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The Art of Storytelling: Concow-Maidu Poet Janice Gould 2

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-02T19:33:52.000Z
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Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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National Museum of the American Indian
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The Art of Storytelling: Concow-Maidu Poet Janice Gould 1

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-02T19:39:40.000Z
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Education  Search this
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Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
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The Art of Storytelling: Walan Amana 1

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
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2016-03-02T21:20:20.000Z
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Education  Search this
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The Art of Storytelling: Paul Cason 1

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
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YouTube Videos
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2016-03-02T19:47:20.000Z
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The Art of Storytelling: Walan Amana 2

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
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YouTube Videos
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2016-03-02T21:28:01.000Z
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MS 1627 Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Husband, Bruce  Search this
Encinas, Fr  Search this
Whipple, Amiel Weeks, 1817?-1863  Search this
Brown, H. B.  Search this
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880  Search this
Duralde, Martin  Search this
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro  Search this
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Esteban  Search this
Colusio  Search this
Extent:
183 Items (numbered pages )
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Pujunan  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Seri  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Wakashan Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Kulanapan  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Maya  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1627
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Yaqui language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Chiricahua language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Maidu language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Comanche language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chitimacha language  Search this
Atakapa language  Search this
Tarahumara language  Search this
Pima Bajo language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Wakash  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1627
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a26edfb4-2402-46a4-a7d1-b985e6b84b47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1627
Online Media:

MS 1522 Notes on names, and linguistic notes on Siouan, Athapascan, Caddoan, Iroquoian, and Muskhogean tribes

Collector:
Haggadorn, Francis T.  Search this
Extent:
256 Pages
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)  Search this
Pamlico  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Apache  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Miami  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Woccon  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Natick  Search this
Openango  Search this
Pennacook  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
ca. 1900
Scope and Contents:
Contents: Dakota or Sioux vocabulary, approximately 27 pages. (notebook) Various Languages- brief vocabularies. 22 pages (copy book) Wampanoag vocabulary 5 pages loose. Sioux vocabulary 3 pages. Blackfoot vocabulary 3 pages. Wichita vocabulary 2 pages. Miscellaneous vocabulary 1 page (name not given) Arikara vocabulary 1 page. Apache vocabulary 8 pages. Aleut (Aleouteans) vocabulary 1 page. Iroquois vocabulary 82 pages. Caddo vocabulary 4 pages. Creek vocabulary 2 slips. Mandan vocabulary 4 pages. Passamaquoddy or Openango vocabulary 3 pages. Micmac vocabulary 11 pages. Pamlico (North Carolina) vocabulary 2 pages. Wocon vocabulary 4 pages. Natick vocabulary 1 page. Pennacook vocabulary 1 page. Mohegan vocabulary 1 page. Number 27. Miami, Comanche and Cushna (Maidu) vocabulary 11 pages. Number 28-a Cuchan, Chippewa of St Marys, Chippewa of Traverse Bay, vocabulary 19 pages. Number 28-b Cree (Knisteneaux) Chippewa of Michigan, Chepewyan approximately 17 pages, 7 pages that are full. Creek and Seminole vocabulary 4 pages (brief notations) Creek and Seminole vocabulary 14 pages. Number 31. Chippewa (Ojibwa or Saulteux) vocabulary Approximately 17 pages. Menominee, Shawnee, and Delaware vocabularies Approximately 12 pages. Notes on the Eskimo, Iroquois, Delaware (Lenape), and Massachuset; notes on the languages of Florida, Cherokee and Sioux languages.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1522
Topic:
Siouan Indians  Search this
Vocabularies  Search this
Algonquian Indians  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Caddoan Indians  Search this
Iroquoian Indians  Search this
Muskogean Indians  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Penacook  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Blackfeet  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1522, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1522
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a09e9c1a-9a66-4ee1-acaa-d6fa16d57e37
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1522

Native Americans

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Beginning with the first Festival in 1967, Native American presentations demonstrated the vitality of craft traditions, culinary arts, song and dance, and folklore. The 1974 Native American program marked the fifth year in a series of regional programs, to culminate in the Bicentennial Festival in 1976 with a comprehensive national program. More than 90 participants joined the Festival, primarily from the Western States of California, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and Colorado; special programs on sports and games brought tribal members from elsewhere in the country.

Among the tribes participating in the 1974 Festival were (from California) the Tolowa, Pomo, Hoopa, Yurok, Karok, Luiseno, Maidu, Cahuilla, as well as (from the Basin and Plateau States) Paiute, Shoshone, Kaibab, Northern Ute, Ute Mountain, Southern Ute, and Nez Perce. Sports and games were presented by Creek, Cherokee, Eskimo, Acoma, Athabaskan, Jemez, and Laguna participants. Pomo basket makers, Karok netmakers, Yurok canoe carvers, a Tolowa reed boat weaver, and cooks from Yurok, Hoopa, Karok and Cahuilla tribes of California demonstrated crafts and foodways.

Performances took place in a California plank house and a Basin/Plateau tipi, with workshops and discussions in a Learning Center, and sports and games in a dedicated area. The Learning Center was a multimedia venue designed as an introduction to contemporary Indian communities and their traditional backgrounds. Such topics as the Indian Family, Native Community, and Contributions to America were discussed by participants, while Festival visitors could attend language classes, learn Indian songs, and view photographs of contemporary and historic Native Americans.

Carole Parker served as program coordinator, assisted by Thomas Kavanagh; the California program was coordinated by Joy Sundberg (Yurok); the Basin/Plateau program, by Jim Jefferson (Southern Ute); and the sports and games, by Matt Waconda and Ethan Bigpond. The multi-year program was shaped by the Native Americans Advisory Group, including Louis Bruce, Clydia Nahwooksy, Dell Hymes, William Sturtevant, Samuel Stanley, Herman Viola, Carnes Burson, and Robert Byington. Major sponsors for the 1974 program included the Public Information Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Department of the Army, the Coalition of Eastern Native Americans and the Louisiana Pacific Redwood Corporation.

The following year (1975) saw the last regional Native American program, with the Bicentennial Festival providing a national overview, including some participants who returned from previous years.
Participants:
California

Tolowa

Sheryl Bommelyn, dancer

Loren Bommelyn, dancer

Kara Brundin, dancer

Brenda Green, dancer

John Green, dancer, singer

Carl James, dancer

Samuel Lopez, 1886-1977, singer

Billy Richards, dancer

Mark Richards, dancer

Marvin Richards, dancer, singer

Nicole Richards, dancer, cook

Don Stunrick, dancer

Pomo

Elsie Allen, 1899-1990, basket maker

Dewey Barnes, 1932-2006, fishtrap maker

Rose Barnes, 1929-, dancer

Elvina Brown, dancer

James Brown II, dancer

James Brown III, dancer

Kenneth Fred, 1929-, singer, dancer

Bernadine Hopper, 1918-1999, dancer

Nelson Hopper, Pomo, shell jeweler, Finley, California

Hoopa

Eleanor Abbott, basket maker

Warren Abbott, dancer

Anthony Risling, 1912-2004, fishnet maker

Yurok

George Blake, bow maker, Eureka, California

Ella Johnson, basket maker

Sam Jones, 1913-1996, salmon cook

Walter Lara, Yurok, canoe carver, Eureka, California

Ella Norris, 1892-1982, Wiyot-Yurok, salmon cook, Crescent City, California

Josephine Peters, 1923-2011, jeweler

Pamela Peters, dancer

Mark Sundberg, dancer

Lisa Sundberg, cook, dancer

Tom Williams, canoe carver

Karok

Francis Davis, Sr., 1929-, fishnet maker

Luiseno

Villiana Hyde, 1903-1994, discussant

Maidu

Gladys Mankins, 1912-1985, bead worker, dancer

Seymore Smith, 1891-, singer

Cahuilla

Katherine Saubel, cook

Basin/Plateau

Paiute

Marie Brown, bead worker, cook

Stannard Frank, 1923-1989, discussant

Lily George, 1911-1977, Paiute, tule boat maker, Ely, Nevada

Madaline Kaamasee, doll maker

Lena Murphy, dancer

Marjorie Stark, Paiute, 1911-2001, basket maker, Ely, Nevada

Shoshone

Ella Bear, 1907-1983, hide tanner

Jimmy Dan, dancer, singer

Agnes Gould, 1925-1991, dancer

Audrey Gould, bead worker

Austin Gould, dancer, singer

Vincent Ponzo, buckskin worker

Kaibab

Dan Bullets, 1906-1990, Kaibab, hide tanner, Fredonia, Arizona

Alva Drye, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lucille Jake, 1920-1997, Kaibab, bead worker, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Lita Sigmiller, Kaibab, basket maker, Fredonia, Arizona

Northern Ute

Irene Coch, bead worker, dancer

Loya Gardner, 1913-2004, dancer

Maxine Natchez, dancer

Ute Mountain

Cliff Duncan, pow wow MC

Bonnie Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Sarah Hatch, Ute Mountain, dancer, potter, Towaoc, Colorado

Danny Tallbird, 1926-1996, Cheyenne, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Ruby Tallbird, 1934-2004, Ute Mountain, buckskin worker, Towaoc, Colorado

Tony Tallbird, Ute Mountain, dancer, Towaoc, Colorado

Southern Ute

Ramona Eagle, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Dan Jefferson, dancer

Tim Jefferson, dancer

Bonnie Kent, 1918-1989, Southern Ute, dancer, Ignacio, Colorado

Elsie Kent, dancer

Nez Perce

Randall Ellenwood, dancer

Wilfred Halfmoon, dancer

Owen Slickapoo, dancer

Allen Slickpoo, discussant

Sports and Games

Creek

Paul Culley, 1931-1993, Creek, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Paula Culley, 1963-, Creek-Seminole, stickball, Wetumka, Oklahoma

Jeannie Fixico, 1953-, Creek, stickball, Seminole, Oklahoma

Emma Lowe, 1942-, Creek, stickball, Holdenville, Oklahoma

Larry Soweka, 1945-, Creek, stickball, Henryetta, Oklahoma

Cherokee

George Dixon, 1946-, Cherokee, archer, Muskogee, Oklahoma

Larry Rackliff, 1952-, Cherokee, archer, Tahlequa, Oklahoma

Lyman Vann, 1907-1985, Cherokee, archer, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Pete Vann, 1948-, archer

Eskimo

Laura Bergt, sports

Les Bodfish, sports

Reggie Joule, sports

Roger Kunayak, sports

Acoma

Gordon Joe, 1955-, Acoma, track runner, Paraje, New Mexico

Athabaskan

Fred Titus, sports

Jemez

Steven Gachupin, 1942-, Jemez, track coach, Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico

Laguna

Emmet Hunt, 1948-, Laguna-Acoma, cross country coach, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Bruce Allen Romero, 1959-, track, Paguate, New Mexico

Meldon R. Sanchez, 1959-, runner, San Fidel, New Mexico
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1974, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1974 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f59ccba9-abe4-47b0-9617-7edbbf544066
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1974-ref577

Memory and Imagination: The Legacy of Maidu Indian Artist Frank Day

Author:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2001
Citation:
Scherer, Joanna Cohan. 2001. [Book review] "Memory and Imagination: The Legacy of Maidu Indian Artist Frank Day." Visual Anthropology, 14, (4), 459–460.
Identifier:
20905
ISSN:
0894-9468
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_20905

The Art of Storytelling: Paul Cason 2

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-03-02T19:59:10.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_DisYy5i2gEU

Maidu--AMNH 16

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 301
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1990
Scope and Contents note:
for Salamander publication
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 3: Writings / 3.1: Drafts
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32afd722f-bc60-4877-a5b6-f5c44e848126
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref8724

California 3 - (Wintun Cont'd[?]) - Patwin, Maidu (2)

Collection Creator:
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna papers
Frederica de Laguna papers / Series 4: Teaching / 4.1: American Indians
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f8a35d3e-11ab-4c82-a368-6bae5e7adc72
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref1586

Calif - (4) Patwin & Neighbors - Maidu Death

Collection Creator:
De Laguna, Frederica, 1906-2004  Search this
McClellan, Catharine  Search this
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Guédon, Marie Françoise  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Collection Correspondent:
Stearns, Mary Lee  Search this
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Some of the original field notes are restricted due to Frederica de Laguna's request to protect the privacy of those accused of witchcraft. The originals are restricted until 2030. Photocopies may be made with the names of the accused redacted.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Frederica de Laguna papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Frederica de Laguna papers
Frederica de Laguna papers / Series 4: Teaching / 4.1: American Indians
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c6acaa0b-634b-43ee-b0b1-2e6d33df1ee5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-89-ref1587

Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian

Photographer:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
96 Photomechanical prints (photogravure proofs)
184 Printing plates (copper printing plates)
Culture:
Twana  Search this
Hoh  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Wishram  Search this
Suquamish  Search this
Skokomish  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tolowa  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Squaxon  Search this
Mewuk (Miwok)  Search this
Achomawi (Pit River)  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Yurok  Search this
Kumeyaay (Diegueño)  Search this
Cayuse  Search this
Northern Paiute (Paviotso)  Search this
Santa Ysabel (Santa Isabela) Diegueño  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Pikuni Blackfeet (Piegan)  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
A'aninin (Gros Ventre)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Tsuu T'ina (Sarcee)  Search this
Kainai Blackfoot (Kainah/Blood)  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Tewa Pueblos  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Serrano  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Kutzadika'a (Mono Paiute)  Search this
Kupangaxwichem (Kupa/Cupeño)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Wichita  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Osage  Search this
Yokuts  Search this
Chukchansi Yokuts  Search this
Southern Mewuk (Southern Miwok)  Search this
Wailaki  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Wappo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photomechanical prints
Printing plates
Photogravures
Photographs
Date:
1899-1927
circa 1980
Summary:
The Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian include photogravure printing plates and associated proofs made from Curtis photographs and used in the publication of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The bulk of the images are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps.
Scope and Contents:
The collection comprises 183 photogravure plates (101 folio and 82 octavo) and 96 associated proofs used in the printing of The North American Indian volumes 1-9 and 12-19. The original photographs used to make the photogravures were made circa 1903-1926 and the photogravure plates were made in 1907-1930. The bulk are portraits, though there are also images of everyday items, ceremonial artifacts, and camps. About half of the proofs in the collection are originals used for Curtis's publication, though the collection also includes proofs made in the process of later publication by the Classic Gravure Company (circa 1980). Vintage proofs include handwritten notes, likely made by Curtis Studio employees in Seattle and Los Angeles. Many of the photogravure plates do not have matching proofs; in particular, there are no proofs for the octavo plates.
Arrangement:
The plates and proofs are arranged by the volume of The North American Indian in which they were published. They are described in this finding aid by the caption and plate number with which they were published.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) was an American photographer best known for his monumental and now-controversial project, the twenty-volume publication The North American Indian. Here he sought to document in words and pictures the "vanishing race" of American Indians.

Born in Wisconsin in 1868, Edward Curtis grew up on his family's farm in Le Sueur County, Minnesota, from 1874 to 1887. In 1887, he and his father Johnson Curtis settled on a plot near what is now Port Orchard, Washington, and the rest of the family joined them the following year. When Johnson Curtis died within a month of the family's arrival, the burden of providing for his mother and siblings fell to 20-year-old Edward, and Edward set out to do so through his photography. In 1891, Curtis moved to the booming city of Seattle and bought into a joint photo studio with Rasmus Rothi. Less than a year later, he formed "Curtis and Guptill, Photographers and Photoengravers" with Thomas Guptill; the enterprise quickly became a premier portrait studio for Seattle's elite. In 1895, Curtis made his first "Indian photograph" depicting Princess Angeline, daughter of the chief for whom Seattle had been named. The following year he earned his first medal from the National Photographic Convention for his "genre studies."

In 1899, Edward Curtis joined the Harriman Alaska Expedition as official photographer, a position which allowed him to learn from anthropologists C. Hart Merriam and George Bird Grinnell while documenting the landscapes and peoples of the Alaskan coast. This expedition and the resulting friendship with Grinnell helped to foster Curtis's ultimate goal to "form a comprehensive and permanent record of all the important tribes of the United States and Alaska that still retain to a considerable degree their primitive customs and traditions" (General Introduction, The North American Indian). Curtis made several trips to reservations from 1900 to 1904, including a trip with Grinnell to Montana in 1900 and multiple trips to the Southwest, including the Hopi Reservation. He also hired Adolph Muhr, former assistant to Omaha photographer Frank A. Rinehart, to manage the Curtis studio in his absence, a decision which would prove more and more fruitful as Curtis spent less and less time in Seattle.

In 1906, Curtis struck a deal with financier J. P. Morgan, whereby Morgan would support a company – The North American Indian, Inc. – with $15,000 for five years, by which time the project was expected to have ended. Systematic fieldwork for the publication began in earnest that summer season, with Curtis accompanied by a team of ethnological researchers and American Indian assistants. Arguably the most important member of Curtis' field team was William Myers, a former newspaperman who collected much of the ethnological data and completed most of the writing for the project. The first volume, covering Navajo and Apache peoples, was published at the end of 1907, but already Morgan's funding was incapable of meeting Curtis's needs. Despite heaping praise from society's elite, Curtis spent much of his time struggling to find people and institutions willing to subscribe to the expensive set of volumes. After the initial five years, only eight of the proposed twenty volumes had been completed. Fieldwork and publication continued with the support of J. P. Morgan, but Curtis's home life suffered because of his prolonged absences.

In 1919, Curtis's wife Clara was awarded a divorce settlement which included the entire Curtis studio in Seattle. Exhausted and bankrupt, Edward Curtis moved with his daughter Beth Magnuson to Los Angeles, where they operated a new Curtis Studio and continued work on the volumes; volume 12 was published in 1922. The constant financial strain forced Myers to leave the North American Indian team after volume 18 (fieldwork in 1926) and Curtis made his last trip to photograph and gather data for volume 20 in 1927. After the final volumes were published in 1930, Curtis almost completely faded from public notice until his work was "rediscovered" and popularized in the 1970s.

Curtis's "salvage ethnology," as scholar Mick Gidley describes it, was mildly controversial even during his life and has become ever more so as his legacy deepens. In his quest to photograph pre-colonial Indian life through a twentieth-century lens, he often manipulated and constructed history as much as he recorded it: he staged reenactments, added props, and removed evidence of twentieth-century influences on "primitive" life. Curtis's work continues to shape popular conceptions of American Indians and so, while problematic, his legacy--his vision of American Indian life--continues to be relevant.
Related Materials:
NMAI also holds Edward Curtis photographs documenting the Harriman Expedition (1899) as well as platinum prints and photogravures of the images published in The North American Indian.

The Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropological Archives holds Edward Curtis prints submitted for copyright (Photo Lot 59) as well as many of his original negatives, photographs, and papers.

Steve Kern donated photogravure plates to the Center for Creative Photography and the Seattle Art Museum at the same time that he donated this set to MAI.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Steven and Arlene Kern to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in 1984.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photogravures
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.080
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis photogravure plates and proofs for The North American Indian
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47bb7e1cf-cd0f-42a1-ac5b-8ee402c1ab8f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-080
Online Media:

Grace Nicholson: Inventories and Clippings

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 262A, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1928 - 1968
Restrictions:
Image number 011 "Holiday Handcraft" has been removed from the slideshow due to culutral sensitivity.
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4a322f6cb-5196-43ba-a2f9-d7bc7ada72a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14859
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Frances Densmore

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Biographical / Historical:
Frances Theresa Densmore (1867-1957) was born in Red Wing, Minnesota to Benjamin and Sarah Densmore. Densmore began piano lessons at an early age and became exposed to American Indian music when quite young, living close to Lakota people. Densmore attended the Oberlin Conservatory of Music where she studied the organ and harmony, in addition to the piano. After Oberlin, Densmore became a church organist and taught music. Around 1890, she move to Boston to continue her studies in music. There, she learnt about Alice Cunningham Fletcher's work among the Omaha Indians. Densmore wrote to Fletcher and Fletcher quickly became Densmore's mentor.

Densmore's first field work was among the Chippewa of Grande Portage, in 1905. In 1908 the Bureau of American Ethnology provided Densmore with a graphophone. Densmore's association with the BAE lasted fifty years. Densmore worked among the Cocopah, Makah, Winnebago, Lakota, Mandan and Hidatsa, Northern Ute, Nootka and Quileute, Ojibwa, Onondaga, Omaha, Apache and Navajo, Santo Domingo, Cheyenne and Arapaho, Maidu, Choctaw, Pawnee, Papago, Menominee, Chippewa, Yuma, Yaqui, Seminole, Acoma, Isleta, Cochiti, Zuni, Chitimacha and Alibamu Indian peoples. She also worked with the Tule Indians of Panama. Densmore served as a founding Officer and second Vice-President of the Society for Ethnomusicology in 1956. She recorded over 2,400 American Indian songs. She died at the age of 90.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 6: Collectors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40017d625-d859-402a-a7fb-9cfcb3326c6b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref15733

Maidu Indian altar near Placerville, California

Creator:
Carpenter  Search this
Hudson, J. W. (photographer ?)  Search this
Collector:
Tilton, Willis G.  Search this
Collection Collector:
Tilton, Willis G.  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic negative)
Culture:
Maidu  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
before 1903
Local Numbers:
OPPS NEG.T1832
Local Note:
Cataloging based on examination of NAA file print.
Number 19347 on original pink list.
Negative
Related Materials:
Related negatives in the Field Museum of Natural History, Photography Department, Roosevelt Road at Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60605-2496
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Photo Lot 89-8, Willis G. Tilton collection of photographs of Native Americans, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Willis G. Tilton collection of photographs of Native Americans
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3184d9068-ff0e-4ab6-86ac-c7324591297f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-89-8-ref646

Northern Maidu

Collection Creator:
Beals, Ralph L. (Ralph Leon), 1901-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 38
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1954 - 1955
Collection Restrictions:
The Ralph Leon Beals papers are open for research. At Ralph Beals' request, his 1930-1933 correspondence were restricted until 2000. These include letters to and from his wife while he was in the field, several letters to his children, and one letter to his mother-in-law. Beals supplied edited copies of the restricted letters for public access. The restrictions have since been lifted, and the edited copies have been retained with the original letters. His field assistants' materials have been restricted for the lifetime of the creators.

Access to the Ralph Leon Beals papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Leon Beals papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Ralph Leon Beals papers
Ralph Leon Beals papers / Series 9: California Indians materials
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d127d281-8a0e-47e9-8f65-35d0344537a8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1980-54a-ref722

Nisenan/Maidu/Yana Yahi/Yokuts

Collection Creator:
Beals, Ralph L. (Ralph Leon), 1901-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 40
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1954 - 1955
Collection Restrictions:
The Ralph Leon Beals papers are open for research. At Ralph Beals' request, his 1930-1933 correspondence were restricted until 2000. These include letters to and from his wife while he was in the field, several letters to his children, and one letter to his mother-in-law. Beals supplied edited copies of the restricted letters for public access. The restrictions have since been lifted, and the edited copies have been retained with the original letters. His field assistants' materials have been restricted for the lifetime of the creators.

Access to the Ralph Leon Beals papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Leon Beals papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Ralph Leon Beals papers
Ralph Leon Beals papers / Series 9: California Indians materials
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw322a46582-615c-49a4-89be-3523cd2dabb3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1980-54a-ref776

[Day, Frank (Maidu)]

Collection Correspondent:
Hanson, James A.  Search this
Conner, Stuart W.  Search this
Dempsey, Hugh A.  Search this
Brasser, Ted J.  Search this
DeMallie, Raymond  Search this
Schaeffer, Claude E.  Search this
Taylor, Colin F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1977
Collection Restrictions:
The John Canfield Ewers papers are open for research.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Canfield Ewers papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
John Canfield Ewers Papers
John Canfield Ewers Papers / Series 6: North American Indian Art / Artists:
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39183bbc2-ffec-45df-8104-181d464866f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1998-35-ref790

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