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MS 1321 Notes on physical anthropology

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
3 Pages
Culture:
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1321
Topic:
Physical anthropology -- Comanche  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1321, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1321
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw383a6f4b1-0760-454a-8868-f2ed82ee3f43
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1321

Material critical of Truman Michelsonʹs work

Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Names:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Collection Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Culture:
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Fox  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Including copy of letter. Hewitt to Jesse Walter Fewkes, criticizing "The Ritualistic Origin Myth of the White Buffalo Dance of the Fox Indians", April 19, 1913; a draft of a letter to Alanson Skinner regarding Michelsonʹs review of his Observations on the Ethnology of the Sauk Indiana"; and some notes.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1647(6)
Topic:
Meskwaki; Sauk and Fox  Search this
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 1647, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 1647 Miscellaneous materials by Hewitt and others
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw355156aa2-8a0f-4043-9484-7bd9c7a38e59
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms1647-ref6

Letter to F. W. Hodge

Creator:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Names:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Collection Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Culture:
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Pointing out errors in a map of Algonquian languages prepared by John R. Swanton and Truman Michelson.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1647(10)
Topic:
Algonquin  Search this
Collection Citation:
Manuscript 1647, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
MS 1647 Miscellaneous materials by Hewitt and others
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3718f5b1a-01ba-4fad-ad73-61345bce3fa3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-ms1647-ref8

Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collection relating to Native Americans

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Photographer:
Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882  Search this
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Smillie, T. W. (Thomas William), 1843-1917  Search this
Extent:
2 Prints (etching or engraving)
13 Prints (albumen)
230 Copy prints (circa)
1 Chromolithograph
179 Cyanotypes
200 Prints (circa, silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Sisitonwan Dakota (Sisseton Sioux)  Search this
Sihasapa Lakota (Blackfoot Sioux)  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Wenatchi Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Tuscarora  Search this
Yanktonnai Nakota (Yankton Sioux)  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Iowa  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Cayuga  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Oneida  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Fox  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Jicarilla Apache  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Copy prints
Chromolithographs
Cyanotypes
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs mostly commissioned and collected by personnel in the Bureau of American Ethnology. Most of the photographs are studio portraits of Native Americans made by the Bureau of American Ethnology and Smithsonian Institution, possibly for physical anthropologist Ales Hrdlicka. There are also photographs made by Truman Michelson among the Catawba tribe, copies of illustrations and drawings, and various images of archeological sites and artifacts.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-2M, USNM ACC 42191
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Original negatives for many photographs in this collection held in the National Anthropological Archives in the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Michelson photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 13, Photo Lot 24, MS 2139, and MS 4365-c.
Additional Hillers photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 28, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 143, Photo Lot 83-18, Photo Lot 87-2N, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-46, and the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Jackson photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 37, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 60, Photo Lot 93, Photo Lot 143, Photo Lot R82-10, Photo Lot 87-2P, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-3, the records of the Department of Anthropology, and the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Smillie photographs held in the National Museum of American History Archives Center in the Frances Benjamin Johnston and Thomas W. Smillie Glass Plate Negatives and in Smithsonian Institution Archives SIA Acc. 05-123.
Additional Gardner photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 80-18, Photo Lot 87-2P, Photo Lot 90-1, and the BAE historical negatives.
Associated busts and molds held in the Department of Anthropology collections in accession 42191.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Catawba Indians  Search this
Citation:
Photo lot 87-2M, Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collection relating to Native Americans, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-2M
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38ec3245f-6abd-4664-a65e-b51cdda340e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-2m

MS 4238 J.P. Harrington replies to inquiries

Collector:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Correspondent:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Merrill, Robert Valentine, 1892-1951  Search this
Leveque, Ernest J.  Search this
Wright, C. H. C. (Charles Henry Conrad), 1869-1957  Search this
Ford, J. D. M. (Jeremiah Denis Matthias), 1873-1958  Search this
Launay, Jean L.  Search this
Briggs, William A.  Search this
Culture:
Potawatomi  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Concerns the origin of the word: Tassinong. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico gives it as "probably a Potawatomie place name." Replies from the following are cited: Truman Michelson, Robert V. Merrill (2), Ernest J. Leveque, C. H. C. Wright, J. D. M. Ford, Jean L. Launay, W. A. Briggs (Gary, Indiana), and J. P. Harrington.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4238
Topic:
Names, place -- Potawatomi ?  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4238, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4238
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ad00a500-a467-4a72-86db-b657074700d6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4238

MS 3089 Brief Dakota vocabulary

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Informant:
Frazier (Dakota)  Search this
Extent:
1 Page
Culture:
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
Summer 1928
Scope and Contents:
Contains 13 items. Informant: "Frazier," a Mdewakanton Dakota.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3089
Local Note:
Autograph document
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Sioux (Eastern)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3089, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3089
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31633b3c4-6531-47f6-aefd-b066c0fb84c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3089

Algonquian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Miami  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Pequot  Search this
Montauk  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Piscataway (Conoy)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Algonquian research. It consists primarily of material he collected; there is very little original data, most of which are undated. The topics covered are Cheyenne grammar, Fox linguistic notes, Menominee grammar, Miami-Peoria grammar, Mohegan-Pequot-Montauk vocabulary, Montagnais miscellaneous notes, Nanticoke-Conoy-Unalachtigo linguistic notes, Ojibwa linguistic notes, Potawatomi linguistic notes, and comparative and miscellaneous notes.

The Cheyenne material consist of two pages of grammatical excerpts from Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).

The Fox notes stem from conversations which Harrington had with Truman Michelson on the Fox syllabary and grammar. One note is dated September 24, 1924; others are undated. One page gives the etymology of the word Chicago and a Potawatomi equivalent. Phonetic material (former B.A.E. MS 6021 pt. and 6025pt.) is based on William Jones's "Algonquian (Fox)" (1911). A bibliography is included, mainly on Michelson's publications and manuscripts which he submitted to the B.A.E.

The Menominee files contain a phonetic key from Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1928), a short report on a conversation with Michelson (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt. and 6030), and a brief description of Menominee tentshaking was excerpted from W. J. Hoffman's The Menomini Indians (1896).

Miami-Peoria vocabulary were copied from Albert Gatschet's B.A.E. manuscripts 3025 and 3026b. (Those entries marked 3026b are no longer listed as part of that B.A.E. manuscript.)

An 1890 copy of a 1798 Montauk vocabulary taken by John Lyon Gardiner was loaned to Harrington by Foster H. Saville. There are also a three-page typescript of this manuscript and several pages of a Mohegan-Pequot bibliography.

For Montagnais, there are three bibliographical notes. Two placenames came from J.N.B. Hewitt in November 1926.

Reading notes on Nanticoke, Conoy, and Unalachtigo were taken principally from Speck's The Nanticoke and Conoy Indians . .. (1927) and from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907). Some linguistic and ethnohistoric material is included and there is a brief bibliography.

Ojibwa forms the largest portion of this subseries. It includes notes from a joint interview conducted most likely in 1940 with C. F. Voegelin and his informant, Gregor McGregor, who was technically considered a speaker of Ottawa. There are also notes Harrington took of Voegelin's lecture at the University of Michigan on June 25, 1940 (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt.). There is a slight emphasis on placenames in an otherwise random vocabulary. From James Hammond Trumbull's Notes on Forty Algonkin Versions of the Lord's Prayer (1873), Harrington copied the Southern Chippeway version (pp. 74 -75) and penciled in a slightly different English translation. A final potpourri of undated notes includes a miscellaneous vocabulary from secondary sources and a few pages of grammatical material. The etymologies of several Ojibwa words are briefly developed. Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language is the most frequently cited source (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt. and 6025pt.).

The Potawatomi files contain material from Harrington's interview with Chief Simon Kahquados in Blackwell, Wisconsin (n.d.) with whom he recorded general ethnographic information, particularly regarding the loss of Potawatomi lands due to Indian Office policies and illegal acts of the Menominee. A brief vocabulary is included. Unrelated to this interview is a Potawatomi phoneme chart.

Comparative material includes reading notes regarding the earliest appearances of certain Algonquian phonetic sounds. Harrington consulted primarily the works of Sir Isaac Pitman, Jean Claude Mathevet (Nipissing, Abnaki), and Silas Tertius Rand (Micmac). Additional peripheral bibliographical information is identified in the notes. The only date recorded is March 26, 1951. There are other scattered reading notes with Menominee, Cree, Fox, and Ojibwa phonetic comparisons, based mainly on Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1938) and Plains Cree Texts (1934). One page of Arapaho terms was copied from Kroeber.

In the category of general linguistic and ethnographic notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6025pt.), information results from various conversations with fellow linguists: Truman Michelson and J.N.B. Hewitt on September 24, 1924; Hewitt in November 1924 and November 1926; Michelson in October 1930; and Michelson and Frank G. Speck in May 1934. Under the heading "The Southern Delawares," Harrington arranged random information on the Virginia Indians, touching briefly on history and ethnography. He included some Abnaki, Cree, and Cherokee linguistic terms, as well as a general bibliography. Vocabulary material in this series (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt.) consists of terms from various Algonquian languages, most probably taken from unidentified printed sources. One note gives "The Chief from Mass[achusetts]" as an informant. One group of terms is compared with Natick words and with a vocabulary recorded by Roger Williams.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Algonquian languages  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Montagnais language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw320d52ed8-2a4a-49a7-b5a3-67bbc9806544
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14792

Mahican/Stockbridge

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
Mahican  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
Stockbridge-Munsee Reservation (Wis.)
Date:
1930-1952
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Mahican/Stockbridge research. The materials consist of comparative vocabulary, comparative grammar, comparative linguistic notes, and writings.

The vocabulary is arranged according to numerous semantic categories designated by Harrington. The basic source is Truman Michelson's Stockbridge Manuscript 2734, information from which was reheard with Mahican speakers, and compared with secondary sources and with Abenaki material rewritten or removed from his own field notes. Harrington interfiled Menominee information secured later in Washington from Al Dodge. The "Persons" category is quite rich in biographical information. Webb Miller apparently identified for Harrington the subjects of some of his old photographs, although the prints were not found with the notes. There are two pages taken from an old family record listing the names Pye, Bennett, Moon, and Turkey, the dates ranging from 1845 to 1865. Harrington evidently began another (possibly later) semantic organization of the Michelson notes. Other secondary sources used as a basis for comparison are Brinton and Anthony (1888), James Trumbull's Natick Dictionary (1903), and Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language (1853).

A set of grammatical notes is also based on MS 2734 but it is not as well developed as the vocabulary material. Only a few notes deal with phonetics. There is more information on verbs and numerals than on any other morphological category.

The comparative linguistic notes are from Harrington's two 1949 interviews with Bernice Robinson Huntington and encompass vocabulary, grammar, ethnography, ethnohistory, and some miscellaneous information on Stockbridge persons, including something of her own background. One group is arranged alphabetically by main entry in Mahican, with Delaware, St. Francis Abenaki, Natick, Ojibwa, and Cree equivalences (if any) placed immediately following the related Mahican term. The unmarked main entries are apparently Huntington's original terms; those in ink marked Brinton and Anthony are from their 1888 dictionary; the pencil notes are St. Francis Abenaki obtained in the field and are identified by informant "codes" Am. (Alfred Miller), Den. (George Dennis); Watso (John Watso); (Oliver Obomsawin). The significance of the numbered divider pages was not documented. Another group designated "B2" probably refers to the fall rehearing with Bernice Huntington and is confined chiefly to St. Francis Abenaki and Menominee equivalences. Some new information from Huntington, especially changes in orthography, may have been interfiled. A third group contains Huntington's comments on Mathew S. Henry's Vocabulary. ... It represents an attempt to organize Henry's material according to a semantically arranged vocabulary and a brief grammar touching on phonetics and morphology. Harrington crossed out St. Francis Abnaki comparisons and, according to a field note, copied them for use elsewhere. He also incorporated some of Huntington's (B2) terms.

This subseries also contains a draft and notes relating to his unpublished manuscript, "Seven Mahican Texts Recorded by Truman Michelson". Harrington excerpted the texts verbatim from the Michelson MS 2734, including Michelson's interlinear Mahican translations and free English versions. The draft contains a short vocabulary culled from the texts which Harrington arranged semantically. He provided some Mahican historical background and explained certain orthographic changes made to update Michelson's spelling and to facilitate pronunciation. An eighth text in English only was given to Michelson by Sterling Peters. There is informative bibliographical material both in the body of the draft and in the separate section devoted to this category.
Biographical / Historical:
The first evidence of John P. Harrington's interest in studying the Mahican language surfaced in January 1930 correspondence. (At this time, he used the names Mahican and Mohegan interchangeably.) In September 1930 he tried to interest Bernard Hoffmann of Santa Barbara, California, to fund a Wisconsin field trip in a search for Stockbridge vocabulary, legends, songs, placenames, tribenames, history, etc. He hoped to find native speakers who could rehear terms from early manuscripts and publications.

Between 1930 and 1949, Harrington secured copies of or made reading notes from some of these manuscripts, most of which are clearly identified in the field notes. The most exhaustively reheard and reorganized body of material consists of terms and text copied from the Stockbridge linguistic notes and texts recorded by Truman Michelson in 1914 (B.A.E. MS 2734). Harrington's notes and correspondence reveal a diligent search for those informants of Michelson who might still be living in the Stockbridge, Wisconsin, area in the hope that they would be willing to work with him.

In 1949, Harrington arrived at the Stockbridge Reservation on April 16 and remained there until April 23. Mr. Arvid E. Miller drove him around the area and introduced him to numerous other Millers, most of whom supplied linguistic and ethnohistoric information. His first introduction to Bernice Metoxen Robinson Huntington (sometimes erroneously spelled Robertson) took place at this time. In 1914, at the age of about thirty-seven, she had been one of Michelson's informants. She had also worked with Frank T. Siebert,Jr., in 1935 and 1936. She was a black adopted by the Mahicans with whom she lived from earliest childhood; she learned Menominee in school. Harrington's first meeting with her was unsuccessful, the second more cordial and fruitful, and about the last week of October 1949, on a subsequent trip to Wisconsin, he was able to hear and rehear with her a substantial amount of Mahican linguistics. He found another excellent informant in Webb Miller. Most of the notes are of a comparative nature, particularly comparisons with the two Abenaki dialects and with Delaware. This fell into place rather easily as Harrington was in various cities of Maine, in Quebec, and in Albany, N.Y., between April 24 and October 24 taking notes from St. Francis and Penobscot Abenaki speakers. He extracted Delaware terms from Daniel G. Brinton and Albert S. Anthony's A Lenape-English Dictionary (1888), and from the unpublished manuscript of Mathew S. Henry, Vocabulary of Words in Various Indian Dialects of the United States (ca. 1861). In November and December while traveling between New York and Washington for other reasons, he carried most of these notes with him and began the work of sorting and rearranging, which continued on and off in Washington at least until 1952. Other equivalent terms are in Menominee and were supplied by interviews in Washington with Al Dodge, an employee of the Interior Department. Ojibwa and Pequot terms are mainly from secondary sources.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mahican language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Massachuset language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3dab14dc9-d14e-4ac2-b02d-2bed09dbe1a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14955
Online Media:

Supplemental Material on the Northeast/Southeast

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Penobscot -- language  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Fox  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Conoy Indians  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Northeast/Southeast field notes.

The file on Algonquian includes three slips of Fox, Cree, Ojibwa, and Massachusett (labeled "Natick") vocabulary in the hand of Truman Michelson; typed copies of the above; notes on Cree and Ojibwa from secondary sources; information on the growing of wild rice by the Menominee; and miscellaneous notes on placenames and tribenames regarding the Cree, Ojibwa, Conoy, Nanticoke, and Narraganset.

The Shawnee/Peoria section consists of six pages of notes on Shawnee tribal divisions.

Among the miscellaneous material on the Abnaki languages is a page of Penobscot vocabulary obtained from Frank Siebert in April 1940. The remaining material was compiled during fieldwork on Western Abnaki at St. Francis in 1949. There are four pages on possible informants from Charles Nolet and a page of vocabulary from "Am"; bibliographic references; and lexical and grammatical notes excerpted from the works of Joseph Laurent and Masta.

For Massachusett there are three pages of miscellaneous notes with references to Trumbull's Natick Dictionary.

The bulk of the file on Iroquoian consists of a typed copy of an unidentified historical text from the 1880s. It discusses the relations of the Iroquois with the Spanish, French, and English settlers in the New World. Special mention is made of Gy-ant-va-chia (Cornplanter), chief of the Seneca. The spacing of the lines of text suggests that Harrington was planning to add a translation or annotations of some kind. There are also three pages of miscellaneous notes in his hand.

Most of the file on Delaware consists of information on placenames and tribenames obtained from Frank Siebert, Carl F. Voegelin, and a number of Oklahoma residents in 1940. Siebert gave both Delaware and Penobscot terms, and Unami words were given by Roy Longbone, Salley Fallleaf, and Jake Parks. Munsee forms were obtained from Josiah Montour and Jane Pattice of the Six-Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Also included are a carbon copy of a typed list of possible informants and several pages of miscellaneous notes from the works of Brinton, Strachey, and Zeisberger.

The section on Creek/Seminole/Alabama/Koasati/Choctaw contains twenty-one pages of vocabulary (mostly on tribenames) which Harrington obtained in an interview with James Feagin Sylestine, a speaker of the Alabama language, on April 25, 1940. The informant's home was in Livingston, Texas, although he was at the Shawnee Sanatorium at the time Harrington worked with him. The remaining miscellaneous notes were excerpted from various published and manuscript sources. They include references to Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Alabama, and Choctaw.

Miscellaneous material relating to the East consists of brief notes which Harrington copied from a number of secondary sources. There are mentions of the Huron, Wyandot, Powhatan, and Cherokee tribes, among others. Three of the pages consist of a partial typed list (alphabetically arranged K to M) of "Carolina and Virginia Algonquian" words. This list is based on that given in the commentary on the map of Raleigh's Virginia, pages 852 to 872 of The Roanoke Voyages, which was published by the Hakluyt Society in 1955.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquian languages  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Wampanoag language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Narragansett language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Munsee language  Search this
Creek language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Alabama language  Search this
Choctaw language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.6
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cd9617a0-28a5-4c9d-a745-4da9c52b91fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15294

Records Relating to the Siberian Origin of the American Indian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Jochelson, Waldemar, 1855-1937  Search this
Correspondent:
Jenness, Diamond, 1886-1969  Search this
Names:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899-1987  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Chukchee  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Notes
Manuscripts
Maps
Vocabulary
Place:
Bering Strait
Siberia (Russia)
Date:
1909-1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material reflecting John P. Harrington's long-time interest in theories of the Siberian origin of American Indians. Materials consist of notes and drafts for his paper "Siberian Origin of the American Indian.

His early notes include handwritten and typed versions of the outline "Antiquity of Man . . . " from 1915 (dated by handwriting as well as by type of pencil and paper); copies of short early vocabularies recorded by La Perouse (Tchoka) and Father Jette (Ten'a), probably prepared by Harrington around 1922 to 1923; a mimeographed statement by the Science News Service, dated 1923; newspaper clippings on Harrington's theories from 1924; and two pages of notes which Harrington recorded during a discussion with colleague Truman Michelson in November 1926. There is also an undated typed proposal titled "Investigation of the Origin of the Native American Race." This three page document does not appear to have been written by Harrington, but the source is not indicated.

Materials accumulated during the period 1937 to 1938 are the most numerous. They include notes from interviews; copies of correspondence; records regarding the computation of tribal areas; notes on maps and photographs; and reading notes, extracts, and bibliographic references to secondary sources. The transcripts of interviews, dated February 1937 through November 1938, include information from Riley Moore, Carl Bishop, John G. Carter, and B.A.E. colleagues Truman Michelson and Matthew W. Stirling. The lengthiest set of notes is from a discussion with Smithsonian archeologist Henry B. Collins, who described fieldwork he had conducted from May to November 1936. The brief file of correspondence contains letters from Diamond Jenness and H. E. Rollins and a note from John G. Carter. The file on illustrative materials includes maps and charts showing the computation of land areas occupied by the Chukchee, Aleut, Eskimo, and Athapascan tribes. Supplementing these are notes from meetings with staff members of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in March and April 1937. There are also notes on maps, motion picture films, and photographs, as well as illustrations by Clark M. Garber and Joelle Danner. The notes from secondary sources include the title page and table of contents for a manuscript by Ivan A. Lopatin titled "The Cult of the Dead Among the Natives of the Amur Valley." There are also a few pages on file for another paper by Lopatin, "Material on the Language of the Natives of the Amur Region." There is also a sizable set of notes relating to the translation of various terms--mostly tribal names--into Russian. These include cut-and-pasted portions of letters which Waldemar Jochelson sent Harrington.

The material compiled after 1937 is highly miscellaneous. Items from the 1940s include a sixteen-page untitled rough draft on the migration of Siberian man; a three-page typed carbon copy of the article "Stepping Stones Between Eurasia and America" which was used in a release by the Office of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, on August 4, 1940; a partial draft of an article on boats; a sectional map of the Bering Strait which was mailed to Harrington by C. M. Garber on January 18, 1947; and notes from interviews with Mr. [Tappan?] Adney on March 28, 1941, with William Heslop and King Mooers later in that year, and with Henry B. Collins on December 8, 1947. There is also an Eskimo vocabulary which Harrington copied from William Thalbitzer and three pages of miscellaneous notes dating from the late 1950s.

A separate file of notes on Chukchee spans the entire period of Harrington's work on Siberia. There are a number of pages on Chukchee, Yukagir, and Eskimo mythology which he extracted from his notes for lectures at the University of Washington in 1910; brief notes from discussions with Truman Michelson, Waldemar Jochelson, and Franz Boas around 1926 to 1928; and copies made on February 23, 1937, of "Chukchee polysynthesis words" which had been compiled in an unspecified article by colleague Robert W. Young. The source of data for the latter was Waldemar Bogoras's paper "Chukchee" in the Handbook of American Indian Languages edited by Franz Boas. Later material includes a copy of a letter from Ivan Lopatin (November 23, 1947) with an enclosure titled "Discovery of the Chukchee and Derivation of the Name"; a copy by Harrington of the enclosure; and the rough beginning of a paper by Harrington titled "Short Sketch of the Grammar of the Chukchee Language," also evidently written in 1947.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians -- origin  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Manuscripts
Maps
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.15
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3024e243c-0e4b-4932-b361-b91e745f9ade
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15644

Records Relating to Phonetics

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Bloomfield, Leonard, 1887-1949  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Lowie, Robert Harry, 1883-1957  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Swadesh, Morris, 1909-1967  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Underhill, Ruth, 1883-1984  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Type:
Archival materials
Notes
Manuscripts
Date:
1910-1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains materials resulting from Harrington's efforts to develop a phonetic alphabet for writing all languages.

There are four main groupings of notes relating to phonetics. A large set of uncategorized notes has been arranged in chronological order from 1910 through the 1950s. Most of the material dates from the period 1910 to 1915 and from 1921 to 1928; there are smaller amounts of data for the following three decades. The notes present alternate phonetic systems--sometimes referred to as "sonoscript"--in chart form with accompanying explanations of the rationale behind each proposed alphabet. There are also sample words and sentences written out phonetically. The notes from 1910 include a draft of a letter from Harrington to his mother and those from 1912 contain three large poster-sized charts. A second set of notes is arranged alphabetically by topic and includes subsections on alphabetic order, length, letters practical in handwriting, and pitch accent. A relatively large file labeled "phon[etic] letter forms" consists of various handwritten and typed letters as well as cut-and-pasted examples of letters from printed sources. There is also a clipping dated 1922 regarding an advocate of Esperanto with Harrington's own proposals for word forms in that language. In addition, the files contain a copy of an I.P.A. questionnaire and Harrington's comments on it. A third section of material consists of the notes which Harrington made during or immediately following interviews with about twenty linguists and anthropologists, among them Leonard Bloomfield, Alfred L. Kroeber, Robert H. Lowie, Edward Sapir, Morris Swadesh (misspelled "Schwadesh"), Ruth Underhill, Carl F. Voegelin, T. T. Waterman, and B.A.E. colleagues Hewitt, Michelson, and Swanton. Not all of the notes are dated; those which are clearly labeled cover discussions from the 1920s to the 1940s. The last grouping, compiled around 1923 to 1926, contains brief notes on various alphabets. The alphabetically arranged files cover the proposed systems of Arden, Forchhammer, Jespersen, Murray, Olbrechts, Pierce, Powell, and Rouse.

This subseries also contains drafts for four papers by Harrington on phonetics as well as a brief one-page draft description of a "Seminar in General Phonetics" which Harrington was planning to offer at the University of Southern California in 1935 or 1936.
Biographical / Historical:
One aspect of the study of linguistics of special interest to John P. Harrington was the development of a practical phonetic alphabet for writing all languages. It was an effort to which he devoted a great amount of time from 1910 to 1915, from 1922 to 1928, and again intermittently in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s.

In 1912 Harrington drafted comments on a proposal for an international conference to devise a universal phonetic system, and on a sample questionnaire which was mailed to many linguists by the International Phonetic Association (I.P.A.). It is unclear whether or not he actually submitted them to the I.P.A.

Also in that year he was chosen to serve on a committee ofthe American Anthropological Association to "prepare a scheme of phonetic representation which [would] have the official sanction" of the organization. Fellow committee members were Franz Boas (chair), Edward Sapir, Alfred L. Kroeber, and Earl Pliny Goddard.

Although later notes indicate that he consulted a number of language specialists, it appears that most of Harrington's efforts at devising a workable alphabet were undertaken alone or with only the cooperation of his friend Paul Vogenitz.

In the mid-1930s he was invited to teach a seminar on "General Phonetics" at the University of Southern California. While correspondence with Dr. Frank C. Touton, vice president of the university, suggests that Harrington contemplated offering the course at various times between the spring of 1935 and the summer of 1936, this plan was abandoned because of more pressing interests. He did touch on phonetics during his course on language at the University of Washington during the summer of 1910

At various points in his career Harrington wrote preliminary descriptions of the phonetic system he favored at that time. None of the early drafts appeared in print and as late as the 1940s, while writing the treatise "Linguistics," Harrington was undecided whether to publish his system or "die keeping it hidden."
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.17
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37683fd02-43cb-403a-bd16-24268d884c66
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15672

Major Writings on Linguistics

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Siebert, Frank T. (Frank Thomas), 1912-1998  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Names:
Pike, Kenneth L. (Kenneth Lee), 1912-2000  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
14 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Notes
Writings
Manuscripts
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains materials that represent John P. Harrington's work preparing a major work on linguistics. The results of his efforts were four separate manuscripts that not published.

The first manuscript is untitled. Related materials consist of handwritten notes and fragmentary rough drafts. There are extracts from a number of published sources which include linguistic data for Greek, Latin, Sanskrit, Chinese, Turkish, Korean, and English as well as a number of American Indian languages. Also included here is material relating to grammatical terminology. There are extracts from a variety of dictionaries, copies of incoming and outgoing letters, and records of interviews.

Files for a manuscript titled "Linguistics" consist of extensive notes, a rough draft, a final draft, illustrations, and a draft of a review of the manuscript. The notes contain a mixture of reading notes, records of interviews, summaries of letters, and newspaper clippings. There are also references to a number of brief discussions which Harrington had at the two linguistic conferences he attended in 1940. At the meeting of the Linguistic Institute in Ann Arbor, Michigan, he learned about the work of Della Brunsteter on Cherokee and made records of a conversation with C. F. Voegelin and his Ojibwa informant, Gregor McGregor. At the Summer Institute of Linguistics at Sulphur Springs, Arkansas, he obtained details on Tule phonetics from a San BIas informant and spoke with Eunice Pike (the sister of Kenneth Pike) and Florence Hansen who were preparing a primer of the Mazatec language. There is also Navajo linguistic information from speaker Howard Gorman, some obtained directly from him and the remainder enclosed in correspondence from Robert W. Young. In addition there is a discrete file of notes which Harrington compiled from and about Kenneth L. Pike. Interspersed with his rough draft are notes reflecting his attempt to devise a personal phonetic system. The draft of a review of his manuscripts was written by Harrington, evidently to serve as a model for a review which would appear under the signature of a colleague.

The third manuscript in this subseries is a revised version of the previous manuscript. The files contain material that Harrington accumulated after submitting the original manuscript to Smithsonian Secretary Charles Abbott in 1941. These include notes recorded from Joseph White and a note from Truman Michelson, several bibliographies, illustrations, and scattered notes reflecting Harrington's attempt to develop a personal system of phonetics. Data from many languages are represented, although there is slightly more emphasis on the North American Indian languages than in the previous manuscript; extracts from Harrington's own field notes are included.

The fourth manuscript is titled "Language" and is represented by a mostly handwritten draft. The draft is basically a sequence of random ideas grouped loosely in outline fashion under the major headings "Phonetics," "Morphology," and "Writing."

The final file in this series contains copies of correspondence which were interfiled with Harrington's notes and writings on linguistics. The letters, which span the dates 1936 to 1951, have been arranged chronologically; three undated items have been placed at the end. Both incoming and outgoing letters are included. The most noteworthy item is a letter from Frank T. Siebert, Jr., dated July 23, 1944. It contains numerous suggestions for improving a chapter which Harrington wrote on phonology.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Languages  Search this
Language and languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Writings
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.19
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw317d78732-1439-4eb8-b5f5-386e49ff32b2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15964
Online Media:

Letters Received

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Correspondent:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899-1987  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Hewett, Edgar L. (Edgar Lee), 1865-1946  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Marr, John Paul  Search this
Martin, Fredericka I.  Search this
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Roberts, Frank H. H. (Frank Harold Hanna), 1897-1966  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Tolkien, J. R. R. (John Ronald Reuel), 1892-1973  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
United States. Office of Censorship  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
26 Boxes
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Date:
1904-1960
bulk 1935-1954
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Correspondence series contains letters received by John P. Harrington. His incoming letters include handwritten and typed letters, postcards, and telegrams.

The primary focus of Harrington's correspondence is his work--both that which he undertook on an official basis for the B.A.E. and that which he pursued because of strong personal interests. References to his research and fieldwork take the form of passing references in letters to acquaintances, detailed accounts in letters to close friends, requests for authorization of proposed fieldwork, and reports of work accomplished in letters to supervisors, and lists of instructions to field and clerical assistants.

Much of the correspondence involves queries and the exchange of information and questions. Harrington wrote to scientists for identification of plant, animal or mineral specimens collected during fieldwork, and to postmasters, Indian agents, and social works in search of informants. There is also correspondence regarding acquisition of books, photostats, microfilm, and various supplies and equipment. There are also letters to editors of various journals enclosing articles for publication as well as letters of introduction, obtained by Harrington to facilitate his own work or prepared by him for use by his assistants. A number of letters involve answers which Harrington prepared to questions which were addressed directly to him by members of the public or were referred to him in the capacity of Senior Ethnologist at the B.A.E.

Several hundred items of correspondence relate to Harrington's duties when detailed to the Office of Censorship from 1943 to 1945. Most of these reflect his efforts to obtain translations of letters in foreign languages which he could not identify or for which dictionaries were not available.

Finally there are letters exchanged with landladies; real estate agents; bank personnel; and city, county and federal officials regarding payment or collection of rent, selling of property, confirmation of bank balances, and payment of taxes, as well as letters written to friends and family dealing with purely personal matters.

Some of the letters are incomplete. A number of lengthy responses to Harrington's queries were cut apart by him and pasted on separate sheets for filing in various subject categories in his field notes. Such letters were reconstructed as much as possible by N.A.A. staff. Attempts were also made to determine the identity of each correspondent. The full name of an individual is supplied if known even though only the first name, initials, or a nickname were used on a letter. In those cases in which signatures are illegible, a suggested form is given in brackets; if the form is doubtful, it is marked with a question mark. There is a small file of four items at the end for which the identity of the correspondent has not been determined. In those cases where onlly a partial date was given by Harrington or his correspondents, brackets have been used to supply a fuller suggested date.

More than 140 incoming letters were never opened by Harrington. These items were removed from their envelopes after any relevant data appearing on an envelope were transferred to the letter. These are annotated with the date when they were opened at the N.A.A.
Arrangement:
The documents are arranged alphabetically by the surname of the correspondent and thereunder chronologically; any undated items have been placed at the end of the group of letters for each person. In those instances when only a company name is given, the item in question is filed under that name. Some letters written by third parties to various acquaintances of Harrington were then forwarded to him without a cover letter. These records have been filed under the name of the original recipient as though they were enclosures. Letters, photographs, notes, drawings, maps, and other miscellaneous items which were sent under cover of a letter are labeled as enclosures and immediately follow the letter with which they were sent.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 9.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 9: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3aa1e7caa-edea-4fac-a7d7-6d0d7e7936fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15991

Letters Sent

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Roberts, Helen H. (Helen Heffron), 1888-1985  Search this
Correspondent:
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899-1987  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Hewett, Edgar L. (Edgar Lee), 1865-1946  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Marr, John Paul  Search this
Martin, Fredericka I.  Search this
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967  Search this
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart), 1855-1942  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Roberts, Frank H. H. (Frank Harold Hanna), 1897-1966  Search this
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
United States. Office of Censorship  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
11 Boxes
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Date:
1904-1960
bulk 1935-1954
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Correspondence series contains copies of letters that John P. Harrington sent. For the most part the file consists of carbon copies of typed letters or handwritten drafts. There are also a number of signed originals. It is not always clear whether these documents were not sent or whether they were returned to Harrington. In those cases in which an original letter was returned with a reply written on it, the original letter is filed as though it were the reply and can be located under the name of the correspondent who returned it; a photocopy has been made for filing in correct chronological order within the file of letters sent.

The primary focus of Harrington's correspondence is his work--both that which he undertook on an official basis for the B.A.E. and that which he pursued because of strong personal interests. References to his research and fieldwork take the form of passing references in letters to acquaintances, detailed accounts in letters to close friends, requests for authorization of proposed fieldwork, and reports of work accomplished in letters to supervisors, and lists of instructions to field and clerical assistants.

Much of the correspondence involves queries and the exchange of information and questions. Harrington wrote to scientists for identification of plant, animal or mineral specimens collected during fieldwork, and to postmasters, Indian agents, and social works in search of informants. There is also correspondence regarding acquisition of books, photostats, microfilm, and various supplies and equipment. There are also letters to editors of various journals enclosing articles for publication as well as letters of introduction, obtained by Harrington to facilitate his own work or prepared by him for use by his assistants. A number of letters involve answers which Harrington prepared to questions which were addressed directly to him by members of the public or were referred to him in the capacity of Senior Ethnologist at the B.A.E.

Several hundred items of correspondence relate to Harrington's duties when detailed to the Office of Censorship from 1943 to 1945. Most of these reflect his efforts to obtain translations of letters in foreign languages which he could not identify or for which dictionaries were not available.

Finally there are letters exchanged with landladies; real estate agents; bank personnel; and city, county and federal officials regarding payment or collection of rent, selling of property, confirmation of bank balances, and payment of taxes, as well as letters written to friends and family dealing with purely personal matters.

There are small subsections for undated letters and unmatched portions of letters (second and third pages without salutation) at the end of the file of outgoing letters.
Arrangement:
The section of outgoing letters is arranged chronologically. Under each date, letters are further arranged in alphabetical order by the name of the addressee. When multiple letters were sent to the same correspondent on the same date, these are labeled "(1st)," "(2nd)," etc. In some cases Harrington addressed a letter to a company; when the identity of the respondent at the company is known, this individual's name has been added to the letter in brackets and is the basis for filing. When Harrington addressed a letter to one individual and another replied, the letter is filed under the name of the addressee, but the name of the respondent has been added in a cross-reference note on the letter or on a target.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 9.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 9: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f693dc10-bacc-4a10-95bc-a457bc6c9541
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref16046
Online Media:

MS 2692 Shawnee grammatical tables by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
6 Pages
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Notes
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Shawnee grammatical tables by Truman Michelson with English translations.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2692
Topic:
Shawnee language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Citation:
Manuscript 2692, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2692
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30542f4e9-8ee4-4d4d-a529-5807085586ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2692
Online Media:

MS 2787-a Truman Michelson notes on verbs in Omaha and Osage

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (slip )
Culture:
Osage  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Truman Michelson's handwritten notes on the conjugations of "to laugh" and "to hold" in Omaha and "to hold" and "to see" in Osage.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2787-a
Local Note:
Title changed from "Verbs to laugh and to hold in Omaha; verbs to hold and to see in Osage" 5/1/2014.
Topic:
Omaha language  Search this
Osage language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2787-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2787A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3535d213f-ffea-49e3-8312-4cc0a849e02b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2787a
Online Media:

MS 2958 The story of Wisakea, a culture hero

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Informant:
Kiyana, Alfred, 1877-1918  Search this
Translator:
Poweshiek, Horace  Search this
Names:
Wisakea (Fox)  Search this
Extent:
1,110 Pages
Culture:
Fox  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Text and paraphrase (translation). MS 7555 is a trypescript transcription of the translation.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2958-a-b
Local Note:
See Number 1181 and 1305; summary in Number 1305.
Topic:
Folklore -- Fox  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2958-a-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2958
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ff57c510-1e81-486f-915a-644ff5d96e00
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2958
Online Media:

MS 1329 Kickapoo linguistic notes from Joseph Murdock

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Informant:
Murdock, Joseph  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (6 pages)
Culture:
Kickapoo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Place:
Shawnee (Okla.)
Date:
1929
Scope and Contents:
Truman Michelson conducted research among the Kickapoo in 1929 in Shawnee, Oklahoma. During this time, he worked with Joseph Murdock, a Mexican Kickapoo and former student at Carlisle Indian Industrial School. These notes contain information from Murdock and include phonetic transcriptions of vocabulary, a list of gentes, and some personal names.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1329
Local Note:
Title changed from "Texts 1929" 3/12/2014.
Topic:
Kickapoo Indians -- Kinship  Search this
Names, Personal -- Kickapoo  Search this
Kickapoo language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 1329, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1329
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ad61e58e-c715-445b-b898-09504e634e8f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1329
Online Media:

MS 1774 Shawnee linguistic notes collected by Truman Michelson

Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Creator:
Switch, Charley  Search this
Extent:
1 Notebook (20 pages)
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notebooks
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1929
Scope and Contents:
Shawnee linguistic notes collected by Truman Michelson, most likely during his fieldwork in Oklahoma. The notes may be from Michelson's work with Charley Switch, whose name appears on the top of the first page. Notes consist of Shawnee terms and phrases with English glosses.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1774
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 1774, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1774
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw399d6dec7-8e69-43d7-9cc4-4d5c27a9cf69
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1774
Online Media:

MS 2704 Miscellaneous tales

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
38 Pages
Culture:
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2704
Local Note:
Typescript
Citation:
Manuscript 2704, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2704
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3126321f4-0ac8-4476-98f0-eb6127ebd11e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2704
Online Media:

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