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Olive Rush papers

Creator:
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Names:
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Extent:
6.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Diaries
Photographs
Date:
1879-1967
Summary:
The papers of Olive Rush measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1879 to 1967. They contain correspondence, artwork, photographs, writings, and other personal papers documenting Rush's education and career as an illustrator, portraitist, muralist, painter, teacher, and promoter of Native American art.
Scope and Contents note:
The records of Olive Rush measure 6.3 linear feet and date from 1879 to 1967. They contain correspondence, artwork, photographs, writings, and other records that document her education and career as an illustrator, portraitist, muralist, painter, and promoter of Native American art.

Biographical materials include several narratives written by Rush and others, as well as a few items related to Delaware artist Ethel Pennewill Brown Leach, Rush's close friend and colleague. Correspondence spans Rush's education and career, and documents her early career in illustration, purchases and exhibitions of her work, her efforts to secure exhibitions for Native American artists, and her dealings with administrators of Federal Art Projects of the 1930s.

Writings include diaries from Rush's early years, including an especially detailed diary from her Santa Fe Indian School mural project in 1932. Also found are lectures, talks, essays, notebooks with technical experiments and aesthetic ideas, and loose notes for her FAP project at the New Mexico College of Agricultural and Mechanical Arts.

Records of Rush's artwork include two record books, receipts for supplies and shipments, price lists, inventories, records of submissions, and a small number of similar records of artwork by Native American artists. Sketchbooks, loose sketches, and drawings by Rush span her entire career and include many studies and proposed designs for murals and frescoes.

Printed Materials consist of exhibition catalogs, clippings, and reproductions of artwork, especially illustration work from Rush's early career. Photographs include a class photograph from the Corcoran School of Art circa 1890 and many of Rush and her fellow artists in Wilmington, Delaware from around 1904 to 1910. Photographs of works of art document Rush's murals and frescoes in private homes, businesses, and public buildings.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into seven series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1886-1966 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1889-1964 (Boxes 1-2, 8; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1886-1962 (Box 2; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Records of Artwork, 1904-1956 (Box 3; 8 folders)

Series 5: Artwork, 1896-1957 (Boxes 3-4, 7, OV 8-12; 1 linear foot)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1879-1967 (Boxes 4-5, 7, OV 13; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1890-1966 (Box 6; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Olive Rush was born in Fairmount, Indiana in 1875 to a Quaker farm family of six children, and attended nearby Earlham College, a Quaker school with a studio art program. Encouraged by her teacher, Rush enrolled in the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C. in 1890, where she stayed for two years and achieved early recognition for her work. In 1893, Rush joined the Indiana delegation of artists to the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

In 1894, she moved to New York City and continued her studies at the Art Students League with Henry Siddons Mowbray, John Twachtman, and Augustus St. Gaudens. She secured her first job as an illustrator with Harper and Brothers and quickly started doing additional illustration work for Good Housekeeping, Scribner's, The Delineator, Woman's Home Companion, Sunday Magazine and St. Nicholas Magazine. Rush also became a staff artist at the New York Tribune and illustrated several books.

In 1904, Rush sent an inquiry with samples of her work to master illustrator Howard Pyle, who had established what was then the only school of illustration in the country in Wilmington, Delaware. There he provided free instruction to a small number hand-picked artists culled from hundreds of applicants. Although Pyle did not admit women to his studio, he encouranged her to come and join the class for lectures and criticisms. Rush moved to Delaware later that year, joining a growing number of female illustrators there including Ethel Pennewill Brown (later Leach), Blanche Chloe Grant, Sarah Katherine Smith, and Harriet Roosevelt Richards, among others. Rush and her female colleagues lived together in a boarding house known as Tusculum, which became well-known as a gathering place for women artists.

Rush traveled to Europe in 1910, embarking on a period of intense study and travel which would mark a steady transition from illustration to painting. She studied at Newlyn in Cornwall, England and then in France with the American impressionist Richard E. Miller. She returned to Wilmington in 1911, where she moved into Pyle's studio with Ethel Pennewill Brown. Rush bounced to New York, Boston, and back to France, where she lived for a time with fellow artists Alice Schille, Ethel Pennewill Brown, and Orville Houghton Peets. Her reputation grew, and she began to exhibit regularly in major national and regional juried exhibitions including the Carnegie, Pennsylvania Academy, and Corcoran annual exhibitions, as well as the Hoosier Salon.

In 1914, Rush made her first trip to Arizona and New Mexico. Passing through Santa Fe on her return trip, Rush made contact with the artists community at the Museum of New Mexico, where she secured an impromptu solo exhibition after showing her new work, inspired by the landscape of the Southwest. She made Santa Fe her permanent home in 1920 in an adobe cottage on Canyon Road, which became a main thoroughfare of the Santa Fe artists' community.

Rush began to experiment with fresco painting, and developed her own techniques suitable to the local climate. She became a sought-after muralist and was asked to create frescoes for many private homes and businesses. In her painting, she often depicted the Native American dances and ceremonies she attended. She exhibited these paintings around the country, including with the Society of Independent Artists in New York, and in the Corcoran Annual Juried exhibition, where Mrs. Herbert Hoover and Duncan Phillips both purchased her work.

In 1932, Rush was hired to teach at the Santa Fe Indian School. Rush's enthusiastic work in the 1930s with the young pueblo artists is credited with helping to bring about a flourishing of Native American visual art in New Mexico. Rush continued to work with native artists throughout her life, and many of her associates went on to gain national reputations, including Harrison Begay, Awa-Tsireh, Pop Chalee, Pablita Valerde, and Ha-So-De (Narciso Abeyta).

From 1934 to 1939, Rush executed murals for the Public Works of Art Project (PWAP) and the Federal Art Project (FAP) of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Rush's federal art projects included murals for the Santa Fe Public Library (1934), the Biology Building of the New Mexico Agricultural College (1935), the Pawhuska, Oklahoma Post Office (1938), and the Florence, Colorado Post Office (1939). Rush was also asked to join the Advisory Committee on Indian Art created by the PWAP in 1934, to help administer a segment of the program aimed at employing Native American artists.

In her later years, Rush's artwork became increasingly experimental, incorporating the ideas of Chinese painting, Native American art, and her contemporaries, the modernists, especially Wassily Kandinsky. She continued painting and exhibiting until 1964, when illness prohibited her from working. She died in 1966, leaving her home and studio to the Santa Fe Society of Friends.

Sources consulted for this biography include Olive Rush: A Hoosier Artist in New Mexico (1992) by Stanley L. Cuba, and Almost Forgotten: Delaware Women Artists and Arts Patrons 1900-1950 (2002) by Janice Haynes Gilmore.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Archives of American Art holds a brief oral history interview with Olive Rush concerning her involvement with Federal Art Projects.
Separated Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel SW4) including scrapbooks, photographs, clippings, and exhibition catalogs. Most of this material was later donated, but some items remain with the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Olive Rush donated the bulk of her papers to the Archives of American Art in 1963 and 1964. Additional exhibition catalogs and photographs were added to the collection upon her death in 1966. An anonymous donation of diaries, sketchbooks, and a photograph was received by the Archives in 1970. Also in 1970, the Olive Rush Memorial Studio lent papers for microfilming. Many, but not all, of the loaned materials were later donated.
Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Olive Rush papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
American Indians in art  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Muralists -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Illustrators -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Diaries
Photographs
Citation:
Olive Rush papers, 1879-1967. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rusholiv
See more items in:
Olive Rush papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rusholiv
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Will Shuster, 1964 July 30

Interviewee:
Shuster, Will, 1893-1969  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Subject:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13208
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213829
AAA_collcode_shuste64
Theme:
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213829

Olive Rush papers, 1879-1967

Creator:
Rush, Olive, 1873-1966  Search this
Subject:
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Topic:
American Indians in art  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9223
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211418
AAA_collcode_rusholiv
Theme:
Diaries
Sketches & Sketchbooks
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211418
Online Media:

Will Shuster papers, [undated] and 1914-1970

Creator:
Shuster, Will, 1893-1969  Search this
Subject:
Sheridan, John E.  Search this
Nash, Willard Ayer  Search this
Scott, Winfield Townley  Search this
Sloan, John French  Search this
La Farge, Oliver  Search this
Karig, Walter  Search this
Wheelock, Warren  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art festivals  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art and state  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
United States  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13458
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211861
AAA_collcode_shuswill
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Diaries
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211861

Emil J. Bisttram papers, 1902-1982

Creator:
Bisttram, Emil, 1895-1976  Search this
Subject:
Berninghaus, Oscar E. (Oscar Edmund)  Search this
Jonson, Raymond  Search this
Phillips, Bert Geer  Search this
Saarinen, Eero  Search this
Higgins, Victor  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton  Search this
Ufer, Walter  Search this
Dows, Olin  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Treasury Relief Art Project  Search this
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Design  Search this
Symmetry  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Proportion (Art)  Search this
Taos school of art  Search this
Painting, Abstract  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9018
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211207
AAA_collcode_bistemil
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools
Lives of American Artists
Government Sponsorship of the Arts
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211207

Michele Zackheim papers

Creator:
Zackheim, Michele  Search this
Names:
College of Santa Fe -- Faculty  Search this
Extent:
2.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Date:
1976-2012
bulk 1980-2000
Summary:
The papers of artist Michele Zackheim measure 2.3 linear feet and date from 1976 to 2012, bulk 1980-2000. The collection documents her career in the visual arts through correspondence, interviews, writings, project files, teaching files, printed material, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of artist Michele Zackheim measure 2.3 linear feet and date from 1976 to 2012, bulk 1980-2000. The collection documents her career in the visual arts through correspondence, interviews, writings, project files, teaching files, printed material, and photographic material.

Correspondence includes communication with museums, galleries, and publishers relating to Zackheim's projects. The interview is a radio broadcast on one sound cassette. Writings include an illustrated botany manuscript and learning portfolios. Project files relate to Zackheim's major works including Tent of Meeting and The Café Series, and are comprised of notes, correspondence, photographic material, video recordings, and a sound recording. Teaching files include notes, slides, and articles that Zackheim used for courses she taught at the College of Santa Fe. Printed material includes exhibition cards and announcements, clippings, journals, and a poster. Photographic material includes artwork, installation process, and portraits of the artist.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series

Series 1: Correspondence, 1986-2002 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Interviews, circa 1980s (0.1 linear foot; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1990-1991 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Project Files, 1983-2012 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 5: Teaching Files, circa 1990-1991 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1977-1998 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 7: Photographic Material, 1976-circa 2000 (0.4 linear feet; Box 2-3)
Biographical / Historical:
Michele Zackheim (1941- ) is a writer and former visual artist in New York City working throughout the 1970s-1990s as a fresco muralist, installation artist, print-maker, and painter.

Zackheim was born in Reno, Nevada and grew up in Compton, California. She began working as an artist in the 1970s in New York City, where she was active in the early feminist art movement. In the 1980s, Zackheim moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she taught at the College of Santa Fe and continued to make art. Notable projects include Inherited Dreams, Tent of Meeting, and The Café Series. Tent of Meeting was a large-scale installation using fabric that she printed with images from religious history and proposed the possibility of peaceful coexistence among people of various backgrounds.

In the mid-1990s, Zackheim became a writer of biographical fiction. She currently teaches Creative Writing from a Visual Perspective at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.
Provenance:
Michele Zackheim donated her papers to the Archives in 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Michele Zackheim papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Michele Zackheim papers, 1976-2012, bulk 1980-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.zackmich
See more items in:
Michele Zackheim papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-zackmich

William Penhallow Henderson papers

Creator:
Henderson, William Penhallow, 1877-1943  Search this
Names:
Art in Embassies Program (U.S.)  Search this
Santa Fe Painters and Sculptors  Search this
Henderson, Alice Corbin, 1881-1949  Search this
Henderson, William Oliver  Search this
Extent:
10.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1876-1987
bulk 1876-1943
Summary:
The papers of Chicago and Santa Fe painter, muralist, architect, and furniture designer William Penhallow Henderson measure 10.5 linear feet and date from 1876 to 1987 (bulk dates 1876 to 1943). Found within the papers are scattered biographical material; correspondence with friends and colleagues; three diaries; personal business records; two files concerning the Santa Fe Painters and Sculptors and the Art in Embassies Program; architecture, furniture, and other design project files; exhibition files; notes and writings; artwork, including 64 sketchbooks by Henderson and others; miscellaneous printed material; and photographs of Henderson, his family and colleagues.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Chicago and Santa Fe painter, architect, and furniture designer William Penhallow Henderson measure 10.5 linear feet and date from 1876 to 1987 (bulk dates 1876-1943). Found within the collection are biographical material; a file concerning Henderson's father William Oliver Henderson; correspondence primarily with colleagues discussing art-related topics; two diaries describing his student days in Paris, 1902-1903, and one concerning the latter part of his life; personal business records; subject files for the Santa Fe Painters and Sculptors and the Art in Embassies Program; architecture and furniture files containing notes, designs, and photographs of Henderson's work in these areas; additional project files concerning other projects, including a play, architectural projects, and a mural; exhibition files; notes and writings; artwork, including 64 sketchbooks by Henderson; miscellaneous printed material; and photographs of Henderson, his family, colleagues, and artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 13 series primarily according to type of material; materials within series are arranged chronologically.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1897-1984 (Boxes 1, 12; 14 folders)

Series 2: File on William Oliver Henderson, 1876-1906 (Box 1; 12 folders)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1883-1987 (Boxes 1-2; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 4: Diaries, 1902-1940 (Box 3; 4 folders)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1887-1984 (Box 3; 40 folders)

Series 6: Subject Files, 1921-1975 (Box 3; 2 folders)

Series 7: Architecture and Furniture Files, 1926-1983 (Boxes 3-4, 12, OV 14; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Project Files, 1916-1942 (Boxes 4-5, 12, OV 14; 40 folders)

Series 9: Exhibition Files, 1927-1964 (Box 5; 25 folders)

Series 10: Notes and Writings, 1901-1985 (Boxes 5-6; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 11: Artwork, 1886-1929 (Boxes 6-8, OV 14; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 12: Printed Material, 1891-1988 (Boxes 8-9; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 13: Photographs, 1887-1985 (Boxes 9-11, 13; 1.6 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Painter, architect, and furniture designer, William Penhallow Henderson was born in 1877 in Medford, Massachusetts. His father, William Oliver Henderson was a friend of painter William Edward Norton and an amateur painter himself. During Henderson's childhood, the family moved several times, settling in Turkey Creek, Texas, in 1879, and Clifton, Kansas, in 1886.

Returning to Boston in 1891, Henderson studied at the Massachusetts Normal Art School and, and in 1899, entered the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, studying under Edmund C. Tarbell. In the following year, he won the Paige Traveling Scholarship for two years of study in Europe. His travels, from 1902-1903, included London, where he became acquainted with the family of John Singer Sargent. He also traveled to Paris, Berlin, Dresden, Madrid, and the Azores.

From 1904 to 1910, Henderson taught at the Academy of Fine Arts in Chicago. In 1904 he painted in Mexico and Arizona with colleague Carl N. Werntz. He married the poet-editor of Poetry magazine, Alice Corbin in 1905, and their only child, Alice Oliver Henderson, was born in 1907.

Between 1906 and 1907 Henderson completed ten murals for the Joliet Township High School. Mrs. Henderson's book Anderson's Best Fairy Tales, illustrated by her husband, provided the funds for a second trip to Europe from 1910-1911. In 1914, Henderson built a house and studio of his own design at Lake Bluff, Illinois, and in the same year he was commissioned by Frank Lloyd Wright to design murals for Midway Gardens, Chicago. Unfortunately, the murals were painted over shortly after completion. In the following year, he designed the scenery and costumes for the Chicago Fine Arts Theatre production of Alice in Wonderland.

Due to his wife's failing health, the family moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1916, and in 1918, Henderson was employed by the U. S. Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation in San Francisco to paint camouflage onto the hulls of ships during World War I.

In 1925, Henderson, with his first son-in-law John Evans, formed the Pueblo-Spanish Building Company, through which he designed and built many private homes and some public buildings, including the Railroad Ticket Office in Santa Fe. Henderson was also successful at designing carved wooden furniture. In the mid-1930s, he was appointed to the Federal Arts Project, for which he completed easel paintings and six murals for the Santa Fe Federal Court Building.

In 1937, Henderson completed the impressive Navajo House of Religion, built in the style of an American Indian hogan and later re-named the Museum of Navajo Ceremonial Art.

William Penhallow Henderson died in 1943 in Tesuque, New Mexico.
Provenance:
The William Penhallow Henderson papers were donated by Carlton Colquitt, on behalf of the estate of his late wife, Alice Henderson Rossin, the daughter of William Penhallow Henderson, in 1988.
Restrictions:
Open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The William Penhallow Henderson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Architects -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Furniture designers -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
William Penhallow Henderson papers, 1876-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hendwill
See more items in:
William Penhallow Henderson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hendwill

Fremont F. Ellis scrapbook, 1919-1969

Creator:
Ellis, Fremont F., 1897-1985  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7011
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209144
AAA_collcode_ellifrem
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209144

W. Herbert Dunton papers, 1896-1960

Creator:
Dunton, W. Herbert, 1878-1936  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7607
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209769
AAA_collcode_duntw
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209769

New Mexico

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Before the people there was the land. High mountains in northern New Mexico fork southward, forming arms. One curls westward to embrace the high mesa and plateau land, while the other thrusts directly south to separate the dry grasslands of the east from the fertile valley carved by the Rio Grande. Stories tell that the First People found this land when they emerged onto its surface, born from the womb of Mother Earth.

The Spanish and later the Mexicans also found this land, as they wound their way north on horseback or in carretas, following the course of the long, wild river, and establishing a permanent connection - the Camino Real - between northern New Mexico and Mexico. Then, from Texas, California, Oklahoma, came still others, determined to transform the land and tame the river. And today people still come, on family odysseys that began in Italy, Lebanon, Iran, Czechoslovakia, India, Poland, Japan, or Germany. In one short stretch, the Rio Grande recounts this history as it passes near old communities like San Juan Pueblo and Embudo, then the new atomic city, Los Alamos, and then Albuquerque, a city of a half-million people.

Five hundred years after Columbus, the complex engagement between Europe and America, which his voyage has come to symbolize, continued to produce patterns of accommodation and resistance that were presented in the 1992 Festival program. Conflicting uses and meanings for the same land seem inevitable in New Mexico, where more than 70% of the land is managed by the state or federal government, and where a significant percentage of local income is derived from tourism. Cultural traditions of New Mexico's diverse communities were not seen, at the Festival, as immutable heirlooms passed down from one generation to the next. Rather, visitors could see how today's New Mexicans shape traditions by the conflicted choices they make today, weaving a design that can never be wholly foreseen.

José Griego and Andrew Wiget were Curators, with Philippa Jackson as Research & Program Coordinator and Francesca McLean as Program Assistant.

The New Mexico program was made possible with the support of the State of New Mexico, Bruce King, Governor; with the collaboration of the Department of Tourism, the Office of Cultural Affairs, the New Mexico Arts Division, and the Museum of International Folk Art; and with the assistance of the Tourism Association of New Mexico.
Fieldworkers and consultants:
Fieldworkers

Tomás Atencio, Charles Carillo, Beaumont Chrisner, Patricia D'Andrea, Tobias Duran, Judith Goldberg, José Griego, Jim Harris, Stanley Hordes, Theodore Jojola, Kenneth Keppeler, Gina L'Acqua; Enrique Lamadrid, Katherine Liden, Jack Loeffler, Felix Lopez, Helen Lucero, Gwendolyn Mintz, Lynn Moncus, Stephan Moore, Pat Music, A. Rudy Padilla, Patricia Ruiz, Marilee Schmit, Glenda Sours, Elizabeth Taliman, Soge Track, Sandra Turner, Maria Varela, Marta Wiegle, Peter White

Consultants

Olivia Cadaval, Richard Kennedy
Presenters:
Charles Carrillo, Andrew Connors, José Griego, Kenneth Keppeler, Enrique Lamadrid, Felix Lopez, Tessie Naranjo, Gilbert Sanchez, Maria Varela, Andrew Wiget
Participants:
New Mexico Crafts

Charles Carrillo, santero, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Cordelia Coronado, 1933-, weaver, Medanales, New Mexico

Frances Naranjo Dennis, 1949-, potter, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico

Austin "Slim" Green, saddle maker, Tesuque, New Mexico

Sam Leyba, 1950-, muralist, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Felix Lopez, 1942-, santero, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Irene E. Lopez, 1949-, weaver, Española, New Mexico

José Benjamin Lopez, 1947-, santero, Española, New Mexico

Jerome Lujan, santero, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Deana McGuffin, 1950-, bootmaker, Clovis, New Mexico

Wilberto Miera, adobe worker, furniture maker, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patricio Mora, 1937-, -- paño -- artist, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Madelyn Naranjo, 1915-, potter, Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico

Felipe Ortega, potter, cook, La Madera, New Mexico

Alberto Parra, 1954-, adobe worker, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Carolina Paz, potter, -- quiote -- maker, Tortugas, New Mexico

Lydia Pesata, 1942-, basket maker, storyteller, Dulce, New Mexico

Eliseo Rodriguez, 1915-, straw applique, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Paula Rodriguez, 1915-, straw applique, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Timothy P. Roybal, 1947-, furniture maker, Española, New Mexico

Bonifacio Sandoval, 1922-, tin worker, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Thelma Sheche, 1928-, fetish carver, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico

Ada Suina, potter, Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico

Elizabeth Taliman, 1953-, bead worker, cook, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Carmen Romero Velarde, 1928-, adobe worker, cook, Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Priscilla Vigil, 1919-2001, potter, cook, storyteller, Tesuque, New Mexico

Maria Vergara Wilson, -- colcha -- embroiderer, La Madera, New Mexico

Home and Garden

Paulette Atencio, 1947-, storyteller, Chama, New Mexico

Alice Hoppes, 1939-2003, cook, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Edward Kretek, 1927-1997, cook, Deming, New Mexico

Geraldine Kretek, 1929-, cook, Deming, New Mexico

Gertrude Kretek, cook, Deming, New Mexico

Consuela Martinez, 1948-, curandera, Mora, New Mexico

Elizabeth Taliman, cook, bead worker, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Maclovia Zamora, 1931-, cook, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Range

Ganados del Valle -- Ganados del ValleEstafanita Martinez, 1968-, weaver, Tiera Amarilla, New MexicoNorma Martinez, 1963-, weaver, Chama, New MexicoSophie Martinez, 1959-, weaver, Tierra Amarilla, New MexicoNena Russan, 1964-, weaver, Chama, New Mexico

Ramah Navajo Sheep Camp -- Ramah Navajo Sheep CampKatie C. Henio, Ramah, New MexicoSamuel Henio, 1952-, Pine Hill, New MexicoAnnie L. Pino, 1925-2006, Ramah, New MexicoLorraine Wayne, Ramah, New Mexico

Mountain Spirit Dancers -- Mountain Spirit DancersFreddy Apache, 1963-, dancer, Mescalero, New MexicoAbraham Chee, 1959-, dancer, drum maker, Mescalero, New MexicoNathaniel Chee, Sr., 1936-2004, drummer, singer, Mescalero, New MexicoNathaniel Chee, Jr., dancer, Mescalero, New MexicoSamuel Chee, 1970-, dancer, drum maker, Mescalero, New MexicoJoseph Geronimo, 1949-, drummer, singer, drum maker, Mescalero, New Mexico

Philip Pike, dancer, Mescalero, New Mexico

Jose Castro, charro, La Mesa, New Mexico

Thelma Castro, charro, La Mesa, New Mexico

Banjo Garcia, camp cook, Continental Divide, , New Mexico

Cindy Jo Gainer Graham, 1959-, ranch skills, Tatum, New Mexico

R.W. Hampton, 1957-, ranch skills, guitarist, vocalist, Sedan, New Mexico

James Keith, farrier, blacksmith, Tucumcari, New Mexico

Pete Lewis, 1938-, ranch skills, fiddler, Dell City, New Mexico

Musicians

Antonia Apodaca, 1923-, accordion, vocals, Rociada, New Mexico

Fernando Cellicion, flute, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico

Vodra Dorn, 1957-, vocals, Albuquerque, New Mexico

William Dorn, 1952-, vocals, sermon traditions, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Juan Manuel Flores, guitar, Las Cruces, New Mexico

J.P. Lewis, 1950-, guitar, Dell City, New Mexico

Charla Nettleton, 1955-, bass, Mesilla Park, New Mexico

Cleofes Ortiz, fiddle, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Buster Payne, 1915-, fiddle, Eunice, New Mexico

Floyd Trujillo, 1934-, vocals, bone carver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Gretchen Van Houton, 1963-, fiddle, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Cipriano Vigil, 1941-, guitar, fiddle, vocals, Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico

Johnny Whelan, 1946-, guitar, poetry, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Luther Whelan, 1975-, harmonica, bass, poetry, Las Cruces, New Mexico

Los Alegres -- Los AlegresFrank Jaramillo, 1950-, bass, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoJulia Jaramillo, 1922-, mandolin, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoPablo Trujillo, 1916-, bass, Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Los Reyes de Albuquerque -- Los Reyes de AlbuquerqueMiguel Archibeque, 1938-, guitar, vocals, Albuquerque, New MexicoIsidro Chavez, 1921-, guitar, Albuquerque, New MexicoRay Flores, trumpet, Albuquerque, New MexicoLorenzo Martinez, violin, Albuquerque, New MexicoRoberto Martinez, 1929-, vihuela, guitar, vocals, Albuquerque, New MexicoAngela Perez, 1970-, violin, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Plaza Dancers

Los Bernalillo Matachines -- Los Bernalillo MatachinesTheresa Acosta, 1952-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoCharles J. Aguilar, 1946-, violin, Bernalillo, New MexicoRalph Chavez, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoJohn Crespin, 1952-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoJocelyn Duran, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoJoseph R. Garcia, 1950-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoEddie D. Gutierrez, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoLeroy J. Lovato, 1955-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoLaurence Lucero, 1966-, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoPhillip Montano, 1961-, dancer, Albuquerque, New MexicoLeonard Prairie, dancer, Bernalillo, New MexicoMelanie Wiggins, dancer, Bernalillo, New Mexico

Los Comanches de la Serna -- Los Comanches de la SernaDavid Antonio Gonzales, 1965-, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoFrancisco Gonzales, 1941-, singer, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoMoises Romero, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New MexicoJulian Struck, dancer, Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

Concha Dancers -- Concha DancersAdeline Concha, 1973-, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoBenito Concha, 1965-, drummer, flautist, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoCelestina Concha, 1937-, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoJodie Concha, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoMichelle Concha, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoMike Concha, 1932-, vocals, drummer, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoNicolas Concha, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoDonna Sandoval, 1964-, dancer, bead worker, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoSonny Spruce, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New MexicoBransen Velarde, dancer, Taos Pueblo, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1992-ref34

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