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MS 1626 Grammar of the Nez Perce, formerly of Oregon

Collector:
Smith, Asa Bowen, 1809-1886  Search this
Creator:
Tingley, Sylvanus  Search this
Extent:
147 Pages
Culture:
Nez Percé Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
September 28, 1840
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1626
Local Note:
Copied by Sylvanus Tingley, April-May, 1909.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1626, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1626
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1626

Oral history interview with Agnes Abbot, 1981 August 25-1982 January 15

Interviewee:
Abbot, Agnes Anne, 1897-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Subject:
Hibbard, A. T. (Aldro Thompson)  Search this
Woodbury, Charles H. (Charles Herbert)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12915
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211916
AAA_collcode_abbot81
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_211916
Online Media:

22c Public Hospitals single

Title:
Scott Catalogue USA 2210
Medium:
paper; ink (multicolored); adhesive / photogravure
Type:
Postage Stamps
Place:
United States of America
Date:
April 11, 1986
Topic:
Health & Medicine  Search this
The Cold War (1945-1990)  Search this
Humanitarian Causes  Search this
U.S. Stamps  Search this
Credit line:
Copyright United States Postal Service. All rights reserved.
Object number:
1999.2004.481
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/hm85ba050a4-1f99-4f37-9f1f-bdadc774ad02
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npm_1999.2004.481

3c Paul Dudley White single

Title:
Scott Catalogue USA 2170
Depicts:
Paul Dudley White, American, 1886 - 1973  Search this
Medium:
paper; ink (bright blue); adhesive / engraving
Type:
Postage Stamps
Place:
United States of America
Date:
September 15, 1986
Topic:
Health & Medicine  Search this
U.S. Stamps  Search this
Credit line:
Copyright United States Postal Service. All rights reserved.
Object number:
1998.2008.7
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/hm8366743f2-1ff3-474c-8dc5-8b04cf78bb55
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npm_1998.2008.7

22c Massachusetts single

Title:
Scott Catalogue USA 2341
Medium:
paper; ink (dark blue, dark red); adhesive / lithography, engraving
Type:
Postage Stamps
Place:
Massachusetts
United States of America
Date:
February 6, 1988
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
U.S. Stamps  Search this
Credit line:
Copyright United States Postal Service. All rights reserved.
Object number:
1989.0496.10133
See more items in:
National Postal Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Postal Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/hm80a7cda84-b8fa-448f-96b0-b3ed8afe72b3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npm_1989.0496.10133

Cello, Sanitary Hot Water Bottle

Maker:
S. A. Cambell Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 cm x 25.5 cm x 21 cm; 1 3/16 in x 10 1/16 in x 8 1/4 in
overall: 1 3/4 in x 8 3/8 in x 9 3/4 in; 4.445 cm x 21.2725 cm x 24.765 cm
Object Name:
hot water bottle
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Date made:
ca 1910
ID Number:
MG.M-11459 [dup1]
Catalog number:
M-11459
Accession number:
260557
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a5-6c92-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_735987
Online Media:

Carte-de-visite portrait of Lydia Maria Child

Photograph by:
John Adams Whipple, American, 1822 - 1891  Search this
Subject of:
Lydia Maria Child, American, 1802 - 1880  Search this
Owned by:
Emily Howland, American, 1827 - 1929  Search this
Medium:
albumen and silver on photographic paper on card mount
Dimensions:
H x W (Image): 3 9/16 × 2 1/4 in. (9 × 5.7 cm)
H x W (Image and Mount): 4 1/8 × 2 7/16 in. (10.5 × 6.2 cm)
Type:
cartes-de-visite
albumen prints
portraits
Place captured:
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Date:
ca. 1865
Topic:
African American  Search this
Antislavery  Search this
Literature  Search this
Photography  Search this
Reconstruction, U.S. History, 1865-1877  Search this
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture shared with the Library of Congress
Object number:
2017.30.21
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
Emily Howland Photograph Album
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Media Arts-Photography
Movement:
Abolitionist movement
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd510f1d07e-0562-46a1-9c39-03a89dd55cdc
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2017.30.21
Online Media:

Diary of Frances Anne Rollin

Written by:
Frances Anne Rollin, American, 1845 - 1901  Search this
Manufactured by:
Taggard & Thompson, American, c. nineteenth century  Search this
Subject of:
Frances Anne Rollin, American, 1845 - 1901  Search this
Martin Robison Delany, American, 1812 - 1885  Search this
William J. Whipper, American, 1834 - 1907  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper with leather and adhesive
Dimensions:
H x W x D (closed): 4 15/16 × 3 1/16 × 11/16 in. (12.5 × 7.8 × 1.8 cm)
Type:
diaries
Place made:
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Place used:
Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1868
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
American South  Search this
Domestic life  Search this
Families  Search this
Literature  Search this
Politics (Practical)  Search this
Reconstruction, U.S. History, 1865-1877  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Suffrage  Search this
Women  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Carole Ione Lewis Family Collection
Object number:
2018.101.1
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5a9e1565e-9c5d-48e4-b96f-633bbf4852ff
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2018.101.1

Max Bohm papers

Creator:
Bohm, Max, 1868-1923  Search this
Names:
Beachcombers (Organization)  Search this
Salmagundi Club  Search this
Bohm, Zella Newcomb  Search this
Hunt, Clyde du Vernet  Search this
Locke, Esther Bohm, d. 1913  Search this
Longyear, Mary Beecher, 1851-1931  Search this
Macbeth, Robert W. (Robert Walker), 1884-1940  Search this
Macbeth, William, 1851-1917  Search this
Extent:
5.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Paintings
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Place:
France -- description and travel
Date:
1873-1970
bulk 1880-1959
Summary:
The papers of painter Max Bohm measure 5.6 linear feet and date from 1873-1970, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1959. Biographical material includes a file concerning the Provincetown artist's club The Beachcombers. Also found is detailed family correspondence, as well as general correspondence that includes exchanges with patron Mary Beecher Longyear and dealer William Macbeth. The papers contain scattered business records; five diaries written by Bohm's wife Zella; other notes and writings; art work including fifteen sketchbooks, loose drawings, and oil paintings; printed material; and photographs of Bohm, his family, and colleagues including artists attending a Salmagundi dinner. There is also a motion picture film Six Foot Art, in Which Max Bohm, Member of the National Academy Tells How He Does It.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter Max Bohm measure 5.6 linear feet and date from 1873-1970, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1959. Biographical material includes a file concerning the Provincetown artist's club The Beachcombers. Also found within the papers is detailed family correspondence, as well as general correspondence that includes exchanges with patron Mary Beecher Longyear and dealer William Macbeth. Also found are scattered business records; five diaries written by Bohm's wife Zella; other notes and writings; art work including sketchbooks, loose drawings, and oil paintings; printed material; and photographs of Bohm, his family, and colleagues including artists attending a Salmagundi dinner. There is also a motion picture film Six Foot Art, in Which Max Bohm, Member of the National Academy Tells How He Does It.

Family correspondence consists of letters exchanged between various Bohm family members during their long periods of separation. Decades of almost daily exchanges of letters offer detailed descriptions of Bohm's activities in pursuit of notoriety as an artist including his frequent travels in Europe and the United States, attendance of art-related and other cultural events, and his thoughts about art, philosophy, and his strong opposition to German aggression in World War I. The often affectionate letters from Bohm's wife Zella describe her concerns over finances and raising the children during Bohm's frequent absences, but also include descriptions of their summers in coastal France.

Professional correspondence consists of scattered letters discussing art-related business with colleagues including Bohm's longtime patron and Christian Science advocate, Mary Beecher Longyear, and Macbeth Gallery owners Robert and William Macbeth.

Scattered business records include price lists for art work, banking records, and miscellaneous receipts.

Five diaries and loose diary pages written by Bohm's wife Zella contain detailed descriptions of daily activities and her observations and thoughts, some drawings, notes, and financial notations. Some of the diaries contain annotations by her daughter, Esther.

Notes and writings include notebooks containing original short stories and miscellaneous sketches by Bohm, lists of art work, miscellaneous notes including several written by Esther Bohm, and miscellaneous writings by and about Bohm including his typescript "An Artist's Philosophy."

Art work consists of fifteen sketchbooks, miscellaneous drawings including a self-portrait, and oil paintings on board and on unstretched canvases including Bohm's studies of works by Titian and Van Dyke, and a painting of a young Esther Bohm looking at the sea. Works by others include a batik design on silk by Zella Bohm, a watercolor by Bohm's aunt, Anna Stuhr Weitz, and an oil portrait of Zella by her granddaughter.

Printed material primarily consists of clippings generated by Bohm's participation in the Paris Salons, in addition to several exhibition announcements and catalogs for Bohm and for others, and reproductions of art work by Bohm and others. There are also 2 copies of a silent, black and white Pathé newsreel titled Six Foot Art, in Which Max Bohm, Member of the National Academy Tells How He Does It on 16mm and 35mm film reels.

Photographs are of Bohm and his family, colleagues including Clyde du Vernet Hunt in his studio and a Salmagundi Club "Get Together" dinner, views of the town of Etaples, France, and of works of art by Bohm and others.
Arrangement:
The papers have been organized into 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1898-1970 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1, OV 8)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1880-1955 (3.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-4, 7)

Series 3: Business Records, 1910-1930 (0.2 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 4: Diaries, 1887-1916 (0.2 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 5: Notes and Writings, 1882-circa 1970 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 4, 7)

Series 6: Art Work, 1873-1951 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 4-5, 7, OVs 8-10)

Series 7: Printed Material and Motion Picture Film, 1886-1957 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 5-7, FC 11-12)

Series 8: Photographs, 1886-1959 (0.2 linear feet; Boxes 6-7)
Biographical / Historical:
Max Bohm was born on January 21, 1868, in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Henry and Emilie Bohm.

Bohm began his study of art in 1887 when he accompanied his aunt, Anna Stuhr, on the first of several voyages to France. He studied in artist communities in Brittany and in Paris at the Académie Julian with Boulanger, Lefebvre, and Benjamin Constant. He also traveled to Belgium, The Netherlands, and Germany.

In 1895, Bohm attended an open school of painting in Etaples on the coast of France, and during the winter months he taught painting at a school in London, England. His painting En Mer was awarded the Gold Medal by the Paris Salon of 1897.

While teaching in Etaples in 1898, Bohm married one of his pupils, Zella Newcomb, an art teacher from Carlton College in Minnesota. In 1900, the Bohms traveled to Italy for several months before returning to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where Bohm established a studio. After trying to find affordable studio and living space in New York City, Bohm moved his family back to France in 1902. Bohm established a studio in Paris for two years and during the summer months his wife and children moved to the less expensive and cooler coastal towns of France. Bohm continued to display his work in the annual Paris Salons.

From 1905 until the summer of 1908, the Bohm family lived primarily in England. In 1909, Bohm entered and won the Cleveland Court House mural competition, prompting the family to return to the United States for several months. They returned to Paris the following year, where Bohm established a studio and worked on the Cleveland Court House mural. Again, Bohm's wife and children would live in French coastal towns, while Bohm was on extended visits to Paris, London, or the United States.

Sometime around 1911, Bohm became acquainted with Mrs. Mary Beecher Longyear, a wealthy follower of Mary Baker Eddy and Christian Science. Over the next decade, Mrs. Longyear commissioned many works by Bohm and supported his career. In May of 1912 Bohm's mural, First New England Town Meeting, was installed in the new Cleveland Court House and arrangements were made with Macbeth Galleries to exhibit Bohm's work. Late in 1913, Bohm became involved with the Pan-Pacific International Exposition where his painting Promenade won the Gold Medal in 1915.

During World War I, the Bohm family fled France and temporarily settled in Tuckahoe, New York, and Bohm made frequent visits to his patron, Mrs. Longyear, in Boston. In 1916, the Knoedler Gallery exhibited Bohm's murals for Mrs. Longyear's music room. Also during this time, the family enjoyed spending summers in Provincetown, where Bohm joined The Beachcombers, an organization of artists.

In 1919, the Bohms built a house in Bronxville, New York, for easy access to New York City, while simultaneously purchasing a cottage in Provincetown. While the house was being constructed, Zella and the children became boarders in the home of painter Spencer Nichols, who also lived in Bronxville. During this year, Max Bohm, Jr., entered Harvard University while Mrs. Longyear continued to provide commissions for Max Bohm's art work.

Between 1922 and 1923, Bohm had exhibitions in Greenwich, Connecticut, Washington, D.C., and at the Grand Central Galleries, with his painting En Mer being exhibited at the National Academy of Design.

Max Bohm died on September 19, 1923 in Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 420-421) including biographical material, scattered letters, notes and writings, drawings, clippings, exhibition catalogs, booklets, a scrapbooks, and photographs of Bohm, his family, colleagues, and residences. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.

The original Six Foot Art film was also transferred to 16mm and 35mm film reels in the 1970s, but is not in the collection.
Provenance:
Kathryn Esther Locke and Elizabeth Schwarz, the artist's daughters, lent the material on microfilm reels 420-421 and donated papers in 1972.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Max Bohm papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Christian Scientists  Search this
Painting, American -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Paintings
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
Max Bohm papers, 1873-1970, bulk 1880-1959. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bohmmax
See more items in:
Max Bohm papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bohmmax
Online Media:

Photographs of Chief Wolf Wanna

Creator:
Marotta, Louis  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Linear feet
7 Photographic prints
Container:
Photo-folder 1
Photo-folder 2
Culture:
Apache  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Date:
circa 1910-1914
Summary:
This collection consists of 5 publicity photographic portraits and 2 photographic performance posters of Native American entertainer and performer Chief Wolf Wanna.
Content Description:
The Photographs of Chief Wolf Wanna collection consists of 5 publicity portraits and 2 photographic performance posters of Native American entertainer and performer Chief Wolf Wanna. These materials provide a window into the performing career of Wanna, originally from the U.S. Southwest, who moved to New York City at the turn of the twentieth century. Wanna briefly found celebrity in lecturing, singing, and performing dances which romanticized and to some extent stereotyped Native cultures throughout the U.S.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection are organized into folders.
Biographical / Historical:
Specific details on the life of Chief Wolf Wanna (1880-1919) are somewhat difficult to locate. Wolf Wanna was born to Petro Wanna and Luiza Obanda in Pueblo, Colorado in 1880. He may have possibly attended the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, although no records appear to exist. Around 1905 Wanna lived in San Antonio, Texas, where he worked as a ranch foreman. He later relocated to New York City sometime prior to 1911, and in June of that year married Loretta Colombo in Boston, Massachusetts.

During his early years in New York City he traveled throughout the country, working in motion pictures, vaudeville, and stage performances, and was billed as "Chief Wolf Wanna – Full blood American Indian Performer and Entertainer." Various newspaper articles and playbills identify Wanna as either Diné (Navajo) or Apache, and as the "favorite grandson" of Goyathlay (Geronimo, ca. 1825-1909; Chiricahua Apache). During these early years of his stage career, he reportedly lectured on "Justice to the Indian," spoke about Custer's Last Stand and Sitting Bull, sang a number of songs, and performed Native American dances. In the years 1911-1914, he may have also been involved with Wild West shows.

By 1915 Wanna was re-married to Mary Schlereth, still living in New York City, and self-employed as a Medicine Manufacturer. Sometime around 1915-1916 Wanna was employed to promote "Walsh's Eucalyptus and Menthol Inhaler" by John J. Walsh, whom the 1915 Journal of the American Medical Association considered a street faker. By 1919 Wanna and Schlereth had separated, and he was employed as a "Medical Demonstrator." Chief Wolf Wanna died in November, 1919, in New York.
Related Materials:
The Carl A. Kroch Library of Rare and Manuscript Collections at Cornell University also contains two cloth-backed posters promoting lectures by Chief Wolf Wanna.
Separated Materials:
One oil portrait of Chief Wolf Wanna is in the NMAI Object Collections, and was assigned the object number 24/3981.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Louis Marotta in 1970.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Photographs of Chief Wolf Wanna, NMAI.AC.332; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.332
See more items in:
Photographs of Chief Wolf Wanna
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-332
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Agnes Abbot

Interviewee:
Abbot, Agnes Anne, 1897-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Hibbard, A. T. (Aldro Thompson), 1886-1972  Search this
Woodbury, Charles H. (Charles Herbert), 1864-1940  Search this
Extent:
75 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1981 August 25-1982 January 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Agnes Abbot conducted 1981 August 25-1982 January 15, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Abbot speaks of her early education in Berlin; training at the Child-Walker School in Boston under Aldro T. Hibbard and Charles H. Woodbury; and her early years as a studio art instructor at Wellesley College.
Biographical / Historical:
Agnes A. Abbot (1897-1992) was a painter and watercolorist from Wellesley, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes and 2 sound tape reels. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 2 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- Interviews  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.abbot81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-abbot81

Grace F. Thorpe Collection

Creator:
Thorpe, Grace F.  Search this
Names:
National Congress of American Indians  Search this
United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.)  Search this
Abourezk, James G., 1931-  Search this
Seely, Dagmar  Search this
Thorpe, Charlotte  Search this
Thorpe, Jim, 1887-1953  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Linear feet
2,175 Photographic prints
166 Negatives (photographic)
27 Nitrate negatives
113 Slides (photographs)
5 Contact sheets
Culture:
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Nitrate negatives
Slides (photographs)
Contact sheets
Place:
Oklahoma
Arizona
Japan -- 1940-1950
Pearl River (N.Y.)
Jim Thorpe (Pa.)
Date:
1900-2008
Scope and Contents:
The Grace F. Thorpe Collection (1900-2008) includes documents, photographic prints, slides, negatives and other materials that encapsulate the breadth of Grace Thorpe's life and work as a WWII veteran, Native rights activist, and dedicated daughter, mother and family member. This includes material from her personal, military and professional life. Series 1: Early Life and Family History (1921-1940) includes materials related to the Thorpe family including photographs of Grace's parents, Jim and Iva at the Carlisle Indian School as well as letters and photographs from Grace as a young girl. Series 2: Military Career and Life in Japan (1943-1950) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives from Grace's time as a Corporal in the Women's Army Corps and her life as a wife and mother in Japan following the war. This series also includes the medals Grace received for her service in WWII. Series 3: Pearl River, New York and Business (1950-1967) contains documents and photographs from Grace's time as a mother and business woman in Pearl River, New York. Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism (1968-1977) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives from Grace's work with various Native American organizations on economic and civil rights issues following her move to Arizona in 1967. Series 5: Jim Thorpe and His Legacy (1912-1984) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives regarding Jim Thorpe and the work by the Thorpe family to restore Jim's Olympic record and keep his legacy alive. Series 6: Later Years (1979-2007) includes documents, photographic prints and negatives from Grace's life in Oklahoma, her work as an environmental activist, and other activities later in her life.
Arrangement:
This collection has been arranged in six series chronologically based on how the collection was received with minor changes. The Series' include--Series 1: Early Life and Family History (1921-1940), Series 2: Military Career and Life in Japan (1943-1950), Series 3: Pearl River, New York and Business (1950-1967), Series 4: Working on Behalf of Native Americans and Activism (1968-1977), Series 5: Jim Thorpe and His Legacy (1912-1984), and Series 6: Later Years (1979-2007). There is some chronological crossover between Series 5: Jim Thorpe and His Legacy and the rest of the collection.

The physical arrangement of the materials was determined by storage needs.
Biographical / Historical:
Grace Frances Thorpe was born in Yale, Oklahoma on December 10, 1921 to parents James (Jim) Francis Thorpe (Sac and Fox (Sauk)) and Iva Margaret Miller Thorpe. Jim, already a famed athelete and olympic medalist, had met Iva as students at Carlisle Indian School and were married in 1913. Grace was the youngest of four, Gail Margaret, James and Charlotte Marie though her brother James died from polio at a young age. When Iva and Jim divorced in 1923, Iva and the girls moved to Chicago while Jim moved to California to pursue work in the movies. For school, Grace attended St. Mary's Academy, Sacred Heart, in Oklahoma and Haskell Institute in Kansas, which was where her father had attended school.

In 1943 Grace worked briefly at the Ford Motor Company before enlisting in the Women's Army Corps (WAC) during WWII. After attending training and graduating from the WAAC Training Center in Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia, Thorpe attained the rank of Corporal, and served as a Recruiter for the Women's Army Corps stationed in Tucson and Camp White in Oregon before being assigned overseas to the New Guinea Campaign. From 1944-1945 Corporal Thorpe was stationed in New Guinea, Philippines and Japan. Following an Honorable Discharge in 1945, Grace remained in Japan during the occupation with her husband Lieutenant Fred W. Seely (1918-2008) whom she married in June 1946. She became employed at General MacArthur Headquarters as Chief of the Recruitment Section, Department of Army Civilians, Tokyo, Japan. Both of her children, Dagmar (1946-) and Paul Thorpe (1948-1964) were born during this time in Japan.

Grace and her children left Japan and arrived in San Francisco on April 20, 1950. They lived in Pearl River, New York from late 1950 to the mid 1960s. She first became employed as a Hostess with Welcome Wagon upon completing training in July of 1951 and later became a supervisor, business machine salesperson, and territorial account executive for the Yellow Pages with the Reuben H. Donnelly Corp. earning recognition in Distinguished Sales Performance. She completed a course in effective speaking and human relations conducted by the Dale Carnegie Institute and won a Best Speech Award. In 1967, Grace moved to Arizona where she became involved with American Indian tribes. Grace was appointed Economic Development Conference Coordinator for the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)'s 1968 and 1969 conferences. In 1969-1970, Grace joined Native American Activists at the occupation of Alcatraz Island for three months and managed their publicity. She then served as a Congressional Intern from 1974-1975 for Senator James Abourezk. Grace was later appointed Legislative Assistant with the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs and as a Task Force Program and Planning Analyst for the American Indian Policy Review Commission. During this time period she attended—The Antioch School of Law, Washington DC; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Research Fellow), Boston, Massachusetts; University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Northeastern University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. During this time she also began working on the restoration of her father's 1912 Olympic titles as well as other projects to recognize and honor her father.

After returning to her tribal homeland in Oklahoma she became active in tribal affairs and in 1983 successfully restored her father's Olympic record. She also conducted genealogical research on the Thorpe family. Her article "The Jim Thorpe Family' was published as a two-part series in the Chronicles of Oklahoma in 1981. In later years, Grace served her tribe as a tribal judge, health commissioner, and became an environmental activist opposing nuclear waste on tribal lands. She remained active in Native American issues, a matriarch of the Thorpe family, and involved with her granddaughter, Tena Malotte, and her great-grandchildren, Aspen and Huna.

Biographical note provided by Dagmar Seely, daughter to Grace Thorpe, with additions by Rachel Menyuk, Processing Archivist.
Separated Materials:
27 nitrate negatives have been moved offsite and are being housed at the National Anthropological Archives.
Provenance:
Donated by Dr. Dagmar Seely and Tena Malotte, 2015.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Yellow pages  Search this
United States. Army. Women's Army Corps  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- New Guinea.  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japan.  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Philippines.  Search this
Alcatraz Island (Calif.) -- History -- Indian occupation, 1969-1971.  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Grace F. Thorpe Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.085
See more items in:
Grace F. Thorpe Collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-085
Online Media:

Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
96 Photomechanical prints (photogravure proofs)
184 Printing plates (copper printing plates)
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Skokomish  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Squaxon  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Santa Ysabel (Santa Isabela) Diegueño  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Serrano  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Kupangaxwichem (Kupa/Cupeño)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Southern Mewuk (Southern Miwok)  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photomechanical prints
Printing plates
Photogravures
Photographs
Date:
1899-1927
circa 1980
Summary:
The Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian include photogravure printing plates and associated proofs made from Curtis photographs and used in the publication of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The bulk of the images are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps.
Scope and Contents:
The collection comprises 183 photogravure plates (101 folio and 82 octavo) and 96 associated proofs used in the printing of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The original photographs used to make the photogravures were made circa 1903-1926 and the photogravure plates were made in 1907-1930. The bulk are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps. About half of the proofs in the collection are originals used for Curtis's publication, though the collection also includes proofs made in the process of later publication by the Classic Gravure Company (circa 1980). Vintage proofs include handwritten notes, likely made by Curtis Studio employees in Seattle and Los Angeles. Many of the photogravure plates do not have matching proofs; in particular, there are no proofs for the octavo plates.
Arrangement:
The plates and proofs are arranged by the volume of The North American Indian in which they were published. They are described in this finding aid by the caption and plate number with which they were published.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer best known for his monumental and now-controversial project, the twenty-volume publication The North American Indian. Here he sought to document in words and pictures the "vanishing race" of American Indians.

Born in Wisconsin in 1868, Edward Curtis grew up on his family's farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, from 1874 to 1887. In 1887, he and his father Johnson Curtis settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, and the rest of the family joined them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, the burden of providing for his mother and siblings fell to 20-year-old Edward, and Edward set out to do so through his photography. In 1891, Curtis moved to the booming city of Seattle and bought into a joint photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers" with Thomas Guptill; the enterprise quickly became a premier portrait studio for Seattle's elite. In 1895, Curtis made his first "Indian photograph" depicting Princess Angeline, daughter of the chief for whom Seattle had been named. The following year he earned his first medal from the National Photographic Convention for his "genre studies."

In 1899, Edward Curtis joined the Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer, a position which allowed him to learn from anthropologists C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell while documenting the landscapes and peoples of the Alaskan coast. This expedition and the resulting friendship with Grinnell helped to foster Curtis's ultimate goal to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, The North American Indian). Curtis made several trips to reservations from 1900 to 1904, including a trip with Grinnell to Montana in 1900 and multiple trips to the Southwest, including the Hopi Reservation. He also hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank A. Rinehart, to manage the Curtis studio in his absence, a decision which would prove more and more fruitful as Curtis spent less and less time in Seattle.

In 1906, Curtis struck a deal with financier J. P. Morgan, whereby Morgan would support a company – The North American Indian, Inc. – with $15,000 for five years, by which time the project was expected to have ended. Systematic fieldwork for the publication began in earnest that summer season, with Curtis accompanied by a team of ethnological researchers and American Indian assistants. Arguably the most important member of Curtis' field team was William Myers, a former newspaperman who collected much of the ethnological data and completed most of the writing for the project. The first volume, covering Navajo and Apache peoples, was published at the end of 1907, but already Morgan's funding was incapable of meeting Curtis's needs. Despite heaping praise from society's elite, Curtis spent much of his time struggling to find people and institutions willing to subscribe to the expensive set of volumes. After the initial five years, only eight of the proposed twenty volumes had been completed. Fieldwork and publication continued with the support of J. P. Morgan, but Curtis's home life suffered because of his prolonged absences.

In 1919, Curtis's wife Clara was awarded a divorce settlement which included the entire Curtis studio in Seattle. Exhausted and bankrupt, Edward Curtis moved with his daughter Beth Magnuson to Los Angeles, where they operated a new Curtis Studio and continued work on the volumes; volume 12 was published in 1922. The constant financial strain forced Myers to leave the North American Indian team after volume 18 (fieldwork in 1926) and Curtis made his last trip to photograph and gather data for volume 20 in 1927. After the final volumes were published in 1930, Curtis almost completely faded from public notice until his work was "rediscovered" and popularized in the 1970s.

Curtis's "salvage ethnology," as scholar Mick Gidley describes it, was mildly controversial even during his life and has become ever more so as his legacy deepens. In his quest to photograph pre-colonial Indian life through a twentieth-century lens, he often manipulated and constructed history as much as he recorded it: he staged reenactments, added props, and removed evidence of twentieth-century influences on "primitive" life. Curtis's work continues to shape popular conceptions of American Indians and so, while problematic, his legacy--his vision of American Indian life--continues to be relevant.
Related Materials:
NMAI also holds Edward Curtis photographs documenting the Harriman Expedition (1899) as well as platinum prints and photogravures of the images published in The North American Indian.

The Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives holds Edward Curtis prints submitted for copyright (Photo Lot 59) as well as many of his original negatives, photographs, and papers.

Steve Kern donated photogravure plates to the Center for Creative Photography and the Seattle Art Museum at the same time that he donated this set to MAI.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Steven and Arlene Kern to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1984.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-080
Online Media:

The Puritans Were Not Tolerant of Other Religions

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-12-14T16:30:01.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_4Med0n-Yyao

Women in Jazz | Toshiko Akiyoshi behind the poster

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-10T17:10:01.000Z
YouTube Category:
Music  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_LfqyA3i9870

The Network Behind the Cosmic Web | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T15:11:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_qaRuVS2d-d4

Rwanda Institute for Conservation Agriculture | Nature–Design Triennial

Creator:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-07-02T16:49:15.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Design  Search this
See more by:
cooperhewitt
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
YouTube Channel:
cooperhewitt
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_2e0Ar1nVU8Q

A Half Century of Fellowship: Wyeth Foundation for American Art Symposium

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-10-22T14:36:18.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_3TIJc-6rOJk

Phocanema decipiens

Collector:
A. R. Belson  Search this
Prep Count:
1
Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Remarks:
Vial/bottle
Place:
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, North America
Collection Date:
Oct 1971
Common name:
Nematodes
Published Name:
Phocanema decipiens
Other Numbers:
USNPC Accession (Catalog) : 072138.00
USNM Number:
1367715
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Nematoda
US National Parasite Collection
Parasite Collection
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3a8c7e5fa-1f00-470f-bafb-24b1bbe285d2
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_12022017

Amphitrite figulus

Collector:
Dr. Marian H. Pettibone  Search this
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
North Atlantic Ocean  Search this
Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Place:
Boston, Beverly Harbor, Massachusetts, United States, North Atlantic Ocean
Collection Date:
28 Aug 1953
Common name:
Polychaetes
Published Name:
Amphitrite figulus (Dalyell, 1853)
USNM Number:
44476
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Annelida
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3170019e8-d8bf-4259-9821-69ad9ba7632e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_877611

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