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(Re)Telling the American Story | Youth in Action

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-01-08T21:13:45.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_cJLRGcNsOwc

James Mooney photographs

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
11.75 Linear feet (Photographic prints: albumen, gelatin silver Negatives: glass, cellulose nitrate )
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Nansemond  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Mexico
Date:
circa 1872-1920
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made during James Mooney's fieldwork with Apache, Arapaho, Caddo, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Comanche, Dakota/Lakota, Hopi, Kiowa, Navaho, Powhatan, and Wichita communities, as well as in Mexico. Photographs document individuals and families, gatherings, ceremonies and dances, daily activities, games, crafts, landscapes, and burials.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Biographical / Historical:
James Mooney (1861-1921) was an American ethnographer whose research focused on Native North Americans. The son of Irish Catholic immigrants, Mooney was born in Richmond, Indiana. His formal education was limited to the public schools of the city; most of his knowledge of anthropology and ethnography was self-taught, largely through his field experience working with various Native communities.

In 1885, Mooney began working for the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) under John Wesley Powell. There, he carried out ethnographic research for more than 30 years. He was a very early adopter of photography and made thouands of photographs in the course of his fieldwork.

Mooney married Ione Lee Gaut in 1897, and had six children. He died in 1921 in Washington, D.C. from heart disease.

For fuller biographies of Mooney see George Ellison's introduction to the 1992 edition of Mooney's History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees, as well as The Indian Man: A Biography of James Mooney by L.G. Moses (2002).

Chronology

February 10, 1861 -- Born

1878 -- Graduated high school, then taught public school for 1 year

1879 -- Joined the staff of The Richmond Palladium

April 1885 -- Joined the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE)

May-June 1885 -- Worked with Cherokee Chief N. J. Smith on Eastern Cherokee grammar

Summer 1886 -- Worked with Chief Smith (in D.C.)

Summer 1887 -- First trip to the Eastern Cherokee of the Great Smokey Mountains to study language, collect material culture, and document activities including the Green Corn Dance and Cherokee ball games (3.5 months)

Winter/Spring 1888 -- Studied Iroquoian and Algonquian synonymies and published articles on the Irish and the Cherokee, collected and studied Cherokee sacred formulae

1889 -- Visit to Cherokee (worked with Swimmer, worked on his maps of place names/mound sites, witnessed ball play and the Green Corn Dance, gathered plants and collected objects for the Smithsonian

December 1890 -- Visited Oklahoma Territory to complete research with Western Cherokee, witnessed the Ghost Dance at the Cheyenne/Arapaho Reservation for the first time

1891 -- "The Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee" published Visit to Cherokee in Oklahoma Territory

April 1891 -- Delegated to collect material for Chicago Exposition. Collected for the next 2 years while studying the Ghost Dance

May 1891 -- Photographed Kiowa Mescal (Peyote) Ceremony Headed west for a four month collecting trip for the Chicago exposition, commissioned model tipis and summer houses from the Kiowa

1891-1893 -- Observed/participated in three ghost dances during three seasons of fieldwork among Arapaho, Sioux, Kiowa, and Cheyenne communities

1892 -- Photographed Kiowa Mescal (Peyote) Ceremony and Oglala Sioux Ghost Dance

Winter 1892 -- Began intensive field study of Kiowa winter counts and Kiowa heraldry Among the Navajo and Hopi, making collections for Chicago Exposition

Fall 1893 -- Returned to Oklahoma Territory to observe and record Arapaho Sun Dance. Also studied the Hopi Kachina Dance, the Wichita Corn Dance, and possibly also the Arapaho Ghost Dance

May 1895 -- "Siouan Tribes of the East" published

1895 -- Trip to the Southwest, visited Hopi and Navajo communities

1896 -- "The Ghost Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890" published

January 1897 -- At Anadarko

September 28, 1897 -- Married Ione Lee Gaut

Fall 1898 -- Trip to Southwest, visited Hopi and Navajo communities

1898 -- Attended Omaha Fair, helped plan 'Congress of Indians', supervised Frank Rinehart, who photographed many of the Indian delegates to the fair Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians published

Fall 1899 -- For three weeks in the fall traveled with DeLancey Gill to William Co, VA to study and photograph Mattapony and Pamunkey communities; Gill took pictures while Mooney did census work before traveling to the Chickahominy River

1900 -- Myths of the Cherokee published

Spring 1900 -- Studied communities of the Powhatan Confederacy in VA; traveled to VA again with Gill to visit the Pamunkey and Mattapony communities for more pictures and to complete census, then traveled to area south of Portsmouth to find the rural settlement of the Nansemond.

Fall 1901 -- Cooperative agreement with Field Museum and J. Owen Dorsey; Studied Kiowa for BAE, studied Cheyenne for Field Museum (focused on heraldry). This project, with Dorsey working on Arapaho, continued until 1906

1902 -- Fieldwork on heraldry with Kiowa and Apache communities all year except for two brief visits to Washington, D.C. in September and November

July 1903 -- Mooney and Dorsey study Sun Dance on Cheyenne reservation in Oklahoma Territory, brought staff photographer Charles Carpenter. Spent a week attending the Sun Dance and made the first photographs of the skull-dragging ceremony

October 1903 -- Photographed Arapaho Tomahawk Dance

Winter 1903 -- At the Cheyenne-Arapaho agency in Darlington; winter spent with Cheyenne, and finishing Kiowa tipi models for the Bureau's exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition

March 1904 -- At Mount Scott with Kiowa

June 1904 -- St. Louis Exposition opens

April 1906 -- Last visit to Cheyenne

Summers, 1911-1916 -- Visits to Cherokee

1918 -- Assisted with charting the Native American Church of Oklahoma (the Secretary of the Interior issued a ban on his research)

June 28, 1918 -- Requested by Fewkes to study peyote cult and Kiowa Heraldry (see Mooney Papers, Box 1, Letters, statement dated 1921)

December 22, 1921 -- Died
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 74, James Mooney photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.74
See more items in:
James Mooney photographs
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35162d7ce-2ae2-4302-963d-b416aa1eca3b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-74
Online Media:

Upper Marlboro -- Bowieville

Former owner:
Bowie, Robert Gov  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
General:
Bowieville is a historic home built in 1820 located in Upper Marlboro in Prince George County by Mary Wooten Bowie, daughter of Robert Bowie, Governor of Maryland.It is very similar in style to her father's home known as Mattaponi. The house still stands and is listed on the National Historic Registry.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Plantations  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MD024
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Maryland
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb63e47382f-4e39-4f02-8c7e-801be4b0a02f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref14242

William C. Sturtevant papers

Topic:
Handbook of North American Indians
Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Six Nations  Search this
Extent:
220 Linear feet (The total extent of the collection is 191.41 linear feet (consisting of 473 document boxes and 2 record boxes) plus 254 sound recordings, 94 computer disks, 42 card file boxes, 85 oversize folders, 9 rolled items, 18 binder boxes, and 3 oversize boxes. Of the total extent, 4.79 linear feet (14 boxes) are restricted.)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Date:
1952-2007
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and other professional activities. The collection is comprised of books, sound recordings, research and field notes, realia, artifacts, clippings, microfilm, negatives, slides, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, memorandums, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, and bibliographies.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and his involvement in various professional activities. The collection is comprised of research and field notes, sound recordings, realia, clippings, negatives, slides, prints, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, memorandums, conference papers and meeting notes, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, bibliographies, student files such as class notes and papers from Sturtevant's years as an anthropology student, teaching materials including lecture notes and exams, daily planners, passports, military records, artwork including prints and lithographs, maps, and computer files.

The materials in this collection document Sturtevant's career as a preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, university professor, his role as General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, and his contributions to the field of Anthropology. From his early work with the Seminole Indians of Florida to his forays into Burma, and his decades-long study of how Native Americans have been depicted in artistic and popular culture, Sturtevant's diverse intellectual interests are represented in his research files. A copious note taker, Sturtevant captured his observations and opinions of everything from meetings with colleagues to museum exhibits. Sturtevant's commitment to the anthropological profession can be found in the notes and programs of the many conferences, symposiums, and lecture series he attended and at which he presented. He also held numerous leadership positions in various professional associations and sat on the board of directors/trustees for several cultural organizations including Survival International and the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation. Sturtevant was respected for his vast knowledge of indigenous peoples and he received a voluminous amount of correspondence from colleagues who often included copies of their papers and grant proposals. He kept many of these works, which, it appears he used as reference material. Sturtevant's own work is reflected in his writings; he published over 200 scholarly papers, articles, and books.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 14 series: 1. Correspondence, 1951-2008; 2. Research Files, 1851, 1860s, 1880s, 1890, 1939-2006; 3. Writings, 1952-2006; 4. Professional Activities, 1952-2006; 5. Smithsonian, 1954-2008; 6. Handbook of North American Indians, 1971-2007; 7. Biographical Files, 1933-2007; 8. Student Files, 1944-1985; 9. Subject Files, 1902-2002; 10. Photographs, 1927-2004; 11. Artwork, 1699-1998; 12. Maps, 1949-1975; 13. Sound Recordings, 1950-2000; 14. Computer Files, 1987-2006.
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007), preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, and university professor, was best known for his contributions to Seminole ethnology, as curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and for his work as the general editor of the Handbook of North American Indians.

Sturtevant's passion for studying Native peoples began at a young age. In third grade "after a class on American Indians, he asked his father what kind of people study Indians, and his father replied, 'Anthropologists.' Sturtevant decided then that he would make anthropology his career" (Merrill 11). After graduating with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949, Sturtevant went on to Yale University to complete his graduate work in anthropology. When it came time to decide on what area of North America he should focus his research, one of his faculty members at Yale, Irving Rouse, "suggested he consider the Seminoles of south Florida. By the end of his first fieldwork season, Sturtevant was convinced that the dearth of ethnographic information about these Seminoles and their status as one of the least acculturated of all North American Indian societies justified ethnographic research among them and offered the possibility of making an important contribution to North American ethnology" (Merrill 13). Sturtevant spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 conducting preliminary fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole and in 1952 he took up temporary residence at Big Cypress Reservation to undertake research for his dissertation, "The Mikasuki Seminole: Medical Beliefs and Practices." This work focused on Seminole medicine, but also included Sturtevant's analysis of Seminole worldview, religion, history, inter-ethnic relations, material culture, economy, kinship, language, and social organization.

In 1954, while he was finishing his dissertation, Sturtevant made the transition from student of anthropology to professional anthropologist. He was hired as an instructor in Yale's Anthropology Department and began his career in museum work as an assistant curator of anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. After receiving his PhD from Yale in 1955, Sturtevant moved on to the Smithsonian Institution, where he accepted a position as a research anthropologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). This position afforded Sturtevant the chance to continue to explore his many research interests in ways that a full time professorship or museum curatorship could not. Over the next ten years he studied the Catawba in South Carolina; the Seneca and Cayuga nations of the Iroquois League in New York, Oklahoma, and Ontario; continued his work with the Seminole; visited European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture; and spent a year in Burma. In 1963, Sturtevant and his wife, Theda Maw, the daughter of a prominent Burmese family, took their three young children to Burma so that they could visit with Maw's family. Sturtevant took this as an opportunity to branch out from his Native American research and spent the year visiting neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examining archival materials, studying the Burmese language, learning about Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, and taking photographs. He also collected 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian.

When Sturtevant returned from Burma, he found the BAE had been dissolved. In 1965, he was transferred from the now-defunct BAE to the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), where he became curator of North American Ethnology, a position he held for the next forty-two years. During his tenure at NMNH Sturtevant oversaw all the North American ethnology collections, planned exhibitions, served on committees, and sponsored interns and fellows. One of Sturtevant's primary duties at NMNH was serving as the General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, "a major multi-volume reference work summarizing anthropological, linguistic, and historical knowledge about native peoples north of Mexico" (Jackson). Each volume was designed to represent a geographic or topical area of Americanist study. As General Editor, Sturtevant selected volume editors, chapter authors, oversaw office staff, and proofread manuscripts over the course of production.

Besides focusing on the Handbook, much of Sturtevant's time was taken up by responsibilities he held outside the Institution. Sturtevant was extremely involved in professional anthropological associations and held many leadership positions. Fresh out of graduate school, he began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1957. He later became a member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society, served as book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist from 1962-1968, was a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums and was both vice president and president of the committee once it became the Council for Museum Anthropology, was on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives, served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation from 1976-1982 and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986, and sat on the Board of Directors of Survival International from 1982-1988. He was President of the American Society for Ethnohistory, the American Ethnological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropological Society of Washington. Sturtevant also taught classes at Johns Hopkins University as an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology, served as a consultant on exhibits at other museums, and reviewed manuscripts for scholarly publications.

Sturtevant remained active in the profession throughout his later years. After divorcing Theda Maw in 1986, he married Sally McLendon, a fellow anthropologist, in 1990 and they undertook several research projects together. Sturtevant was recognized for his dedication and contributions to the field of anthropology in 1996 when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Brown University, and in 2002 when his colleagues published a festschrift in his honor, Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant.

Sturtevant died on March 2, 2007 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, MD after suffering from emphysema.

Sources Consulted

Estrada, Louie. 2007. William C. Sturtevant; Expert on Indians. Washington Post, March 17. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/16/AR2007031602273.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Jackson, Jason Baird. 2007. William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007). http://museumanthropology.blogspot.com/2007/03/william-c-sturtevant-1926-2007.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Merrill, William L. 2002. William Curtis Sturtevant, Anthropologist. In Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant. William L. Merrill and Ives Goddard, eds. Pp. 11-36. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1926 -- Born July 26 in Morristown, NJ

1944 -- Entered the University of California at Berkeley as a second-semester freshman

1944 -- Attended summer school at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City where he took courses on Mexican archaeology and South American ethnology

1945 -- Drafted into the United States Navy

1946 -- Received an honorable discharge from the Navy with the rank of pharmacist's mate third class and returned to UC Berkeley

1947 -- Attended the University of New Mexico's summer field school in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

1949 -- January: Received his Bachelor's degree with honors in anthropology from UC Berkeley

1949 -- Began graduate studies at Yale University

1950-1951 -- Spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 in Florida conducting fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole

1951 -- Conducted his first research study of the Iroquois, a classification of Seneca musical instruments, their construction and use, with Harold Conklin

1952 -- May: Moved to Big Cypress Reservation in Florida to conduct research for his dissertation. He focused on Seminole medicine, but also collected physical anthropological data such as blood-type frequencies, handedness, and color blindness

1952 -- July 26: Married Theda Maw

1954 -- Hired by Yale University as an instructor in the Department of Anthropology and as an assistant curator of anthropology in the Yale Peabody Museum

1955 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1956 -- Joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) as a research anthropologist

1957 -- Began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1957 -- Traveled to Rock Hill, South Carolina to collect linguistic data from Sam Blue, the last member of the Catawba tribe to have maintained some proficiency in the Catawba language. While there, he made a small collection of Catawba pottery for the United States National Museum

1957-1958 -- Spent seven weeks continuing his research among the New York Seneca

1959 -- Returned to Florida to study Seminole ethnobotany. He also collected ethnographic materials, especially objects made for the tourist market, which he deposited in the United States National Museum

1959-1960 -- Member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society

1960 -- July and August: Visited 17 European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture

1961-1962 -- Spent the summers of these years conducting ethnographic fieldwork among the Seneca-Cayuga in Oklahoma

1962 -- October: Visited the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada to conduct fieldwork among the Seneca and Cayuga there

1962-1968 -- Book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist

1963 -- October: Spent the year in Burma; visited neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examined photographs in several archives, studied the Burmese language, and read extensively about the country's history and culture. Assembled notes on Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, took hundreds of photographs, and made a collection of 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian

1964 -- Visited Inle Lake in the Southern Shan States southeast of Mandalay, where he examined local approaches to artificial island agriculture

1964-1981 -- Became a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums, which became the Council for Museum Anthropology in 1974. Sturtevant was the Council's first vice president, serving two terms between 1974 and 1978, and was its president from 1978 to 1981

1965 -- Became curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History after the dissolution of the BAE

1965-1966 -- President of the American Society for Ethnohistory

1966 -- Named the editor of the Handbook of North American Indians

1967-1968 -- Fulbright scholar and lecturer at Oxford University's Institute of Social Anthropology

1969 -- Began serving on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives

1974-1989 -- Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

1976-1982 -- Served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986

1977 -- President of the American Ethnological Society

1980-1981 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1981 -- Spent part of the spring semester at the University of California Berkeley as a Regents Lecturer

1982-1988 -- Board of Directors of Survival International

1986 -- Divorced Theda Maw

1986-1987 -- Smithsonian Fellow at Oxford University's Worcester College

1990 -- Married Sally McLendon

1992 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1996 -- Awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters at Brown University

2007 -- Died March 2 in Rockville, MD
Related Materials:
Other materials relating to William C. Sturtevant at the National Anthropological Archives are included in the following collections:

Manuscript 4504

Manuscript 4595

Manuscript 4806

Manuscript 4821

Manuscript 4972

Manuscript 7045

Photo Lot 59

Photo Lot 79-51

Photo Lot 80-3

Photo Lot 81R

Photo Lot 86-68 (6)

Photo Lot 86-68 (7)

American Society for Ethnohistory records

Committee on Anthropological Research in Museum Records

Handbook of North American Indians records

Records of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History

Gordon Davis Gibson Papers, Sound Recordings

SPC Se Powhatan Confederacy Mattapony BAE No # 01790700

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913800

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913900

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04914000

Negative MNH 1530

Negative MNH 1530 B

Sturtevant is listed as a correspondent in the following NAA collections:

Administrative file, 1949-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

John Lawrence Angel Papers

James Henri Howard Papers

Donald Jayne Lehmer Papers

John Victor Murra Papers

Records of the Society for American Archaeology

Albert Clanton Spaulding Papers

Waldo Rudolph Wedel and Mildred Mott Wedel Papers

Copies of sound recordings made by William C. Sturtevant can be found at The California Language Archive at UC Berkeley in two collections, The William Sturtevant collection of Creek/Seminole sound recordings, which includes 31 minutes of Northern Muskogean linguistic field recordings from 1951, and The William Sturtevant collection of Mikasuki sound recordings, which includes 33 minutes of Mikasuki linguistic field recordings from 1951. Two sound tape reels of Seminole music Sturtevant recorded in Florida in 1951 can be found at Wesleyan University's World Music Archives. Folk songs on these recordings include "Scalping Sickness," "Bear Sickness with blowing," "Bear sickness without blowing," "Lullaby," "Feather Dance," "Snake Dance," and "Crazy Dance." Performers include Josie Billie, Lee Cypress, Harvey Jumper, Boy Jim, Charlie (Johnny?) Cypress, Little Tiger Tail, Billy Ossiola, and Charlie Billy Boy.
Separated Materials:
One video tape, "Seminole History and Tradition", was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Series 2.2, Tukabahchee Plate: Glass negative of spectrogram from FBI (Box 135), removed for storage with other glass plate negatives.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History.
Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
History  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-24
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b2223e72-e872-41c5-ae7b-abd0b27eaf6a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-24
Online Media:

Mark Raymond Harrington photograph collection

Creator:
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Donor:
Harrington, Marie Walsh  Search this
Extent:
2133 Negatives (photographic)
3 Lantern slides
174 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Mesoamerica  Search this
Southwest  Search this
Island Caribbean  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Alibamu  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Catawba  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Coushatta (Koasati)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Miami  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Niantic  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Bribri  Search this
Chiricahua Apache  Search this
Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Kickapoo [Oklahoma]  Search this
Kikapu (Mexican Kickapoo)  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Mississippi Choctaw  Search this
Oklahoma Delaware  Search this
Oklahoma Shawnee  Search this
Oneida  Search this
Onondaga  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Shinnecock  Search this
Sisitonwan Dakota (Sisseton Sioux)  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Yara Taíno  Search this
Absentee Shawnee [Shawnee, Oklahoma-Pottawatomie County]  Search this
Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Mississauga (Missisauga)  Search this
Munsee Delaware  Search this
Wyandotte [Oklahoma]  Search this
Gay Head Wampanoag  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
Cuba
Texas
Arkansas
Louisiana
Northeastern States
Missouri
California
New Mexico
Tennessee
New York
Florida
Southern States
Nevada
Mexico
Great Basin
Southwestern States
Arizona
Canada
Ecuador
Date:
1899-1947
Summary:
Includes photographs of individual tribal members, artifacts; and the following archeological sites: Hawikku (Hawikuh), Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico; Mill Creek, Tehama County, California; Coachilla Valley, California; Sandal Cave, New Mexico; Eagle Canyon, Texas; Thea Heye Cave, Pyramid Lake, Nevada; Crown Peak, Chisos Mountains, Texas; Pueblo Grande, Nevada; Salt Caves, St. Thomas, Nevada; Chuckawalla Cave, Nevada; Lovelock Cave, Pershing County, Nevada; other sites in Nevada; cacti in Brewster County, Texas and California; archaeological sites in Arkansas, Florida, Missouri, New York, and Tennessee Collection also includes a variety of scenic shots in different states; shots of persons, identified and unidentified; personal photographs of Harrington, his son, and one of his wives (ELH); and photographs taken during his expeditions to Cuba and Ecuador. Includes photographs of the Alibamu, Apache, Catawba, Cherokee, Chitimacha, Choctaw, Chumash, Comanche, Delaware, Iowa, Iroquois, Kaw, Kickapoo, Kiowa, Klamath, Koasati, Maidu, Mattaponi, Mohegan, Nanticoke, Narragansett, Navajo, Niantic (Nyantic),Ojibwa (Chippewa), Osage, Paiute, Pamunkey, Peoria, Pit River, Potawatomi, Quapaw, Sac and Fox (Sauk and Fox), Seminole, Shawnee, Tolowa, Tulare, Wampanoag, Wichita, Wyandot, Yara, and Zuni tribes.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by format and item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Mark Raymond Harrington was born on the campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor on July 6, 1882. He received his BS in 1907 and his MA in 1908 from Columbia University, where he studied under Franz Boas. He met George Heye while working at Covert's Indian store in New York in 1908 and Heye hired him shortly thereafter. Harrington spent from 1908-1911 visiting and collecting from tribes in the east and Midwest for Heye. From 1911-1915 Harrington was assistant curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. From 1916-1917 he conducted archeological surveys in Cuba and Arkansas, after which he spent a short time in the U.S. Army during the First World War. After his return in 1919 he started a series of archeological surveys in Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Nevada, and Texas. Harrington worked for George G. Heye as an archaeologist, ethnologist, field collector, and curator, primarily along the eastern seaboard, in the south, Midwest, west, Cuba and Ecuador, from 1908 to 1928. He then joined the staff of the Southwest Museum as curator until his retirement in 1964. He died in San Fernando, California on June 30, 1971. Harrington is the author of many books and several hundred articles. A partial bibliography can be found in the Mark Raymond Harrington manuscript collection in the archives of the National Museum of the American Indian, Cultural Resource Center, Suitland, Maryland.
General note:
NMAItest
Restrictions:
Access restricted. For information on this collection consult the NMAI photo archivist at 301-238-1400 or NMAIphotos@si.edu.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.035
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4acadc0fb-6afe-4e43-9413-0684acc3dda5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-035

Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection

Creator:
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Former owner:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
1428 Negatives (photographic)
40 Photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Mushuaunnuat (Barren Ground Naskapi)  Search this
Mistassini Cree  Search this
Lorette Huron  Search this
Mohawk  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg (Maniwaki Algonquin) [River Desert]  Search this
Maliseet (Malecite)  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Iroquois [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Penobscot  Search this
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Nauset  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Niantic  Search this
Pequot  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Rappahannock  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Nansemond  Search this
Catawba  Search this
Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Machapunga (Pungo River)  Search this
Innu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
Massachusetts
Maine
Maryland
Virginia
Canada
Delaware
North Carolina
Date:
1909-1937
Summary:
The Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection includes portraits of individuals and families, as well as scenic shots and landscape views made between 1909 and 1937. Speck was an anthropologist and ethnographer, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and worked on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation collecting ethnographic materials across the Eastern United States and Canada. His collection of photographs includes materials from native communities ranging from Newfoundland to Ontario in Canada and from Maine to South Carolina in the United States.
Scope and Contents:
The Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection includes negatives and a small amount of prints made by Speck throughout the course of his career as an anthropologist and ethnographer. The majority of the photographs in this collection were made while Speck conducted field trips on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation between 1924 and 1932, though there are photographs from before and after this time. This collection has been arranged into Series by geographical location and then into subseries by culture group or community. Series 1: Newfoundland and Labrador: Innu, Mushuaunnuat, 1916-1935; Series 2: Quebec: Innu, Mistassini Cree, Lorette Huron, Wawenock, Mohawk, Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, 1910-1937; Series 3: New Brunswick and Nova Scotia: Maliseet, Mi'kmaq, 1909-1917; Series 4: Ontario: Six Nations/Grand River (Naticoke, Mohawk, Cayuga, Mahican, Tutelo), Oneida Nation, 1914-1937; Series 5: Maine and New Hampshire: Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, 1910-1924; Series 6: Massachussets and Rhode Island: Wampanoag, Nauset, 1914-1931; Series 7: Connecticut: Mohegan, Niantic, Schaghticoke, Pequot, 1912-1931; Series 8: Delaware: Nanticoke and Rappahanock, 1911-1925; Series 9: Virginia and Maryland: Rappahanock, Chickahominy, Pamunkey, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Potomac, Accomac, Powhatan, 1915-1924; Series 10: North Carolina and South Carolina: Catawba, Eastern Band of Cherokee, 1915-1930.

Many of Frank Speck's photographs are individual and family portraits of community members, many identified, posed outdoors in front of homes and community buildings. There are also landscape views as well as photographs taken during community events. There are a small amount of photographs that have now been restricted due to cultural sensitivity though for the most part Speck did not photograph culturally sensitive activities.
Arrangement:
The collection is intellectually arranged in 10 Series by geographic region and within each series by culture group. The negatives are physically arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Frank Gouldsmith Speck was born on November 8, 1881 in Brooklyn, New York. He studied under the prominent linguist John Dyneley Prince and anthropologist Franz Boas at Columbia University, receiving his BA in 1904 and MA in 1905. He received his Ph.D. in 1908 from the University of Pennsylvania. His doctoral dissertation on the ethnography of the Yuchi became a basis for an article which later appeared in the Handbook of American Indians. That same year Speck became an assistant in the University of Pennsylvania Museum and an instructor in anthropology at the University. He was made assistant professor in 1911, and professor and chairperson of the department in 1925, a position which he held until his death in 1950. Speck was the founder of the Philadelphia Anthropological Society, and was vice-president of the American Anthropological Association from 1945-46. Speck's research concentration was on the Algonkian speaking peoples. Speck studied every aspect of a culture: language, ethnobiology, technology, decorative art, myths, religion, ceremonialism, social organization, and music. Collecting material culture was also an integral part of Speck's fieldwork. His collections can be found in museums around the world, one of which is the National Museum of the American Indian. He is the author of numerous books and articles. Frank G. Speck died February 6, 1950. (A. Irving Hallowell, American Anthropologist, Vol. 53, No. 1, 1951)
Related Materials:
The Frank G. Speck Papers can be found at the American Philosophical Society (Mss.Ms.Coll.126) along with additional photographic materials by Speck.
Frank Speck published extensively in the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation publications; "Indian Notes" and "Indian Notes and Monographs." These publications are avialable through the Smithsonian Institution Libraries or online on the Internet Archive.
Separated Materials:
A small amount of notes from Speck's field work can be found in the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records (NMAI.AC.001) in Box 273, Folder 18 through Box 274 Folder 2.

Close to 4000 ethnographic and archeological items were collected by Speck for the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (MAI) and are now in the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) collection. For more information about these objects contact the NMAI Collections Department.
Provenance:
The majority of the negatives were gifted to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation (MAI) by Frank Speck in 1927. The group of Nanticoke photographs were purchased by the MAI in 1915 and smaller amounts of photographs were gifted and purchased by the MAI between 1923 and 1942.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Maine  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Maryland  Search this
Indians of North America -- Massachusetts  Search this
Indians of North America -- Canada  Search this
Indians of North America -- Delaware  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Virginia  Search this
Indians of North America -- North Carolina  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Frank Speck photograph collection, Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.032
See more items in:
Frank Gouldsmith Speck photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a7ad21af-6cc2-49e2-a636-bcf01e1c4dc6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-032
Online Media:

MS 2197 Pamunkey notebook

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Creator:
Cook, Lavinia  Search this
C., R., Mrs  Search this
Smith, John, 1580-1631  Search this
Strachey, Thomas  Search this
Dalrymple, William  Search this
Extent:
38 Pages
Culture:
Pamunkey  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Maps
Newsclippings
Date:
post 1893
Scope and Contents:
Includes occasional brief references to the Mattaponi and Chickahominy. Contents: Indian medicines by Lavinia Cook, 3 pages; names of Chiefs, from "Mrs R. C.," 1 page; the country and animals hunted, 1 page; tenure of lands, 1 page; population, 1 page; government, 1 page; "sustentation," 1 page; local names in King William Co., Virginia, 3 pages, note about Roxy (Roxanna) Indians near Norfolk, Virginia: "Meherrins?," 1 page; note on Cumberland town, English settlement on Pamunkey river, and "Cumberland Indians" visited by Gatschet, November 16, 1890, 3 pages; vocabulary notes from John Smith, Thomas Strachey, and the Reverend William Dalrymple, 3 pages; historical notes extracted in Virginia State Library, 2 pages; sketch map of King William County, Virginia, 1 page; sketch map of same area, after John Smith, 1608, 1 page.
Newspaper clippings, as follows: "Tribe of Pamunkey," The Daily Times, Richmond, Virginia, October 26, 1890 and November 2, 1890, 6 pages; a notice of the Pamunkey Indians on a reservation near Richmond, Virginia having sent a delegation to the World's Fair to invite other Indians to come and settle on their reservation, Indian Journal of Muskogee, Eufaula, Indian Territory, August 3, 1893, 1 page; "Pamunkeys Want a Sea Trip," Times, Washington, D.C., July 6, 1899, 1 page; "Powhatan's Men Yet Live," Washington [D.C.] Evening Star, Washington, D.C., April 25, 1894, 2 pages; "Pamunkey Indians and Their Little Reservation," Washington Chronicle, Washington, D.C., December 14, 1890, 2 pages. Reference added to file, 1956: The Historical Magazine, 1853, Volume 2, Number 6, page 182, containing Pamunkey vocabulary by Reverend Dalrymple (transcribed by Gatschet in his notebook). Photostat, 1 page.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2197
Local Note:
printed document
Other Title:
Tribe of Pamunkey
Pamunkeys Want a Sea Trip
Powhatan's Men Yet Live
Pamunkey Indians and Their Little Reservation
Topic:
Medicine -- Pamunkey  Search this
Names, Personal -- Pamunkey  Search this
Names, place -- King William County, Virginia -- Pamunkey  Search this
Hunting -- Pamunkey  Search this
Land tenure -- Pamunkey  Search this
population -- Pamunkey  Search this
Government -- Pamunkey  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
King William County (Virginia) -- Place names  Search this
Cumberland Town (Virginia)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 2197, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2197
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31468d656-ca73-4349-aa19-80a1d8542340
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2197

[A young Mattapony girl. Mixed blood.]

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative
Culture:
Mattaponi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Photographs
Date:
1900
1900
Biographical / Historical:
Home: Small State Res., Mattapony River, King William County, VA
Local Numbers:
BAE GN.849 B
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
See more items in:
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives / Additional Materials / Mooney, James
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3aba478bc-4c4e-42a0-b00b-31d2fd17cb25
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-176-ref13940

[Profile of Mattapony man. Mixed blood.]

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative
Culture:
Mattaponi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Photographs
Date:
1900
1900
Biographical / Historical:
Home: Small State Res., Mattapony River, King William County, VA
Local Numbers:
BAE GN.850
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
See more items in:
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives / Additional Materials / Mooney, James
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37c79a65e-5d82-4d35-b7cb-f4af7cbe293b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-176-ref13941

Helen C. Rountree papers

Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Names:
Upper Mattaponi Indian Tribe  Search this
Extent:
27 Sound recordings (1/4" reels and cassettes)
2.4 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Culture:
Pamunkey  Search this
Nansemond  Search this
Upper Mattaponi  Search this
Mattaponi  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Rappahannock  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Interviews
Field notes
Place:
Virginia
Date:
1969-1990
Summary:
Helen C. Rountree is emeritus professor of anthropology at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. She studied the history of the Virginia Tribes from the 17th century to the 21st century and is considered a leading expert on Pocahontas. The Helen C. Rountree papers include field notes, correspondence, and sound recordings relating to her field work among the Pamunkey, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Rappahannock, Chickahominy, Monacan, as well as the area around Nottoway Reservation and Gingaskin Reservation.
Scope and Contents:
The Helen C Rountree papers contain correspondence, field notes, and sound recordings relating to her field work primarily among Virginian tribes including the Pamunkey, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Rappahannock, Chickahominy, Monacan, as well as the area around Nottoway Reservation and Gingaskin Reservation. Correspondents include Robert Y. Barham, Christian F. Feest, Samuel Proctor, C.G. Holland, Frank Porter, Marshall Becker, and Nancy Oestreich Lurie.

The sound recordings relate to Rountree's fieldwork and contain recordings of the Chickahominy Fall Festivals, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1978, 1981-1986 and a Chickahominy tribal meeting 1987; Nansemond Tribe Spring Festival, 1984, and Homecoming, 1988. Also included are recordings among the Pamumkey; Mattaponi; Shoshoni; Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; meetings; public events, and some lectures by Helen Rountree and others. There is one unidentified sound cassette.
Arrangement:
The collection contains: Correspondence, 1969-1985; Field notes, 1969-1988; Cook Books, 1981, 1983; Audio Ephemera, undated; Sound Recordings, 1969-1990.
Biographical note:
Helen C. Rountree earned an A.B. in Sociology & Anthropology from the College of William and Mary, an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Utah, and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She joined the faculty of Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia as an Instructor in 1968 and retired as a full Professor in 1999. Dr. Rountree worked initially with the Shoshone in Nevada, then began research on the Algonquian-speaking Native Americans of eastern Virginia, becoming an honorary member of the Nansemond and Upper Mattaponi tribes in Virginia. She is acknowledged as a leading researcher and writer on Virginia Indians from the 17th century to the present and is considered an expert on Pocahontas.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Helen C. Rountree in 2005.
Restrictions:
Materials related to interview notes are restricted until June 2025.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Folk songs, Shoshoni  Search this
Indians of North America -- Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Interviews
Field notes
Citation:
Helen C. Rountree papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2005-22
See more items in:
Helen C. Rountree papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw305310d7f-0cdd-4bf1-857a-704e10c40a51
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2005-22

Mattaponi (Mattapony)

Collection Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Container:
Box 20, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Photo Lot 74, James Mooney photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
James Mooney photographs
James Mooney photographs / Powhatan
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30f22f04f-8eb0-4c43-8e14-c3ab6d3b8681
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-74-ref927

Water Ways Fieldwork: Interview with Ivy Bradley, Isabelle Bradby Brown (Pamunkey), Shirley "Little Dove" Custalow McGowan (Mattaponi) by Harold Anderson (Reedville and Northern Neck of Virginia)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2002 September 28-2002 October 12
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2004, Item FP-2004-CT-0399
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 5: Water Ways: Mid-Atlantic Maritime Communities / 5.1: Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5323c188d-397f-4eff-9202-b98956ca369c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2004-ref946

Upper Mattaponi Tribe at King William Board of Supervisors

Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (Duration: 90 minutes)
Container:
Item 22
Culture:
Mattaponi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Meetings
Place:
King William County (Virginia) -- Place names
Date:
1986 December 17
Collection Restrictions:
Materials related to interview notes are restricted until June 2025.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mattaponi -- Meetings  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
King William County Board of Supervisors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Meetings
Collection Citation:
Helen C. Rountree papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Helen C. Rountree papers
Helen C. Rountree papers / Series 4: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3274b3fc7-e1a2-4762-9fe6-72ba8c68c662
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2005-22-ref32

Mattaponi Reservation Speech and Interview with Curtis Custalow

Interviewee:
Custalow, Curtis  Search this
Speaker:
Custalow, Curtis  Search this
Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (Duration: 90 minutes)
Container:
Item 26
Culture:
Mattaponi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Interviews
Speeches
Date:
1983 April 16
Collection Restrictions:
Materials related to interview notes are restricted until June 2025.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Speeches
Collection Citation:
Helen C. Rountree papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Helen C. Rountree papers
Helen C. Rountree papers / Series 4: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e6105673-93cb-4bb8-b2bc-73ab89354239
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2005-22-ref35
Online Media:

Helen C. Rountree Lecture to Anthropological Society of Washington

Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (Duration: 120 minutes)
Container:
Item 12
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Speeches
Date:
1988 October 18-19
Collection Restrictions:
Materials related to interview notes are restricted until June 2025.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Anthropological Society of Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Speeches
Collection Citation:
Helen C. Rountree papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Helen C. Rountree papers
Helen C. Rountree papers / Series 4: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f04abda5-2e8d-43ca-8814-4f61956e7ad0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2005-22-ref37
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Online Media:

Upper Mattaponi Officer Installation

Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette
Container:
Item 23
Culture:
Mattaponi  Search this
Upper Mattaponi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Ritual (events)
Date:
1983 December 17
Collection Restrictions:
Materials related to interview notes are restricted until June 2025.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ritual (events)
Collection Citation:
Helen C. Rountree papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Helen C. Rountree papers
Helen C. Rountree papers / Series 4: Sound Recordings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c4f509b7-26a6-4f18-967b-9d0bddee8af7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2005-22-ref49

Sound Recordings

Collection Creator:
Rountree, Helen C., 1944-  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents:
Series 4 consists of audio tapes related to Rountree's fieldwork and contain recordings of the Chickahominy Fall Festivals, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1978, 1981-1986 and a Chickahominy tribal meeting 1987. Recordings of the Nansemond Tribe Spring Festival, 1984 , and Homecoming, 1988, are included. Other tribes with recordings in this series are: the Pamunkey, Upper Mattaponi, Mattaponi. Also included are audio tapes recorded among the Western Shoshone, Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada. Recordings of meetings public events, and some lectures by Helen Rountree and others are included. There is one uncataloged, unidentified sound cassette.

The titles of the tapes [and content descriptions] have been transcribed from information on the tape boxes. The content of recordings has not been verified.

Names of the performers and co-creators are listed in the scope and contents notes for each sound recording and in the SIRIS item level records.
Collection Restrictions:
Materials related to interview notes are restricted until June 2025.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Helen C. Rountree papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2005-22, Series 4
See more items in:
Helen C. Rountree papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34f135b79-1a52-440b-9ac4-78c7348915fb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2005-22-ref59

Reports

Collection Creator:
Knabenshue, A. Roy (Augustus Roy), 1876-1960  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
A. Roy Knabenshue Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0136, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
A. Roy Knabenshue Collection
A. Roy Knabenshue Collection / Series 5: Subject files
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2b83d0fa5-caf0-4137-92c9-265c19ae2a7a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0136-ref159
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  • View Reports digital asset number 1

Branchiobdellidae

Collector:
D. Peters  Search this
River Basin:
Mattaponi River  Search this
Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Place:
Plymouth Creek, 0.2 Mile W Of Little Plymouth On State Route 14n, 7.5 Mile W Of junction With Route 33n, King And Queen County, Virginia, United States
Collection Date:
1 Jul 1972
USNM Number:
1636532
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3f91d81c0-3895-40aa-8880-53176f32a8fe
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_16039390

Branchiobdellidae

Collector:
D. Peters  Search this
River Basin:
Mattaponi River  Search this
Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Place:
Glebe Swamp, 0.1 mile E Of junction Of US 14 And County Route 678 On 678, 0.8 Mile From junction Of 608 And 678, King And Queen County, Virginia, United States
Collection Date:
24 Jun 1972
USNM Number:
1636542
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/32042ffaa-958f-49fe-b5d9-cd56cbe7cce3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_16039400

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