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Oral history interview with Val Laigo

Interviewee:
Laigo, Val M., 1930-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Lau, Alan Chong  Search this
Nakane, Kazuko  Search this
Names:
Charles and Emma Frye Art Museum  Search this
Foster/White Gallery  Search this
Mexico City College -- Students  Search this
Northwest Asian American Project  Search this
Seattle University -- Students  Search this
University of Washington -- Students  Search this
Bennett, Doug  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth, 1905-1986  Search this
Chong, Fay  Search this
Dusanne, Zoe, 1884-1977  Search this
Horiuchi, Paul, 1906-  Search this
Jones, Quincy, 1933-  Search this
Katayama, Mits  Search this
Nordness, Lee  Search this
Okada, Frank S. (Frank Sumio), 1931-2000  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Ritchie, Bill  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro, 1896-1974  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-1991  Search this
Voorhees, Clark G. (Clark Greenwood), 1871-1933  Search this
Washington, James W., 1911-2000  Search this
Extent:
42 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1989 July 12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Val Laigo conducted 1989 July 12, by Alan Lau and Kazuko Nakane, for the Archives of American Art Northwest Asian American Project, in Laigo's home, Seattle, Wash.
Laigo speaks of learning how to paint at age eleven with watercolors; growing up with a heart condition known as Eisenmenger's Complex; teaching at Highline High School and creating a wolverine as the school's mascot; the inclusion of his life story in a Filipino oral history project; singing for an orchestra called the Gentlemen of Rhythm, at the Filipino Catholic Youth Activities events and other venues; Doug Bennett as an influence in composition and design; being a student at Seattle University and joining Art Equity in approximately 1951; remembering his painting, "Madonna" being shown at the Seattle Art Museum; his first show at the People's Furniture Store and later with Fay Chong at the Hathaway House; Zoe Dusanne became his agent; his introduction to the MacPaint software program and his first piece of computer art; his desire to study Mexican muralists, Diego Rivera, Jose Orozco, David Siqueiros, and Rufino Tamayo and becoming at student at Mexico City College; his life in Mexico with the woman who would become his wife; the strong influence of Nick Damascus on his painting; how his palette changed to brighter colors after living in Mexico; his health crisis there that lead him to abandon his work towards a master's degree and return to Seattle in 1959; having to start over from the beginning at the University of Washington; Tommy Kwazume hiring him at Boing as an artist in 1960; Lee Nordness and the RCA Victor album cover; his negative experience with Margaret Reed while showing at the Panaca Gallery; his exhibit at the Frye Art Museum in 1969 and criticism by Clark Voorhees; his Mexican experience having influenced his vigor and scale; the Lost Generation series; his comment about Picasso not being able to paint; encouragement from his family to pursue art training; the murder of his father in 1936; his mother's success as a new painter; and his work, "Dilemma of the Atom" featured on the cover of an RCA Victor record album. Laigo also recalls Perry Acker, Foster White Gallery, David Mendoza, Fred Mendoza, Tom Tooley, Ray Sadirius, Quincy Jones, Oscar Holden's Orchestra, Fred Cordova, Mits Katayama, Rudy Bundis, Kal Chin, Paul Horiuchi, James Washington, Dick Kirsten, Frank Okada, John Matsudaira, Walter Froelich, Bill Ritchie, John Counts, Don Fenton, Kenneth Callahan, Fred Run, Barry Ferrell, Ken Harms, Andrew Chin, Ben Dar, Ruth Mora, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Val Laigo (1930-1992) was a Filipino American painter based in Seattle, Washington. Val Laigo was born in Naguilian, La Union, in the Phillipines. His family moved to the United States in 1931 and to Seattle in 1941. Laigo's full name Valeriano Emerenciano Montante Laigo.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 48 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Filipino American art  Search this
Filipino American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American muralists  Search this
Muralists -- Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.laigo89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90a8fb211-d3b2-4e6d-9727-b2bc260466e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-laigo89
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Val Laigo, 1989 July 12

Interviewee:
Laigo, Val M., 1930-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Lau, Alan Chong  Search this
Subject:
Nakane, Kazuko  Search this
Bennett, Doug  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth  Search this
Chong, Fay  Search this
Dusanne, Zoe  Search this
Horiuchi, Paul  Search this
Jones, Quincy  Search this
Katayama, Mits  Search this
Nordness, Lee  Search this
Okada, Frank S. (Frank Sumio)  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente  Search this
Picasso, Pablo  Search this
Ritchie, Bill  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino  Search this
Voorhees, Clark G. (Clark Greenwood)  Search this
Washington, James W.  Search this
Charles and Emma Frye Art Museum  Search this
Foster/White Gallery  Search this
Mexico City College  Search this
Seattle University  Search this
University of Washington  Search this
Northwest Asian American Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Val Laigo, 1989 July 12. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Computer Art  Search this
Filipino American art  Search this
Filipino American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American muralists  Search this
Muralists -- Mexico  Search this
Theme:
Asian American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12747
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)224926
AAA_collcode_laigo89
Theme:
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_224926
Online Media:

Walter W. Taylor papers

Creator:
Taylor, Walter W. (Walter Willard)  Search this
Names:
Pueblo Ecology Survey  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Northern Mexico Archeological Fund  Search this
Adams, William Yewdale  Search this
Taylor, Lyda Averill  Search this
Extent:
59.82 Linear feet
Culture:
Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Maps
Place:
Coahuila (Mexico : State)
Monument Valley (Ariz. and Utah)
Sonora (Mexico : State)
Spain
Date:
1925-1983
Scope and Contents:
Includes correspondence, teaching materials, student papers, manuscripts, miscellaneous papers relating to projects, diaries, printed materials, photographs, cartographic materials. Much of the material concerns Taylor's archeological work in Coahuila, Mexico, some of which was carried out for the Smithsonian Institution (Northern Mexico Archeological Fund), and material on Tatvejo Cave in Sonora. Some materials concern Southeastern Indians and some or all of that belonged to Lyda Averell Taylor. Still other material concerns work in Monument Valley, Arizona, in 1952; the Pueblo Ecology Survey (with William Yewdale Adams), and work in Spain. The work also includes material concerning many other aspects of Taylor's life, both personal and professional. Also included are many papers by Taylor's students and other archeologists.
Biographical Note:
Walter W. Taylor, Jr. was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1913, but moved to Greenwich, Connecticut, as a young boy. He earned an A. B. in Geology from Yale University in 1935, and upon graduation worked for the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, where he was involved in archeological excavations, before becoming archeological field foreman at the University of New Mexico field school in Chaco Canyon.

In 1938, Taylor enrolled in the anthropology doctoral program at Harvard University, from which he earned his Ph. D. in 1942. That same year, Taylor enlisted as a private in the U. S. Marine Corps, and in 1944 his service overseas resulted in his capture and detainment in prisoner-of-war camps by German forces, from which he was not released until the end of the war in Europe. Taylor's military career lasted until 1955, when he resigned from the Marines as a captain, having earned a Purple Heart.

In 1958, Taylor began teaching at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, founding its Department of Anthropology. He also taught at the University of Texas, University of Washington, University of Santa Fe, Mexico City College, and La Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico.

During his career, Taylor produced several publications on the topics of archaeological theory and Coahuila archeology. Early professional influences include his acquaintanceship with anthropologist Clyde Kluckhohn, and the work of anthropologist Lyndon Hargrave.

"A specialist in the neolithic and chalcolithic archaeology of Western Europe, he was also known for his North American fieldwork," which he "conducted in Arizona, New Mexico, Georgia, Mexico (Coahuila, Sonora, and Zacatecas), and Spain, before retiring in 1974" (Bowman 1995, Euler 1997).

Taylor is perhaps best remembered for his research and fieldwork in Coahuila, Mexico, and his controversial doctoral dissertation, published as a book in 1948, titled A Study of Archeology, in which he criticized the approaches of contemporary archeologists and posited a new theory of conducting archeological research, called the "conjunctive approach." Taylor's book is widely regarded as being directly influential in the development of "New Archeology," or the "processual approach."

On April 14, 1997, Taylor "died at his home in Rockaway Beach, Oregon, of complications resulting from the debilitating effects of Alzheimer's disease" (Euler 1997).

Sources Consulted

Bowman, John S., ed., "Taylor, Walter W. (Willard)," The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Euler, Robert C. "Walter Willard Taylor, Jr. 1913-1997." Society for American Archaeology Bulletin 15:4 (1997). Accessed August 7, 2013. http://www.saa.org/Portals/0/SAA/publications/saabulletin/15-4/SAA15.html.

Maca, Allan, William Folan and Jonathan Reyman, editors, Prophet, Pariah, and Pioneer: Walter W. Taylor and Dissension in American Archaeology. Chicago: University Press of Chicago, 2010.

Taylor, Walter W. Curriculum vitae. 1975.

1913 -- Born in Chicago, Illinois

1935 -- Earns A. B. in Geology from Yale University

1935-1941 -- Field work in Arizona, New Mexico, Georgia, Mexico (Coahuila)

1942 -- Earns Ph. D. in Anthropology from Harvard UniversityEnlists in U. S. Marine Corps

1944 -- Captured and detained in prisoner-of-war camps by German forces during overseas service in WWII

1947 -- Field work in Mexico (Coahuila)

1948 -- Publishes book, A Study of Archeology

1949-1965 -- Field work in Arizona, Mexico (Coahuila, Sonora, Zacatecas)

1955 -- Resigns from U. S. Marine Corps with rank of Captain

1958-1974 -- Professor of Anthropology and Chairman of the Department, Southern Illinois University

1963, 1967 -- Field work in Spain

1973 -- Field work in Arizona

1974 -- Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Southern Illinois University

1997 -- Dies April 14 in Rockaway Beach, Oregon, from complications of Alzheimer's disease
Related Materials:
Taylor is listed as a correspondent in the following collections at the National Anthropological Archives: Frank Maryl Setzler Papers 1927-1960 American Indian Chicago Conference Records 1960-1966.

Taylor is listed as a subject in the following collection at the Smithsonian Institution Archives: Permanent Administrative Files, 1877-1975, United States National Museum.

Archeological specimens related to Taylor's fieldwork, especially in Coahuila, Mexico, can be found in the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) Anthropology Collections.

Bone specimens related to Taylor's fieldwork in Coahuila, Mexico, can be found in the NMNH Mammals Divison of Vertebrate Zoology Collections.

Print versions of Taylor's books (author, editor, and contributor) can be found at the Smithsonian Institution Libraries. These volumes include: A Study of Archeology Contributions to Coahuila archaeology: with an introduction to the Coahuila project The identification of non-artifactual archaeological materials : report of a conference held in Chicago, March 11-13, 1956 / by the Committee on Archaeological Identification, Division of Anthropology and Psychology, National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council. Culture and life; essays in memory of Clyde Kluckhohn Archaeology without borders: contact, commerce, and change in the U.S. Southwest and northwestern Mexico

For oral history interviews with anthropologists that have Taylor listed as a subject or professional influence, see the following video cassettes at the Human Studies Film Archives: Video Dialogues in Anthropology: John Rowe and Charles Wagley, 1984 Video Dialogues in Anthropology: Charles Wagley, 1983

For additional materials concerning Taylor's manuscript on "Sandals from Coahuila Caves," see: Patty Jo Watson collection on Walter Taylor, circa 1980-2003, at the National Anthropological Archives.

For correspondence and other documents related to Taylor's position held at Southern Illinois University, see: Walter W. Taylor Papers, 1958-1973, University Archives, Southern Illinois University.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Walter Taylor in 2004.
Restrictions:
Portions of the collection have been restricted at Natch Taylor's request until 2034. See finding aid for more information.
Rights:
Contact the Repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Maps
Citation:
Walter W. Taylor Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1987-00
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c1b9e30b-c8ca-4ccf-94bc-a1dfbc26b844
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1987-00

Exhibition Announcements and Catalogs

Collection Creator:
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1963-1968
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Mel Casas papers, 1963-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Mel Casas papers
Mel Casas papers / Series 4: Printed Materials
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9fe251500-2cb2-4c00-b9f6-9dc14370f01f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-casamel-ref23
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