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Louis A. Holman papers and Holman's Print Shop records, ca. 1870-1977

Creator:
Holman, Louis A. (Louis Arthur), 1866-1939  Search this
Subject:
Nash, Ray  Search this
Datziel, John Sanderson  Search this
Cole, Timothy  Search this
Holman, Richard Bourne  Search this
Heintzelman, Arthur William  Search this
Andrews, John  Search this
Topic:
Prints  Search this
Prints, American  Search this
Map printing  Search this
Art  Search this
Wood-engraving  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8138
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210309
AAA_collcode_holmloui
Theme:
The Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210309

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
de Hauke, César  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de  Search this
Arenberg  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L.  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
MM. Jacques Seligmann & fils  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc  Search this
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
The Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
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Online Media:

Irving F. Burton papers, 1816-1967

Creator:
Burton, Irving F. (Irving Frederick), 1918-  Search this
Subject:
Sargent, John Singer  Search this
Sloan, John French  Search this
Johnson, Eastman  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo  Search this
West, Benjamin  Search this
Whistler, James McNeill  Search this
Gropper, William  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7184
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209321
AAA_collcode_burtirvi
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Government Sponsorship of the Arts
The Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209321

Leo H. Baekeland Papers

Creator:
Baekeland, L. H. (Leo Hendrik), 1863-1944  Search this
Names:
Bakelite Corporation  Search this
Nepera Chemical Co.  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (49 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Professional papers
Clippings
Laboratory notes
Personal correspondence
Photographs
Notebooks
Diaries
Date:
1976
1863 - 1968
Summary:
The papers document Leo H. Baekeland, a Belgian born chemist who invented Velox photographic paper (1893) and Bakelite (1907), an inexpensive, nonflammable, versatile plastic. The papers include student notebooks; private laboratory notebooks and journals; commercial laboratory notes; diaries; patents; technical papers; biographies; newspaper clippings; maps; graphs; blueprints; account books; batch books; formula books; order books; photographs; and correspondence regarding Baekeland, 1887-1943.
Scope and Contents:
Baekeland documented his life prolifically through diaries, laboratory notebooks, photographs, and correspondence. These constitute the bulk of the collection. The Bakelite company history is also incompletely documented in this collection through Baekeland's correspondence, the commercial laboratory notebooks, and some company ledgers.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Reference Materials, 1863-1868 and undated

Subseries 1.1: Biographical, 1880-1965

Subseries 1.2:Company History, 1910-1961

Subseries 1.3: Related Interests, 1863-1968 and undated

Series 2: Published and Unpublished Writings (by Leo H. Baekeland), 1884-1945

Series 3: Correspondence, 1888-1963 Subseries 3.1: Personal Correspondence, 1916-1943

Subseries 3.2: Charitable Donations, 1916-1938

Subseries 3.3: Family Correspondence, 1888-1963

Subseries 3.4: Clubs and Associations, 1916-1943

Series 4: Diaries, 1907-1943

Series 5: Reading and Lecture Notes, 1878-1886

Series 6, Laboratory Notebooks, 1893-1915

Series 7: Commercial Laboratory Notebooks, 1910-1920

Series 8: Bakelite Company, 1887-1945

Series 9, Patents, 1894-1940

Series 10: Bakelite Corporation Ledgers, 1910-1924; 1935; 1939

Series 11: Photographs, 1889-1950 and undated

Subseries 11.1: Photographs, 1889-1950 and undated

Subseries 11.2: Film Negatives, 1900-1941 and undated

Subseries 11.3: Photoprints, 1894-1941

Subseries 11.4: Stereographs, 1888-1902 and undated

Subseries 11.5: Film and Glass Plate Negatives, 1899-1900 and undated

Series 12: Audio Materials, 1976
Biographical / Historical:
Leo Hendrik Baekeland was an industrial chemist famous for his invention of Bakelite, the first moldable synthetic polymer, and for his invention of Velox photographic paper. Baekeland's career as an inventor and innovator was punctuated by an urge to improve existing technologies and a willingness to experiment both meticulously and daringly. Born in Ghent, Belgium in 1863, Baekeland was a distinguished chemistry student and became a young professor at the University of Ghent. He had a long standing interest in photography and sought to further photographic technology with his expertise in chemistry. In 1887 he obtained his first patent for a dry plate which contained its own developer and could be developed in a tray of water. With the support of a business partner/faculty associate, Jules Guequier, he formed a company named Baekeland et Cie to produce the plate, but the venture failed due to lack of capital.

On August 8, 1889, he married Celine Swarts, daughter of his academic mentor Theodore Swarts, Dean of the Faculty of Sciences at the University of Ghent. After his wedding he travelled to different countries using a traveling scholarship he had been awarded two years previously. His travels ended in the United States where he was offered a job researching chemical problems associated with manufacturing bromide papers and films with A. and H.T. Anthony and Company, a photographic supply producer. Leo and Celine Baekeland had three children: George, Nina and Jenny (1890-1895).

He left Anthony and Company in 1891 to be a consulting chemist. During that time he invented a photographic print paper using silver chloride which could be developed in artificial light instead of sunlight and thus offered more flexibility and consistency to photographers. In 1893, with financial support from Leonard Jacobi, a scrap metal dealer from San Francisco, he formed the Nepera Chemical Company in Yonkers, New York, to manufacture "gaslight" paper under the trade name Velox. The paper became quite popular and the company expanded its operations after its first three years. Finally, George Eastman bought the company for a reported $750,000 which afforded Baekeland the time to conduct his own research in a laboratory he set up on his estate, "Snug Rock," in Yonkers.

Baekeland worked on problems of electrolysis of salt and the production of synthetic resins. He was hired as a consultant to work with Clinton P. Townsend to perfect Townsend's patented electrolytic cell. Baekeland's work there contributed to the success of the Hooke Electrochemical Company which began in operations in Niagara Falls in 1905.

Simultaneously, in 1902 Baekeland began researching reactions of phenol and formaldehyde, and by 1907 was able to control the reactions and produce a moldable plastic (oxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride) which he named Bakelite. Although the process was not perfected for another couple of years, Baekeland applied for a patent for Bakelite right away. He announced his discovery to the scientific community in 1909, and in 1910 formed the General Bakelite Company. Bakelite was a thermosetting resin that, unlike Celluloid became permanently solid when heated. It was virtually impervious to heat, acids, or caustic substances. It could be molded into a wide variety of shapes and was an excellent electric insulator that came to replace hard rubber and amber for electrical and industrial applications. It was also suitable for a wide variety of consumer products such as billiard balls, jewelry, pot handles, telephones, toasters, electric plugs, and airplane instrument knobs. Two companies challenged Bakelite with significant competition, Condensite Corporation of America and Redmanol Chemical Products Company. Bakelite finally merged with these two companies in 1922 to become the Bakelite Corporation. Union Carbide finally bought the corporation in 1939.

Baekeland sustained his interest in photography by taking numerous photographs throughout his lifetime. He also devoted much of his spare time to professional societies and received various honorary degrees and awards such as the Perkin Medal. He had several hobbies such as boating, wine and beer making, and, exotic plants. He also traveled extensively throughout the world, which is documented in his diaries and photographs.

Baekeland spent his final years mostly in his Coconut Grove, Florida home where he became increasingly eccentric until his mind failed him and he was institutionalized. He died in 1943 at the age of eighty.

Scope and Content: Baekeland documented his life prolifically through diaries, laboratory notebooks, photographs, and correspondence. These constitute the bulk of the collection. The Bakelite company history is also incompletely documented in this collection through Baekeland's correspondence, the commercial laboratory notebooks, and some company ledgers.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Albany Billiard Ball Company Records (AC0011)

Celluloid Corporation Records (AC0009)

J. Harry DuBois Collection on the History of Plastics (AC0008)

Materials at Other Organizations

The Hagley Museum and Library, Manuscripts and Archives Department in Delaware also several related collections including: the Directors of Industrial Research Records, 1929 -982; the Du Pont Viscoloid Company, Survey of the Plastics Field, 1932; The Society of the Plastics Industry, 1937-1987; the Roy J. Plunkett Collection, 1910-1994 (inventor of Teflon); and the Gordon M. Kline Collection, 1903.
Separated Materials:
The National Museum of American History, Division Medicine and Science has several artifacts associated with Baekeland including the original "Bakalizer" the apparatus in which Bakelite was first made. See accession numbers: 1977.0368; 1979.1179; 1981.0976; 1982.0034; 1983.0524; 1984.0138.
Provenance:
The bulk of the collection was donated to the National Museum of American History's Division of Physical Sciences in November, 1981, by Celine Karraker, Leo H. Baekeland's granddaughter.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Phenolic resins  Search this
Travel -- Photographs  Search this
Chemists -- 1880-1970  Search this
Inventors -- 1880-1970  Search this
Plastics -- 1880-1970  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Professional papers -- 1880-1970
Clippings -- 1880-1970
Laboratory notes
Personal correspondence -- 1880-1970
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Glass -- 19th-20th century
Notebooks -- 1880-1970
Diaries -- 1880-1970
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 19th-20th century
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Nitrate -- 19th-20th century
Citation:
Leo Baekeland Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0005
See more items in:
Leo H. Baekeland Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0005
Online Media:

Why Is Ivory So Precious? And More Questions From Our Readers

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 08 Jul 2020 14:30:00 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_5cfbda8acaf7d04c54655f84d29b4155

Grayce Uyehara Papers

Topic:
Social Justice
Creator:
Uyehara, Grayce  Search this
Donor:
Uyehara, Paul M.  Search this
Uyehara, Paul M.  Search this
Names:
Japanese American Citizens' League  Search this
Extent:
18 Cubic feet (18 boxes)
Culture:
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Audio cassettes
Awards
Compact discs
Letters (correspondence)
Memoranda
Minutes
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Oral history
Pamphlets
Photographs
Reports
Slides
Speeches
Videocassettes
Date:
1929-2008
Summary:
The papers document the life and activism of Grayce Uyehara who was a pivotal figure within the Redress Movement and sought reparations for the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.
Content Description:
The papers document the life and activism of Grayce Uyehara who was a pivotal figure within the Redress Movement and sought reparations for the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The collection materials span different social justice topics that Uyehara was involved with outside of Japanese American communities. Geographically, the materials are primarily from her time in Stockton, California; Rohwer, Arkansas; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Washington, D.C., as well as other places.

The papers include materials relating to Uyehara's own incarceration; her lobbying work with the Japanese American Citizens League; other activism and grass roots activities; speeches; campaign materials; articles; memos; financial reports; work journals; photographs of the Uyeharas; community newspapers; film slides of redress; personal letters; internal correspondence; leadership conference notes; educational materials; interviews; awards; student theses; pamphlets; booklets; oral histories; maps; meeting minutes; newsletters; directories; and congressional records.
Arrangement:
The collection is unarranged.
Biographical:
Grayce Uyehara was a social worker and pivotal Redress Movement activist who helped lead the reparations campaign for the wrongful incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. Uyehara was born Ritsuko Kaneda on July 4th, 1919, in Stockton, California. Her parents named her Ritsu, which roughly translates to notions of law and independence, informed by their understanding of the significance of Independence Day. Her father, Tsuyanoshi Kaneda, worked in agriculture and business and performed domestic tasks. Through this, he developed a reliable business working for lawyers, doctors, and school administrators. Her mother, Tome Kaneda, raised their children. Her mother was strict but also encouraged her children to excel at whatever they did. She enrolled them in Japanese and music classes and expected them to help out at church and in the community. Uyehara was the second of seven children, and as the eldest daughter was expected to be a role model for her younger siblings.

In high school, Uyehara belonged to a Japanese student club, excelled in her schoolwork, and was part of the marching band, playing the bassoon. She also played piano for Sunday school at church, which had both English and Japanese services. She became involved in the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), participating in its oratorical contests. Because of her community service, the elders and her peers in the Japanese American community respected Uyehara.

Uyehara majored in music at the University of the Pacific. She believed music would allow her to start a career as a local Japanese American piano teacher and church organist. She worked many jobs to pay for tuition while her parents helped cover her costs. While in college, she became involved in the Japanese American Young People's Christian Conference (YPCC) in Northern California. Uyehara continued to be recognized for her leadership and competence by becoming the chairperson of the Sacramento YPCC as a college senior.

In January 1942, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Uyehara was asked by the university president to become an instructor to teach Japanese to young men in military service at the local army base. Citing her patriotic duty, she accepted the position. She was able to finish school before being incarcerated, partly because her mother pushed her to do well and to stay in school. When the Uyehara family prepared to leave their home in April, one of her professors offered to hold their household belongings. Although she satisfied her graduation requirements, she received her degree in absentia. Two of her siblings were also in college when their academic careers were interrupted. She was very upset that her parents did not get to see her graduate because they had sacrificed so much.

The Kaneda family was forcibly relocated to the Stockton Temporary Detention Center in May 1942. At the Stockton Center, she put her service skills to work and assisted other Nisei inmates in organizing a makeshift school for Japanese American youth. Located on the site of the county fairgrounds, the school was forced to hold classes in the grandstands. Through one of her father's contacts, she was able to secure a donation of books, and she became the supervisor in charge of elementary education. Some of the young soldiers that she taught at the base also came to visit her. She spent four months there, and in September of 1942, her family was notified that they would be forcibly moved to Rohwer, Arkansas. While her family traveled ahead, she stayed behind to help close the Stockton Temporary Detention Center.

At Rohwer, Uyehara remained active and continued to hone her leadership and organizational skills. She helped create church services for young people, played the piano at various events, and taught music in junior high-level classes. During this time, she realized that her previous career path as a piano teacher was not realistic. She discovered that the Minnesota State Teachers College was offering scholarships to eligible camp inmates and decided to pursue the opportunity. She left the camp in January 1943 with three other young Nisei. She lived at a boarding house with another Nisei student from the Tule Lake incarceration camp. She had an active social life but found the classes to be unchallenging. During the summer in St. Paul, she stayed with a woman who was active with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, a liberal group who spoke out against war. Unsure of what to do next, she then returned to Rohwer where she worked at the camp hospital, continually checking for jobs. She found a job listing in Virginia where one of her younger sisters was attending school, and she left Rohwer for the last time. In Virginia, she worked as an editorial secretary. She was grateful that it was not a service job, which was the norm for young Japanese American women. Uyehara's brother, Ben, was attending Temple University in Philadelphia during this time. He assured her that the Quakers would help the Kaneda family with moving from the camp. Convinced, she packed up again and moved further north.

In Philadelphia, Uyehara found an apartment in the Fellowship House, an organization providing workshops on race relations in the city. She began working for Family Services, a social service agency in the Germantown area of Philadelphia as a receptionist and typist, but she also conducted intake interviews with the clients of the agency. She further continued her role as a community leader by becoming involved with the International Institute which assisted immigrants settling in Philadelphia, and became concerned with the needs of the Japanese American population moving in. Working closely with the Institute, she helped form the Philadelphia Nisei Council, which coordinated with the War Relocation Authority. She was the Nikkei representative of the Philadelphia Committee of Social Service Agencies whose role was to assist with relocation problems. Uyehara developed a handbook that detailed practical issues such as the cost of living in the city, how to rent an apartment, and where to find jobs. The Council began a newsletter, so the community could be aware of new people moving in to the area and of community events. She also started youth groups to provide activities and social interaction for high school and college-age youth coming out of the camp experience.

In Philadelphia, Uyehara became re-acquainted with Hiroshi Uyehara, whose mother knew Grayce's mother. They briefly met in Rohwer. He worked at a nearby Westinghouse factory as a draftsman. He had to receive an Army and Navy clearance, and during the wait went on strike. He became a volunteer at the International Institute where they reconnected. They married in 1946. Later, she and her husband were among those who formed the Philadelphia Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) to influence more people on social issues affecting Japanese Americans in a national context. Afterwards, the director of the International Institute arranged for the board to pay her graduate school tuition at the University of Pennsylvania while she worked as a social worker for the agency. She graduated in 1947 with a Masters in Social Work. Within two years of working in the community, she was asked to serve on the Philadelphia Fellowship Commission. She used this opportunity to highlight the perspectives of Japanese Americans.

The Uyehara's first son, Chris, was born in May of 1948. In 1950, they had a second child, Lisa. The International Institute asked her to return as a volunteer, and she started a program to help American servicemen and Japanese brides returning from Japan to adjust to a new life. She worked directly with Japanese women in teaching American customs, including etiquette and cooking lessons. She also provided individual counseling. She was very active with the local Parent Teacher Association (PTA) and became president, creating parent education programs and raising funds for the local school library. Uyehara was also very active in the National Association of Social Workers, the Cub Scouts, the local Presbyterian church, the West Chester Human Relationships Council, and the League of Women Voters. Later, she had two more children, Larry, in 1952, and Paul, in 1955. During this time, she was asked to help in establishing the first day care center for working mothers in West Chester. Despite the low pay, she was instrumental in establishing the center. In addition, she got involved in civil rights issues for African Americans, especially for school desegregation and upgrading placement rates for African American students.

In 1972, Uyehara served as the governor for the Eastern District Council of the JACL. She was on the National Board, and was the vice-president for General Operations, Chapter President, the National Civil Rights Committee, and the National Scholarship Committee. In 1974, Uyehara was the first woman to hold a JACL elected office. From 1973 to 1974, she was on the National Education Committee. She used her organizational skills to rearrange some existing educational programs so that the history of Japanese Americans could become more well known throughout the country. She also prioritized projects within the committee to make the programs more attractive to potential funders. Her ability to effectively organize with the JACL was influenced by the lessons learned in reading Years of Infamy by Michi Weglyn, and in the organizing lessons within African American communities after Brown v. Board of Education was passed.

In 1978, Uyehara was present at the 1978 Salt Lake City Convention when JACL decided to pursue redress, and was asked to be on the National Committee for Redress. Using her experience in improving school districts for African Americans, she worked hard to generate educational materials, bombard congressional offices and speak at various events and community organizations. She was also effective in gaining support from the Presbyterian Church and Jewish organizations. By 1985 she devised a plan to reach people on the East Coast, since there weren't many JACL chapters in major cities there. She retired from her job as a school social worker in order to help the JACL achieve redress. In the spring, she transferred to the Legislative Education Committee (LEC). Her philosophy was "If you're going to do it, you do it right. You just don't talk about it".

Uyehara did a lot of traveling between Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Her husband was very supportive during this time. The leadership in Washington consisted of JACL officials and four Nikkei congressmen, who recognized Uyehara's work in coalition building and developing political relationships. Whenever a new member of Congress signed on to the Civil Liberties Act, she would send out a press statement, and any significant chapter events would be announced through her "Action Alerts." She also led congressional meetings with people like Senator Inouye, Ralph Neas, and Mike Masaoka because she was very familiar with the legislative process.

Uyehara sent information "vernaculars" to newspapers and newsletter organizations in New York and Los Angeles as well as the Pacific Citizen, so that people could see progress taking place within the redress effort. She urged people to initiate contacts in states like Florida and North Carolina to ensure votes were not lost. If an area had lower numbers of Japanese American constituents, she would ask different contacts to support the redress effort and lobby congress to vote for it. She also used her existing relationships with the American Friends Service Committee, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Jewish war veterans, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B'nai B'irth and the American Jewish Committee. Greatly aided by her efforts, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 was passed. It issued a formal apology from the government and $20,000 to each surviving incarceree. This act also required monuments, museums, and classrooms to teach the history of Japanese American incarceration so similar discrimination would never happen again to others.

After redress was passed, Uyehara was still actively involved in community organizing. She chaired the JACL Legacy Fund campaign, which raised over $5 million to support other JACL programs. She engaged with the Japanese House and Garden in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park, speaking at educational engagements about redress and organizing efforts for residents in her retirement community through the Diversity Committee and the Mental Health Committee. She was a passionate advocate for Japanese Canadian redress. She also helped coordinate the Philadelphia area fundraising effort for the National Japanese American Memorial Foundation. In addition, she enjoyed spending more time with family, gardening, and playing the piano.

In 2014, Uyehara was honored by Asian Americans United with its Standing Up for Justice Award. Uyehara passed away on June 22, 2014, at Virtual Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly, New Jersey. Japanese Americans remember Uyehara for her effectiveness and dedication as an activist, community leader, and the mother of Redress. Her experiences of being discriminated against and having to work to support the family at a young age sensitized her to the plight of working women and the economically disadvantaged. This greatly informed her service not only for Japanese Americans, but for all communities in America.

Sources

Susan Nakaoka. "Nisei Political Activists: The Stories of Five Japanese American Women Master of Arts., (University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 1999) found in Grayce Uyehara Papers, Box 1, Folder N, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

Gammage, Jeff. "Grayce Uyehara, fought for interned Japanese-Americans." The Philadelphia Inquirer, https://www.inquirer.com/philly/obituaries/20140624_Grayce_Uyehara fought_for_interned_Japanese-Americans.html June 23, 2014. Last Accessed March 18, 2019.
Provenance:
Collection donated to the Archives Center in 2019 by Paul M. Uyehara.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Civil rights movements  Search this
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Newspapers -- 20th century  Search this
Reparations for historical injustices  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles -- 20th century
Audio cassettes
Awards
Compact discs
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Memoranda
Minutes
Newsclippings
Newsletters
Oral history
Pamphlets
Photographs
Reports -- 20th century
Slides
Speeches -- 20th century
Videocassettes
Citation:
Grayce Uyehara Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1480
See more items in:
Grayce Uyehara Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1480
Online Media:

Elgin Wristwatch

Manufacturer:
Elgin National Watch Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
leather (watch wrist strap material)
metal (part of watch case material)
silver (watch case material)
Measurements:
overall: 3 in x 2 3/4 in x 7/8 in; 7.62 cm x 6.985 cm x 2.2225 cm
Object Name:
watch
Place made:
United States
Date made:
ca 1917
Credit Line:
Donald Bronkema
ID Number:
ME.333963
Catalog number:
333963
Accession number:
304914
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Industry & Manufacturing
Measuring & Mapping
Clothing & Accessories
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a6-a082-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_851776

Automatic Screw Making Machine

Manufacturer:
Waltham Watch Company  Search this
Designer:
Woerd, Vander  Search this
Physical Description:
nickel plated cast iron (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 3/8 in x 20 7/8 in x 20 1/4 in; 26.3525 cm x 53.0225 cm x 51.435 cm
Object Name:
automatic screw machine
Date made:
ca 1875
ID Number:
ME.316564
Catalog number:
316564
Accession number:
225117
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Measuring & Mapping
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746aa-81b4-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1203377

Watch movement, Waltham

Maker:
Howard & Davis  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 1/2 in x 1 13/16 in; 1.27 cm x 4.60375 cm
Object Name:
pocket watch movement with dial and hands
watch movement
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston, Roxbury
Date made:
1853
Credit Line:
Abraham Burnstine
ID Number:
ME.222557
Catalog number:
222557
Accession number:
41705
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Measuring & Mapping
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b2-d45e-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_851193
Online Media:

Watch movement, Waltham

Maker:
American Waltham Watch Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/2 in x 1 3/4 in x 1/2 in; 6.35 cm x 4.445 cm x 1.27 cm
Object Name:
watch movement
Place made:
United States
Date made:
ca 1867
Credit Line:
W. E. Emory
ID Number:
ME.271558
Serial number:
520977
Catalog number:
271558
Accession number:
53268
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Measuring & Mapping
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b2-d891-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_851346
Online Media:

Watch movement, Waltham

Manufacturer:
American Waltham Watch Co.  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 46 mm; 1 13/16 in
Object Name:
watch movement
Place made:
United States
Date made:
1862
Credit Line:
John Hansen
ID Number:
ME.252965
Catalog number:
252965
Accession number:
49576
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Measuring & Mapping
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b2-d45f-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_856097
Online Media:

Keuffel & Esser Military Protractor

Maker:
Keuffel & Esser Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
xylonite (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .4 cm x 15 cm x 4.6 cm; 5/32 in x 5 29/32 in x 1 13/16 in
Object Name:
protractor
Place made:
United States: New York, New York City
Date made:
ca 1918
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Protractor  Search this
Artillery  Search this
Maps  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mrs. Llewellyn N. Edwards
ID Number:
MA.325515
Accession number:
257193
Catalog number:
325515
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Protractors
Science & Mathematics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a7-3ee8-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_904341

A. H. Abbott & Co. Ruler

Maker:
A. H. Abbott & Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
boxwood (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .4 cm x 17.1 cm x 3.2 cm; 5/32 in x 6 23/32 in x 1 1/4 in
Object Name:
rule
scale rule
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
ca 1906
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Education  Search this
Credit Line:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana
ID Number:
MA.293320.2819
Accession number:
293320
Catalog number:
293320.2819
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Measuring & Mapping
Scale Rules
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a5-21f4-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_690255
Online Media:

Reconstruction

Copyright holder; publisher:
Bateman, Horatio  Search this
Lithographer:
Giles, John Lawrence  Search this
Printer:
Ratellier, Francis  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
image: 8 in x 10 in; 20.32 cm x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
Lithograph
Object Type:
Lithograph
Place printed:
United States: New York, New York City
Date made:
1867
Subject:
Carriages  Search this
Education  Search this
Chronology: 1860-1869  Search this
Patriotism and Patriotic Symbols  Search this
U.S. National Government, legislative branch  Search this
Architecture, Educational Buildings  Search this
Reform Movements  Search this
Indians  Search this
Blacks  Search this
Architecture, Domestic Buildings  Search this
Architecture, Industrial Buildings  Search this
Civil War  Search this
Related event:
Reconstruction  Search this
Credit Line:
Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection
ID Number:
DL.60.2554
Catalog number:
60.2554
Accession number:
228146
228146
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a2-d0a0-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_324694

General. Robert E. Lee

Depicted:
Lee, Robert E.  Search this
Copyright holder:
Kelly, Thomas  Search this
Printer:
Spohni, G.  Search this
Lithographic artist:
Hohenstein, Anton  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
image: 24 1/4 in x 18 5/8 in; 61.595 cm x 47.3075 cm
Object Name:
Lithograph
Object Type:
Lithograph
Place made:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Date made:
1867
Subject:
Civil War  Search this
Furnishings  Search this
Communication, letter writing  Search this
Chronology: 1860-1869  Search this
Uniforms, Military  Search this
Related Publication:
Peters, Harry T.. America on Stone
Southern Cultures
Holtzer, Harold and Gabor S. Boritt. The Confederate Image: Prints of the Lost Cause
Credit Line:
Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection
ID Number:
DL.60.3118
Catalog number:
60.3118
Accession number:
228146
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b5-1bb6-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_325378

Duboscq Colorimeter

Maker:
Bausch & Lomb Optical Company  Search this
Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 40.7 cm x 16 cm x 14 cm; 16 1/32 in x 6 5/16 in x 5 1/2 in
case: 38 cm x 18.5 cm x 17.5 cm; 14 15/16 in x 7 5/16 in x 6 7/8 in
overall in case: 14 7/8 in x 7 9/16 in x 6 7/8 in; 37.7825 cm x 19.20875 cm x 17.4625 cm
Object Name:
Colorimeter
Place made:
United States: New York, Rochester
Subject:
Color  Search this
Optics  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
National Bureau of Standards  Search this
Credit Line:
National Bureau of Standards
ID Number:
CH.326630
Catalog number:
326630
Accession number:
261654
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Chemistry
Measuring & Mapping
Saccharimeters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a0-e549-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_2502
Online Media:

Truman Gravity Meter No. 1

Maker:
Humble Oil and Refining Co.  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 33 in x 24 in; 83.82 cm x 60.96 cm
Object Name:
gravity meter
Date made:
ca 1931
Credit Line:
Humble Oil and Refining Company
ID Number:
AG.MHI-P-7682
Catalog number:
MHI-P-7682
Accession number:
230370
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Petroleum
Measuring & Mapping
Natural Resources
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a7-292f-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_892824

Adams Synchronological Chart or Map of History of the World 1400 to 1920

Maker:
Strobridge Lithographic Company  Search this
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
metal (overall material)
ink (overall material)
linen (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 82 cm x 4.572 m x 14.5 cm; 32 9/32 in x 15 ft x 5 23/32 in
Object Name:
scroll
history scroll
Place made:
United States: Missouri, Cincinnati
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
ca 1886
Subject:
Education  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Dr. Richard Lodish American School Collection
ID Number:
2014.0244.321
Accession number:
2014.0244
Catalog number:
2014.0244.321
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Education
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b4-1163-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1807960

Société Genevoise 103 Meter Standard

Maker:
Societe Genevoise d’Instruments de Physique  Search this
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
metal (overall material)
cloth (overall material)
cotton (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5.2 cm x 106.5 cm x 10.8 cm; 2 1/16 in x 41 15/16 in x 4 1/4 in
Object Name:
rule
scale rule
Place made:
Switzerland: Genève, Geneva
Date made:
early 20th century
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Rule, Measuring  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Charles A. and Helen S. Mulhern
ID Number:
2000.0126.25
Catalog number:
2000.0126.25
Accession number:
2000.0126
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Measuring & Mapping
Scale Rules
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b3-3838-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_905335
Online Media:

Clipboard with Stopwatch

Measurements:
overall: 14 3/8 in x 13 in x 1 3/4 in; 36.5125 cm x 33.02 cm x 4.445 cm
Object Name:
clipboard with stopwatch
Place made:
United States
Date made:
ca 1950s
1940s - 1950s
Credit Line:
Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Industrial & Systems Engineering
ID Number:
1997.0160.03
Accession number:
1997.0160
Catalog number:
1997.0160.03.1
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Measuring & Mapping
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746aa-6e80-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1204751
Online Media:

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