Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
1,344 documents - page 1 of 68

Session 1 Global and National Contexts of Indian Bondage

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-10-25T16:16:41.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_8okAIJxirAk

Preamble to the Republic: Condolence, Wampum, and the Language of Peace

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2010-11-23T15:30:40.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_eAlRwi9mnwA

Wood Modified

Donor Name:
No Information  Search this
Object Type:
Wood Modified
Place:
Unga Island, Port Moller Quad / Aleutian Islands / Shumagin Islands, Alaska, United States, North America
Accession Date:
1991
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Accession Number:
999999
USNM Number:
AT6385-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3bc4fc501-8351-4420-af30-afe8a8351fff
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8326517

Material culture in America understanding everyday life Helen Sheumaker and Shirley Teresa Wajda, editors

Author:
Sheumaker, Helen  Search this
Wajda, Shirley Teresa  Search this
Physical description:
xviii, 569 pages illustrations 26 cm
Type:
Encyclopedias
Encyclopédies
Uppslagsverk
Wörterbuch
encyclopedias
History
W̲rterbuch
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Estados unidos
Förenta staterna
USA
Date:
2008
Topic:
Material culture--History  Search this
Culture matérielle--Histoire  Search this
Material culture  Search this
Sachkultur  Search this
Massenkultur  Search this
Alltag  Search this
Cultura material (história)  Search this
Enciclopédias  Search this
Materiell kultur  Search this
Materiell kultur--historia  Search this
Vardagsliv--historia  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_823166

New dresses, new traditions: Jill Biden’s inaugural ensembles go on view

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 24 Jan 2023 16:59:20 +0000
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more posts:
Blog Feed
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_b1003f2145cde762e90d5fcd914f3e29

Patterns of Health and Wellbeing 02: Opening Remarks and Keynote

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-04-29T19:28:45.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1u2yy5UJfPQ

Slavery and the making of early American libraries : British literature, political thought, and the transatlantic book trade, 1731-1814 / Sean D. Moore

Author:
Moore, Sean D.  Search this
Physical description:
xxvi, 256 pages : illustrations, portraits, facsimiles ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
America
United States
Date:
2019
Topic:
Book industries and trade--History  Search this
Slave trade--History  Search this
Public libraries--Finance--History  Search this
Slavery--Economic aspects--History  Search this
English literature--Social aspects  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1113220

Evoking a sense of place : Long Island Studies / edited by Joann P. Krieg ; with an introduction by Natalie A. Naylor

Author:
Krieg, Joann P  Search this
Long Island Studies Conference (1986 : Hofstra University)  Search this
Physical description:
186 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
New York (State)
Long Island
Long Island (N.Y.)
Date:
1988
Topic:
Material culture  Search this
Transportation--History  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Commerce  Search this
Call number:
F127.L8E95 1988X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_445624

Model, Lunar Module, CBS News

Title:
Model, Lunar Module, CBS News
Materials:
Plastic, Paint, Aluminum Alloy, Copper Alloy, Iron Alloy, Decal Paper and Adhesive
Dimensions:
Model: 7.5 × 8 × 7.5 in., 1/2lb. (19.1cm × 20.3cm × 19.1cm, 0.2kg)
Other (weight with stand): 1lb. (0.5kg)
Type:
MODELS-Crewed Spacecraft & Parts
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Gift of Walter Lister, Producer, CBS News
Inventory Number:
A20090208000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Destination Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv94a50e954-9d0d-4d7a-a219-9dff9cd3f062
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20090208000
Online Media:

Material culture of the people of southeastern Panama, based on specimens in the United States National Museum

Author:
Krieger, Herbert W.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1926
Citation:
Krieger, Herbert W. 1926. "Material culture of the people of southeastern Panama, based on specimens in the United States National Museum." Bulletin of the United States National Museum, (134) i–v, 1-141, 1 fig, 37 pls. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.03629236.134.1.
Identifier:
82780
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.5479/si.03629236.134.1
ISSN:
0362-9236
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_82780

Jane and Michael Stern Collection

Creator:
Stern, Michael, 1946-  Search this
Stern, Jane  Search this
Extent:
17 Cubic feet (41 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ephemera
Trade literature
Articles
Notes
Menus
Cookbooks
Brochures
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Writings
Business records
Postcards
Date:
1890-2008
Summary:
Collection documents Jane and Michael Stern's travels across the United States collecting data for their books on American material culture subjects, with particular emphasis on food and dining.
Scope and Contents:
Collection primarily consists of the raw materials amassed by Jane and Michael Stern as they traveled the United States, researching for their books on American material culture subjects, with particular emphasis on food and dining. These materials include writings and notes from their various stops while traveling; photographs and slides of places they visited; vintage postcards collected in their travels; paper ephemera such as take-out menus, placemats, etc.; large quantities of trade literature such as product cookbooks (some dating back to the 1920s), food packaging and brochures on food related subjects, under headings such as "Meat, Fish, Game", "Parties, Etiquette, How-To", "Baking" and numerous others; trade literature on other material culture subjects the Sterns wrote books about with headings which include Rodeo, Cowboys, Indians" and many others; correspondence; business records, articles, and clippings. The collection is arranged into five series: Series 1, Research Documentation and Writings, 1975-2015, undated; Series 2, Product Cookbooks, and Trade Literature, 1890-1993, undated; Series 3, Photographic Materials, 1947-2008, undated; Series 4, Subject Files, 1910-1995; and Series 5, Vintage Postcards, undated.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into five series:

Series 1, Research Documentation and Writings, 1975-2015, undated

Series 2, Product Cookbooks, and Trade Literature, 1890-1993, undated

Series 3, Photographic Materials, 1947-2008, undated

Subseries 3.1, Photographs, 1947-2002, undated

Subseries 3.2, Slides and Transparencies, 1965-2008, undated

Series 4, Subject Files, 1910-1995

Series 5, Vintage Postcards, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Jane Grossman Stern (1946-) and Michael Stern (1946-) are American writers best known for their popular series of books titled Roadfood. These publications provided recommendations of restaurants, truck stops, diners, delis, bakeries, and other food-related establishments in the United States who served classic American regional specialties. The Sterns are also authors of books about American material culture subjects including truckers, cowboys, kitsch, and dog shows. They have been guests on public radio, contributors to magazine columns, and have won numerous awards for their work.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Jane and Michael Stern, 2016.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Automobile travel -- United States  Search this
Diners -- United States  Search this
Bakeries -- United States  Search this
Restaurants -- United States  Search this
Truck stops -- United States  Search this
Cowboys -- United States  Search this
Roads -- United States  Search this
Delicatessens -- United States  Search this
Dining  Search this
Dog shows -- United States  Search this
Truck drivers -- United States  Search this
Rodeos -- United States  Search this
Food -- United States  Search this
Local foods -- United States  Search this
Kitsch -- United States  Search this
Material culture -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ephemera -- 20th century
Ephemera -- 21st century
Trade literature
Articles -- 21st century
Notes -- 20th century
Menus -- 20th century
Cookbooks -- 21st century
Brochures -- 20th century
Correspondence -- 21st century
Brochures -- 21st century
Cookbooks -- 20th century
Slides (photographs) -- 20th century
Writings
Business records -- 20th century
Articles -- 20th century
Postcards -- 20th century -- United States
Correspondence -- 20th century
Menus -- 21st century
Citation:
Jane and Michael Stern Collection, circa 1920-2015, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1392
See more items in:
Jane and Michael Stern Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep89b79d74d-7499-469b-8dad-ee18dd9a59e3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1392
Online Media:

Richard Lodish Collection of American Education Ephemera

Collector:
Lodish, Richard  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Instructional materials
School records
Account books
Ephemera
Diplomas
Business records
Report cards
Certificates
Lesson books
Prints
Lectures
Reports
Receipts
Scrapbooks
Examinations (documents)
Workbooks
Date:
circa 1825-1908
Scope and Contents:
Ephemeral archival materials from American schools, primarily from the northeastern United States, and primarily in the 19th century. Types of materials include instruction books and kits; students' work books and notebooks; flash cards; lesson books, some on religious subjects; religious tracts; printed lectures; students' report cards; school registers; attendance records; printed examinations; homework assignments; teachers' reports; scrapbooks; certificates of award; penmanship samples; diplomas; programs from school events; prints of school scenes; account books; receipts; school reports; and business documents of school boards.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Lodish, an avid collector of the material culture of education, was principal of Sidwell Friends Lower School in Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Richard Lodish, 2014 and 2015.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Public schools -- 19th century  Search this
Schools -- Accounting  Search this
Teachers -- 19th century  Search this
Penmanship  Search this
Students -- 19th century  Search this
Education -- finance  Search this
Education -- Costs  Search this
Schools -- 19th century -- United States  Search this
Education  Search this
Genre/Form:
Instructional materials -- 19th century
School records -- 19th century
Account books -- 19th century
Ephemera
Diplomas -- 19th century
Business records -- 19th century
Report cards -- 19th century
Certificates -- 19th century
Lesson books -- 19th century
Prints -- 19th century
Lectures -- 19th century
Reports -- 19th century
Receipts -- 19th century
Scrapbooks -- 19th century
Examinations (documents) -- 19th century
Workbooks -- 19th century
Citation:
Richard Lodish Collection of American Education Ephemera, ca. 1825-1908, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1421
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86bf293fc-952d-4800-a0ad-92731a7297a5
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1421

Down Through the Years: Docent Training

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1996
Scope and Contents:
During docent training for the exhibition 'Down Through the Years: Stories from the Anacostia Museum's Collection,' docents learned about the major sections of the exhibition as well as specific objects in the museum's collection and context for those objects. Material culture, why people and society needs things, the meaning of treasure seen in everyday objects, and the importance and value of the museum's collection were discussed. Portia James led part of the training session.
Training. Audio only. Related to exhibition 'Down Through the Years: Stories from the Anacostia Museum's Collection.' AV001103: dated 19980427. AV001097: dated 19960427.
Biographical / Historical:
'Down Through the Years: Stories from the Anacostia Museum's Collection' explored the stories and the histories of objects and artifacts from the museum's collection. The exhibition was held from April 28, 1996 - December 8, 1996 at the Anacostia Museum.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001103_B

ACMA AV001097
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Material culture  Search this
Collectors and collecting  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Down Through the Years: Docent Training, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-042, Item ACMA AV001103_A
See more items in:
Down Through the Years: Stories from the Anacostia Museum's Collections
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74f9d3495-6d57-411e-84fe-4e5994710d92
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-042-ref1

On-Line Academy

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
11 Sound recordings (11 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
0.5 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
2002
Scope and Contents note:
This collection contains the video interviews conducted with collectors, scholars, and and other specialists as part of the Anacostia Community Museum's On-Line Academy. The On-line Academy was presented to demonstrate the Museum's commitment to collections development, storage, and preservation, and it encourages patrons to use the information presented along with the database of artifacts in the museum's permanent collection to think about what role material culture plays in helping us to come to a better understanding of the African American historical and cultural experience.
Provenance:
In 1999-2000 the Anacostia Community Museum renovated its facility to focus on the collection, storage and study of artifacts. The on-line academy is presented as part of the museum's reemphasis of our commitment to collections development and to the study of African American material culture. The Academy features a series of people offering their expertise and sharing their insights on different subjects within the field of material culture. Collectors, preservers, scholars, and educators conduct virtual lectures, workshops, and demonstrations for your enjoyment and education.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Material culture -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
On-Line Academy Audiovisual Records, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-009
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d6cd5c38-75c3-41d6-b35d-e49f84f7ed31
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-009

Ethel Cutler Freeman papers

Creator:
Freeman, Ethel Cutler, 1886-1972  Search this
Names:
American Museum of Natural History  Search this
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Extent:
61.03 Linear feet (114 boxes)
Culture:
Seminole  Search this
Maasai (African people)  Search this
Culture  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Florida
Date:
1934-1972
Summary:
Ethel Cutler Freeman was an amateur Seminole specialist and research associate with the American Museum of Natural History. Her papers also reflect field work among the Arapaho, Shoshoni, Navaho, Pueblo, Hopi, Kickapoo, and people of the Virgin Islands, the Bahama Islands, and Haiti, and the music and chants of Africa, including those of the Maasai, Zulu, and Pygmies. A small amount of material relates to the Hoover Commission on Indian Affairs, of which Freeman was a member. Correspondents include several Seminole Indians and government officials, personal acquaintances, organizations, and associates of the American Museum of Natural History.
Scope and Contents:
These papers reflect the anthropological interests of Ethel Cutler Freeman. The papers in this collection include her notes and diaries, published articles, unfinished manuscripts, and source materials. The bulk of the collection is material relating to the Seminole Indians of Florida.

Mrs. Freeman also made several trips to the Southwest and Mexico to study such tribes as the Arapaho, Shoshone, Navajo, Pueblo, and Hopi. There is substantial information from these studies included in this collection. She also made less extensive studies of various other cultures in the Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, and Haiti. In 1950, she studied tribal music and chants of several African tribes and the material from these studies forms the major portion of Series 7.

The collection also contains several sound recordings made by Freeman and numerous photographs, negatives, and slides. During rehousing, additional materials including index cards and notebooks from field trips were located and incorporated into the collection. A small amount of material relates to the Hoover Commission on Indian Affairs, of which Freeman was a member.

Correspondents include several Seminole Indians and government officials, personal acquaintances, organizations, and associates of the American Museum of Natural History as well as Dean Amadon, Richard Archbold, Conrad M. Arensberg, Dana W. Atchley, Jacques Barzun, Ruth Benedict, Leonard J. Brass, Louis Capron, Frances Densmore, Margery S. Douglas, John W. Griffin, A.J. Hanna, Ronald F. Lee, Margaret Mead, Robert Cushman Murphy, Kenneth W. Porter, Harry L. Shapiro, Howard Sharp, Frank Speck, Charlton W. Tebean, and Clark Wissler.

Although the majority of the collection spans the years 1934 to 1972, there are some items with dates that fall outside of this range. Some published materials are dated as early as 1822 and one note is dated 1975 and was added to the collection after Freeman's death in 1972. The folders containing these items have been dated accordingly, but these outlier dates have not affected the dates of the sub-series or series.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 15 series: (1) Biographical information and miscellaneous personal papers, 1939-1971; (2) Correspondence, 1936-1972; (3) Manuscripts, 1936-1971; (4) Source Material, 1934-1970; (5) Seminole Indians, 1934-1972; (6) North American Indians, 1936-1971; (7) Cultures other than North American Indian, 1943-1970; (8) Meetings, 1956-1968; (9) Printed materials, 1936-1972; (10) Pamphlets, 1935-1970; (11) Population and Material Culture, 1939, 1951-1963; (12) Sound recordings, 1940-1958, 1969-1970; (13) Lists of Photographs, 1939-1970; (14) Photographs, 1936-1971; (15) Index Cards, undated
Biographical Note:
Ethel Cutler Freeman was born in 1886 in Morristown, New Jersey. Freeman was the daughter of a prosperous family, which gave her the opportunity to study abroad in England at Mademoiselle Marie Souvestre's Academy for girls. After studying in England, Freeman returned to the United States and was married to Leon S. Freeman, a New York broker, in 1909.

By 1934, Freeman had become bored with the typical social activities available to her; while discussing the matter with a friend, Marcellus Hartley Dodge, she described herself as having a "brain full of cobwebs." Dodge, a former trustee at Columbia University, suggested that Freeman enroll in some courses at Columbia. Acting on Dodge's advice, Freeman started taking graduate courses in psychology and sociology at Columbia University, but soon became fascinated with anthropology. During her studies at Columbia, Freeman spent time in the western United States studying the Arapaho and Shoshone while her husband recuperated from a horse riding accident; it was at this point that she developed a taste for field work and an interest in Native American cultures. After completing her studies, Freeman decided that she wanted to study the Seminole people of Florida, near whom she and her family owned a winter home in Naples.

Back on the East Coast, Freeman met Dr. Clark Wissler, then Curator of the Indian Division of the American Museum of Natural History. Wissler was supportive of Freeman's aspirations to continue her anthropological studies, but balked at her expressed interest in the Seminole, whom at that time had a reputation for not being open to contact with outsiders. Undaunted, Freeman contacted W. Stanley Hansen, the man in charge of Seminole settlement; after repeated correspondence with Hansen convinced him she was no mere hobbyist, he agreed to help her make connections within the Seminole community.

Freeman made two visits to the Big Cypress Reservation for the American Museum of Natural History with a government representative before taking her 14-year-old daughter, Condict, and 12-year-old son, Leon Jr., for an extended stay with a group of Seminoles at the heart of the Everglades in February of 1940. After that first winter stay with the Seminoles, Freeman spent virtually every winter living within their remote communities and studying their culture. Over time, Dr. Wissler became impressed by Freeman's thorough and insightful reports and analysis of her findings among the Seminoles and got the American Museum of Natural History to back her winter field studies. Eventually Freeman's work gained her a reputation for being an expert on Seminole culture, which often placed her in the role of consultant to government agencies on issues dealing with Seminole and broader Native American concerns.

As a result of her long acquaintance with the Seminoles, Freeman also became interested in how different groups of Native Americans and other cultures adapted to changes brought about by contact with modern society. Freeman made several trips to the Southwestern United States and Mexico to study such tribes as the Arapaho, Shoshone, Navajo, Pueblo, Choctaw, and Hopi; she also made less extensive studies of various other cultures in the Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, and Haiti. In 1950, Freeman went to Africa to study tribal music and chants of several tribes. Much later, in 1968, the American Museum of Natural History sent Freeman to Portugal to study local costumes.

In the 1940s, Freeman took part in publishing studies for the Department of Agriculture about the Seminoles and worked as an advocate for the Navajo, who at that time were in tense relations with the United States government over their living conditions. From 1947 to 1957, Freeman worked as a representative for the American Civil Liberties Union on the National Coordinating Committee for Indian Affairs; she also was a member of the Indian Rights Committee for the American Civil Liberties Union from 1946 to 1966. From 1948 to 1950, Freeman served as a member of the Hoover Commission for Reorganization of Government within the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Throughout her studies in the field and her activities as an advocate for Native American rights, Freeman published her work frequently and gave many talks at a variety of conferences and special events. In 1964, Freeman traveled to Moscow to deliver her paper, "The Correlation between Directed Culture Change and Self Determination," at the 7th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences; she attended the same conference series the following year in Japan to deliver another paper, entitled "Lawlessness in an Indian Tribe as a Microcosm of a World Trend." Freeman continued visiting and studying the Seminoles in Florida late into her career, making her last visit the year before her death.

Ethel Cutler Freeman died on July 14th, 1972.

Sources Consulted

Letter to Mrs. Margaret Blaker, Archivist at the Smithsonian Institution's Anthropological Archives; Washington, D.C. from Ethel Cutler Freeman. Dated April 24, 1972. Located in vertical files, folders on Ethel Cutler Freeman, in the reading room of the National Anthropological Archives.

"Morristown Anthropologist; Mrs. Leon Freeman Likes Seminole Indians." Newark Sunday News, February 16, 1947.

"New Vernon Woman, Indian Authority." The Morris Observer, October 13, 1955.

"She's 'Hooked' On Seminole Indians: Leading Authority On That World." Daily Record, March 6, 1970.

"The Sentinel Visits--Indian Authority Mrs. Leon Freeman: Who Is Now Working To Rescue A Nation." Sunday Sentinel, February 2, 1947.

Chronology

1886 -- Born in Morristown, New Jersey.

1909 -- Married Leon S. Freeman.

1934 -- Began taking graduate courses at Columbia University in philosophy before changing to anthropology.

1936 -- Field work with the Arapaho and Shoshone.

1938 -- Joined American Anthropological Association. First became associated with American Museum of Natural History.

1939-1943 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1940-1948 -- Special Field Assistant, American Museum of Natural History.

1943 -- Joined American Ethnological Society.

1944 -- Field work in Mexico searching for a lost tribe of Seminoles; studied the Mascogas, Papagos, and Kickapoo.

1945 -- Field work in New Mexico, studying the Pueblo and Navajo.

1946 -- Joined the Society of Women Geographers. Field work with the Navajo, Papago, and Hopi.

1946-1948 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1947 -- Field work with the Navajo, Papago, and Pueblo.

1947-1957 -- Represented the American Civil Liberties Union on the National Coordinating Committee for Indian Affairs.

1947-1966 -- Member Indian Rights Committee, American Civil Liberties Union.

1948 -- Appointed first female trustee of the American Institute of Anthropology. Became Field Associate, American Museum of Natural History.

1948-1950 -- Member Hoover Commission for Reorganization of Government – Bureau of Indian Affairs.

1949 -- Field work in the Bahamas, studying native culture.

1950 -- Field work in Africa, studying the Zulu, Masai, and pygmy peoples.

1951 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1952 -- Field work studying native cultures of the Virgin Islands and Haiti.

1953-1955 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1955-1957 -- Acting Chairman, American Civil Liberties Union.

1957 -- Field work studying Mexican Seminoles.

1957-1958 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1959 -- Attended annual meeting of American Anthropological Association in Mexico City.

1960-1965 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1963 -- Field work in Oklahoma, studying Seminoles.

1964 -- Presented paper, "The Correlation between Directed Culture Change and Self Determination" VII International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Moscow.

1968 -- Studied costumes of Portugal for American Museum of Natural History.

1965 -- Presented paper, "Lawlessness in an Indian Tribe as a Microcosm of a World Trend" VIII International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Tokyo and Kyoto, Japan.

1970-1971 -- Winter field work with Florida Seminoles.

1972 -- Field work in Portugal and the Azores. Died, July 14.

Selected Bibliography

1942 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "We Live with the Seminoles," Natural History 49, no. 4 (April 1942): 226-236.

1944 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "The Seminole Woman of the Big Cypress and Her Influence in Modern Life," América Indígena 4, no. 2 (April 1944), 123-128.

1960 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Culture Stability and Change among the Seminoles of Florida." In Men and Cultures: Selected Papers of the Fifth International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, Philadelphia, September 1-9, 1956, edited by Anthony F.C. Wallace, 249-254. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1960. Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Directed Culture-Change and Selfdetermination in Superordinate and Subordinate Societies," Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences 4, Moscow (August 1964), 85-90.

1961 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "The Happy Life in the City of Ghosts: An Analysis of a Mikasuki Myth," The Florida Anthropologist 14, nos. 1-2 (March-June 1961), 23-36.

1964 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Directed Culture-Change and Selfdetermination in Superordinate and Subordinate Societies," Proceedings of the 7th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences 4, Moscow (August 1964), 85-90.

1965 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Two Types of Cultural Response to External Pressures Among the Florida Seminoles," Anthropological Quarterly 38, no. 2 (April 1965), 55-61.

1968 -- Freeman, Ethel Cutler. "Lawlessness in an Indian Tribe as a Microcosm of a World Trend," Proceedings of the VIIIth International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 1968, Tokyo and Kyoto (Tokyo: Science Council of Japan, 1968) 191-193.
Related Materials:
Photo lot 62, W. Stanley Hanson photographs of Seminole Indians in Florida, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Objects donated by Ethel Cutler Freeman held in Department of Anthropology collections in accession 319549.

The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum on the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation also holds an Ethel Cutler Freeman collection.
Separated Materials:
Film materials were transfered to the Human Studies Film Archive under the accession numbers HSFA 1986.11.8 (African footage) and HSFA 1986.11.9 (Seminole footage).
Provenance:
The papers of Ethel Cutler Freeman were left to the National Anthropological Archives by the terms of her will. Her son, Leon Freeman, Jr., donated the collection to NAA in August 1972.
Restrictions:
By Ethel Freeman's instructions, the collection was restricted for ten years dating from the receipt and signing of the release forms on October 12, 1972. Literary property rights to the unpublished materials in the collection were donated to the National Anthropological Archives.

Access to the Ethel Cutler Freeman papers requires an appointment.
Seminole recordings cannot be accessed without the permission of the Seminole Tribe.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo Indians  Search this
Language and languages  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Music  Search this
Citation:
Ethel Cutler Freeman papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0166
See more items in:
Ethel Cutler Freeman papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a548e5a0-c124-413d-ade0-345b46f30a72
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0166

Jules David Prown research material on artists, 1935-2010, bulk 1958-1975

Creator:
Prown, Jules David, 1930-  Search this
Subject:
West, Benjamin  Search this
Copley, John Singleton  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Citation:
Jules David Prown research material on artists, 1935-2010, bulk 1958-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Theme:
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6038
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)239353
AAA_collcode_prowjule
Theme:
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_239353
Online Media:

Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection

Creator:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Drewal, Margaret Thompson  Search this
Extent:
10,000 Slides (color)
10,617 Copy slides
Container:
Item 10000
Volume 1
Volume 2
Volume 3
Volume 4
Volume 5
Volume 6
Volume 7
Volume 8
Volume 9
Volume 10
Volume 11
Volume 12
Volume 13
Volume 14
Volume 15
Volume 16
Volume 17
Culture:
Ewe (African people)  Search this
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Slides
Copy slides
Color slides
Place:
Togo
Africa
Nigeria
Ghana
Sierra Leone
Date:
1970-1989
Summary:
Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993).Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993).

Photographs taken by Henry John and Margaret Thompson Drewal during the 1970s and 1980s of Yoruba and Ewe art and culture.
Scope and Contents:
The Drewal collection is a photographic documentation of several trips made to the West African countries of Ghana, Nigeria, and Togo to conduct field research. This collection, which consists of over 10,000 color slides (35mm), represents a major portion of the photographs taken by the Drewals during their visits to West Africa from 1967-1986 to conduct field work.

There are several subjects present in this collection. The most prominent being the Egúngún and Gelede rituals and festivals of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Other subjects found in the collection are Ifá initiation, Òrìsà and Mami Wata festivals, Òrìsà shrines, sacred arts, beading techniques, and traditional and modern architecture. There is a large selection of images specifically of shrines and festivals for Òrìsà such as Sango, Ògún, Agemo, Eyinle and others. Details of implements like the ose Sango, opa Osanyin, and opa Osun can also be seen in the collection.

The Drewals also photographed and documented Yoruba sacred art (i.e. shrine objects; masks) in a number of international museums in Africa, Europe and the United States. Their collection contains images of Yoruba art in the British Museum, London; Nigeria National Museum, Lagos; National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C.; Everton Museum, New York; and Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. For a complete listing of slides depicting museum collections see pages 28-33. These images are restricted and can not be reproduced without permission of the copyright holder.
Organization of the Finding Aid:
Drewal, Margaret Thompson. "Symbols of Possession: A Study of Movement and Regalia in an Anago-Yoruba Ceremony." -- Dance Research Journal -- 7, no. 2 (1975).

Drewal, Margaret Thompson and Henry John Drewal. "Gelede: Dance of the Western Yoruba," -- African Arts -- 8, no. 2 (Winter 1975).

Drewal, Henry John. "Efe: Voiced Power and Pagenatry." -- African Arts -- 7, no. 1 (Autumn 1973).

Drewal, Margaret Thompson and Henry John Drewal. "More Powerful than Each Other: An Egbado Classification of Egungun." -- African Arts -- 11, no. 3 (April 1978).

Drewal, Margaret Thompson. "Projections from the Top in Yoruba Art." -- African Arts -- 11, no. 1 (October 1977).

Drewal, Henry John. "Gelede Masquerade: Imagery and Motif." -- African Arts -- 7, no. 4 (Summer 1974).

Drewal, Henry John. "Pageantry and Power in Yoruba Costuming." Justine M. Cordwell and Ronald M. Schwarz, ed. -- The Fabrics of Culture -- . Hauge: Mouton, 1979.

Drewal, Margaret Thompson. "Art and Trance Among Yoruba Sango Devotees." -- African Arts -- 20, no. 1 (November 1986).

Drewal, Henry John. "Flaming Crowns, Cooling Waters: Masquerades of the Ijebu Yoruba" -- African Arts -- 20, no. 1 (November 1986).

Drewal, Henry John. "Mermaids, Mirrors, and Snake Charmers: Igbo Mami Wata Shrines" -- African Arts -- 21, no. 2 (February 1988).

Drewal, Henry John. "Performing the Other: Mami Wata Worship in Africa" -- TDR -- 32, no. 2 (Summer 1988).

Drewal, Henry John. "Beauty and Being: Aesthetics and Ontology in Yoruba Body Art." Arnold Rubin, ed. -- Marks of Civilization: Artistic Transformation of the Human Body -- . Los Angeles, CA, 1988.

Drewal, Henry John, John Pemberton III, Rowland Abiodun. -- Yoruba: Nine Centuries of African Art and Thought -- . NY: Center for African Art in Association with H.N. Abrams, 1989.

Homberger, Lorenz ed. -- Yoruba Art and Aesthetics -- . Zurich: Museum Rietberg; New York: Center for African Art, 1991.

Drewal, Margaret Thompson. -- Yoruba Ritual: Performers, Play, Agency -- . Bloomington and Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 1992.

Drewal, Henry John and Margaret Thompson Drewal. -- Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba -- . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993.

Abiodun, Rowland, Henry J. Drewal, and John Pemberton III, editors. -- The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts -- . Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

Drewal, Henry John. "Yoruba Beadwork Beauty Brightness." -- Faces -- 12, no. 1 (September 1995).

This finding aid was organized according to the inherent value of the Drewal collection to art historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, and cultural historians. It has been kept simple but made as detailed as possible while still providing the researcher with references to the images and other valuable research information. The finding aid has been organized into three principal sections:

A. Bibliography of Drewal publications with image numbers; B. Primary keyword subjects: Field images; C. Primary keyword subjects: Art images; and D. Restricted images: B/W copy slides and non-Drewal color slides

A. Bibliography of Drewal publications: The first section contains a bibliography of primary Drewal publications and lists the image numbers for reproductions that appear in either black-and-white or color. These publications are listed chronologically with a corresponding list of image numbers. For the researcher's convenience, all images from the Drewal collection that have been published are listed in a separate column beside the publication in which the picture appears. Due to space restrictions, only the last five digits of the accession numbers are listed in the Image # column.

**Please note that some of the color slides in the collection have been reproduced as black-and-white images in several Drewal publications. A separate column in the bibliographic section indicates whether the image was reproduced in black-and-white or color in the publication. The Elisofon Archives does not currently possess any of the Drewal's black-and-white negatives. For additional information on these images, please contact Drs. Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal.

Example:

Publication Title Image # Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba, 1993

To further assist researchers, two additional columns have been created to indicate if the image is published in color or black/white.

Example: Publication Title Image # Color Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba, 1993 • 00000 

B & C. Primary keyword: Field and Art images The second section contains a complete list of images available in the collection, subdivided by field and art images. Field images refer to cultural or natural landscapes shot in Africa and Art images refer to images of objects in museums (or photographed in the field as an object by itself). These images have been categorized by primary keywords (i.e. artisan; leadership; masquerade) and subdivided into subcategories or type within these general keyword subjects (i.e. carvers; chiefs; Egungun).

Example:

Primary Keyword Subcategory Image # Architecture • Modern • 00000

D. Restricted images: The final section lists restricted images in the collection: b/w copy slides from publications and color slides not produced by the Drewals. These images are for study purposes only and not for reproduction.
Arrangement note:
The slides were sent to the Elisofon Archives in several batches. They were arranged according to the Drewals' own system of classification and field notes (see below). This arrangement is roughly by subject and further subdivided by subcategory or type. Slides of museum objects are grouped with field images of similar subject matter. For instance, museum object related to Sango worship can be found with the field images of Sango devotees and shrines.

The Drewals donated copies of their field notes (Red and Blue Books) which correspond to most of the slides found in the collection. The Red and Blue books are arranged in reverse chronological order starting with Blue Book 1977-78.1. Reference numbers to these books appear on the upper left hand corner of the slide (e.g. 78.34.6; 28-11). The majority of the field notes give the date and place where the photos were taken as well as a brief descriptive of the subject of the image related to the note. In some cases, the Òrìsà of a particular town was recorded in addition to how many Òrìsà are worshipped. The Drewals attended several private ceremonies and there are some descriptions of their experiences, however, in most cases not in extensive detail.

There is an additional notebook containing more field notes for years prior to 1975. This notebook has information about the images of museum objects and is a collection of Xeroxed copies of notes on index cards. There are no dates on the copies, but there are reference numbers as with the Red and Blue Books.

Images indexed by negative number.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian Henry John Drewal received his BA from Hamilton College and two Masters' degrees and a PhD from Columbia University (1973). In between college and graduate school, Drewal served in the Peace Corps, where he taught French and English, organized arts camps in Nigeria, and apprenticed himself to a Yoruba sculptor.

He taught at Cleveland State University (Chair of the Art Department), and was a Visiting Professor at UC-Santa Barbara and SUNY-Purchase. Since 1991 he has been the Evjue-Bascom Professor of Art History and Afro-American Studies at UW-Madison. He has published several books, edited volumes, exhibition catalogues, and many articles and produced a number of films documenting African and African Diaspora arts, and lectured widely on these topics. He has received several NEH and NEA grants, three Fulbright Research Awards (Brazil, Benin, Morocco), a Metropolitan Museum of Art Fellowship, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Dr. Margaret Thompson Drewal is an ethnographer, performance theorist, and dance historian. She has conducted extensive research on Yoruba and Afro-Brazilian ritual dance with a special interest in the poetics and politics of performance discourse. She is the author of Performers, Play, and Agency: Yoruba Ritual Process (1989). She has also authored numerous articles that have appeared in such journals as TDR: A Journal of Performance Studies, African Arts, and The Journal Ritual Studies. She is also a trained dancer and choreographer. At present, Dr. Drewal is the Chair of the Department of Performance Studies at North Western University.

There are also video productions by Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal available in the Warren M. Robbins Library. The videos available are "Ẹfẹ/Gẹlẹdẹ Ceremonies among the Western Yoruba," by Henry John Drewal; "Yoruba Performance," by Henry John Drewal; and "Yoruba Ritual: A Companion Video," by Margaret Thompson Drewal.
Cultural Information and Background:
The information found here goes slightly beyond the notes of the Red/Blue Books and index card that accompany the images. Because the Drewal Collection primarily centers on the Yoruba and Mami Wata spiritual traditions and material cultures, the focus of images are of specific implements of the deities and priests, such as staffs, pots, stools, thrones, statues, and bells. Also included in the collection are images of divination, sacrifice, and other important rituals, festivals and ceremonies. What is given here is pertinent background information on the cosmology of the Yoruba and Mami Wata spiritual traditions as it relates to the iconographical focus of the slides.

In Yoruba cosmology, there is a supreme being commonly referred to as Ọlọdumare. Ọlọdumare is essentially understood as being genderless or androgynous. There are no shrines or spiritual implements dedicated to Ọlọdumare. The Yoruba believe that Ọlọdumare is too vast and its power too strong to be channeled into one building or space. Everything is a part of or expresses an aspect of Ọlọdumare. Through the appeasement of the Òrìsà Ọlọdumare is served. The Òrìsà are the emissaries of Ọlọdumare sent to the world to assist their devotees in every day life. There are hundreds of Òrìsà within the Yoruba pantheon. Deities such as Ọbatala, Ifá, Èshù, Ọshún, Shango, Ọsanyin, Yemọja and Oya are worshipped throughout Yorubaland; there are also deities that are specific to particular locations and are not as popular as the aforementioned eight.

Implements of the priests are classified as sacred art. These spiritual tools are not only instruments of the priests, but ultimately, they are tools for the Òrìsà. It is important to understand that the shrines are not the Òrìsà. This very prominent misconception has plagued traditional practitioners both in and out of Yorubaland for centuries. The emphasis of reverence is placed on the spirit associated with the materials used to construct a shrine or ceremonial item and not the item itself. The shrine and other sacred tools serve as vortices to channel the ashe or power of the Òrìsà into the physical world.

Ifá is a term that has been used to refer to the Yoruba traditional spiritual system. However, Ifá also refers to the Òrìsà of divination, Ọrunmila, as well as the system of divination used by the priests of Ọrunmila. Ifá's role as a diviner is so important in Yoruba cosmology that he is referred to as Ẹlẹri ipin, ibikéjì Ọlọdumare (witness to all destinies, second only to Ọlọdumare). The Drewals were allowed to follow the process of three initiations and other sacred rituals performed by priests. Certain rituals cannot be witnessed by non-initiates; however the Drewals were able to photograph many of the sacred rites of the initiation process. The roles of the Ifá priest vary. Divining is a very important role of the Ifá priest, and the tools used to divine are also sacred. There is a section of the collection dedicated to images of divination tools and the Ifá shrine.

Èshù is another one of the most important deities within Yoruba cosmology. Èshù is the keeper of ashe and the inspector of all sacrifices. His image is carved into the top of the Ifá divination tray (ọpọn Ifá) because he is a witness to all actions, thoughts, and events. According to Yoruba cosmology, he is an unbiased observer who will convey only the truth of any subject. Both Ifá and Èshù assist devotees in overcoming unsavory circumstances and bad luck, according to the Yoruba. There are many roads (aspects) of Èshù, each performing a specific duty in a devotee's life. Shigidi is one of the more powerful aspects of Èshù. One can see the noticeable differences between the Shigidi and the yangi (laterite or sculpted clay used to create an Èshù shrine).

The implements that are found on traditional Òrìsà shrines are based on Yoruba mythology. For instance, the odo Shango, ritual mortar, is found on almost all shrines dedicated to this particular Òrìsà. The legend goes that he used an inverted mortar to kill a leopard that was terrorizing the people of Enpe. The odo Shango is sometimes used to support the container that holds the "thunderstones" (lightning struck stones) of Shango's shrine. The inverted mortar is also used as a stool for priests or initiates to sit. Shango's priests usually keep their hair braided, even if the priest is male. Equestrian figures are utilized in both Shango and Oya sacred art. Oya is the only female deity in the Yoruba pantheon that has ever been depicted riding a horse. Yoruba mythology states that Oya is a warrior goddess who accompanies her husband, Shango into battle and fights by his side. Together the husband and wife team is associated with thunderstorms. Oya is mythically related to the winds that precede the thunder and lightning that are both said to be associated with Shango.

There are several types of staffs or dance wands seen in the Drewal collection. In the case of dance wands, they are often times utilized during spirit possession. In some instances, the shrine of the Òrìsà is only the staff of that particular deity. Such is the case with the ọpa Osun, a deity associated with Ifá and his devotees and the ọpa Òrìsà Oko, the deity of agriculture.

The Ogboni society (also known as Osugbo) possesses a mixture of spiritual and governmental power within the traditional Yoruba community. It was the foundation of order in traditional Yoruba society. The focus of worship and veneration amongst Ogboni members is Onilẹh, the Owner of the land or Earth. Sometimes one may hear the term Onileh, Owner of the house, instead. Both pronunciations can be used and carry significant meaning in either case. However, the consensus of scholarly research associates Ogboni with the Earth. In that case the term Onilẹh is more suitable.

Egúngún and Gelede festivals are of significant importance amongst the Yoruba. The Egúngún society is dedicated to the veneration and appeasement of honorable ancestors. This can take place in private or public. Families celebrate their deceased relatives' lives and accomplishments privately through sacrifice, prayer and celebration. In a public arena ancestors from the community are given recognition. The Yoruba have long believed that community solidarity and welfare begins with the family. In honoring one's personal ancestors as well as benevolent community ancestors, the family receives the blessings of those that reside in the spiritual realm—those who have become ara ọrun, or the people of heaven. Because the Yoruba believe in reincarnation, it is thought that the ancestors will one day return to the material world in a future lifetime. If proper rituals and prayers are performed, the spirits returning will have a better chance of being assets to society by hopefully making positive contributions to the elevation of the Yoruba people.

Gelede is always a public event. The time of year which the festival will take place is dependent on the locality in which the festival is being held. Gelede focuses mainly on the feminine and the role of women in society. Female deities such as Yemọja, Olókun, and Ilẹh are associated with Gelede. Another aspect of major importance to Gelede is the inclusion of Ìyánla, the Great Mother, which is a reference to Onilè. This reference is but one facet that connects Gelede to the Ogboni society. It is also during the Gelede festival that Awọn Ìyá Wa, Our Mothers or the Mothers, are petitioned and appeased so that they may not interfere with the positive efforts of the community.

Both the Egúngún and Gelede festivals help to ensure prosperity, abundance, and fertility of the people. It is through these festivals that indecent conduct is addressed in hopes of exorcising the root of such behavior. It is believed that bringing any disgraceful and inhumane acts to the forefront encourages individuals to act responsibly in all matters.

The final subject presented in the Drewal Collection is of the Mami Wata traditions in West Africa. Representations of Mami Wata often include foreign images, usually of Indian gods, to describe the attributes of Mami Wata as a deity. The term Mami Wata refers to a water spirit or a collective of water spirits. The names associated with the original African water spirit(s) have long been forgotten in some regions of West Africa where Mami Wata is worshipped. However, in other areas, the term Mami Wata is interchangeable with the indigenous name used to identify the water spirit(s). There are variations to the worship of Mami Wata throughout West Africa, yet similarities prevail. Togo is most popularly associated with the Mami Wata tradition. Most of the slides featuring Mami Wata devotees in the Drewal Collection were taken in Togo.
Related Materials:
Additional photographs by Henry John Drewal held at the EEPA are located within the collection: Henry John Drewal Collection, EEPA 2010-010.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. Copyright held by John and Margaret Drewal. To publish images from this collection, permission must be given by Henry and Margaret Drewal. Contact Archives staff for further information. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Citation:
Henry and Margaret Drewal Photographs, EEPA 1992-028, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1992-028
See more items in:
Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo75d71915f-d8ca-4633-a51c-c73dae691495
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1992-028

Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding the AIDS Memorial Quilt

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Presenters:
James Deutsch, Guy Hemrick, Brian Holman, Anthony Knight, Nadine Licostie, Marsha MacDowell, Katherine Ott, Julie Rhoad, Mike Smith, Jeff Stott, Nomvula Mashoai-Cook, David Gere, Annie Groeber, Jada Harris, Teresa Hollingsworth, Linda Rethman
Introduction:
The year 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and 30 years of life with AIDS. With the introduction of The Quilt in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation redefined the tradition of quilt making in response to contemporary circumstances. Through hands-on panel-making activities, individuals and communities have come together to remember loved ones, grieve, find support and strength, and engage in dialogues for change.

In 2012, The Quilt contained nearly 48,000 panels, and it had been viewed by more than 18 million people. It is much more than pieced-together fabric squares: it is a moving and monumental creative collaboration; it is a catalyst to remember, understand, educate, and act.

The 2012 Festival program featured the remarkable artistry, inspiration, and impact of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and provided the public with an unparalleled opportunity to experience this highly charged symbol of the AIDS crisis and the largest community art project in the world. It was the first Festival program to focus exclusively on community craft and performance directly developed in response to crisis and grief. With The AIDS Memorial Quilt as the anchor and through craft demonstrations, dance and musical performances, interactive discussions, and other activities, this program commemorated the innovative and resourceful ways through which communities have endeavored to educate people and to cope with one of the most complex pandemics in modern history.

The Festival brought together approximately 100 visual artists, designers, quilters, dancers, musicians, community activists, and others who shared the knowledge and creativity that shape their efforts to disseminate the message of the AIDS crisis. Quilt panel-making groups demonstrated and taught a variety of traditional quilting techniques. Volunteers and staff from The NAMES Project Foundation performed the rituals surrounding new panels and Quilt displays. The program also featured other artistic responses to the AIDS crisis from the United States and South Africa, and presented moderated conversations with project contributors, community leaders, and pioneers. Festival venues served as sites for sharing and documenting visitors' personal stories and creative expressions related to living in the age of HIV and AIDS.

Visitors of all ages had the opportunity to learn quilting techniques, make panels, and share stories from their own experiences. Sections of The Quilt were displayed throughout the Festival site, incorporated into the various demonstration and performance venues, and laid out on the National Mall - reinforcing The Quilt's size, visual impact, and the scale and diversity of people impacted by HIV and AIDS.

Arlene Reiniger was Curator and Anna Kaplan was Program Coordinator. The NAMES Project Foundation team included: Julie Rhoad, Jim Marks, Roddy Williams, Gert McMullin, Jada Harris, Chili Crane, Brian Holman, and Ritchie Crownfield.

Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding The AIDS Memorial Quilt program at the 2012 Festival was a partnership between the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and The NAMES Project Foundation, with the support and participation of many others.
Participants:
Hilary Anderson

David H. Bell, 1949-, writer and director, The NAMES Performers, Evanston, Illinois

Tom Berklund

Michael Berresse

Leigh Blake

Mary Bowman, 1988-, spoken word artist, Suitland, Maryland

J.T. Bullock, 1980-, spoken word artist, Silver Spring, Maryland

Reginald Cabico, 1970-, spoken word artist, Washington, D.C.

Jostina Nomvula Mashoai-Cook, 1952-, Observatory-Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

William R. Crownfield, Jr., 1959-, Atlanta, Georgia

Ryan Garson, 1991-, La Crosse, Wisconsin

Dan Green

Annie Groeber, New York, New York

Addison Heimann

Alex Hills

Teresa Hollingsworth, 1968-, Atlanta, Georgia

Terry Hooks

Stephen Keen, 1956-, DJ, Berkeley, California

Dwayne Lawson-Brown, spoken word artist, Community Outreach Coordinator for Metro Teen AIDS, Washington, D.C.

Cindi Love

Dale MacDonald, 1958-, Palo Alto, California

Kathleen Mead

Sherry Moore, 1956-, Desert Hot Springs, California

Richard Moultrie

Kelly Pochop

Vivian Pochop

Linda Rethman, 1958-, Berea, Durban, South Africa

Kelly Rivera Hart, San Francisco, California

Lili Romero De Simone

Molly Smith

Sonya Renee, 1976-, spoken word artist, Baltimore, Maryland

The NAMES Performers, Performance Group A – Green -- The NAMES Performers, Performance Group A – GreenGeoffrey Button, 1976-, Evanston, IllinoisRobert Deason, 1984-, Chicago, IllinoisJessica Paige Kahkoska, 1991-, Evanston, IllinoisNathaniel Lewellyn, 1988-, Milwaukee, WisconsinPatrick Martin, 1977-, Chicago, IllinoisBrad Raymond, 1977-, Newnan, GeorgiaBethany Thomas, 1982-, Chicago, Illinois

The NAMES Performers, Performance Group B - Blue -- The NAMES Performers, Performance Group B - BlueBrian J. Bohr, 1990-, Wheaton, IllinoisCarly Cantor, 1990-, Cincinnati, OhioEvelyn Jacoby, 1990-, Maplewood, New JerseyEmily Maltby, 1990-, New York, New YorkJevares Myrick, 1985-, Powder Springs, GeorgiaLatrice Ann Pace, 1978-, Atlanta, GeorgiaPatrick Sulken, 1990-, Evanston, Illinois

The NAMES Project Foundation -- The NAMES Project FoundationCleve Edward Jones, 1954-, AIDS Memorial Quilt founder, San Francisco, CaliforniaMike Smith, The NAMES Project Foundation co-founder, San Francisco, CaliforniaJulie Rhoad, 1960-, Atlanta, GeorgiaJada Harris, 1966-, Atlanta, GeorgiaJames Marks, Jr., 1957-, Atlanta, Georgia

Digital Component -- Digital ComponentRosemary Comella, 1961-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaTisha Dejmanee, 1985-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaBrittany Farr, 1988-, Los Angeles, CaliforniaBridgette Kidd, 1967-, Los Angeles, California

Quilt Display -- Quilt DisplayKevin Crane, 1974-, warehouse manager, Avondale Estates, GeorgiaBradford James Gammell, 1962-, chapter program coordinator, quilt display co-manager, Wilton Manors, FloridaDeneice Garland, 1961-, display assistant, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Bowie, MarylandSheila Hamilton, 1970-, display assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaKelly Hart, 1959-, display assistant, San Francisco, CaliforniaJoan Juster, 1953-, reader coordinator, San Francisco, CaliforniaWilfred Roczkos, panel maker, display assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaSherman R. Williams, 1972-, project manager, Atlanta, Georgia

2362 Market Street -- 2362 Market StreetPhillip Andrew Cockrell, Jr., 1960-, panel-making assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaKarl Burten Gustafson, 1958-, panel-making assistant, Atlanta, GeorgiaRaymond Slater Kinlock, III, 1949-, panel maker, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Solebury, PennsylvaniaJon Lopez, 1957-, panel maker, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Palm Springs, CaliforniaRick McCormack, 1956-, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Springfield, MissouriCindy Ann McMullin, 1955-, quilt production manager, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaAudrey Muldoon, 1952-, hand maiden/quilt repairer, Peachtree City, GeorgiaLawrence Pellino, 1952-, panel maker, Avondale Estates, Georgia

Common Threads -- Common ThreadsNokuphiwa Caroline Gedze, 1981-, embroiderer, Peddie, South AfricaDavid Gere, 1957-, co-curator, The A.R.T. Show, Los Angeles, CaliforniaUnathi Bulelwa Mtshemla-Meslane, 1974-, Keiskamma Trust, Peddie, South AfricaBeauty Ndlovu, 1960-, beaded doll maker, Cato Ridge, South AfricaLobolile Bhekiswephi Ximba, 1953-, beaded doll maker, Muden, South Africa

Healing Arts -- Healing ArtsTeena Cahill-Dyer, 1946-, director of Wisdom and Beyond LLC, Princeton, New JerseyOsayi Endolyn, 1982-, storyteller, writer, Atlanta, GeorgiaNondumiso Hlwele, 1974-, artist, activist, Cape Town, South AfricaWilliam F. Howard, 1953-, photographer, Atlanta, GeorgiaValerie Knight, 1952-, expressive arts psychologist, New York, New YorkDouglas Lothes, 1958-, spoken word artist, Palm Springs, CaliforniaSydney March, 1954-, writing workshop facilitator, Washington, D.C.Jane Solomon, 1963-, body map facilitator, Cape Town, South Africa

Quilting Bee -- Quilting BeeJada Harris, project manager, Atlanta, GeorgiaMarquetta Bell-Johnson, 1955-, panel-making facilitator, Stone Mountain, Georgia Shannon Brogdon-Grantham, 1987-, material culture specialist, Bowie, MarylandRasheeda Parada Burston, 1953-, teaching artist, call my name facilitator, Atlanta, GeorgiaClarissa Christine Crabtree, panel maker, display and workshop coordinator, Glendale, New YorkDonita Lanette Daniels, 1955-, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaOnifa Funke Adesanya-Awoyade, 1964-, ritual performer, Seattle, WashingtonSonja Jackson, 1962-, panel maker, Clarkston, GeorgiaShelia Jones, 1957-, panel maker, Decatur, GeorgiaStephanie Laster, 1962-, panel maker, East Point, GeorgiaChristopher Locklear, 1969-, panel maker, Atlanta, GeorgiaKaren Meredith, 1947-, panel maker, Manahawkin, New JerseyAma Saran, 1948-, ritual specialist, Washington, D.C.Juanita Williams, 1956-, panel maker, Orangeburg, South Carolina

Remember Their Names -- Remember Their NamesDarin Arrowood, Atlanta, GeorgiaAnne Balsamo, Los Angeles, California

In Process… -- In Process…Adwoa Agyeman, Washington, D.C.Vanessa Crosson, 1953-, Upper Marlboro, MarylandPamela Rogers, 1942-, Capitol Heights, Maryland

Rock Creek Singers -- Rock Creek SingersGiuseppe DeBartolo, 1976-, Washington, D.C.Robert Dragoset, Germantown, MarylandAndrew Harmon, 1973-, Washington, D.C.Kyle Holland, 1980-, Hanover, MarylandGeorge Huffman, 1958-, Washington, D.C.David Jonas, 1966-, Washington, D.C.John Jowers, 1980-, Hyattsville, MarylandJack Reiffer, 1944-, Washington, D.C.Lyn Van Noy, 1954-, Arlington, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2012, Series 4
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk569d36668-c562-4f86-9c51-a9eadcf3b63f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2012-ref32

Appalachia: Heritage and Harmony

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The period from July 2002 through July 2003 was declared by Congress the "Year of Appalachia." The year also marked the 75th anniversary of the historically important Victor recording sessions held in Bristol, Tennessee, in 1927. A small museum in Bristol administered by the Birthplace of Country Music Alliance (BCMA), a non-profit group run by country music enthusiasts and supporters of Appalachian music that is also an affiliate of the Smithsonian, approached the Smithsonian with a proposal to mount a Folklife Festival program in 2003 celebrating Appalachian culture. The year began with a series of regional concerts in Appalachia and culminated with the 2003 Festival program on the National Mall. Smithsonian staff worked closely with scholars and experts in the Appalachian region to help us tell their story, to discover what qualities in the region have made it such a hotbed of musical creativity and cooperation.

Although it was not the first time country music had been recorded for commercial distribution, the 1927 Bristol Sessions are considered the "big bang" that kicked off the country music industry. These were the first recordings of the original Carter Family and the singing brakeman, Jimmie Rodgers, the two most important early country music stars. They began what has since become a multibillion-dollar business. For this reason the area around Bristol, Virginia/Tennessee, has been referred to as "the Birthplace of Country Music."

The Festival program focused on the region within a hundred miles of Bristol, although certainly important music was and still is being made in the other parts of Appalachia. What forces converged in this one area of the United States to produce this music? There were various factors: isolation, strength of family, a strong religious faith, a feeling of community, and a sense of innovation. The area's music has influenced subsequent American popular music, but traditional music is still alive and thriving in the region, with younger people learning to play. Traditional music is even being taught in schools, such as the Mt. Rogers Combined School in Virginia and East Tennessee State University, which has a program in bluegrass. Nowadays, the music is also played and loved all over the planet, from Europe to Japan. The Festival program surveyed the different kinds of music one can find in the region. There were older master performers and those just starting out. For every group selected to bring to the Festival there were dozens of other worthy candidates.

Since its founding in 1967, the Smithsonian Folklife Festival has maintained a strong interest in the culture of Appalachia, and particularly its music. In 1968, Doc Watson & Family, Jean Ritchie, and Ralph Stanley participated in the Festival; in 1969 Dock Boggs, Maybelle Carter, Bill Monroe & the Monroe Brothers, and Merle Travis were featured. State programs on Kentucky (1973), Virginia (1977), and Tennessee (1986) have been presented on the Mall. Festival co-founder Ralph Rinzler had a great love for the region; besides "discovering" Doc Watson in 1960, Rinzler recorded and produced numerous recordings of Appalachian music and collected and documented Appalachian crafts. He was also responsible for bringing Appalachian musicians to New York and the Newport Folk Festival for concerts. The other Festival co-founder, James Morris, had been the director of the Asheville Folk Festival. Festival audiences in 2003 relished the opportunity to meet old friends again and to encounter new ones.

Jean Haskell and Jeff Place were Curators, and Arlene Reiniger was Coordinator.

This program was produced in collaboration with the Birthplace of Country Music Alliance and the Center for Appalachian Studies at East Tennessee State University. Major contributions were provided by the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds, the National Endowment for the Arts, King Pharmaceuticals, the Norfolk Southern Foundation, Tennessee Tourism, and West Virginia Division ofTourism. Additional support was provided by the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Virginia Foundation for Humanities, Eastman Chemical, and The United Company.

Friends of Appalachia

Bill and Mary Aldacushion, Joseph & Maureen Alonso, Valerie Amerkhail, R. Bruce Barritt, Rebecca Bartholomae, David Bearinger, Alan Berg, Barry Bergey, Vernon & Mary Emma Bohl, Florence Ann Bowen, Anne Boynton, Joan Brown, Mukadder Buyukunsal, Martha Christie, Denis Clements, Elizabeth Dahlin, Christine Di Lapi, Yeshi Dorjee, Fleur Duggan, William & Elizabeth Edwards, Carolie Farlee, Laura Feller, Amet Figueroa, Barbara Francisco, Gerald Gaudet, Patricia & Thomas Gibney, Angus Gillespie, Anthony Gittens, Paul D. Gould, William Granik, Milton Grossman, John Guffey, Jeffrey Harwood, Marilyn Hayes, Adam Heller, John Herzog, Jon Hundley, Richard Kaczmarek, Peter Kent, John Kerr, Kathryn Kerr, Richard & Allyn Kurin, Jay Ladin, Geoffry & Terry Lewis, Sarah Lewis, George and Marcia Loeb, Kathy Condon and R. Luftglass, Marian A. Lund, Aaron Joel Markel, Alice Markham, Terry & Sara Miller, Kathy Ann Millholland, Toni Milto, Frederick & Karen Mulhauser, Suzanne Murray, Music from China Inc., Sara Ohlidal, Marvin Nakashima, Angela Olszewski, Jeanne Ormsby, Hassan Oushani, Anthony Palombella, Roland Pytel, Joan N. Radner, Ethel Raim, Grace Rawlins, Roland Roebuck, Sue Rollins, Zelda Jenne Rouillar, Sigmund Shapiro, James Shook, Dr. and Mrs. Milton Shor, Gabrielle Shubert, Daniel Snodderly, James & Anita Steele, Louise Steele, Alan J. Steiner, Diane Strnad, Barbara Stratyner, Aaron Sturgis, Thomas Sukitsch, George Swisko, Teoffy Taganas, Kay Turner, Carlha Vickers, William Vickers, Chuck Wagner, John Shunshieh Wang, Douglas Wonderlic
Researchers:
Jean Haskell, East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies, and Ted Olson, East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies, served as co-chairs and Research Curators.

Childlore Task Force: David Winship, chair; Roberta Herrin, East Tennessee State University

Dance and Narrative Traditions Task Force: Susan Spalding, Berea College, chair; Katy Brown; Angelyn DeBord; Barbara Duncan, Museum of the Cherokee Indian; Betty Fine, Virginia Tech University; Phil Jamison, Warren Wilson College; Bob Leonard, Virginia Tech University; John Lilly, Goldenseal Magazine; Richard Rose, Barter Theater; Sparky Rucker; Jimmy Neil Smith, International Storytelling Foundation; Joseph Sobol, East Tennessee State University

Foodways Task Force: Phyllis Deel, Virginia Tech University, chair; Jon Lohman, Virginia Folklife Program, chair; Fred McClellan, Birthplace of Country Music Alliance, chair; Jeannie Mullins, Virginia Tech University; Mark Sohn, Pikeville College

Material Culture Task Force: Anna Fariello, Virginia Tech University, Curatorial InSight, chair; Kathleen Curtis Wilson, visiting scholar, University of Ulster, chair; Sandra Bennett, Thistle Cover Farm; Donia Eley; Tim Glotzbach, Dean, Kentucky School of Craft; George Hiller, Virginia Economic Development Partnership; John Huron; Allison Kaiser, Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen; Tess Lloyd, East Tennessee State University; Dian Magie, Center for Craft, Creativity and Design; Rex McCarty; Jeannie Mullins, Virginia Tech University; Kim Parker; Ruth Summers, Southern Highland Craft Guild; Blair White, East Tennessee State University

Media Task Force: Greg Wallace, Wallace Video, chair; Bill Hartley, Birthplace cf Country Music Alliance; Rich Kirby, Appalshop; Jamie Ross, James Agee Appalachian Film Project; Wayne Winkler; Stephen Wade

Music Task Force: Katie Doman, Tusculum College, chair; Richard Blaustein, East Tennessee State University; Ed Cabbell; Ron Carson, Appalshop; Cecilia Conway, Appalachian State University; Steve Fisher, Emory and Henry College; Rita Forrester, Carter Family Memorial Music Center; Pamela Foster; Cary Fridley; Bruce Haney; Bill Hartley, Birthplace of Country Music Alliance; Eddie Huffinan; Rich Kirby, Appalshop; John Lilly, Goldenseal Magazine; Raymond McLain, East Tennessee State University; Gerry Milnes, Augusta Heritage Center; Ted Olson, East Tennessee State University, Center for Appalachian Studies; Jeff Place, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage; Cassie Robinson; Sparky Rucker; Mike Seeger; Tim Stafford; Jack Tattle, East Tennessee State University; Tim White, Birthplace of Country Music Alliance

Tourism Task Force: Matt Bolas, Bristol Tennessee/Virginia Chamber of Commerce, co-chair; Geneva O'Quinn, Heart of Appalachia Tourism, co-chair; Kitty Barker, Blue Ridge Travel Association of Virginia; Judy Donaghy, North Carolina High Country Host; Steve Galyean, Abingdon Convention and Visitors Bureau; Amy McDougal, First Tennessee Development District; Leesa Sutton, North Carolina Division ofTourism
Presenters:
Charlie Camp, Dudley Connell, Phyllis Deel, Lee Michael Demsey, Katie Doman, Jean Haskell, Rich Kirby, Jon Lohman, Fred McClellan, Ted Olson, Barry Lee Pearson, Susan Spalding, Stephen Wade, Joe Wilson
Participants:
AFRICAN-AMERICAN TRADITIONS

John Dee Holeman, guitar, Durham, North Carolina

Melvin Alston, 1943-, guitar, Durham, North Carolina

Nat Reese, 1924-, guitar, Princeton, West Virginia

James "Sparky" Rucker, 1946-, guitar, Maryville, Tennessee

Rhonda Rucker, 1961-, harmonica, Maryville, Tennessee

Joe Thompson, 1918-2012, fiddle, Mebane, North Carolina

Bob Carlin, 1953-, banjo, Lexington, North Carolina

BALLAD SINGERS

Sheila Kay Adams, 1953-, banjo, Marshall, North Carolina

Jim Taylor, 1952-, guitar, Marshall, North Carolina

Laura Boosinger, 1957-, banjo, Asheville, North Carolina

Ginny Hawker, 1940-, vocals, Coxs Mill, West Virginia

Tracy Schwarz, 1938-, fiddle, guitar, Coxs Mill, West Virginia

Bobby McMillon, 1951-, Lenoir, North Carolina

Jean Ritchie, 1922-2015, Port Washington, New York

Randy Wilson, 1952-, banjo, Big Creek, Kentucky

BLUEGRASS

Hazel Dickens and Friends -- Hazel Dickens and FriendsHazel Dickens, 1925-2011, Washington, D.C.Richard UnderwoodJack LiebermanMarshall WilbornDudley Connell, Silver Spring, MarylandBarry Mitterhoff, Scotch Plains, New Jersey

The East Tennessee State University Student Bluegrass Band -- The East Tennessee State University Student Bluegrass BandRaymond McLain, fiddle, Johnson City, TennesseeDaniel Boner, 1981-, guitar, Bridgeton, New JerseyJosh Goforth, 1981-, mandolin, Marshall, North CarolinaJenny Lyn Harper, 1983-, bass, Simsboro, LouisianaJ.P. Mathes, 1980-, banjo, Elizabeth, Tennessee

Jesse McReynolds and the Virginia Boys -- Jesse McReynolds and the Virginia BoysJesse McReynolds, 1929-, mandolin, vocals, Gallatin, TennesseeMatthew Allred, guitarKent Blanton, bassDonny CatronDaniel Grandstaff, banjoBobby Hicks, fiddleLuke McKnight

The O'Quinn Brothers & the Bluegrass Travelers -- The O'Quinn Brothers & the Bluegrass TravelersFred O'Quinn, 1934-, banjo, Birchleaf, VirginiaJoe Arrington, 1938-, bass, Haysi, VirginiaHerb Bowman, 1929-, fiddle, North Tazewell, VirginiaKeith O'Quinn, 1959-, mandolin, Bee, VirginiaKyle O'Quinn, 1962-, guitar, Birchleaf, Virginia

Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys -- Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain BoysRalph Stanley, 1927-2016, banjo, vocalsRalph Stanley IIRalph Stanley IIIJack CookeJames PriceJohn RigsbyJames Alan SheltonSteve Sparkman

The VW Boys -- The VW BoysTim White, 1956-, banjo, Blountville, TennesseeLarry McPeak, 1947-, bass, Wytheville, VirginiaDave Vaught, 1952-, guitar, Bristol, Tennessee

CONTEMPORARY APPALACHIAN MUSIC

The Celtibillies -- The CeltibilliesJack Hinshelwood, 1956-, fiddle, guitar, Shawsville, VirginiaBecky Barlow, 1957-, hammered dulcimer, keyboard, bodhran, Christiansburg, VirginiaJeff Hofmann, 1971-, bass, Roanoke, VirginiaTim Sauls, 1956-, banjo, bouzouki, and guitar, Roanoke, Virginia

Appalachian Reggae Musician Ras Alan with Brother Bob -- Appalachian Reggae Musician Ras Alan with Brother BobRas Alan Childres, 1959-, guitar, kickbox, Zionville, North CarolinaBrother Bob Franklin, 1962-, bass, Weaverville, North Carolina

GOSPEL TRADITIONS

Dorothy "Fountain" Myles, 1947-, vocals, Appalachia, Virginia

Pastor Stanley D. Almon, 1966-, keyboard, Lynch, Kentucky

Still Waters -- Still WatersChris Hall, 1974-, upright bass, Leburn, KentuckyBennie Moore, 1934-, mandolin, Langley, KentuckyDexter Mullins, 1972-, rhythm guitar, Pinetop, KentuckyDelmas Slone, lead guitar, Pinetop, KentuckyDoyal Waddles, banjo, Dobro, Hindman, KentuckyJosh Martin, Eastern, KentuckyThomas Martin, guitar, Eastern, Kentucky

INSTRUMENTAL TRADITIONS

Clyde Davenport, 1921-, fiddle, Jamestown, Tennessee

Michael DeFosche, 1949-, guitar, Whiteyville, Tennessee

Dwight Diller, 1946-, banjo, Hillsboro, West Virginia

Rayna Gellert, 1975-, fiddle, Asheville, North Carolina

Joe Fallon, 1952-, banjo, guitar, Charlottesville, Virginia

Bruce Greene, 1951-, fiddle, Burnsville, North Carolina

Wayne Henderson, 1947-, guitar, Mouth of Wilson, Virginia

Will Keys, 1923-, banjo, Gray, Tennessee

Doug Dorschug, 1946-, guitar, Mountain City, Tennessee

Lester and Linda McCumbers, and Jake Krack -- Lester and Linda McCumbers, and Jake KrackLester McCumbers, 1921-, fiddle, Nicut, West VirginiaLinda McCumbers, 1921-, guitar, Nicut, West VirginiaJake Krack, 1984-, fiddle, Orma, West VirginiaKim Johnson, 1952-, banjo, Clendenin, West VirginiaDara Krack, 1953-2014, guitar, Orma, West Virginia

Don Pedi, 1947-, dulcimer, Marshall, North Carolina

Doug Rorrer, 1951-, guitar, Eden, North Carolina

Taylor Rorrer, 1984-, guitar, Eden, North Carolina

Lee Sexton, 1928-, banjo, fiddle, Cornettsville, Kentucky

OCCUPATIONAL SONG

The Buckingham Lining Bar Gang -- The Buckingham Lining Bar GangCharles W. White, 1930-, leader, Buckingham, VirginiaFrank Austin, 1925-, Buckingham, VirginiaFrank Cottrell, 1928-, Arrington, VirginiaRobert Jones, 1924-, Prospect, VirginiaAsbury Laury, 1936-, Buckingham, VirginiaJohn H. Laury, 1931-, Buckingham, VirginiaDaniel McKinney, 1931-, Dillwyn, VirginiaSamuel Mosley, Buckingham, VirginiaWilliam Eddie Neighbors, 1916-2006, Buckingham, VirginiaIsaac W. Pankey, 1923-, Green Bay, Virginia

Elaine Purkey, 1949-, guitar, Ranger, West Virginia

Carl Rutherford, 1929-2006, guitar, Caretta, West Virginia

OLD-TIME MUSIC STRING BAND

The New Ballard's Branch Bogtrotters -- The New Ballard's Branch BogtrottersDennis Hall, 1953-, guitar, Galax, VirginiaEddie Bond, 1971-, fiddle, Fries, VirginiaDallas Hall, 1958-, mandolin, Galax, VirginiaJesse Morris, 1979-, bass, Elk Creek, VirginiaWayne Watson, 1947-, banjo, Galax, Virginia

The New Southern Ramblers (with Ralph Blizard) -- The New Southern Ramblers (with Ralph Blizard)Ralph Blizard, 1918-2004, fiddle, Blountville, TennesseeJohn Herrmann, 1943-, bass, Asheville, North CarolinaGordy Hinners, 1955-, banjo, Weaverville, North CarolinaPhil Jamison, 1953-, guitar, Asheville, North CarolinaJohn Lilly, 1954-, mandolin, Charleston, West Virginia

STORYTELLING

Lloyd Arneach, 1943-, Asheville, North Carolina

Bonnie Collins, 1915-, Fairmont, West Virginia

Orville Hicks, 1951-, Boone, North Carolina

Bil Lepp, 1970-, South Charleston, West Virginia

Frank Proffitt, Jr., 1946-2005, Todd, North Carolina

DANCE

Carcassonne Community Dancers, square dance -- Carcassonne Community Dancers, square danceJon Henrikson, 1942-, Blackey, KentuckyJames Boggs, 1983-, Big Laurel, KentuckyRachel Boggs, 1981-, Big Laurel, KentuckyLoretta Henrikson, 1949-, Blackey, KentuckyBeverly Johnson, 1961-, Amsterdam, New YorkDale Johnson, 1954-, Amsterdam, New YorkRay Slone, 1932-2007, fiddle, guitar, Hindman, KentuckyBobbie J. Whitaker, 1934-, Cromona, KentuckyCharles Whitaker, 1928-, Cromona, KentuckyCharlie Whitaker, 1929-, Blackey, Kentucky, callerJoyce Whitaker, Blackey, Kentucky

The Green Grass Cloggers, clog-dancing -- The Green Grass Cloggers, clog-dancingPhil Jamison, 1953-, Asheville, North CarolinaKaren Bartlett, 1950-, Asheville, North CarolinaWanda Davidson, 1953-, Swannanoa, North CarolinaGordy Hinners, 1955-, Weaverville, North CarolinaCarol Mallett, 1953-, Asheville, North CarolinaHunt Mallett, 1955-, Asheville, North CarolinaTrina Royar, 1959-, Asheville, North CarolinaRodney Sutton, 1950-, Marshall, North Carolina

FOODWAYS TRADITIONS

Susan Bridges, 1954-, Meadows of Dan, Virginia

Kim Carroll, 1972-, Clintwood, Virginia

Linda Childress, 1947-, Clintwood, Virginia

Harvey Christie, 1964-, Romney, West Virginia

Lacey Griffey, 1928-, Benham, Kentucky

Gerald Hawkins, 1942-, Knoxville, Tennessee

Greg Golden, Treadway, Tennessee

Marie Junaluska, Cherokee, North Carolina

Bennie Massey, 1949-, Lynch, Kentucky

Fred McClellan, 1953-, Abingdon, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2003, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk520de318e-cc42-453e-92c8-1e614d901176
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2003-ref18

Festival Recordings: AFS Centennial Stage: Material World: Preserving, Presenting, Pretending (Glassie, Vlach, Gadaire, B

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. American Folklore Society Centennial Program 1988 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Glassie, Henry H.  Search this
Vlach, John Michael, 1948-  Search this
Brassieur, C. Ray  Search this
Gadaire, Janice  Search this
Performer:
Glassie, Henry H.  Search this
Brassieur, C. Ray  Search this
Gadaire, Janice  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
sound-tape reel (analog, 7 in.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Pennsylvania
Massachusetts
Louisiana
Date:
1988 June 24
Local Numbers:
FP-1988-7RR-0094
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, June 24, 1988.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Material culture  Search this
Boatbuilding  Search this
Folklore -- Study and teaching  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Item FP-1988-7RR-0094
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife / Series 2: American Folklore Society Centennial / Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5413c4dbd-3721-45bd-90eb-467e4432e230
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref576

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By