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Rupert García : prints and posters, 1967-1990 = Rupert García : grabados y afiches, 1967-1990

Title:
Prints and posters, 1967-1990
Rupert García, grabados y afiches, 1967-1990
Grabados y afiches, 1967-1990
Author:
Garcia, Rupert 1941-  Search this
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco  Search this
Centro Cultural/Arte Contemporáneo (Mexico)  Search this
Fundación Cultural Televisa (Mexico)  Search this
Subject:
Garcia, Rupert 1941-  Search this
Physical description:
64 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
California
San Francisco Bay Area
United States
Date:
1990
[1990?]
20th century
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Politics in art  Search this
Graphic arts  Search this
Mexican Americans--Posters  Search this
Political posters  Search this
Mexican American posters  Search this
Mexican American prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Prints  Search this
Call number:
NC139.G3 A4 1990
N40.1.G219y F49 1990
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_410768

What is Con Safos?

Creator:
Smithsonian Insider  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 27 Sep 2018 12:20:06 +0000
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Insider
Data Source:
Smithsonian Insider
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_931125cbd1c16754d469633f6668cca2

Mexican Boy

Title (Spanish):
Niño Mexican
Graphic artist:
Kistler, Lynton R.  Search this
Original artist:
Contreras, Ramon  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 40.8 cm x 29 cm; 16 1/16 in x 11 7/16 in
Object Name:
print
Object Type:
Lithograph
Other Terms:
print; Lithograph
Place made:
United States: California, Los Angeles
Date made:
ca 1950
Subject:
Latino  Search this
Immigration  Search this
Credit Line:
Kistler Collection
ID Number:
1978.0650.1130
Accession number:
1978.0650
Catalog number:
1978.0650.1130
78.0650.1130
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Graphic Arts
Cultures & Communities
Mexican America
Art
Agriculture
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a5-dfcc-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_800258

Oral history interview with Patssi Valdez

Interviewee:
Valdez, Patssi  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Otis Art Institute  Search this
Self-Help Graphics and Art, Inc.  Search this
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Mesa-Bains, Amalia  Search this
Extent:
80 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 May 26-June 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Patssi Valdez conducted 1999 May 26-June 2, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews were conducted at the artist's home/studio in Los Angeles, California. Valdez discusses her current show at the Laguna Art Museum, "A Precarious Comfort," and the intensely personal nature of the work being exhibited; the liberating aspects of painting and her journey from dealing with the problems and concerns of the Chicano community to a more internal focus in which she examines her personal emotional life through symbol and imagination; how, in her work, landscape has come to represent emotions and states of mind; health problems and her turning to alternative methods of healing; her relationship with Asco and her eventual break from the group to pursue her art studies at Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles (now Otis College of Art and Design) and in New York, and with a NEA grant to Europe and Mexico; difficulties she experienced with her decision to focus on art school and on her survival as an artist, while trying to keep in touch with friends and peers; friendships with Amalia Mesa Bains, Christina Fernandez, and Gronk, as well as with Sister Karen Boccalero whose Self-Help Graphics contributed so much to the growth of a younger generation of Chicano artists; fellow Asco artist Harry Gamboa, Jr., and their mutual goals in their art to subvert Chicano stereotypes; what constitutes Chicano art and how the Les Demon des Anges show changed her perspective; and her ability to create change through her art.
Biographical / Historical:
Patssi Valdez (1951-) is a painter, and installation artist from Los Angeles, California. Valdez is known for her boldly rendered works that vary in themes from homages to female deities to mystical environments.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 32 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Inititatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.valdez99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-valdez99

Oral history interview with Cinthya Santos-Briones

Interviewee:
Santos Briones, Cinthya  Search this
Interviewer:
Espinosa, Fernanda  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((30 min.), digital, mp4)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 September 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Cinthya Santos-Briones conducted 2020 September 16, by Fernanda Espinosa, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Santos-Briones' home in Brooklyn, New York.
Biographical / Historical:
Cinthya Santos-Briones is a Mexican photographer and anthropologist in Brooklyn, New York. Santos-Briones' work explores issues of multiculturalism and migration, particularly the treatment of undocumented immigrants in the United States.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information
Occupation:
Photographers -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Anthropologists -- New York (State) -- Brooklyn  Search this
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
Pandemics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.santosb20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-santosb20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Graciela Sanchez

Interviewee:
Sanchez, Graciela I.  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Esperanza Peace & Justice Center  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Anzaldúa, Gloria  Search this
Calvo, Luz María  Search this
Diaz, Eduardo  Search this
Guerra, Susan  Search this
Kasterly, Amy  Search this
Lorde, Audre.  Search this
Mondini-Ruiz, Franco, 1961-  Search this
Moraga, Cherríe  Search this
Perez, Cynthia  Search this
Vaughn, Genevieve  Search this
Wilson, Liliana, 1953-  Search this
Extent:
91 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 June 25-July 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Graciela Sanchez conducted 2004 June 25-July 2, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Tex.
Sánchez speaks of her family background, her family's move to Chicago, return to San Antonio, and cultural traditions; San Antonio's Chili Queens; activism in the community; high school, attending Yale University; MEChA; Gloria Anzaldúa and This Bridge Called My Back; working for the Southwest Voter Registration Project; MALDEF, Mexican American Legal Defense; the foundation of Esperanza Peace and Justice Center with Susan Guerra and others; going to Cuba to study film; the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center; the values of being "buena gente," "good people"; Ellas, a Latina lesbian organization; working with Amy Kastely, lawyer; Mujer Artes; her film "No Porque lo Diga Fidel Castro"; working for AIDS prevention/education; the newsletter "The Interchange" which became "La Voz de Esperanza"; Stonehaven Ranch, a retreat location; the film screenings "Other America"; the complete de-funding of Esperanza in 1997 and the four year litigation with the city of San Antonio; trying to save the building La Gloria and other endeavors taken on by the Esperanza; the Cuentos Project and recent events sponsored by the Esperanza. Sánchez also recalls Audre Lorde, Luz Calvo, Eduardo Diaz, Liliana Wilson Grez, Cherríe Moraga, Cynthia Perez, Genevieve Vaughn, Franco Mondini-Ruiz, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Graciela Sanchez (1960- ) is an arts activist and the executive director of the Esperanza Peace and Justice Center in San Antonio, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970- ) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound discs. Duration is 5 hr., 30 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Gay artists -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.sanche04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sanche04

Oral history interview with Frank Romero

Interviewee:
Romero, Frank  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
Otis Art Institute -- Students  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Mugnaini, Joseph A.  Search this
Rocha, Roberto de la  Search this
Sanchez Luján, Gilbert  Search this
Sheets, Millard, 1907-1989  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Extent:
99 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 January 17-March 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Frank Romero conducted 1997 January 17-March 2, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art, in Romero's studio, in Los Angeles, Calif.
Romero discusses his growing up in East Los Angeles and his large extended family; his earliest art studies in the public schools; attending the Otis Art Institute where he studied with Joe Mugnaini and had contact with Millard Sheets and Peter Voulkos; the "very polyglut culture" of East Los Angeles; the influences of television, western movies, rock-and-roll, and rhythm and blues on his early musical/artistic taste; time spent in New York; returning to Los Angeles in 1969; and his marriage and family.
He describes his move into Carlos Almaraz's house which became the informal meeting place of the artist group Los Four (Almaraz, Romero, Gilbert Sanchez Lujan, and Roberto "Beto" de la Rocha); the Los Four show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1974; and the stylistic aesthetics of Los Four.
Romero describes the "boys club" nature of Chicano art centers; his contributions to the Chicano art movement; his relationship to the Chicano/Mexican culture and mainstream U.S. culture; murals done by members of Los Four for the Inner City Mural Program; his work for the Metropolitan Transit Authority; the Murals of Aztlan exhibit in 1981 at the Craft and Folk Art Museum; and his shows at the ARCO Center for the Visual Arts. He concludes with his assessment of the Chicano arts movement, the relationship between economic and art cycles, and the role of the more established artists to those of a younger generation.
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Romero (1941- ) is a painter from Los Angeles, Calif.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 9 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 27 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Street art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.romero97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-romero97

Oral history interview with Alessandra Moctezuma

Interviewee:
Moctezuma, Alessandra  Search this
Interviewer:
Espinosa, Fernanda  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (video files (29 min.) Video, digital, mp4)
8 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 July 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Alessandra Moctezuma conducted 2020 July 22, by Fernanda Espinosa, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at at Moctezuma's home in San Diego, California.
Biographical / Historical:
Alessandra Moctezuma is an artist, curator, and arts teacher active in San Diego, California. Moctezuma is a professor and gallery Director at San Diego Mesa College, San Diego, California.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Educators -- California -- San Diego  Search this
Gallery directors -- California -- San Diego  Search this
Artists -- California -- San Diego  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Pandemics  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.moctuz20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-moctuz20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Gronk

Interviewee:
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (Gallery)  Search this
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
Dreva, Jerry  Search this
Extent:
6 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (ca. 6 hrs.), analog)
94 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Jan. 20-23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Gronk conducted by Jeffrey Rangel for the Archives of American Art.
Gronk discusses differences between two artists' group, Los Four and and Asco; the Chicano artists view of Asco; isolation from the Chicano arts movement as well as the mainstream avant-garde art scene; his relationship with Jerry Dreva and the development of mail art and the Dreva/Gronk Show: 1968-1978 at the Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions; and his 1983 NEA fellowship for performance/conceptual work.
Biographical / Historical:
Gronk (1954-) is an artist from California. Gronk, whose full name is Glugio Gronk Nicandro, was born in Los Angeles in 1954. As a member of the 1970s activist performance group, Asco (nausea), with Harry Gamboa, Jr., Patssi Valdez, and Willie Herron, Gronk arranged anti-war protests and painted graffiti murals.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview provided by the Smithsonian Latino Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gronk97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gronk97

Oral history interview with Gilbert Sanchez Lujan

Interviewee:
Sanchez Luján, Gilbert  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Los Four (Art group)  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Rocha, Roberto de la  Search this
Romero, Frank  Search this
Extent:
104 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Nov. 7-17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Gilbert Lujan conducted 1997 Nov. 7-17, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art, in Los Angeles, Calif. and La Mesa, N.M.
Sanchez Lujan discusses his growing up in a rural community, East Los Angeles, and Mexico; how early experiences and changes in culture have affected his art and developed his interest in history and politics; his attraction to black culture and the relationship of art as a medium for inter-ethnic interaction where politics and human nature create divisions; his understanding of racial segregation and apartheid in California society; coming into consciousness as a Chicano; and his collaboration and the formation of Los Four with Roberto de la Rocha, Carlos Almaraz, and Frank Romero.
Biographical / Historical:
Gilbert Sanchez Lujan (1940-2011) was a painter from Los Angeles and La Mesa, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 42 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Latino Pool Allocation.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New Mexico -- La Mesa -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lujan97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lujan97

Oral history interview with Jacinto Quirarte

Interviewee:
Quirarte, Jacinto, 1931-2012  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
San Francisco State University -- Students  Search this
Extent:
97 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1996 Aug. 15-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jacinto Quirarte conducted 1996 Aug. 15-16, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Quirarte discusses his professional and personal experience both as a Mexican-American growing up in the Southwest and in California, and as an art historian who was among the first to identify and study the Chicano art movement. He describes his family background, his attraction to figurative art as a student at San Francisco State University, his interest in Mexican muralists, and his fascination with pre-Columbian art which became his speciality. He further discusses his career in Latin America, particularly from the standpoint of multiculturalism and regionalism in his native country; the problem of overlapping political/cultural entities and the connection between pre-Columbian and Chicano situation; the notions of group identity, and shift from universalism to individual identity as part of the Chicano art evolution.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacinto Quirarte (1931-2012) is an art historian at the University of Texas, San Antonio. Quirarte is the author of several books on Latin American art, among them "Mexican American Artists" (1973), "Izapan-Style Art" (1973), and "Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States, 1920-1970" (1988).
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 5 hr., 7 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview provided by the Smithsonian Latino Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art historians -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Indian art -- Central America  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.quirar96
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-quirar96

Oral history interview with Elsa Flores

Interviewee:
Flores, Elsa  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Extent:
11 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (60 mins. each), analog)
209 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 Feb. 18-Apr. 30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Elsa Flores conducted 1997 Feb. 18-Apr. 30, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews took place in Flores' studio, in South Pasadena, Calif., over four sessions. Flores discusses her parents' diverse backgrounds and her difficult childhood and adolescence; the development of her political consciousness; her involvement with Chicanismo; her interests in art, photography, and music, including being a member of California State University, Los Angeles mariachi band; her art, which she considers more biographical and mystical than ethnic; her use, initially, of a dark palette to distinguish her work from that of her husband, Carlos Almaraz, and changing to a brighter, more optimistic palette after Almaraz's was diagnosed with AIDS. She recalls Almaraz's energy and genius; his struggles with AIDS and his search for alternative healing methods; finding solace in Kauai; and his request to have his ashes strewn around Kauai at his favorite places. Flores comments on the difficult period after Almaraz's death; her devotion to their daughter; keeping Almaraz's work at the forefront of public awareness; and her own art career.
Biographical / Historical:
Elsa Flores (1955-) is a painter from California. Married to painter Carlos Almaraz.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Women painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.flores97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-flores97

Oral history interview with Willie Herrón

Interviewee:
Herrón, Willie, 1951-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Extent:
7 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (6 hrs.), analog)
109 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2000 Feb. 5-Mar. 17
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Willie Herrón conducted 2000 Feb. 5-Mar. 17, by Jeffrey J. Rangel, for the Archives of American Art.
The interviews took place in a restaurant, City Terrace, East Los Angeles, Calif. Herrón describes his childhood growing up in East Los Angeles, culminating with an extensive discussion of the circumstances surrounding the painting of his most acclaimed mural, "The Wall that Cracked Open" in City Terrace; founding the avant-garde Chicano art group Asco along with Harry Gamboa, Jr., Patssi Valdez, and Gronk; his experience as leader of the band Los Illegals and as a cofounder of the alternative music space Club Vex with Self Help Graphics' Sister Karen Boccalero; the Chicano mural movement, particularly his undertakings in City Terrace, Boyle Heights, and at the Estrada Courts and Ramona Gardens housing projects in East Los Angeles; his commitment to working with at-risk youth and his strong desire to expand the stylistic and iconographic parameters of the medium through the incorporation of graffiti; and an assessment of Asco's role in expanding the continuum of Chicano art and identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Willie Herrón (1951-) is a painter, graphic artist, muralist, and musician from Los Angeles, Calif. Herrón is known as one of the premiere artists and musicians to emerge out of the Chicano arts movement during the 1970s.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview and transcription provided by the SI Latino Fund of 1997.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art and music  Search this
Graffiti art  Search this
Street art  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American musicians -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.herron00
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-herron00

Oral history interview with Alberto Mijangos

Interviewee:
Mijangos, Alberto, 1925-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Gamboa, Raul  Search this
Goitia, Francisco, 1882-1960  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Sanchez, Gabriel  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tamayo, Olga  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-  Search this
Extent:
65 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2003 Dec. 5-12
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Alberto Mijangos conducted 2003 Dec. 5- 12, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in San Antonio, Tex.
Mijangos speaks of his family background, early childhood memories and early art education at San Carlos Academy of Art; the Air Force in Mexico; Los Tres Grandes, Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros; coming to the United States; painting bull fighters; leaving Texas for Chicago; favorite paintings at the Art Institute of Chicago; moving to San Antonio; suspicion of being a communist; becoming a Mexican diplomat; working with Mel Casas who led Mijangos to abstraction; Con Safo; difficulty in achieving respect from Americans; moving to Oaxaca, working there and trying to fit in; returning to San Antonio, changing his lifestyle; changing inspiration, Mark Rothko and Mijangos new use for color; tee-shirt paintings; his relationship with galleries; the artistic community of San Antonio; his use of numbers and fabric in his paintings; interest and use of photography in his artwork. Mijangos also recalls Raul Gamboa, Rufino and Olga Tamayo, Gabriel Sanchez, Francisco Goitia and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alberto Mijangos (1925-2007) was an artist from San Antonio, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970- ) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 48 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mijang03
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mijang03

Oral history interview with Sylvia Orozco

Interviewee:
Orozco, Sylvia, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
League of United Chicano Artists  Search this
Mexic-Arte Museum (Austin, Tex.)  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Alvarez Bravo, Manuel, 1902-  Search this
Barraza, Santa  Search this
Cardenas, Gilberto  Search this
Coronado, Sam  Search this
Dodson, Nora Gonzales  Search this
Fearing, Kelly  Search this
Frary, Michael, 1918-  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente, 1883-1949  Search this
Pace, Linda  Search this
Pulido, Piu  Search this
Rivera, Diego, 1886-1957  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Starpattern, Rita  Search this
Trevino, Barbina Modesta  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 Jan. 26-Feb. 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Sylvia Orozco conducted 2004 Jan. 26-Feb. 2, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in Mexic-Arte Gallery, Austin, Tex.
Orozco speaks of her family history, having the best drawing in second grade, the earliest recollection of being an artist; Camp Fire Girls; painting for high school pep squad and protest signs; growing up in Cuero, Tex.; integration in high school; Texas A and I; the Raza Unida movement; University of Texas; the Conferencia del Plastica Chicana, held September 13-16, 1979 in Austin, Tex.; MECha, the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan; the effect of her work as a curator on her ability to do her own artwork; CONACYT, National Council of Arts and Technology; her passion for Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros; meeting Pio Pulido; LUChA, the League of United Chicano Artists; organizing an exhibition on Manuel Alvarez Bravo at the Texas Memorial Museum; the beginnings of Mexic-Arte Gallery; the group Women and Their Work; the installation "Counter Colon-ialismo"; alternative spaces and museums; and future plans for Mexic-Arte Gallery. Orozco also recalls Santa Barraza, Kelly Fearing, Mike Frary, Sam Coronado, Barbina Modesta Treviño, Nora Gonzalez-Dodson, Linda Pace, Rita Starpattern, Gilbert Cardenas, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Sylvia Orozco (1954- ) is an artist from Austin, Tex. Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian from Austin, Tex.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 55 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Museum directors -- Texas  Search this
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Curators -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Hispanic American women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.orozco04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-orozco04

Oral history interview with Harry Gamboa, Jr

Interviewee:
Gamboa, Harry  Search this
Gronk, 1954-  Search this
Interviewer:
Rangel, Jeffrey J.  Search this
Names:
Asco (Group of artists)  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (270 min.), analog)
90 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1999 Apr. 1-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Harry Gamboa, Jr. conducted 1999 Apr. 1-16, at various cafes in Los Angeles, Calif., by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art. The artist, Gronk, joined the interview for the second session.
Photographer, painter, video artist, and writer, Harry Gamboa, Jr. (b. 1951), has been involved in creating visual and performance works that interpret the contemporary urban Chicano culture. A native of Los Angeles, Gamboa began the interview by reflecting on his book Urban Exile (University of Minnesota Press, 1998), which he considers only a fragment of his creative work, feeling photography his primary medium. He expressed a need to maintain his identity as a Chicano artist while at the same time trying to balance financial survival, family maintenance, and creative spontaneity. He described growing up in East Los Angeles, a period that tested his personality and developed his quick wit and humor as a means of survival and his sense of being the "participant viewer." He remembers his educational experiences as "highly damaging," due to the physical violence from a few teachers and the stereotyping of Chicanos. His views about the Vietnam War and his disillusionment of the political process which led to a discussion about the Civil Rights Movement and the African-American culture's influence on his work. He emphasized the lack of an awareness by the art community of black and Chicano artists that was underscored in the Armand Hammer Museum's LA and Noir [Sunshine and Noir: Los Angeles Art, 1960-1990, at the UCLA/Armand Hammer Art Center] exhibition, 1998.
The second session began and ended with Gamboa reflecting on his relationship with his wife and fellow artist, Barbara Carrasco. In the interim, he and Gronk, who joined the interview, discussed the dynamics that brought the artists together in Asco; the differences and competitiveness within the Chicano Arts Movement; and the vulnerabilities of an artist's surviving while trying to maintain an artistic vision. Despite these challenges and an opressive dominant culture that has not embrased Chicano art, Carrasco have continued as artists because they feel a need to create and to present their work as a means of expanding a perception of reality.
Biographical / Historical:
Harry Gamboa, Jr. (1951-) is a painter, writer, photographer, and video artist from Los Angeles, Calif.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for the interview and transcription provided by the Smithsonian Institution Latino Initiatives Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Photography  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gamboa99
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gamboa99

[Eulogy to Xavier Gonzalez]

Creator:
Reynolds, Sally K.  Search this
Names:
Gonzalez, Xavier, 1898-1993  Search this
Extent:
6 Pages ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1993 Oct. 24
Scope and Contents:
A typescript of Sally K. Reynolds' eulogy at the memorial service for Xavier Gonzalez held at the Art Students League in New York City on October 24, 1993. It includes excerpts from Reynolds' interview with Xavier and Ethel Gonzalez conducted on August 8, 1990, in which Gonzalez spoke of his childhood in Mexico, his move to the United States, working as a fruit picker in Iowa, and stockyards in Chicago, and events leading to a scholarship to the at the Art Institute of Chicago.
Biographical / Historical:
Art dealer; New York City.
Provenance:
Donated 1993 by Sally K. Reynolds.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.reynsall
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-reynsall

Oral history interview with Mel Casas

Interviewee:
Casas, Mel, 1929-2014  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Names:
San Antonio College -- Faculty  Search this
Almaraz, Carlos  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Extent:
66 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1996 August 14 and 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Mel Casas conducted 1996 August 14-16, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
Casas discusses his current work - dipped acrylic paintings in which technique and material become the subject; his involvement with Chicano art political issues and his own experience as a Mexican-American; a discussion of his family background; art education; early Abstract Expressionist painting; a shift to figuration; thirty years teaching at San Antonio College; the Chicano "movimiento"; and Chicano art and key figures, including Carlos Almaraz and Carmen Lomas Garza.
Biographical / Historical:
Mel Casas (1929-) is a painter from San Antonio, Texas.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 5 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Mexican American art  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.casas96
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-casas96

Oral history interview with Nao Bustamante

Interviewee:
Bustamante, Nao  Search this
Interviewer:
Franco, Josh T., 1985-  Search this
Names:
Pandemic Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Item ((26 min.), digital, mp4)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Video recordings
Date:
2020 July 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Nao Bustamante conducted 2020 July 3, by Josh Franco, for the Archives of American Art's Pandemic Oral History Project at Bustamante's home in Los Angeles, California.
Biographical / Historical:
Nao Bustamante (1969- ) is a Chicana artist and educator in Los Angeles, California.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its Oral History Program interviews available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. Quotation, reproduction and publication of the audio is governed by restrictions. If an interview has been transcribed, researchers must quote from the transcript. If an interview has not been transcribed, researchers must quote from the audio recording. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Artists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Educators -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
COVID-19 (Disease)  Search this
Pandemics  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.busta20
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-busta20
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Enrique Chagoya

Interviewee:
Chagoya, Enrique  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
95 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2001 July 25-August 6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Enrique Chagoya conducted July 25-August 6, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.
The interview takes place at Chagoya's home in South San Francisco (sessions 1,2) and at Karlstrom's San Francisco office (session 3). Chagoya's wife, Kara Maria, joins in for the final portion of the interview. Chagoya discusses activities in Mexico and the U.S.; his involvement with the Galeria de la Raza and the Chicano Movement; his work, including books that are based on Pre-Columbian codices; his application of "reverse anthropology," the history of the Americas and Europe, as if Mexico conquered Europe; Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera; the legacy of Mexican muralism and the union of art and ideology; the nature of his own interest in Pre-Columbian imagery; his sabbatical year in Paris; collaborations with his wife Kara Maria, including issues of self-projection into works of art; artistic responsibility; creation of hybrid cultures; the separation of his art from other Chicano art; and identity as a Mexican. Chagoya's wife, painter Kara Maria, discusses her training at UC Berkeley, meeting Chagoya; their evolving relationship as artists; his role as mentor; and her separate artistic identity.
Biographical / Historical:
Enrique Chagoya (1953-) is a Mexican American painter, graphic artist, and educator in San Francisco, California. Kara Maria (1968-) is Chagoya's wife.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 13 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Indian art -- Central America  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chagoy01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chagoy01

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