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Kitanemuk

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
4 Boxes
Culture:
Kitanemuk  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Place:
California
Date:
1916-1917
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Kitanemuk.

The linguistic and ethnographic field notes stem from his sessions with Eugenia Mendez, Jose Juan and Magdalena Olivas, and Angela Montes. There are equivalences in Ventureno, "Castec Chumash" (Harrington's identification), Fernandeno, "Rio Chiquito" (Tubatulabal), and Tataviam. Some of the Olivas and Montes material was elicited by Carobeth Tucker Harrington. Miscellaneous material includes field notes taken on several placename trips during which a variety of data was recorded. There are also lists of placenames organized by local geographic region and placenames in Kitanemuk, Serrano, Fernandeno, Spanish, and English. Also filed here are a small section of Kitanemuk, Serrano, Chemehuevi, Fernandeno, Tubatulabal, and Gabrielino tribenames; a description of a wake; and some brief notes on pronouns.

The same speakers also provided information for a semantically arranged vocabulary in slipfile form. Mendez was the primary souce. Some of the placename information resulted from a tour of the area with Sebastiana Higinio. Other placenames were copied from nineteenth-century maps and checked for location rather than for Kitanemuk names. Among numerous categories, the plant names and material culture sections contain the most extensive information. Ethnographic information is freely inserted and includes such topics as myths, history, persons, and reminiscences. There are occasional Ventureno, Serrano, Mohave, and Gabrielino equivalences. Mr. de Billier, Archie Davis, and Mrs. Kirby related some nonlinguistic local incidents.

The dictionary section consists of linguistic data copied from Harrington's field notes from Eugenia Mendez and Angela Montes and later from his grammatical slipfile. The grammatical slipfile represents Harrington's selected editing and subdividing of the original field notes of Eugenia Mendez, Magdalena and Jose Juan Olivas, and Angela Montes. The emphasis is on morphology, with phonetics only rarely considered. There is also a very small section separated by language and dialect. Equivalences in "Tejoneno," Castec, Ventureno, and "Qo'm" were provided by the Olivases, Mendez, Sebastiana Higinio, and Josefa Cordero. Magdalena, Jose Juan, and Eugenia commented on Fernandeno terms, probably those of the Fernandeno informant Setimo Lopez with whom Harrington had worked in October 1916.
Biographical / Historical:
Following three weeks in Los Angeles in October 1916, Harrington (accompanied by his wife, Carobeth) continued field work in an area which encompassed Kitanemuk, Tataviam, Yokuts, and some inland Chumash groups. Due to intermarriage, removal, containment, and trade, many of these people knew terms in several dialects. Among the principal informants were Eugenia Mendez, born at Tejon in 1845; her niece, Magdalena Olivas; and Magdalena's husband, Jose Juan Olivas, who was born at Saticoy, came to Tejon at age twelve, and, according to Harrington's reports, was an "inland Chumash speaker." Angela Montes, Juan and Angela Lozada, Sebastiana Higinio, Jim Monte, and Josefa Cordero also contributed data. Monte and Cordero were of Yokuts parentage. Magdalena Olivas was Angela Lozada's aunt and, according to Lozada, both women also spoke Tubatulabal.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kitanemuk language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Gabrielino language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32c01907d-15a8-4d34-9b2b-64dcc4545634
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14242
Online Media:

Linguistic Questionnaires

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Myers, George S. (George Sprague), 1905-1985  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Chumash  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Vocabulary
Field notes
Questionnaires
Place:
California -- Languages
Date:
1910-1936
bulk 1916-1918
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains a set of questionnaires which John P. Harrington used during various periods of his linguistic fieldwork. It appears that the questionnaires were used principally to elicit words in various California languages--the names of a Salinan speaker and several Wintu and Yana informants are given on a number of heading sheets, although they were undoubtedly used during other fieldwork as well. References to Abby, a speaker of New Mexican Spanish, and to Leonora S. Curtin (abbreviated "LCC"[sic]), a collector of Moroccan botanical specimens, suggest that Harrington used the section of botanical terms in his study of Arabic influences on the Spanish spoken in the American Southwest.

The various components were not organized as a unit but were found scattered throughout his papers. (A portion of the notes were formerly cataloged as parts of B.A.E. mss. 2292 and 6017.) They have been brought together and arranged according to a number of his standard headings: cosmology, botany, anatomy, kinship, material culture. The largest group covers the various classifications of animal species. Within each semantic heading the pages have been arranged as much as possible in chronological order. There is also a set of miscellaneous lists which have not been subdivided semantically.

The questionnaires consist largely of word lists in a mixture of English, California Spanish, and Chumash (Barbareno or Ventureno). Harrington occasionally annotated these lists with equivalent forms in Mohave or Chemehuevi. Although the questionnaires were usually used for eliciting nouns, the section on anatomy also lists verb forms and the section on botany has questions on uses of plants.

Supplementing the word lists are notes from interviews with Smithsonian scientists. Those with George S. Meyers, head curator of the Division of Fishes at the U.S. National Museum, on fish species are particularly extensive. There are also newspaper clippings, bibliographic references, reading notes, and typed extracts from scientific publications. Harrington's files also include reprints and plates picturing various plants and animals which he removed from larger works.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chumash language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Fishes  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Field notes
Questionnaires
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.9
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32d188022-2b3b-4e76-8478-769ba6668e24
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15339

Mohave

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Henderson, Junius, 1865-1937  Search this
Robbins, Wilfred William, 1884-1952  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
33 Boxes
Culture:
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Chemehuevi  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1907-circa 1914, 1946-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Mohave.

Harrington organized his early linguistic and ethnographic notes into more than eighty categories, covering a broad spectrum of Mohave culture from daily practices to mythological and religious beliefs. The variety of content and order of arrangement are encyclopedic. Most of the material is original data from numerous native speakers. Animal and plant notes are also filed in this section. Notes on these topics stem from the Mohave Valley Expedition made with Henderson and Robbins. A typescript of Henderson's report precedes the botanical notes and one by Robbins precedes the zoological notes.

The semantic slipfile consists of data from the original field notes rewritten on slips and arranged in thirteen semantic divisions. Some new information provided by Irving and Wagner was inserted. Material relative to other Yuman tribes is included and almost all categories contain some inextricably interwoven Chemehuevi data which were originally provided by Chemehuevi speakers Jack Jones, John Pete, William Johnson, and Patty Smith. In most instances, the Chemehuevi equivalences are clearly marked. Information on kinship is relatively substantial.

Two Mohave notebooks are also present. One contains vocabulary and texts credited to "Mr. Edgar, Needles, Cal." The other is a packet of loose pages evidently removed from a notebook covering random linguistic and ethnographic data.

Another section consists of a small set of grammar notes arranged under such headings as language, phonology, and morphology. Some notes apparently were taken as early as 1907 and were transferred to slips in 1910 and 1911.

The section of miscellaneous notes on Yuman languages contains Yuma, Cocopa, and Walapai field notebooks. They are principally ethnographic and are difficult to read. Unrelated small groups of notes include Mohave, Yuma, Maricopa, Havasupai, and Walapai ethnographic data, probably provided by Joe Homer. There are lecture notes and students' papers probably from one of the courses which Harrington gave at the University of Colorado. Three small groups of slips include a list of Yuman clan names and a series of excerpts from a Yuman notebook which has not been located. The third is a copy of some Yavapai terms supplied by Barbara Freire-Marreco.

Late linguistic and ethnographic notes contain what appears to be the first draft of a manuscript on Mohave culture. Such subjects as sociology, religion and mythology, physical and mental characteristics, the Mohave universe, warfare, and design are covered. A variety of notes on historical events and on the geographic, political, and economic life of the Needles area was compiled from published sources and correspondence with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and with Indian Agency superintendents. The focus is on Mohave with some general Yuman references. The material has evidently undergone several reorganizations and notes from informants of the earlier period are interfiled. New linguistic and ethnographic information was supplied principally by Hal Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis, and Russell. Comparative terms appear in Yuma, Maricopa, Chemehuevi, and Paiute. Kroeber apparently lent Harrington some of his personal manuscripts, and information from this source is introduced as "Kr. notes." Correspondence with Charles Battye and excerpts from his scrapbooks in the possession of the Needles Public Library are also contained among these notes.

Another section consists of notes and drafts on material culture. They are arranged alphabetically and predominantly ethnographic. Notes came from the earlier period and such 1946 informants as Davidson and the Lewises. George Turner contributed numerous placenames.

The subseries also contains notes and drafts of tribenames. They represent an attempt to identify ethnic names applied to Yuman and some neighboring non-Yuman tribes. Some of the Mohave names may have been given by bilingual Chemehuevi speakers in July 1946, when Harrington and Murl Emery traveled the Colorado River-Mohave Valley area. A brief typescript follows the notes.

The section of semantically arranged notes consists of small amounts of data on minerals, pigments, fire, plants, animals, hunting, food, and medicine.

The section of late grammatical notes is also small. The notes originated mainly from Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, and Warren McCord. He based some hearings on Kroeber's (1911) "Phonetic Elements of the Mohave Language" and Sapir's (1930) "Southern Paiute Language." He also drew on A. M. Halpern's (1946 and 1947) six monographs on Yuma grammar published in the International Journal of American Linguistics. In the mid-1950s he again turned to Halpern and produced a small section of comparative Yuman terms.

The final section of the subseries consists of miscellaneus notes, including drafts of a paper on Mohave history and culture and another on the Kuchan vocabulary of George H. Thomas.
Biographical / Historical:
As a teacher of modern languages at Santa Ana High School in California (1906-1909), John P. Harrington spent his vacations studying Mohave and Yuma in Needles and Yuma, California. Working with a young Mohave woman in Needles in 1907, Mohave was the first Indian language that he ever recorded.

From 1909 until 1915, when he joined the Bureau of American Ethnology, Harrington held various positions with the Museum of the University of New Mexico and the School of American Archaeology, based mainly in Santa Fe. Along with work in other indigenous languages and cultures, he pursued his Mohave studies in Lincolnia, Cottonia, Needles, and Fort Mohave. The focus was on Mohave with ethnographic references to Yuma, Maricopa, Cocopa, Havasupai, and Walapai.

Under the auspices of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the School of American Archaeology, and the University of Colorado, he was ethnologist for a Mohave Valley expedition undertaken in March and April 1911, in conjunction with Junius Henderson and W. W. Robbins. Henderson identified the botanical life of the Mohave Valley and Robbins the zoological.

According to field notes and reports, the years 1910 and 1911 were the most productive ones for this first period of accumulation of Mohave data. Harrington worked with a number of people who spoke Mohave and Chemehuevi, resulting in numerous comparative references. Among the many Mohave speakers, Lee Irving (abbreviated L. I.), Mr. Edgar (Rev. Edgar), Ferd Wagner (Mr. Ferd), and Peter Dean (Peter) contributed substantially. Harrington primarily worked with Wagner in 1907. Edward H. Davis accompanied him on various placename trips and apparently advised him on the collection of artifacts. Financial records indicate that he spent about six weeks in Needles in late spring, 1914, collecting objects for the Panama-California Exposition.

A second period of endeavor commenced in 1946 with new recordings from Hal Davidson (Hal), Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lewis, George Turner, and Russell. Returning from the field to Washington, D.C., in 1947, Harrington compiled a variety of notes on historical events and interfiled some of his earlier material. The physical arrangement indicates an interest in drafting a paper on Mohave culture, more ethnographic than linguistic.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mohave language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Hualapai language  Search this
Havasupai language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuman languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.11
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39e2556eb-1c2d-43d3-85a3-fdeca5f835b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14386

Chemehuevi

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Laird, Carobeth, 1895-1983  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
27 Boxes
Culture:
Chemehuevi  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1910-1946
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chemehuevi.

Materials from his early field work in 1910 and 1911 consist of vocabulary organized into catagories including tribenames, geographic terms, placenames, plants (mainly cacti), and shells as adornment. Among the tribenames are a number of Mohave and Diegueno equivalences, as well as a good bit of Mohave ethnohistory, based on Alfred L. Kroeber's "Shoshonean Dialects of California" and T. T. Waterman's "Religious Practices of the Diegueno Indians." Certain notes indicate the availability and use of the records of Barbara Freire-Marreco. Harrington also accumulated notes for a proposed review of Waterman's "The Phonetic Elements of the Northern Paiute Language," into which he put some of his recently acquired Chemehuevi phonetics.

Carobeth's field notes are also present in this subseries. The bulk of the lingustic and ethnographic data was amassed from her work with George Laird. Harrington copied her notes onto slips, some of which he arranged semantically. The topical vocabulary includes terms for cosmography, geography, age/sex, kinship, material culture, plants, animals, animal parts, and tribenames. There are smaller sections for minerals, names of places and persons, colors, religion, and history.

A section of grammar notes includes excerpts from Carobeth's notes, Edward Sapir's manuscript titled "Southern Paiute, an Illustrative Sketch" (B.A.E. ms. 1751), and from other secondary sources. There are also excerpts from Ben Paddock, Ruby Eddy, and Kitanemuk and Serrano speakers. The organizational pattern is loosely based on Sapir's manuscript.

The subseries also contains a set of thirty-size texts (of which number thirty is missing), each with related notes. In most cases there are typed versions, interlinear translations, handwritten notes, and free English translations. This material was intended for publication, possibly in the form of a primer. This section also contains the Lord's Prayer, notes on song, textlets, and folklore.

Some miscellaneous notes include Chemehuevi names extracted from a June 30, 1918 census of the Mohave Indians of the Colorado River Agency; quotations for the proposed Chemehuevi publication from little-used secondary sources and interviews with colleagues; texts related to sketches; notes and questions to be reheard or clarified; and general linguistic and ethnographic miscellany. There is also an article from fieldwork undertaken in 1934, probably by Harrington's daughter Awona and Carobeth. Notes in an unidentified handwriting list as informants Satania Lopez (Susie), Jerome Booth, George Snyder, and Mukewine.

The last section of this subseries consists of field notes from his research in 1946. There is a comparative vocabulary based on Harrington's Serrano information from Juan Lozada and on Edward Sapir's Paiute terms in "Southern Paiute, a Shoshonean Language." Lucy Mike (referred to as Mrs. Lucy and who also knew Walapai) and Luisa gave Chemehuevi equivalences. There are also notes on placename trips, rehearings of tribenames, and some ethnographic and anecdotal notes
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington first conducted research on Chemehuevi in 1910-1911, collecting information from Jack Jones, George Johnson, and Ohue. In 1919 and 1920, Carobeth, his wife at the time, accumulated extensive data from George Laird, Annie Laird, and Ben Paddock. These notes formed the backbone of Harrington's Chemehuevi material, which was copied, organized, and often reheard in Washington in 1920. Harrington renewed his research in 1946, initiating a search for surviving Chemehuevi speakers. He connected with a number of speakers and embarked with them on placename trips from Barstow to Needles, Searchlight, Nelson, and Las Vegas.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Chemehuevi language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Diegueño language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Southern Paiute language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.10
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3039f7824-8d73-4a8b-a243-6ba360229312
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14367

MS 819-c Mohave sentences, personal names, names of constellations, and other notes on the Mohave language

Creator:
Loew, O. (Oscar), 1844-  Search this
Extent:
8 Pages
Culture:
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1874, 1875
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 819-c
Topic:
Names, Personal -- Mohave  Search this
Astronomy -- Mohave  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 819-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS819C
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw362e031b5-1bdb-48d1-999b-165596e39727
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms819c
Online Media:

MS 1627 Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Husband, Bruce  Search this
Encinas, Fr  Search this
Whipple, Amiel Weeks, 1817?-1863  Search this
Brown, H. B.  Search this
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880  Search this
Duralde, Martin  Search this
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro  Search this
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Esteban  Search this
Colusio  Search this
Extent:
183 Items (numbered pages )
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Pujunan  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Seri  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Wakashan Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Kulanapan  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Maya  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1627
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Yaqui language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Chiricahua language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Maidu language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Comanche language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chitimacha language  Search this
Atakapa language  Search this
Tarahumara language  Search this
Pima Bajo language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Wakash  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1627
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a26edfb4-2402-46a4-a7d1-b985e6b84b47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1627
Online Media:

Serian, Tequistlatecan, and Hokan / by A.L. Kroeber

Author:
Kroeber, A. L (Alfred Louis) 1876-1960  Search this
Physical description:
p.[279]-290. fold. tab. 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1915
Topic:
Seri language  Search this
Chontal language  Search this
Hokan languages  Search this
Yuman languages  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_739579

Phonetic elements of the Mohave language, by A.L. Kroeber

Author:
Kroeber, A. L (Alfred Louis) 1876-1960  Search this
Physical description:
p.[45]-96. pl. 6-20. 27 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1911
Topic:
Mohave language  Search this
Call number:
PM1871 .K76 1911
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_607443

A Mojave dictionary [microform] / Pamela Munro and Nellie Brown

Author:
Munro, Pamela  Search this
Brown, Nellie  Search this
Physical description:
131 leaves ; 28 cm
Type:
Microforms
Date:
1976
Topic:
Mohave language--Dictionaries--English  Search this
English language--Dictionaries--Mohave  Search this
Call number:
mfc 006600.03
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_531025

A Mojave dictionary / Pamela Munro and Nellie Brown

Author:
Munro, Pamela  Search this
Brown, Nellie  Search this
Physical description:
131 leaves ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1976
Topic:
Mohave language--Dictionaries--English  Search this
English language--Dictionaries--Mohave  Search this
Call number:
PM1871.Z5 M8 1976
PM1871.Z5M8 1976
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_426248

Mojave syntax / Pamela Munro

Author:
Munro, Pamela  Search this
Physical description:
xiii, 330 p. ; 21 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1976
Topic:
Mohave language--Syntax  Search this
Call number:
PM1871 .M8 1976X
PM1871.M8 1976X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_83089

Tribal libraries, archives, and museums : preserving our language, memory, and lifeways / edited by Loriene Roy, Anjali Bhasin, and Sarah K. Arriaga

Author:
Roy, Loriene  Search this
Bhasin, Anjali 1979-  Search this
Arriaga, Sarah K. 1986-  Search this
Physical description:
xix, 247 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Archives
Place:
United States
Date:
2011
Topic:
Library resources  Search this
Information services  Search this
Museums  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_972010

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