In the late 1940s, Atalie moved to Washington D.C. where she spent her time digging through government archival records in order to research claims due the Cherokee Indians from the United States government. Atalie passed away in 1954.
Related Materials:
Three photographs in the collection include images of objects currently in the NMAI collection. These include Princess Atalie wearing a Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce) hide dress (NMAI 029996), a Ute beaded hide dress (NMAI 050958) and Ute mocassins (NMAI 006986) and Ethyl E. Schellbach wearing a Niuam (Comanche) beaded hide dress (NMAI 021803) and Niuam (Comanche) legging moccasins (NMAI 021132).
Provenance:
Donated by Mrs. Dale Hall to the C.H. Nash Museum (Chucalissa) in 1967. Donated by the C.H. Nash Museum (Chucalissa) to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1978. It is unclear how Mrs. Hall came into the posesssion of the photographs though it is possible she was a friend of the family or a distant relative.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Opera  Search this
Genre/Form:
Studio portraits
Photographic prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Photographs of Princess Atalie Unkalunt collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.117
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-117

George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Extent:
1292 Negatives (photographic)
23 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Nambe Pueblo  Search this
Picuris Pueblo  Search this
Pojoaque Pueblo  Search this
Puye Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Hopi [Hano]  Search this
Pikuni (Piegan) [Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Mexica (Aztec) (archaeological culture)  Search this
Pueblo (Anasazi) (archaeological)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

William Wildschut Photograph Collection

Creator:
Wildschut, William  Search this
Names:
Curly, approximately 1856-1923  Search this
Plenty Coups, 1848-1932  Search this
Two Leggings, ca. 1847-1923  Search this
Extent:
183 Negatives (photographic)
21 Photographic prints
Culture:
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Postcards
Date:
1870-1930
bulk 1917-1928
Summary:
The William Wildschut photograph collection contains 183 photographic negatives, and 89 post cards. From 1917 to 1928 William Wildschut studied the Apsáalooke people through interviews, photography, and the collection of cultural objects. In 1921 Wildschut was hired as a field man by George Gustav Heye the director of the Museum of the American Indian, Wildschut officially collected and conducted field expeditions in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Canada, and North Dakota on behalf of the Museum until 1928. Wildschuts photographs include portrait style photos of Apsáalooke people, special events, daily reservation life, interments, and encampments. Tribes represented in this collection are primarily Apsáalooke, the postcard collection consists of other tribes including Lakota, Arapaho, and other unidentified tribes.
Scope and Contents:
The William Wildschut collection contains 183 photographic negatives, and 21 photographic prints. The photographic negatives were made by Wildschut between 1917 and 1928. The majority of the photographs in this collection are of Apsáalooke people and their reservation, however the postcard collection consists of over 14 instances of people from unidentified tribes. Wildschut photographed Apsáalooke chiefs, leaders and their families in portrait style poses and his subjects are usually dressed in their finest. He also photographed events such as Crow fair, veteran celebrations, parades, ceremonies, and interments.

The Apsáalooke are a people of the northern plains, their ancestral territory is in Yellowstone River valley, which extends from present-day Wyoming, through Montana and into North Dakota, where it joins the Missouri River. Today the Crow Indian Reservation in located in south-central Montana which covers roughly 2,300,000 acres of land and it is the fifth-largest Indian reservation in the United States. The Crow are known for their horsemanship, exquisite beadwork, clan system, historic war societies, 7th Calvary scouts, prolific chiefs, and beautiful homeland.

Series 1: Apsáalooke chiefs and leaders photographed in portrait style taken between 1917-1928. Wildschut captured images of many of the last Apsáalooke war chiefs who were, at the time, adjusting to a new life on the reservation. Many of the chiefs and leaders Wildschut photographed were dealing with new issues such as the Allotment Act, the Indian Citizenship Act, implementation of boarding schools, and government imposed regulations on traditional practices.

Series 2: Groups of Apsáalooke people in various situations. These photographs were taken at social events such as parades, dances, celebrations, and at the 45th annual Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Series 3: Apsáalooke people (individuals and families) in various situations. Some photographs are portrait style poses and others are casual instances. The Crow, who call themselves Apsáalooke or Biiluuke, are people of the Northern Plains. The Apsáalooke people continue to maintain their language and remain resilient in their cultural practices, they still identify themselves through a clan system, these clans are Ashshitchíte/the Big Lodge, Ashhilaalíoo/ Newly Made Lodge, Uuwatashe/ Greasy Mouth, Ashíiooshe/ Sore Lip, Xúhkaalaxche/ Ties the Bundle, Biliikóoshe/ Whistling Waters, Ashkápkawiia/ Bad War Deeds, and the Aashkamne/ Piegan clan.

Series 4: Photographs of the reenactment of the Battle of the Little Big Horn in Garryowen, MT in 1921. The Battle of the Little Bighorn was fought along the banks of the Little Bighorn River, in south central Montana on June 25-26, 1876. The 7th Regiment of the U.S. Cavalry engaged in armed combat with the Lakota, Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes. The site of the battlefield is located on the Crow Indian reservation which is where Wildschut photographed the re-enactment. This event involved actual survivors of the event and many other re-enactors.

Series 5: Casual photographs of non-ceremonial dances, parades, fairs, races and rodeos. The Apsáalooke enjoy a very social culture, they revel in coming together to sing, dance, and celebrate as often as possible. This is called baasaxpilúua (Celebration). Baasaxpilúua allows families and clans to reunite and solidify their bonds. One such occasion is the annual Crow Fair celebration that takes place on the Crow reservation, on the third week of August. The Crow parade is a stunning exhibition of beadwork adorning people, horses and various types of floats. The beadwork of the Crow people is among the most technically proficient and visually exquisite in the world.

Series 6: Encampments with tipis (ashtáale) and tents. Wildschuts photographs of encampments are on the Crow reservation, Fort Custer, and at the Billings fair (a fair that Crows would go to parade, dance, camp and watch races and rodeos). The Apsáalooke call the tipi ashtáale, which translates to real home. Wildschut was not allowed into the tipi to photograph, there is only one photographic instance where he took photographs of a family in a tipi [N31145] and [N31146].

Series 7: Restricted Photographs of interments, ceremonies, sacred spaces and objects). As an ethnographer William Wildschut spent time studying Crow culture. He interviewed Crow people and even witnessed ceremonial events. Wildschut developed relationships with certain Crows who allowed him the honor of being present when private sacred bundles where opened. In some cases Wildschut was allowed to photograph these sacred events. Not all Apsáalooke people agree with these permissions, however the Crow people understand that those who allowed Wildschuts presence did so for their own purposes. The Apsáalooke come from a living culture and still maintain their language, culture and beliefs. They have respectfully requested that these photographs not be made public.
Arrangement note:
This collection is arranged into eight series by people, events, locations and postcards. Series 1: Apsáalooke Chiefs (Bacheeítche), Series 2: Apsáalooke Groupings, Series 3: Apsáalooke People, Series 4: 45th Annual Battle of the Little Big Horn, Series 5: Parades, Dances, and Events, Series 6: Encampments, Series 7: Restricted Content, Series 8: Postcards.
Biographical/Historical note:
William Wildschut was born Willem Wildschut on March 30, 1883, in Jisp, Holland. He married in 1909 in Leicester, England, and moved with his wife to Trier, Germany, where he was in charge of a cigarette factory. This began a long period during which Wildschut and his family moved frequently between Holland, Canada, and the western United States, usually while Wildschut was managing factories. In 1917 Wildschut moved his family to Billings, Montana where he worked in Farm Mortgages, this work took him to Hardin, Mt. (a small farming community 43 miles east of Billings), which borders the Crow Indian reservation and once served as an economic hub for the Apsáalooke people. William was fascinated with the Crow and began purchasing medicine bundles, war shirts, and various other items from the Crow which he found a market for with George Gustav Heye the founding Director of the Museum of the American Indian. In 1922, Heye purchased Wildschut's medicine bundle collection and hired him as a field man. From 1921 to 1928 Wildschut officially collected and conducted field expeditions in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Canada, and North Dakota on behalf of the Museum. Wildschut was also a collector of photographs. In the late 1920's he distributed a series of postcards that featured Native American people. These postcards featured his own photos as well as those of other photographers. During his employment with the Museum of the American Indian he was made a member of the Explorer's Club, and published several articles in the Museum's series "Indian Notes". On May 1, 1928, after the death of two of Heye's major benefactors, Wildschut was let go. In 1929 Wildschut and his family relocated to California where he worked for different mortgage companies. 1936 he was transferred to Oakland, California where he remained until his passing on January 7, 1955.

According to letters from him wife, William Wildschut was given a Crow name and was close friends with many Crow people. She also wrote that he believed it was his calling to do the work with Indians, however when he was released from employment with MAI he became distraught and never spoke of Indian people again. There are few stories about William Wildschut that remain in Crow Country, one is that his name was "Xaapaliiashilish" (Bundle Buyer) which is fitting considering he purchased and hundreds of sacred bundles from the Crow, which are now in Museums and Private Collections all over the world.

William Wildschut wrote several book manuscripts during his time with the Crow, three were later edited and published, these include: Crow Indian Beadwork (New York: Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation: 1959), Crow Indian Medicine Bundles (New York: Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation: 1960) and Two Leggings: The Making of a Crow Warrior which was published in 1967.
Related Materials:
Additional William Wildschut papers (WA MSS S-2386) are located at Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and The Yale Collection of Western Americana, New Haven, Connecticut.

The National Museum of the American Indian holds additional William Wildschut material such as letters, notes, receipts, and objects descriptions in the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation records, 1890-1989. They can be found in Series 6: Collectors, Box 284, Folder 14 to Box 286, Folder 6.
Separated Materials:
Originally, a collection of Fred E. Miller photographs purchased by William Wildschut were marked as William Wildschut photographs and were included in this collection. They have since been identified by Dorothy Munson, curator of the Fred E. Miller Collection, in Housatonic, Massachusetts, and have been processed separately as the Fred E. Miller photograph collection.
Provenance:
The Wildschut photograph collection was purchased from William P. Wreden of Palo Alto, California, by Frederick Dockstader, director of the Museum of the American Indian, in 1964. Mrs. Wildschut had given the negative collection to Frederick Moore, a friend of the Wildschuts, for his personal collection. However, when Moore's bookselling business went bankrupt the Wildschut images ended up as part of the bankruptcy sale and were purchased by Wreden. Many of the postcards in this collection were taken years after Wildschuts death, these post cards were possibly added to the collection by Fredrick Moore or William P. Wreden.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu). Certain photographs have been restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Crow Indians -- Social life and customs -- Photographs  Search this
Crow Indians -- Dances -- Photographs  Search this
Historical reenactments  Search this
Crow Indians -- Montana -- Crow Indian Reservation -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Negatives (photographic)
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); William Wildschut photograph collection, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.033
See more items in:
William Wildschut Photograph Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-033
Online Media:

Land deed to Stephanus van Cortlandt, 1683 (Anthony's Nose, NY region)

Creator:
Van Cortlandt, Stephanus  Search this
Extent:
0.01 Linear feet
1 Negatives (photographic)
Container:
Oversize 1
Culture:
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Text
Negatives (photographic)
Deeds
Date:
1683
Summary:
This collection contains a land deed dated 1683 conveying the area near Anthony's Nose in New York to Stephanus van Cortlandt and one photographic negative shot in the 1970s depicting this land deed.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains a land deed dated 1683 conveying the area now known as Bear Mountain in Palisades Interstate Park opposite Anthony's Nose along the Hudson River in Rockland County, New York. The grantors were the Lenape (Delaware) to Stephanus van Cortlandt (1643-1700), two-time New York City Mayor. The deed is on Vellum paper. This collection also contains 1 negative depicting the deed that was photographed by Museum of the American Indian staff photographers most likely in the 1970s.

According to landscape architect Julian H. Salomon's 1972 article entitled An Indian Deed Dated 1683, "Among the recent acquisitions on display at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, New York is an Indian deed dated 1683. It conveys most of what is now the Bear Mountain section of the Palisades Interstate Park and the northernmost corner of Rockland County to Stephanus van Cortlandt. The grantors were a group of Haverstraw Indians, part of the Munsi branch of the Lenni-Lenape or Delaware Tribe. Among the signers was Sakaghemerk, sachem of the Haverstraws. The granted tract lay west of the Hudson River and opposite Anthony's Nose. It was bounded on the north by the Assinipink Creek, on the west by the mountains, on the south by Sankapogh Creek and on the east by the river. It included Salisbury's Island (Iona Island), referred to in the deed as "Wanakawaghkon" and shown on an Erskine map as Sidbury's Island. Assinipink Creek is the outlet of Assinipink Lake, which likes at the foot of Bear Mountain and is known today as Highland Lake or Hessian Pond. Sankapogh Creek is the sluggish stream which bounds Iona Island on the south. It is commonly called Snake Hole Creek. This deed of 1683 is the first to land that is now the Palisades Interstate Park and one of the earliest to land that is now part of Rockland County. No mention of it is made in either Cole's or Green's histories of the county." [Salomon, Julian H. 1972. An Indian Deed Dated 1683. South of the Mountains. Vol. 16 (2) (April-June): 11.]
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 2 boxes: 1 box for the land deed and 1 box for the negative.
Biographical / Historical:
Stephanus van Cortlandt held many positions throughout his lifetime including serving as the first native-born Mayor of New York City and as a Chief Justice of the New York Supreme Court in 1700.

Born in New Amsterdam (today New York City) on May 7, 1643 to Captain Olof Stevense van Cortlandt and Anna Loockemans van Cortlandt of the Dutch Republic, Stephanus began his career as a successful mercantile in New Netherlands following his father's profession. After the British conquest in 1664, New Amsterdam was renamed New York City and Stehanus went on to become a council member of the English governor Sir Edmund Andros in 1674. Three years later, he started his career as Mayor of New York, a position he held from 1677 to 1678 and again from 1686 to 1688.

According to Landscape Architect Julian H. Saloman, van Cortlandt was authorized by Governor Andros to purchase land on the east side of Hudson River and eventually accumulated land holdings totaling 83,000 acres. In 1683, van Courtlandt purchased from the Lenape (Delaware) approximately 1,500 acres on the west side of the Hudson, which is detailed in the land deed in this collection.

Van Courtlandt died on November 25, 1700 and his widow Gertruj van Schuyler and children became the heirs of the property.
Provenance:
Originally owned by Stephanus Van Cortlandt (1643-1700); inherited through several generations of Van Cortlandt descendants, including Jean Rutherford Mason Browne (1917-2006); donated to the Museum of the American Indian by Jean Mason Browne in 1966.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Deeds
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Land deed to Stephanus van Cortlandt, 1683 (Anthony's Nose, NY region), catalog #, NMAI.AC.378; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.378
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-378
Online Media:

Septima V. Koehler collection

Creator:
Koehler, Septima, 1848-1918  Search this
Names:
St. Elizabeth's School (Wakpala, S.D.)  Search this
Deloria, Philip Joseph  Search this
Hare, William Hobart, 1838-1909  Search this
Extent:
39 Photographic prints
0.4 Linear feet (1 Document Box)
Culture:
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota [Rosebud Sioux]  Search this
Wahpetonwan Dakota (Wahpeton Sioux)  Search this
Nakota (Yankton Sioux)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Letters (correspondence)
Place:
Rosebud Indian Reservation (S.D.)
Standing Rock Indian Reservation (N.D. and S.D.)
South Dakota
Date:
1890-1905
Summary:
The Septima Koehler collection includes photographic prints, correspondence and student papers that document Septima's work as a mission teacher for the Episcopal Church in South Dakota from around 1895 to 1905. Koehler taught Sicangu Lakota students at St. Mary's Mission School on the Rosebud Reservation and Hunkpapa Lakota students at St. Elizatbeth's Mission School on the Standing Rock Reservation.
Scope and Contents:
The Septima Koehler collection includes photographic prints, letters, essays and student papers that document Septima's work as a mission teacher for the Episcopal Church in South Dakota from around 1895 to 1905. The collection has been divided into two series, Series 1: St. Mary's Mission School, circa 1895 and Series 2: St. Elizabeth's Mission School, circa 1899-1905. Series 1 includes photographic prints shot at St. Mary's Mission School on the Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota. Septima Koehler taught there in the early to mid-1890s but it is unclear when the photographs were taken since the photographer is unknown. The majority of the photographs in the collection were shot at St. Elizabeth's Mission School in Wakpala on the Standing Rock Reservation, South Dakota which are a part of Series 2. These were taken between 1899 and 1902 and several include shots of Septima Koehler herself which suggest they were shot by someone who knew her. There are also a number of portraits of Lakota students who attended the school, some identified with names on the backs of the photographs, including members of the Deloria family among others. There is also a group portrait from the 1903 teacher institute held at Standing Rock organized by A.O. Wright, Supervisor of Indian Schools. In addition to the photographs, there are essays and lesson plans written by Koehler, a letter from Septima Koehler to her sister Aurora from 1902 describing the start of the school year and student papers and work sheets produced by the Native American students (mostly Hunkpapa Lakota) attending the school as well as a student roll book. There are also name and receipt books from Koehler's work with the "Babies' Branch", a missionary outfit that raised money specifically for children.

The majority of the photographic prints in this collection are silver gelatin and most of the St. Elizabeth's photographs are both circular and matted. The prints have catalog numbers P19485-P19523.
Arrangement:
Arranged in two series; Series 1: St. Mary's Mission School, circa 1895 and Series 2: St. Elizabeth's Mission School, circa 1899-1905.
Biographical / Historical:
Septima Koehler (1848-1918) was one of seven children born to Herman and Aurore Koehler in Indiana. Both Septima and her sister Aurora worked as schoolteachers in southeasters Indiana from 1867 to about 1890 when the sisters began their mission work for the Episcopal Church. Around 1895 Septima was appointed by Bishop William Hobart Hare to teach at St. Mary's Mission School on the Rosebud Reservation while Aurora took a job as a librarian in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Only a few years later, around 1899, she was appointed to St. Elizabeth's mission school on the Standing Rock reservation where she taught under Principal Mary E. Francis. In addition to her teaching duties, Koehler also lectured on the importance of health and hygiene at reservation boarding schools, participating in the 1903 Standing Rock Institute organizing by A.O. Wright, supervisor of Indian Schools for the department of the Interior.

Between 1906 and 1908, the Koehler sisters moved to Nashville Tennessee to work within the African American community and from 1908-1909 they worked in a mill in LaGrange, Georgia. Septima died in Hagerstown, Maryland in 1918 from pneumonia.
Related Materials:
The Hutchings-Koehler Family Papers, 1699–1916, can be found in the Manuscript and Visual Collections Department William Henry Smith Memorial Library Indiana Historical Society. This includes correspondence and notebooks from Septima Koehler during this same time period in South Dakota.
Separated Materials:
Archaeological and ethnographic plains materials collected by Septima Koehler and inherited by her great-niece Elizabeth Kelemen can be found in the NMAI ethnographic collections. They have catalog numbers 23/8260 – 23/8319. There are also 14 sketches from St. Mary's Mission students with catalog numbers 25/1093 – 25/1101.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1970 by Pal and Elizabeth Zulauf Kelemen. Elizabeth Kelemen was the great-niece of Septima Koehler.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Women in the Episcopal Church  Search this
Education -- Mission School  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Notebooks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters (correspondence)
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Septima Koehler Collection (NMAI.AC.319), Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.319
See more items in:
Septima V. Koehler collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-319
Online Media:

Timothy H. O'Sullivan and William Bell photographs from the U.S. Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian

Photographer:
O'Sullivan, Timothy H., 1840-1882  Search this
Bell, William, 1830-1910  Search this
Creator:
Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
54 Albumen prints
7 Copy negatives
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Ute  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Copy negatives
Place:
Chelly, Canyon de (Ariz.)
Arizona
Colorado
New Mexico
Idaho
Date:
1871-1874
Summary:
This collection contains photographs documenting American Indian communities and landscape scenes in the Southwest photographed by Timothy O'Sullivan and William Bell for U.S. geographical surveys circa 1971-1974.
Scope and Contents:
P01730, P01731, P01733, P01735, P01743-P01792 (copy negatives: N34849-N34851, N34853- N34855, N35051)

This collection contains 54 photographs (plus 7 copy negatives) that were shot by photographer Timothy O'Sullivan 1871, 1873, and 1874 and William Bell in 1872 for the U.S. Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian, under Lieutenant George M. Wheeler, War Department, Corps of Engineers, U.S.A. The survey was commonly referred to as the "Wheeler Surveys."

The photographs depict American Indian Pueblos in the Southwest including Apache; A:shiwi (Zuni); Diné (Navajo); Hopi; Jicarilla Apache; Laguna Pueblo; Mohave; San Felipe Pueblo; Taos Pueblo; and Ute, among other communities. In addition, the collection contains landscape and scenic shot in the same region.

The bulk of the photos in this collection are one half of a stereoscope photograph that was never pasted onto a stereoscope card. The copy negatives in this collection were created by the Museum of the American Indian in the late 1960s.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged by year and subject matter.
Biographical / Historical:
The geographical surveys west of the 100th meridian were operated under the United States Army Corps of Engineers and supervised by First Lieutenant (later Captain) George Montague Wheeler from 1869 through 1879. They were intended to document the geography in order to make accurate maps, record locations of American Indian tribes in the region, select possible sites for military installations and rail or common roads, and note resources in the area. In total, the surveys analyzed the region now covered by Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Oregon, and the expeditions produced 164 maps, 41 publications, and a series of stereoviews. Timothy H. O'Sullivan began photographing geographical surveys in 1867-1869 when he was the official photographer for Clarence King's United States Geological Exploration of the 40th Parallel. He served as the official photographer for the Wheeler surveys in 1871, 1873, and 1874, with William Bell taking over in 1872. O'Sullivan later became the United States Geological Survey's first photographer in Washington, D.C.

[History note from the National Anthropological Archives collection record NAA.PhotoLot.167 with edits made by NMAI]
Provenance:
It is unclear when most of these photographs were obtained by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Collection of Timothy H. O'Sullivan photographs, image #, NMAI.AC.229, National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.229
See more items in:
Timothy H. O'Sullivan and William Bell photographs from the U.S. Geographical Surveys West of the 100th Meridian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-229
Online Media:

Werner Lüthy photographs from Venezuela

Photographer:
Lüthy , Werner, 1899-1967  Search this
Extent:
0.02 Linear feet
14 Photographs
Culture:
Barí (Motilone)  Search this
Wayuu (Guajira/Goajiro)  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Venezuela
Date:
circa 1931
Summary:
This collection contains 14 photographs depicting the Barí (Motilone) and Wayuu (Guajira/Goajiro) peoples of Venezuela circa 1930-1931.
Scope and Contents:
N36511-N36516, P09993-P10000

This collection contains 8 gelatin silver prints shot by photographer Werner Lüthy circa 1930-1931 and and 6 copy negatives created by the Museum of the American Indian. The photographs depict the Barí (Motilone) and Wayuu (Guajira/Goajiro) peoples of Venezuela. The photographs include portraits of individuals and groups, as well as scenes of daily life such as a pearl fisherman repairing a sail, pearl fishermen sitting on a mound of shells, and individuals wearing face paint. One photograph depicts the top of a man's head showing scars, which according to Lüthy, was obtained during a "Chicha-feast" when one man hits another over the head with a sharp bow until one man drops. The photographs have typed captions on the versos.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Werner Lüthy (also spelled Luthy) was a Swiss photographer who lived in Bern, Switzerland. Born on August 1, 1899, Lüthy specialized in travel photography. His work was exhibited in Bern in the 1930s through 1950s and published in numerous photography journals. Lüthy died on November 11, 1967.
Related Materials:
The State Archives of Canton Bern in Switzerland holds a collection of Werner Lüthy photographs.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation by Werner Lüthy in 1931.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Werner Lüthy photographs from Venezuela, catalog #, NMAI.AC.202; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.189
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-189

Joseph-Fidèle Bernard photographs from Alaska

Creator:
Bernard, Joseph-Fidèle, 1878-1972  Search this
Extent:
11 Glass plate negatives
11 Copy negatives
Culture:
Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo)  Search this
Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass plate negatives
Copy negatives
Place:
Alaska
Siberia (Russia)
Date:
1921
Summary:
The Joseph-Fidèle Bernard photographs from Alaska consists of negatives taken by Bernard in 1921 among the Inupiaq (Alaska Inupiat Eskimo) and Siberian Yu'pik communities. Bernard was an artic trader, trapper and captain of the schooner "Teddy Bear."
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 11 black and white glass negatives, taken by Joseph-Fidèle Bernard in 1921, along with 11 copy negatives (acetate) made by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in the 1960's. The images include scenes of daily life in Nome, Alaska among the Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo) community. The majority of the image are portraits of men, women and children. None of those photographed have been identified. In additon to the photographs in Nome, there is one view of a Siberian Yu'pik vilage in East Cape, Siberia, and one view of a kayak storage location in Cape of Prince of Wales, Alaska.
Arrangement:
The negatives are arranged in original catalog number order; N08110-N08120.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in 1878 in Tignish, Prince Edward Island, Canada, Joseph-Fidèle Bernard was an arctic trader, trapper and captain/owner of the schooner "Teddy Bear"(based in Nome, Alaska). He assisted Canadian ethnologist/explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson (1879-1962) and anthropologist Diamond Jenness (1886-1969) on their travels in Alaska and upper Canada. Bernard was in Coronation Gulf in 1910 and remained there for extended periods between 1910-1914, trading for furs and ethnographic objects. Nearby Bernard Harbour is named for him. In 1921, Bernard and the Teddy Bear became locked in the ice on their way from Nome to Wrangell Island to rescue members of Stefansson's party. Bernard later settled in Cordova, Alaska, where he was harbor master. He died in 1972 in Sitka.
Related Materials:
Additional collections with Joseph F. Bernard materials iclude the Joseph F. Bernard papers, 1900-1970, at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library and the Joseph-Fidele Bernard photograph collection, 1901-1923, at the Alaska State Library.
Provenance:
This collection was likley a purchase from Joseph-Fidèle Bernard around 1923 by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Teddy Bear (Schooner)  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Joseph-Fidèle Bernard photographs from Alaska, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.132
See more items in:
Joseph-Fidèle Bernard photographs from Alaska
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-132
Online Media:

June and Farrar Burn photographs from Alaska

Creator:
Burn, Farrar, 1888-1974  Search this
Burn, June, 1893-1969  Search this
Extent:
12 Glass plate negatives
13 Copy negatives
Culture:
Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik) [St. Lawrence Island]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass plate negatives
Copy negatives
Photographs
Place:
Alaska
Date:
1920-1921
Summary:
This collection includes negatives from June and Farrar Burn's time in Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, Alaska between 1920 and 1921. The Burns were granted teaching appointments from the Bureau of Education in the Alaska School Service and assigned to Gambell where they lived for a year, working closely with the Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik) community there.
Content Description:
This collection consists of 12 glass plate negatives and 13 copy negatives that depict June and Farrar Burns' year long teaching appointments in Gambell, St. Lawrence Island with the Alasksa School Service between 1920 and 1921. This primarily includes photographs of the Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik) community with whom they were living and working. The majority of the photographs were shot outdoors of men, women and children outside of their homes, with their sled dogs, and hunting. There are also several images of June Burn teaching her young students as well as group portraits of the children in her class. The glass plate negatives appear to be copies made sometime between 1921 and 1923 of originals that were likely nitrate negatives shot by Farrar Burn.
Biographical / Historical:
June Burn was born Inez Chandler Harris on June 19, 1893, in Anniston, Alabama. June met Farrar Burn (born September 22, 1888), a World War I veteran, while living in a cabin near Washington, D.C., and the two were wed in 1919. The couple began homesteading on the San Juan Islands in the Puget Sound before being granted teaching appointments from the Bureau of Education in the Alaska School Service and assigned to Gambell, St. Lawrence Island in Alaska in June, 1920. For a year they lived and worked closely with the Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik) population there. When June became pregnant with their first son North they returned to the San Juans.

The Burns continued to travel extensively with June writing for various periodicals and eventually publishing her own autobiography "Living High: An Unconventional Autobiography" in 1941. Later in their lives Farrar traveled the country lecturing on and June taught for a short while at the University of Washington. In 1967, June and Farrar moved to a small farm near Fort Smith, Arkansas – Farrar's home town. June died there in 1969, followed by Farrar in 1975.
Related Materials:
The June and Farrar Burn Papers, 1921-1969, can be found at Western Washington University, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies.
Separated Materials:
The Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation purchased 71 Alaskan ethnographic items from Farrar Burn which are now in NMAI Ethnology collection with catalog numbers 11/6726 - 11/6795.
Provenance:
Purchased by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, along with 71 ehtnographic items, from Farrar Burn in 1923.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); June and Farrar Burn photographs from Alaska, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.131
See more items in:
June and Farrar Burn photographs from Alaska
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-131
Online Media:

Alberto Vojtech Fric photograph collection

Photographer:
Frič, Alberto Vojtěch, 1882-1944  Search this
Extent:
401 Photographs
Culture:
Chamacoco (Zamuko)  Search this
Evueví (Payaguá/Payagua)  Search this
Enxet (Lengua)  Search this
Gran Chaco  Search this
Tomaráho (Tumraha)  Search this
Borôro (Bororo)  Search this
Kadiwéu (Caduveo/Cadioeos/Guaicuru)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Paraguay
Brazil
Date:
circa 1905-1923
Summary:
This collection contains photographs documenting indigenous peoples photographed by Czech botanist and ethnographer Alberto Vojtech Fric during his expeditions to Central and South America circa 1905-1923.
Scope and Contents:
L01573-L01580, N35599-N41410, P05609-P05901, P11533-P11534

This collection contains 401 photographs (autochromes, negatives, and prints) that were shot by Czech botanist and ethnographer Alberto Vojtech Fric during his expeditions to Central and South America circa 1905-1923.

The photographs depict indigenous peoples of Paraguay such as the Chamacoco (Zamuko), Evueví (Payaguá/Payagua), Enxet (Lengua), Gran Chaco, and Tomaráho (Tumraha), as well as indigenous peoples of Brazil such as the Borôro (Bororo) and the Kadiwéu (Caduveo/Cadioeos/Guaicuru). A small set of photographs also depict totem poles in Alaska.

Photographs of note include autochrome photographs (early color photographs) depicting botanical specimens and objects that Fric collected.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number. 
Biographical / Historical:
Alberto Vojtech Fric (1882-1944) was a Czech botanist and ethnographer who studied plant life and indigenous peoples in Central and South America.
Separated Materials:
The Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records (NMAI.AC.001) also contain materials related to Alberto Vojtech Fric's work including a biography and catalog cards related to the objects he collected and donated to MAI, which are cataloged under the numbers 124844 – 125750.
Provenance:
Purchased by the Museum of the American Indian from Alberto Vojtech Fric in 1923.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Some materials in this collection may be RESTRICTED due to cultural sensitivity.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Alberto Vojtech Fric, image #, NMAI.AC.165; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.165
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-165

Sidney S. Wilson and family photographs from Pima Indian Agency

Creator:
Wilson, Sidney S.  Search this
Source:
Wheeler, Roswell G.  Search this
Names:
Gila River Indian Reservation (Ariz.)  Search this
United States. Office of Indian Affairs  Search this
Wilson, Florence L.  Search this
Former owner:
Wheeler, Roswell G.  Search this
Extent:
10 Negatives (photographic)
11 Photographic prints
Culture:
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Date:
1884-1885
1915
1933
Summary:
This collection includes negatives and photographic prints shot or collected at the Pima Indian Agency, now the Gila River Reservation, by Sidney S. Wilson and family members Florence Wilson and Roswell G. Wheeler. Sidney Wilson's sister Florence worked as a teacher at the Agency school during the winter of 1884-1885 while their uncle Roswell Wheeler served as the Indian Agent.
Scope and Contents:
Series 1: Sidney S. Wilson, 1933, includes 10 negatives made by Sidney S. Wilson on his 1933 trip to the Gila River Reservation in Sacaton, Arizona. Wilson met with several of his sister Florence's former Akimel O'odham (Pima) students, including Hugh Patton and Calvin Emerson, and took photographs with them in front of old agency buildings. The photographs with Sidney in the image were likely shot by his wife Anna. Series 2: Roswell G. Wheeler, 1915, includes three photographic prints shot by Ros Wheeler on Easter in 1915. Wheeler had been Indian Inspector of the Pima Indian Agency in the 1880s and returned for a visit in 1915. These include images of Ned Wood and his family and Harvey White and his son. Wood and White were also former students of Florence Wilson in 1884-1885. Series 3: Unknown Photographer, circa 1884, includes eight photographic prints by unknown photographer(s) made around 1884. These images depict school age children, women carrying burden baskets and men on horseback.
Negatives: N22921-N22930, Photographic prints: P15778-P15788.
Arrangement:
Arranged into three series. Series 1: Sidney S. Wilson, 1933; Series 2: Roswell G. Wheeler, 1915; Series 3: Unknown Photographer, 1884.
Biographical / Historical:
During the winter of 1884-1885, Florence L. Wilson (1861-1920), later Mrs. E.E. Flickinger, taught at the Pima Indian Agency School in Sacaton Arizona. Her uncle, Roswell G, Wheeler, had been appointed Indian Agent by President Garfield and he hired Florence, along with an Aunt to teach at the Agency. During her time teaching, one of Florence's tasks was to assign new English names to her Akimel O'odham (Pima) students in addition to teaching them English. Florence wrote letters home to Indiana during this time which were kept by her mother Hepzibah Beulah Wilson.

Florence's younger brother, Sidney S. Wilson (1865-1950) re-discovered the letters, along with other family keepsakes, and in January 1933 traveled to the Pima Agency in Arizona with his wife Anna to see where Florence taught. Wilson sought out several of Florence's students including Ned Wood, Dick Hull and Hugh Patton. Wilson returned to Sacaton, Arizona in 1936 with a picture of his sister Florence that was to hang in the new school building. In 1942, Wilson donated Florence's letters along with photographs to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The letters are now at Cornell University with the Huntington Free Library collection.
Separated Materials:
The letters from Florence Wilson to her family, initially part of the same donation, were part of the Huntington Free Library collection that were sent to Cornell University. They can now be found here: Correspondence from Pima Indian Agency, Sacaton, Arizona, #9050. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
Provenance:
Gift of Sidney S. Wilson, 1942.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Teachers -- 19th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Sidney S. Wilson and family photographs from Pima Indian Agency, image #, NMAI.AC.156; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.156
See more items in:
Sidney S. Wilson and family photographs from Pima Indian Agency
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-156
Online Media:

Arthur Billings Hunt photograph collection

Creator:
Hunt, Arthur Billings  Search this
Photographer:
Barry, D. F. (David Francis), 1854-1934  Search this
Goff, O. S. (Orlando Scott), 1843-1917  Search this
Haynes, F. Jay (Frank Jay), 1853-1921  Search this
Huffman, L. A. (Laton Alton), 1854-1931  Search this
Extent:
15 Photographic prints
0.03 Linear feet
Culture:
Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux)  Search this
Yanktonnai Nakota (Yankton Sioux)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Date:
1870s-1880s
Summary:
This collection consists of fifteen photographic prints depicting individuals from Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux) and Yanktonnai Nakota (Yankton Sioux) communities, and dating from approximately the 1870s and 1880s.
Content Description:
The Arthur Billings Hunt photograph collection consists of fifteen photographic prints dating to the 1870s and 1880s. The bulk of the photographs are studio portraits and depict a number of Hunkpapa Lakota (Hunkpapa Sioux) and Yanktonnai Nakota (Yankton Sioux) community members and leaders. These photographs represent the work of various turn of the twentieth-century photographers of the American West including David F. Barry, Orlando Scott Goff, F. Jay Haynes, and Laton Alton Huffman. The photographs were later acquired by Arthur Billings Hunt, who subsequently donated them to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into folders by cultural group.
Biographical / Historical:
Arthur Billings Hunt was born in 1890. He attended schooling at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, receiving his undergraduate degree there in 1911, and later was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the same institution in 1945. Moving to New York soon after graduation, Hunt had a lifelong career as a well-known soloist, musical director, broadcaster, and collector of Christian Americana. In addition to conducting a weekly broadcast of singing services for fourteen years with the New York Federation of Churches on radio station WEAF, Hunt also served as the Executive Director of the National Hymn Sing Association. While primarily interested in collecting Christian hymnals and sheet music himself, Hunt also inherited from his maternal grandfather, Newell B. Perkins, a number of material culture objects and photographic images related to different North American Plains Indian communities. These he subsequently donated to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in the mid-twentieth century. Arthur Billings Hunt died in 1971 at the age of 81.
Related Materials:
Other archival collections relating to the life and work of Arthur Billings Hunt include the Arthur Billings Hunt papers, located in the Columbia University Libraries Archival Collections.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Arthur Billings Hunt in 1945.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Arthur Billings Hunt photograph collection, NMAI.AC.159; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.159
See more items in:
Arthur Billings Hunt photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-159
Online Media:

George C. Coudert photographs from Brazil

Photographer:
Coudert, George C.  Search this
Extent:
14 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Tenharim  Search this
Parintintín (Parintintin)  Search this
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Amazonia  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Place:
Amazonas (Brazil)
Date:
1924
Summary:
Photographs made by George C. Coudert among the Tenharim and Parintintín (Parintintin) communities in Brazil during a 1924 expedition.
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes 14 negatives shot by George Coudert among the Tenharim and Parintintín (Parintintin) communities along the Rio dos Marmelos in the Amazonas State in Brazil. These were made during an expedition to collect rare bird specimens on behalf of the Zoological Gardens of Philadelphia. According to his original negative sleeves, the expedition stayed six days in the Madeira region to study the indigenous people in the area. Images include portraits of Tenharim and Parintintín (Parintintin) men, women, and children, often posed in groups outside of dwellings and along the river. The photographs were made in 1924 and were likely shot on nitrate. The negatives were transferred to safety film (acetate) in the 1960s when the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation conducted a large scale photograph conservation project. Contact prints were also made at this time.
Catalog numbers: N09121-N09134
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
George C. Coudert (1884-1955) was a photographer and cinematographer. Born in France, Coudert moved to the United States as a young child and attended school in Newark, New Jersey. Thought he started his career as a photographer, he moved into film and worked as cinematographer for most of his career. In the 1920's, Coudert went on several expeditions to South America serving as the photographer. In 1924 he travelled to Brazil on a rare bird catching expedition for the Zoological Gardens of Philadelphia, along with Joseph McGoldrick, Rudolphe Meyer De Schauensee, Henry Norris and Alec Eesso. Eventually, Coudert moved to California where he lived out the rest of his life.
Provenance:
It is still unclear how this collection came to the Museum of the American Indian, though it was likely a donation around 1924-1925 based on the catalog numbers.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu). Some images restricted for cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); George C. Coudert photographs from Brazil, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.133
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-133

E. Lucas Bridges photographs from Tierra del Fuego

Creator:
Bridges, E. Lucas, 1874-1949  Search this
Extent:
10 Copy negatives
Culture:
Selk'nam (Ona)  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Copy negatives
Place:
Tierra del Fuego (Argentina and Chile)
Date:
1900-1910
Summary:
This collection includes 10 copy negatives of E. Lucas Bridges photographs from Tierra del Fuego in Argentina made between 1900 and 1910. Bridges was the son of an Anglican missionary and grew up among the Selk'nam (Ona) indigenous people at the southernmost tip of South America. Bridges published The Uttermost Part of the Earth in 1949 documenting his family's experiences in Tierra del Fuego.
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes 10 copy negatives of E. Lucas Bridges photographs from Tierra del Fuego in Argentina made between 1900 and 1910. The majority of the images are of a Selk'nam (Ona) Hain, or Initiation ceremony. These images have been restricted. The remainder of the photographs include portraits of Selk'nam (Ona) men and women on Isla Grande de Terra del Fuego in Argentina. This includes portraits of Kautempklh and Paloa, Halah and his family, Te-al and Ishtohn, and an unidentified group. Many of these photographs were included in the 1949 book The Uttermost Part of the Earth written by E. Lucas Bridges. The book documents his family's experiences in Tierra del Fuego at the turn of the 20th century.

The copy negatives were made by photographing a set of Lucas Bridges prints. It's unclear whether this was done prior to the donation (by Bridges) or by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
N20227-N20036
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Esteban Lucas Bridges, 1874-1949, was born to Anglican missionary father Reverend Thomas Bridges and mother Mary Ann Bridges in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Although his father resigned his missionary position in 1886, the family remained in Tierra del Fuego and built the Estancia Harberton on the coast of the Beagle Channel. From 1898 through 1914, Bridges, along with his brothers, opened new trails and visited frequently with the indigenous peoples of the region, often providing shelter from white settlers on their estancias. Many European colonizers between the 1870s and 1930 actively and knowingly decimated the Selk'nam population in the quest for gold and land. Although Lucas Bridges did much to try to help the local communities, by 1930 the Selk'nam community was reduced to about 100 members.

During World War I, Bridges went to England to enlist in the army. He married Janette McLeod Jardine in 1917 and following the war the couple moved to South Africa where they developed a ranch. Bridges returned to Argentina shortly before his death in 1949.
Provenance:
Gift of E. Lucas Bridges, 1932.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu). Some images restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Argentina  Search this
Genre/Form:
Copy negatives
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); E. Lucas Bridges photographs from Tierra del Fuego, image #, NMAI.AC.144. National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.144
See more items in:
E. Lucas Bridges photographs from Tierra del Fuego
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-144
Online Media:

Ferdinand Anthony Stahl photographs from the Peruvian Amazon

Creator:
Stahl, Ferdinand Anthony, 1874-1950  Search this
Extent:
3 Negatives (photographic)
18 Photographic prints
6 Copy negatives
Culture:
Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha)  Search this
Yagua (Yahua)  Search this
Amahuaca  Search this
Amazonia  Search this
Indians of South America -- Peru  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Copy negatives
Date:
1925
1928
Summary:
Photographic prints and negatives taken by Seventh-day Adventist missionary Ferdinand Anthony Stahl amongst indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon. These include the Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha), Yagua (Yahua) and Amahuaca communities.
Scope and Contents:
The majority of the photographs in this collection include portraits of indigenous community members in the Peruvian Amazon taken by Ferdinand Anthony Stahl while on Mission for the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Some of the photographs include images of Ferdinand Stahl and his wife Ana posing with community members and it is unclear who the photographer was for these images. The photographs were shot in 1925 and 1928 in the Ucayali (Atalaya Province), Junin (Chanchamayo Province) and Loreto regions in Peru. The bulk of the photographs were taken among the Asháninka (Campa/Chuncha) and includes images of women weaving; group portraits along the Río Perené with canoes; as well as posed group portraits in front of the Stahl's Mission. There are also photographs of Yagua (Tahua) tribal members posed in traditional dress.

Negatives include N14915-N14917. Prints include P07956-P07965, P08614-P08619, P09483-P09484. Copy negatives include N36121-N36124, N36262-N36263. The copy negatives were created by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (NMAI's predecessor museum).
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Ferdinand Anthony Stahl, 1874-1950, was a Seventh-day Adventist missionary to South America. Along with his wife Ana, Stahl converted to Seventh-day Adventism in 1902 and trained as a nurse at the Battle Creek Sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan. In 1909 the Stahls, along with their children, were sent as missionaries to La Paz, Bolivia by the General Conference in order to evangelize the indigenous communities in the area. In 1911, they moved to the Peru side of Lake Titicaca, establishing schools among the Aymara and Quechua communities. In 1920 the Stahls moved from Lake Titicaca to the headwaters of the Amazon in Iquitos, Peru where they established the Metraro Mission Station and launched mission boats downriver. They returned to the United States in 1939.

See "Ferdinand Stahl, Missionary to Peru" Adventist Heritage - Vol. 12, No. 2, summer 1988 by Robert G. Wearner for more information.
Related Materials:
See Box 307, Folder 7 in the Museum of the Amrican Indian, Heye Foundation records (NMAI.AC.001) for an original catalog list of Peruvian and Bolivian Artifacts purchased from Stahl by the MAI in 1927.
Provenance:
Gift of Ferdinand A. Stahl in 1927 (N14915-N14917) and part of a 1929 purchase along with ethnographic objects (P07956-P07965). It is unclear when the remainder of the prints (P08614-P08619, P09483-P09484) were acquired by the Museum.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Peru  Search this
Missionaries  Search this
Missions -- Peru -- Photographs  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Ferdinand Anthony Stahl photographs from Peruvian Amazon, image #, NMAI.AC.141; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.141
See more items in:
Ferdinand Anthony Stahl photographs from the Peruvian Amazon
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-141
Online Media:

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