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Lunch Box, "Tom Corbett, Space Cadet"

Manufacturer:
Aladdin Industries Incorporated  Search this
Artist:
Robert O. Burton  Search this
Materials:
Metal
Dimensions:
3-D: 21.6 x 8.9 x 19.1cm (8 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 7 1/2 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
1952-1953
Credit Line:
Gift of Aladdin Industries, L.L.C.
Inventory Number:
A20070086000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Hangar:
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv91d40c215-b631-4d99-ae26-df230be28816
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20070086000

Bottle, Insulated, "Tom Corbett, Space Cadet"

Manufacturer:
Aladdin Industries Incorporated  Search this
Artist:
Robert O. Burton  Search this
Materials:
Metal, plastic, cork, glass
Dimensions:
3-D: 16.5 x 8.3cm (6 1/2 x 3 1/4 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
1952-1953
Credit Line:
Gift of Aladdin Industries, L.L.C.
Inventory Number:
A20070086001
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Hangar:
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9706ac34d-99ba-4620-8c3e-072453db74ff
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20070086001

Lunch Box, "Colonel Ed McCauley, Space Explorer"

Manufacturer:
Aladdin Industries Incorporated  Search this
Artist:
Elmer Lehnhardt  Search this
Materials:
Steel, plastic handle
Dimensions:
3-D: 20.3 x 10.2 x 17.8cm (8 x 4 x 7 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
1960
Credit Line:
Gift of Aladdin Industries, L.L.C.
Inventory Number:
A20070087000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Hangar:
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9e199b092-21ef-4b66-b794-6f46f13a3fe4
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20070087000

Vacuum Bottle, "Colonel Ed McCauley, Space Explorer"

Manufacturer:
Aladdin Industries Incorporated  Search this
Artist:
Elmer Lehnhardt  Search this
Materials:
Metal, plastic, silvered glass, metallic sticker
Dimensions:
3-D: 16.5 x 8.3cm (6 1/2 x 3 1/4 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Gift of Aladdin Industries, L.L.C.
Inventory Number:
A20070087001
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Hangar:
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv947e702af-904a-4391-8208-3a8579f69a1a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20070087001

Lunchbox, Lindbergh, King Collection

Materials:
Metal
Dimensions:
3-D: 15.9 x 10.2 x 7.6cm, 0.1kg (6 1/4 x 4 x 3 in., 3/16lb.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Credit Line:
Gift of the Stanley King Family.
Inventory Number:
A20040289051
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv90398a805-3c44-4258-9cea-950798eb57f3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20040289051
Online Media:

Lunchbox Kit, "Astronaut" and "Orbit"

Artist:
John Polgreen  Search this
Manufacturer:
King-Seeley Thermos Co.  Search this
Materials:
Overall, steel for both lunchbox and thermos; handle, lunchbox, plastic; cup atop thermos, plastic; lining, thermos, glass
Dimensions:
Overall: 16.51 x 10.8 x 22.23cm (6 1/2in. x 4 1/4in. x 8 3/4in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
Lunchbox, 1960; thermos, 1963
Credit Line:
Gift of Dr. James B. Edson
Inventory Number:
A19680478000
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA
Hangar:
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9a76fb4b1-aaa0-4f38-b344-a70f1325f234
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19680478000
Online Media:

Scrapbook

Collection Creator:
Jones, William  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
bulk 1943 - 1946
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
William Jones World War II Scrapbook, NASM.2006.0067, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
William Jones World War II Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2006-0067-ref506
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Lunchbox Forum

Collection Creator::
National Air and Space Museum. Executive Officer  Search this
Container:
Box 2 of 2
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 345, National Air and Space Museum. Executive Officer, Administrative Records
See more items in:
Administrative Records
Administrative Records / Box 2
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0345-refidd1e1378

Lectures (Lunchbox forum, etc.)

Collection Creator::
National Air and Space Museum. Department of Space Science and Exploration  Search this
Container:
Box 9 of 23
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 348, National Air and Space Museum. Department of Space Science and Exploration, Subject Files
See more items in:
Subject Files
Subject Files / Box 9
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0348-refidd1e4408

NASM Lunchbox Forum

Collection Creator::
National Air and Space Museum. Department of Space Science and Exploration  Search this
Container:
Box 15 of 23
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 348, National Air and Space Museum. Department of Space Science and Exploration, Subject Files
See more items in:
Subject Files
Subject Files / Box 15
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0348-refidd1e7235

Charles Rivers Photographs

Creator:
Rivers, Charles, 1904-1993  Search this
Names:
Chrysler Building (New York, N.Y.) -- Pictorial works  Search this
Empire State Building -- Construction--1929-1930  Search this
Pathe News  Search this
Bates, Ruby  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (4 boxes )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Albums
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 1920-1930
Washington (D.C.) -- 1960-1970
Date:
1929-1963
bulk 1929-1930
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains: twenty-nine silver gelatin photoprints mounted on Fome-Core, Masonite, and cardboard, ranging in size from 5-1/2" x 9-1/4" to 10-11/16" x 13-13/16"; three 5" x 7" unmounted silver gelatin photoprints; a scrapbook which originally contained 56 silver gelatin photoprints, ranging in size from 2" x 3" to 7-1/2" x 9-1/2"; and silver gelatin film negatives (presumably acetate) for the prints. The scrapbook includes a New York Daily News clipping about Rivers: "Builds a Bridge to Students" by Anthony Burton (dated May 12, 1970 by Rivers) with a photograph showing him speaking to a crowd, Most of the photographs depict the construction of the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings--iron workers on the job and relaxing during breaks, and pictures of the buildings at various stages of completion. Other subjects are: a demonstration to prevent World War II (1935), a color photoprint of the Civil Rights March and Demonstration in Washington, D.C. (1963), and two magazine clippings from a Soviet publication, New Times, in which Rivers's prize-winning "Self Portrait" (1930) was reproduced.

Most of these prints were made by Charles Rivers many years after the creation of the original negatives, probably ca.1970s 1980s. The collection is in generally good condition, except that many of the print surfaces are scratched.
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Rivers created a certain amount of confusion about his origins, whether accidentally or intentionally. Born Constantinos Kapornaros[1] (or Kostandinos Kapernaros)[2] in the small town of Vahos in Mani, an isolated area in the southern Peloponnesian region of Greece, on May 20, 1904, he emigrated to the United States as a child of five or six with his parents. His school record showed that he was enrolled in 1911 at the age of seven.[3] The family lived in Maine or New Hampshire, then Massachusetts, and later other locations in New York state. It is believed that his new name was derived from the Charles River in Boston.[4] The change may have been occasioned by a need to conceal his deep involvement in left-wing political and union activities.[5] Mr. Rivers settled in New York City in 1950 and resided there until 1993.[6] He sometimes identified his birthplace as Denver, Colorado,[7] but this may have been a fabrication or simplification, based on the fact that Greek church baptismal records were kept in Denver.[8] His sons James and Ronald believe that he never became an official American citizen. Late in life, in order to visit his birthplace, he was issued a passport, based on his school records, which stated that he was born in Denver. Rivers photographed the construction of the Chrysler Building (1929) and the Empire State Building (1930) in New York City. He was inspired to take up photography by seeing the work of the influential documentary photographer Lewis Hine, whose famous images of working children helped win passage of protective child labor laws. Rivers and Hine both photographed the Empire State Building and the men building it, yet Rivers apparently was unaware until years later that his idol had been present. Employed as an iron worker, Rivers traded his pail of tools for a Zeiss Ikon[9] camera during his lunch hour or when photographic opportunities arose. While the workers depicted in some of the photographs clearly are aware of the photographer's presence, Rivers's project presumably was conducted more or less surreptitiously. It is not known for certain if the paths of Rivers and Hine ever crossed, but his son Ron considers it unlikely: Hine photographed only the Empire State Building in connection with his "Men at Work" project,[10] not the earlier Chrysler Building, and Rivers did not work on the Empire State Building for a very long period. His self-portrait on the Empire State Building, "The Bolter-Up," may have been intended as a memento during one of his last days on that job.[11]

Rivers became unemployed in the Depression and consequently became involved in national efforts to create Social Security, unemployment insurance, and housing programs. These experiences apparently encouraged his active participation in politically leftist activities, as coverage about him in Soviet publications attests. A pacifist, in 1935 he was involved in demonstrations aimed at preventing World War II, and in the 1960s he took part in anti-Vietnam demonstrations and encouraged young people to continue such resistance.

In the 1950s Rivers worked in steel fabrication, in a chemistry lab as a technician, and briefly as a legislative aide for a New York state senator.

In 1986 Rivers submitted his 1930 self-portrait, posed on the Chrysler Building, to the International Year of Peace art contest sponsored by the New Times, published in Moscow: it was awarded a prize and diploma.

Mr. Rivers died in 1993, only two weeks after moving to Arlington, Texas to enter a nursing home near his sons' homes.

1. The page on Rivers in New York University=s Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives web site (http://laborarts.org/collections/item.cfm?itemid=82) --noted 5 June 2002), claims Rivers was born in 1905 and changed his name Ato resemble those of the Mohawk Indians working on the high steel of New York City=s skyscrapers and bridges".

2. This spelling is given in an e-mail from James Rivers to Helen Plummer, Aug. 19, 2002.

3. Ibid.

4. Telephone conversation between Ron Rivers and the author, 6 June 2002. Additional information was provided by Ron Rivers in electronic mail messages, 5 June and 12 June 2002.

5. James Rivers, op. cit.

6. Telephone conversation with Ron Rivers, 6 June 2002.

7. In a biographical statement for the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art (copy supplied by Helen Plummer), Charles Rivers called Denver his birthplace. The George Eastman House photographer database also included this apparently erroneous information, probably derived from the Amon Carter statement (telephone conversation with Helen Plummer, 3 June 2002).

8. Ron Rivers, telephone conversation, 6 June 2002.

9. Identified by Charles Rivers as the camera used in the skyscraper photographs: interview by Carol Sewell, "Photographer looked at U.S. from high view," Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Dec. 27, 1986. Rivers also used a Rolleiflex, according to Ron Rivers (see note above), but the folding Zeiss Ikon camera would have been a more convenient addition to a lunchbox than the bulkier Rolleiflex. The collection negatives are not in the Rolleiflex square format, moreover.

10. See Judith Mara Gutman, Lewis W. Hine and the American social conscience. New York: Walker, 1967.

11. Ron Rivers, telephone conversation, 6 June 2002.
Related Materials:
Materials at the Smithsonian Institution

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Included Rivers's self-portrait, "The Bolter Up," in its summer 2002 exhibition, "Metropolis in the Machine Age," in the form of a new print made from a digital copy of the Archives Center's original negative. The author discussed the new print from the Rivers negative and other photographs in this exhibition in an invited gallery lecture, "The Skyscraper Photographs of Lewis Hine and Charles Rivers," Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, June 6, 2002.

Materials at Other Organizations

Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

See Barbara McCandless and John Rohrbach, Singular moments: photographs from the Amon Carter Museum, with select entries by Helen Plummer. Reproduction of a Rivers photograph, with description and analysis, p. 30. Additional information has been generously supplied by Ms. Plummer, curatorial associate, and Barbara McCandless, curator of photography, Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, Fort Worth Texas.

Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University

Museum of the City of New York

Some of his photographs were included in the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art exhibition, "Looking at America: Documentary Photographs of the 1930s and 1940s," December 1986.
Provenance:
The collection is a gift from Mr. Charles Rivers, 1989.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Archives Center claims copyright. Rights were conveyed to the Archives Center through a Deed of Gift signed by the donor.
Topic:
Self-portraits, American  Search this
Iron and steel workers -- 1920-1930 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Construction workers -- 1900-1950 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Structural steel workers -- 1920-1930 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Labor unions  Search this
Civil rights demonstrations -- 1960-1970  Search this
Skyscrapers -- 1920-1930 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Peace movements -- 1960-1970  Search this
Peace movements -- 1930-1940  Search this
Scottsoro boys case  Search this
Fires  Search this
Scottsboro Trial, Scottsboro, Ala., 1931  Search this
Self-portraits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1900-1950
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Albums
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 1970-1990
Citation:
Charles Rivers Photographs, 1929-1963, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0360
See more items in:
Charles Rivers Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0360
Online Media:

Andy Granatelli Collection

Creator:
Granatelli, Andy, 1923-2013  Search this
Grancor Automotive Specialists  Search this
Hurricane Hot Rod Association  Search this
Studebaker Corporation  Search this
Donor:
Granatelli, Vincent  Search this
Names:
Indianapolis Speedway Race  Search this
Extent:
66 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Advertisements
Business records
Clippings
Correspondence
Design drawings
Drawings
Financial records
Legal records
Minutes
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Speeches
Date:
1940s-1990s
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents Granatelli's lifelong involvement with automobiles, from his youth through his career as an auto industry executive, and as a racing car owner, designer and promoter. The collection consists primarily of files, photographs, scrapbooks, and drawings. Some of the earliest files relate to Grancor, a company founded by Granatelli and his two brothers in 1945, which customized cars for clients. Other things contained in the files include meeting minutes, articles of association, business and financial records, legal records and profit and loss statements. Also included in the files are papers relating to an organization he started called the Hurricane Hot Rod Association. A large portion of the files relate to Granatelli's term as President of STP, a division of the Studebaker Corporation, from 1961-1974. These files detail the internal workings of the company during this period, and include papers relating to such things as strategic planning, sales, marketing, advertising and competitors' products. Additionally, this portion contains STP's Board of Directors' minutes, documents on policies and procedures, papers documenting advertising campaigns, comparative sales figures, sales manuals, and Granatelli's business correspondence. The largest part of the files relates to the Indianapolis 500 race. There are detailed files on the drivers and race teams he assembled for the annual race, but these files also include design drawings, specifications, test data, lap logs, performance statistics, and reports documenting the implementation of design changes. The scrapbooks in the collection contain clippings, biographical materials, and other documents relating to auto racing in America and especially the Indianapolis 500. Finally, the collection contains a large number of photographs covering all aspects of Granatelli's career.
Arrangement:
Collection is unarranged.
Biographical / Historical:
Andy Granatelli (1923-2013) was an automobile racing promoter, a race car engine designer and an automotive innovator. Two of his cars, a 1967 turbine engine race car and the 1969 Indy 500 winner, are in NMAH's Work & Industry collection. More than any other racing figure, Granatelli bridged the realms of garage tinkerers and professional motorsports, and he stimulated public interest in auto racing on a national level. His STP Corporation became a high-profile sponsor of Indianapolis 500 and NASCAR race cars, with Granatelli appearing in ads and commercials. His larger-than-life personality and flair for the dramatic made him an American cultural phenomenon. His career is well summed up in the profile written for his 2003 induction into the Automotive Hall of Fame:

Racer, entrepreneur, engineer, promoter, business executive. This is how one begins to describe the career of Andy Granatelli. But the title Mister 500 is the one that befits him most, for it describes a lifelong dream to conquer the famous 500-mile race in Indianapolis.

It was a preposterous dream for the scrappy kid growing up in the slums of Chicago, whose mother had died when he was twelve, and two years later, at the age of fourteen, dropped out of school to help his father feed the family. Andy Granatelli began his quest for Indy 500 fame at the age of 20 in 1943, when he and his brother pooled their meager, hard-earned money and purchased a Texaco gas station on the north side of Chicago, which he called Andy's Super Service. Andy, always the promoter, needed a gimmick to set himself apart from other service stations. His gimmick? Granatelli initiated the first pit stop service station, utilizing four or five mechanics to work on a car at one time.

Customers appreciated the true super service experience and would often wait in line for this unique treatment. With this unique service and Andy's P.T. Barnum style it was no wonder that the station was prosperous, and just two years later, in 1945, he formed the Granatelli Corporation, known as Grancor Automotive Specialists. As the head of Grancor, Andy Granatelli pioneered the concept of mass merchandising performance products and power and speed equipment to a generation of Americans who were discovering the joys of hot rodding.

Andy quickly learned that if you give the customer what he needs, you can make a living; give him what he wants, and you can make a fortune! Granatelli's racing career began in 1946, when he built the first rocket-powered car to race on an oval track. That same year, he took his first car to the Indianapolis 500 -a pre-war Harry Miller- designed Ford.

When Andy Granatelli wasn't burning up tracks, he was tearing up the business world. In 1958, Andy and his brother Joe purchased Paxton Products, a failing engineering firm that made superchargers. With Andy at the helm, Paxton Products became profitable in seven months. In 1961, Andy sold Paxton Products to Studebaker Corporation and stayed on as Paxton's CEO. Two years later, Studebaker management wanted Granatelli to work his magic on an under-performing division called Chemical Compounds Corporation. Chemical Compounds had only one, little known product . . . STP Oil Treatment. With virtually no advertising budget, Andy created a four-pronged approach to turn the company around: a recognizable corporate logo (the STP oval), a product (oil treatment), a product spokesman (himself) and a reason for existence (racing). The STP logo became one of the best recognized in history. STP could be found in virtually every venue of speed: on land, on the water or in the air. Andy Granatelli once said that in the 1960s, virtually every kid in America had an STP sticker on his bedroom door, his notebook or his lunchbox, and he was probably right!

Back at Indianapolis, Granatelli entered a revolutionary race car of his own design - one with a turbine engine in 1967 and 1968. Even though the car failed to finish both years due to mechanical failure, the cars demonstrated superior speed and performance. At the end of the 1968 season, the U.S. Auto Club revised engine specifications, effectively outlawing Granatelli's turbine car. Undeterred, Granatelli returned to Indy the following year with a conventional car and proceeded to win his first Indianapolis 500 with Mario Andretti at the wheel. Four years later, in 1973, Andy won his second and last Indy 500 with a car driven by Gordon Johncock. Andy Granatelli's childhood dream of conquering Indy was fulfilled, not once, but twice.

Source

Andy Granatelli Biography, Automotive Hall of Fame (last accessed January 29, 2020 https://www.automotivehalloffame.org/honoree/andy-granatelli/)
Provenance:
Collection donated by Vince Granatelli.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Automobiles  Search this
Automobiles -- Design and construction  Search this
Automobile driving  Search this
Automobile industry executives  Search this
Automobile industry and trade  Search this
Automobiles, Racing  Search this
Engines, automobile  Search this
Hot rods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Advertisements -- 20th century
Business records -- 20th century
Clippings -- 20th century
Correspondence -- 20th century
Design drawings -- 20th century
Drawings
Financial records -- 20th century
Legal records -- 20th century
Minutes -- 20th century
Photographs -- 20th century
Scrapbooks
Speeches
Citation:
Andy Granatelli Collection, ca. 1940-1990s, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1403
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1403
Online Media:

Aladdin Industries, Inc. Records

Creator:
Johnson, Victor S., Sr., 1882-1943  Search this
Johnson, Victor, Jr., 1906-  Search this
Aladdin Industries, Inc. (Nashville, Tenn.).  Search this
Names:
Allen, Steve  Search this
Reagan, Ronald  Search this
Extent:
50 Cubic feet (120 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Newsletters
Commercial art
Picture postcards
Laboratory notebooks
Patents
Design drawings
Business records
Advertisements
Scrapbooks
Date:
1889-2003
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of approximately 50 cubic feet of material documenting Aladdin Industries Inc., manufacturers of vacuum ware and lunch boxes. The majority of the material dates from 1947 to the 1970s. The strength of the collection is with the lunch box documentation and product development, marketing, and sales records. There is some interesting labor history—specifically United Steel Workers agreement. The files of Victor S. Johnson, Sr. and Victor S. Johnson, Jr. form the core of the collection and provide rich documentation on the company's activities.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into seventeen series.

Series 1: Historical and Background Materials, 1919-1997

Series 2: Victor S. Johnson Sr. Files, 1916-1945

Series 3: Victor S. Johnson Jr. Files, 1906-1983

Series 4: Employee and Personnel Records, 1910-2001

Series 5: Research and Development Records, 1910-1976

Series 6: Patent Records, 1889-1973

Series 7: Sales Records, 1939-2000

Series 8: Advertising and Marketing Records, 1931-2001

Series 9: School Lunch Kits, 1952-1989

Series 10: Lamps and Kerosene Heaters, 1911-2000

Series 11: Temp-Rite, 1972-2000

Series 12: Competitors, 1963-2001

Series 13: Style Guides, 1966-1998

Series 14: Newsletters, 1943-1998

Series 15: Photographs, 1923-1986

Series 16: Scrapbooks, 1908-1962

Series 17: Audiovisual Materials, 1993-1996
Biographical / Historical:
Victor Samuel Johnson Sr., (1882-1943) was born in Nebraska. As a soap salesman for the Iowa Soap Company, he became interested in kerosene mantle burners. Dissatisfied with the available kerosene lamps, he began selling and dealing U.S. made mantles and incorporated the Mantle Lamp Company of America in Chicago in 1908. Johnson selected the name "Aladdin" from the famous story, "Aladdin; or The Wonderful Lamp." Johnson began research and development of a mantle lamp that gave off a steady white light and did not smoke. The Mantle Lamp Company began manufacturing lamps in 1912, with Plume & Atwood Manufacturing Company burners, and marketed them as "Aladdin Lamps." The company diversified in 1917 and began producing insulated cooking dishes, known as Aladdin Thermalware jars, for the U.S. military. These jars had an aluminum or steel jacket wrapped around a heavy glass receptacle. The space between was filled with cork. The introduction of the thermalware began the company's venture into heat and cold retaining receptacles.

In 1919, Johnson organized a subsidiary of the Mantle Lamp Company of America, Aladdin Industries, Inc., to market and sell the Aladdin thermalware jars and vacuum ware. At the same time, Mantle lamp Company of America formed Aladdin Limited in Canada and England to sell thermalware as well as Pathfinder Radio Corporation, Cadillac Photograph Corporation, Aladdin Chemical Corporation, Aladdin Phonograph Corporation, Johnson Laboratories, Inc. (radio components), and Aladdin Radio Industries (magnetic and radio research). Pathfinder, Cadillac, Aladdin Chemical and Aladdin Phonograph all failed. In 1926, the Mantle Lamp Company acquired Lippincott Glass Company of Alexandria, Indiana, where it manufactured and fabricated glass chimneys, shades and lamp bases, mantles, wicks, and metal lamp bases. The Alexandria plant closed in 1952 and eventually moved to Nashville.

In 1943, Victor S. Johnson Sr. died and his son, Victor S. Johnson Jr. (1906-), succeeded him as president of Aladdin Industries Inc. Johnson Jr. moved Aladdin from Chicago to Nashville, Tennessee in 1949 to place the company strategically in mid-America to distribute its products. Aladdin's general offices, vacuum bottle production, and electric lamps and kerosene completed the move by 1952.

In 1950, Aladdin began illustrating flat metal school lunch kits (lunch boxes with liquid containers) with images of popular radio, movie and television figures. Hopalong Cassidy was the first character kit. This innovative marketing decision produced an explosive growth in the lunch kit market and made Aladdin a pioneer in image licensing. Character lunch boxes became a large part of the childhood experience and are collector's items today. Over the years, Aladdin extended the range of characters depicted and began manufacturing plastic and soft, vinyl lunch kits with printed themes. It also introduced "3D" embossing on the flat metal kits. Embossed metal lunch kits were completely phased out in 1986 due to high production costs. In addition to the school lunch kits, Aladdin also introduced wide mouth vacuum bottles (pint and quart size) in 1953. The wide mouth bottles also carried "adult" themes such as the "Angler" fisherman's bottle. The thermosware line eventually moved from metal to plastic jackets and from a glass insulated filler to foam.

In 1965, Aladdin purchased the Stanley steel bottle operation from Landers, Frary and Clark in New Britain, Connecticut. Aladdin's diversification strategy led to the introduction in 1968 of the Temp-Rite® meal distribution plan, an insulated thermal tray service for hospitals, the airline industry, and prisons. The Temp-Rite® system gave rise to a full line of products and services and Aladdin formed a subsidiary, known as Aladdin Synergetics, Inc., to handle its health care and food service operations. Aladdin Synergetics was sold to Welbilt Corporation in 1998; the new operation was named Aladdin Temp-Rite. Other products added over the years included electric lamps, shades, kerosene stoves, and an electronics division in 1956. This division was established from a small technical research group whose function was patent licensing. As a subsidiary of Aladdin Industries, it produced transformers and radio and telephone filters. The subsidiary was sold to Vernitron in October, 1979.

At various times, Aladdin established offices in Alexandria, Indiana; Chicago, Illinois; Nashville, Tennessee; Portland Oregon, Canada; Hungry; France; Australia, New Zealand; England; Iraq, Iran, Brazil, Japan, Peru, Venezuela, Chile, Uruguay, France, Germany, Iceland, Sweden, and South Africa to market and sell its products.

Aladdin was financially mismanaged in the 1990s and rapidly declined. Aladdin Industries Inc. reorganized in 1999 and became known as Aladdin Industries LLC. High labor costs and unsuccessful efforts to develop new products led to further decline. By January, 2002, Aladdin had sold its remaining product lines and closed its Nashville plant. Aladdin lamps are still sold today by the Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company of Clarksville, Tennessee.
Separated Materials:
The Division of Cultural History, National Museum of American History, holds 30 lunch boxes and 28 thermos bottles from Aladdin Industries, Nashville, Tennessee. Additionally, there is a pair of lamps. See Accession 2003.0255. Although the children's steel lunch boxes predominate, the collection represents the full spectrum of Aladdin box designs including vinyl, hard plastic, and fabric.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center by Aladdin Industries in 2003.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the oversize map folders are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Lunchboxes  Search this
Character merchandising  Search this
Celebrities  Search this
Food containers  Search this
Food container industry  Search this
Thermos bottles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 20th century
Newsletters -- 20th century
Commercial art
Picture postcards -- 20th century -- United States
Laboratory notebooks
Patents -- 20th century
Design drawings -- 1950-2000
Business records -- 20th century
Advertisements -- 20th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Citation:
Aladdin Industries, Inc. Records, 1889-2002, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0844
See more items in:
Aladdin Industries, Inc. Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0844
Online Media:

He Can't Win With His Arm in a Sling ... (Second Prize, Newspaper Cartoonists' Contest, Safety Week, St. Louis)

Issuing body:
National Safety Council  Search this
Creator:
Sparks  Search this
National Safety Council  Search this
Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (1/4 size; Multi-color, 56 x 41 cm)
Container:
Box 23, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
United States
Image:
Main Image: Uncle Sam with his arm in a sling and carrying a lunchbox with a factory labeled "U.S. Industry" in background
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 6414
General:
Issued by: National Safety Council

Artist(s): Sparks
Series:
No. 731
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but is stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Health/Industrial Safety  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Industrial safety  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Posters -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Posters -- World War, 1914-1918 -- United States
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 2: World War One / United States
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref7644

Pack a Lunch for Super Bowl 50

Creator:
Smithsonian Insider  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Fri, 05 Feb 2016 13:30:16 +0000
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Insider
Data Source:
Smithsonian Insider
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_895de30c78bee1739a9bd2968ab2b860

lunchbox

Physical Description:
iron (overall material)
tin (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 3/8 in x 6 1/4 in x 4 3/4 in; 6.0325 cm x 15.875 cm x 12.065 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
lunch box
Place made:
United States
Date made:
late 19th century
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mr. Kenneth E. Jewett
ID Number:
DL.257491.0064
Catalog number:
257491.0064
Accession number:
257491
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ae-2092-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_310794
Online Media:

lunchbox

Physical Description:
iron (overall material)
tin (overall material)
brass (sliding lock button material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/8 in x 8 1/4 in x 4 3/4 in; 5.3975 cm x 20.955 cm x 12.065 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Place made:
United States
Date made:
late 19th century
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mr. Kenneth E. Jewett
ID Number:
DL.257491.0063
Catalog number:
257491.0063
Accession number:
257491
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a1-0f7e-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_310795
Online Media:

lunchbox

Physical Description:
iron (overall material)
tin (overall material)
paint (exterior decoration material)
gold (exterior decoration material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 7/8 in x 7 1/2 in x 5 1/4 in; 4.7625 cm x 19.05 cm x 13.335 cm
Object Name:
Box, Lunch
lunchbox
Place made:
United States
Date made:
c. 1875-1900
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mr. Kenneth E. Jewett
ID Number:
DL.251349.0035
Catalog number:
251349.0034
Accession number:
251349
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ae-2935-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_310796
Online Media:

Book shaped lunch box

Physical Description:
iron (overall material)
tin (overall material)
asphaltum (exterior decoration material)
paint (exterior decoration material)
gold (exterior decoration material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/4 in x 5 5/8 in x 8 3/8 in; 5.715 cm x 14.2875 cm x 21.2725 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Place made:
United States
Date made:
c. 1865-1895
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mr. Kenneth E. Jewett
ID Number:
DL.251349.0034
Catalog number:
251349.0035
Accession number:
251349
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ae-219b-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_310797
Online Media:

lunchbox

Physical Description:
iron (overall material)
tin (overall material)
asphaltum (exterior decoration material)
gold (exterior decoration material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/4 in x 7 in x 4 1/2 in; 5.715 cm x 17.78 cm x 11.43 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Place made:
United States
Date made:
late 19th century
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Mr. Kenneth E. Jewett
ID Number:
DL.251349.0038
Catalog number:
251349.0038
Accession number:
251349
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ae-2936-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_310798
Online Media:

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