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Mrs. Thurgood Marshall, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Maurice Sorrell, a Johnson Publishing company staff photographer pose at the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) 150th Anniversary reception at the National press club

Photograph by:
Milton Williams, American, born 1940  Search this
Subject of:
Maurice Sorrell, American, 1914 - 1998  Search this
Thurgood Marshall, American, 1908 - 1993  Search this
Cecilia Suyat Marshall, American, 1928 - 2022  Search this
Medium:
silver and photographic gelatin on photographic paper
Dimensions:
H x W (Image and Sheet): 7 15/16 x 10 3/16 in. (20.2 x 25.9 cm)
Type:
gelatin silver prints
portraits
Place captured:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1977
Topic:
African American  Search this
Law  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Photography  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Milton Williams Archives
Object number:
2011.15.240
Restrictions & Rights:
© Milton Williams
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Media Arts-Photography
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5afbcbd60-38c7-45d4-beda-397ea3082c05
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.15.240

Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution, Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Flyer advertising student strike against the Vietnam War

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Owned by:
Jan Bailey, American, 1942 - 2010  Search this
Medium:
paper, ink
Dimensions:
H x W: 11 1/16 × 8 9/16 in. (28.1 × 21.7 cm)
Type:
fliers (printed matter)
Place depicted:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1968
Topic:
African American  Search this
Education  Search this
International affairs  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Politics  Search this
Resistance  Search this
Vietnam War, 1961-1975  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2013.201.11.1-.2
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera-Advertisements
Exhibition:
A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 1, C1 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5d26924b8-d61a-4130-a1cb-1532891004b4
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.201.11.1-.2
Online Media:

Holy Bible from New Bethany Baptist Church

Published by:
A. J. Holman & Company, American, 1872 - 1961  Search this
Subject of:
New Bethany Baptist Church, American, founded 1935  Search this
Owned by:
Reverend John Jackson Koger, American, died 1990  Search this
Medium:
ink on book paper, ribbon
Dimensions:
11 9/16 × 10 1/4 × 2 1/4 in. (29.4 × 26 × 5.7 cm)
Type:
Bibles
Place used:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1970
Topic:
African American  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Religious groups  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Rev. Carson E. Wise, Sr.
Object number:
2014.260ab
Restrictions & Rights:
© A. J. Holman & Company
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials
Religious and Sacred Objects
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5cac0f04f-70a5-4150-9082-e6db83068794
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.260ab

Festival at 50

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Description:
The festival this year will mark the 50-year anniversary of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, an international exposition of living culture staged on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Through music, dance, food, crafts, and stories, we learn about other cultures, about each other, about our intriguing differences and surprising similarities. This annual festival event is produced by the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Like other Smithsonian museums, the Festival includes exhibition-quality signs, photo-text panels, a program book/catalog, learning centers, a marketplace, and food concessions.

Tens of thousands of cultural exemplars have benefited from demonstrating their traditions at the Folklife Festival. The participants have returned home uplifted by the applause and appreciation they received. Most have been fortified in their determination to pass on their skill and artistry, their knowledge and wisdom to the next generation; many have been inspired to extend their cultural traditions for wider social, economic, and educational benefit.

The festival has become a national and international model of a research-based presentation of contemporary living cultural traditions. Over the past half century, it has brought more than twenty-three thousand musicians, artists, performers, craftspeople, workers, cooks, storytellers, and others to the National Mall to demonstrate the skills, knowledge, and aesthetics that embody the creative vitality of community-based traditions.

The Festival is a complex production, over the years drawing on the research and presentational skills of more than a thousand folklorists, cultural anthropologists, ethnomusicologists, and numerous other academic and lay scholars. Its production involves the expertise of hundreds of technical staff, the efforts of volunteers, and the backing of sponsors and supporters. At the same time, it is an exercise in cultural democracy, in which cultural practitioners speak for themselves, with each other, and to the public.

The Festival has strong impacts on policies, scholarship, and folks "back home." Many states and several nations have remounted Festival programs locally and used them to generate laws, institutions, educational programs, books, documentary films, recordings, and museum and traveling exhibitions. In many cases, the Festival has energized local and regional tradition bearers and their communities and, thus, helped to conserve and create cultural resources. Festival practice served as both the backdrop and inspiration for the consideration and ultimately the development of UNESCO's 2003 International Convention on the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.
Production, Artists &Ensembles:
PRODUCTION

Reunion Curator:Betty Belanus

Reunion Coordinator: Kim Stryker

Program Interns: Sophie Auffret, Dannah King, Hannah Peterson, Sarah Wilbert

Rinzler Concert Coordinators: Marjorie Hunt, Arlene Reiniger

Dance Parties Lead Volunteer: Malissa Wilkins

ARTISTS & ENSEMBLES

• BeauSoleil Quartet avec Michael Doucet, Cajun Music

• Los Texmaniacs, Texas Mexican conjunto (tribute to Flaco Jiménez)

• Daniel Sheehy, Folklorist & ethnomusicologist

• The Chuck Brown Band, D.C., Go-go music (tribute to Chuck Brown). This dance party was co-presented with the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum in celebration of its fiftieth anniversary.

• Juan Gutiérrez with Los Pleneros de la 21, Puerto Rican bomba and plena. This concert and dance party was presented by the Smithsonian Latino Center in celebration of its twentieth anniversary.

• Mick Moloney and Billy McComiskey, Irish music and dance from the Mid-Atlantic region

• Artemio Posadas, Huastecan son

• Verónica Castillo, Mexican American ceramicist

• Norma Cantú, Mexican American folklorist & writer

• Alfonsina Salas, Hispanic Musician

• Irvin Trujillo, Lisa Trujillo, Hispanic weavers

• Yary Livan Cambodian ceramicist

• Roland Freeman, Photographer, documentarian

• Norman Kennedy, Scottish weaver, singer, storyteller
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk54efbc3b1-8d41-455d-a70d-f9e4159ef843
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref22

Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive

Creator:
Freelon, Philip G., 1953-2019  Search this
Names:
American Institute of Architects  Search this
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup  Search this
Freelon Bond Architects  Search this
Freelon Group  Search this
Hampton University (Va.)  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. School of Architecture  Search this
National Organization of Minority Architects (U.S.)  Search this
North Carolina Board of Architecture  Search this
NorthStar Church of the Arts  Search this
PPG Industries, Inc.  Search this
Perkins & Will  Search this
Adjaye, David, 1966-  Search this
Bond, J. Max, Jr.  Search this
Freelon, Allan Randall, 1895-1960  Search this
Extent:
5.1 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
North Carolina -- United States
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Durham County -- Durham
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Suffolk County -- Boston
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
United States of America -- New York -- New York
Date:
bulk 1939-2017
Scope and Contents:
The Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archival Collection documents the life and career of architect, educator, cultural heritage preservation advocate and artist Philip G. Freelon. The collection highlights his distinguished career from its inception to his role as the "architect of record" for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Freelon was one of the leading African American architects of his generation and he created a focus designing and constructing buildings that paid reverence to African Americans and other underrepresented communities. This collection is comprised of business records, photographic materials, ephemera, correspondence, architectural drawings, and clippings.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been separated into seven series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content and chronology. Within each series and sub-series, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Biographical / Historical:
Philip Goodwin Freelon was born March 26, 1953, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon, Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon. Freelon was greatly influenced by his grandfather, Allan Freelon Sr., a notable Harlem Renaissance visual artist, educator, and civil rights activist. His grandfather's values and artistry inspired him to create a career that focused on creating historical and cultural spaces in African American communities. Freelon attended high school at the former predominantly white elite all-boys school, Central High School located in upper North Philadelphia from 1967 to 1971. His attendance at this school during of the Civil Rights Movement afforded him the unique experience that inspired him to attend a historically Black college (HBCU). Freelon selected Hampton Institute (Hampton University) to develop his veneration of the composition and design of the buildings that held cultural and artistic treasures. Located in the Tidewater area of Virginia, Hampton was renowned among HBCUs for its architecture program. His professor and mentor at Hampton, John Spencer, pushed Freelon academically as he moved easily through the school's curriculum. After two years at Hampton, Spencer helped Freelon transition to a more challenging program at North Carolina State University (NCSU) in Raleigh, North Carolina. Freelon graduated in 1975 with a bachelor's in environmental design in architecture.

Later in the fall of 1975, Freelon enrolled at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to pursue a master's in architecture. During the summers, Freelon worked with one of former his NC State professors at the architectural firm of John D. Latimer and Associates. After graduating from MIT in 1977, Freelon returned to North Carolina to take his Architecture Registration Examination (ARE), becoming the firm's youngest person to receive licensure. He also began teaching classes at his alma mater, NC State. It was there that Freelon met his future wife, Nnenna Pierce. Pierce, a Massachusetts native was attending Simmons College in Boston at the time. The connection was immediate, and the pair was married in 1979 and welcomed their first son, Deen in 1980. After a brief employment for a large Texas firm 3/D International, Freelon returned to Durham to join O'Brien Atkins Associates. He was the firm's youngest partner, eventually serving as principal and vice president of architecture. Freelon worked on a wide variety of projects throughout the state including learning centers, university buildings, churches, and parking garages. Along with Freelon's budding career, his family was expanding as well. Phil and Nnenna welcomed their daughter Maya in 1982 and their son, Pierce in 1983. During this time, Freelon was being highly recognized for his work. The American of Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded him the Honor Award for his design of Terminal 2 of the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, which has since been rebuilt.

By the end of the decade, Freelon and his wife Nnenna needed a change of pace. Nnenna pursued a professional career in music while Phil took a break from his career to expand his skillset and reinforce his intellectual approach to design. In 1989, Freelon was granted the Loeb Fellowship for one year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He also pursued a longtime hobby of furniture design, calling the practice "small architecture". He received industry awards like first prize in the PPG Industries, Inc. Furniture Design Competition as well as AIA Honor Award for conference table designs. With a year away from the field to clarify his vision, Freelon opened his own firm, simply titled, the Freelon Group in 1990. Beginning as a one-man operation, the Freelon Group grew to become one of the largest African American owned architectural firms in the country with over 50 employees, forty percent of which were women, and thirty percent were people of color. With freedom within his own firm, Freelon focused on designing learning centers, libraries and museums and vowed to never build anything that did not bring cultural and intellectual value to a community.

Over the next twenty years, Freelon would assert himself as a force in designing notable cultural institutions and community-driven projects in and around the country including the Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC), Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD), Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA), Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC), the Anacostia and Tenley-Friendship branches of the District of Columbia Public Library , National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA), Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX). Alongside his architectural career, Freelon served as a lecturer and adjunct professor at several colleges and universities including North Carolina State University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Maryland College Park, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Syracuse University, and the Florence, Italy program at Kent State University. Freelon was awarded a full-time appointment as professor of Professional Practice at MIT in 2008. The Professional Practice (4.222) course was a requirement for the master's in architecture and he used examples from his extensive career and personal experience to illustrate legal, ethical, and management concepts. Nnenna's music career was also thriving. She would go on to record twelve albums and be nominated for six Grammys. This fusion of education, the arts, and music inspired another generation of Freelons: their son, Pierce Freelon is a hip-hop artist, educator, and political activist; daughter Maya Freelon is a visual artist; and son Deen Freelon is a professor.

In 2001, George W. Bush established a commission to create a new museum on the National Mall. Freelon wanted to enter his firm to participate in the international design competition. Freelon would partner with famed African American New York City architect, J. Max Bond, Jr. and by 2006 the two officially formed the Freelon Bond Architects.The Freelon Bond group submitted their proposal and soon after were elected to create programming and pre-design work for the museum. When the official design competition for the museum was announced in 2008, UK-based architect David Adjaye joined the team as the lead designer, and along with the partnering firm SmithGroup, the new architectural team became Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup. The three black architects combined a variety of distinctive elements from Africa and the Americas to create the building's unique, historically significant design. The Freelon Group served as the "architect of record" and were responsible for ensuring that key design ideas were upheld. Freelon and key firm members such as Zena Howard were active as on-site project managers during the museum's construction process to certify that the building would be developed according to plan. Freelon, Adjaye, and Bond were tasked with taking the collective history of the African American experience-- generations of pain, triumph, and perseverance-- and forming it into a structure. The team looked to African sources, such as Yoruban architecture, for inspiration. They sought to connect the building's design to the geographic and cultural roots of African Americans. Their design choices also reference the contributions of enslaved and free black metalworkers made to the landscape of the American South. Their goal was to make the museum an extension of its contents, and an expression of the stories told inside. By the groundbreaking for NMAAHC in 2012, Freelon had been appointed to the U.S. Commission of the Fine Arts by President Barack Obama. In an effort to broaden his resources and expand his firm, The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a firm originating in Chicago that grew to have offices across the United States. Freelon was appointed the managing director and later lead design director at the firm's North Carolina offices in Charlotte and Durham in 2014. By the next year, Freelon understood that his work in architecture and education was a necessary voice to preserve, which he did through donation of the bulk of his personal papers to his alma mater, NC State University. The year 2016 proved to be a year of triumph for Freelon as NMAAHC opened its doors on September 24th to much jubilation and celebration. That same year, Freelon's legacy was further cemented as the Phil Freelon Fellowship Fund was established at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a fellowship designed to broaden opportunities for African Americans and other underrepresented communities in architecture and design.

Unfortunately, this triumphant year was met with difficulty as Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive disease that affects the nervous system. He would continue to work and lecture for the next two years until it became too challenging. One of those projects was the renovation and opening of The NorthStar Church of the Arts in early 2019. A passion project with his wife and son, Pierce, a former church was renovated and repurposed as an arts and cultural space for all. This space was created in an effort to support the Durham cultural community as it began to feel the effects of gentrification. When Freelon lost his battle with ALS on July 9, 2019, in his home in Durham, North Carolina, the family requested that in lieu of flowers that donations be sent to the NorthStar Church to continue the center's mission and Phil's dream to give back to the Durham community.

Historical Timeline

1953 -- Philip Goodwin Freelon was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon.

1971 -- Freelon graduated from Central High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and entered School of Architecture, Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia as a design student.

1973 -- Freelon transferred to College of Design at the North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

1975 -- Graduated with a Bachelor's in Environmental Design in Architecture from NC State University. He received the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Book Award for Outstanding Work in Architectural Design. In the fall, he began his master's program in architecture at MIT.

1976 -- Began working as aide for architectural firm, John D. Latimer and Associates.

1977 -- Graduated with a Master's in Architecture and Design from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT.)

1978 -- Freelon became youngest architect to pass the North Carolina Architecture Registration Exam. Freelon started teaching at North Carolina State University.

1979 -- Married Chinyere "Nnenna" Pierce. Freelon began working for, 3/D International in Houston, Texas.

1980 -- Son Deen Freelon was born.

1981 -- Freelon returned to Durham, NC to join O'Brien Atkins Associates as the firm's youngest partner.

1982 -- Daughter Maya Freelon was born.

1983 -- Son Pierce Freelon was born.

1989-1990 -- Received Loeb Fellowship for independent study at Harvard University. Freelon received AIA Honor Award for American Airlines Terminal 2 at Raleigh-Durham Airport, NC (RDU).

1990 -- Freelon left O'Brien Atkins Associates to open his own firm The Freelon Group.

1991 -- Won first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition.

1992 -- Won the AIA Honor Award for Conference Table Designs.

2001 -- Won the AIA Firm Award for The Freelon Group and the AIA Design Award for Parking Structure, RDU Airport. Began attending meetings of President George W. Bush's commission on new National Mall museum dedicated to African American history and culture.

2003 -- Freelon merged his firm with New York architect Max Bond to create Freelon Bond Architects.

2004 -- Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC) was completed.

2005 -- Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD) and Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA) were both completed.

2008 -- UK-based architect David Adjaye and Washington, DC based architecture firm, Smithgroup joined the team, creating the Freelon Adjaye Bond Group/SmithGroup Freelon began teaching at MIT's school of Architecture and Design.

2009 -- Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup won the official design for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC) was completed.

2010 -- Anacostia branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2011 -- Tenley-Friendship branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2012 -- Construction began on NMAAHC.

2014 -- The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a much larger architectural firm. Freelon became managing director and lead design director of the North Carolina branches in Durham and Charlotte. National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA) was completed.

2016 -- Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

2017 -- Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX) were completed.

2019 -- Freelon died in his home in Durham, North Carolina at age 66 on July 9.
Related Materials:
Phil Freelon Papers, 1975-2019 at North Carolina State University Libraries.
Provenance:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Philip G. Freelon.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Business  Search this
Construction  Search this
Entrepreneurship  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
Design  Search this
Education  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Philip G. Freelon Archival Collection, 1939-2017. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2017.51
See more items in:
Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3ba3ca2a2-5495-45cf-801c-f3d66a7002fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2017-51

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Based on research in the rich and dynamic living culture of the border, the Borderlands Festival program of 1993 was designed to provide a glimpse of the border - its histories, its diverse communities, local and regional identities, and its music, arts, crafts, healing practices, foodways, and narrative. The program was about community-based culture. It presented cultural practices found on the border and cultural expressions about the border, and it explored cultural patterns that were created by the border. It also addressed the cultural heritage, adaptability, and creativity of Native Americans and of the Mexican, Hispanic American, Anglo, and other immigrant communities that have played a part in creating the life that surrounds the Mexico-U.S. border - those who maintain it, those who cross it, those who are left behind, and those who dwell in the border region. The program explored the processes through which such groups create, adapt, and preserve culture to meet the challenges of life on the border. It sought to present and understand community codes of behavior that evolved on the border including confrontation, evasion, violence, and romance, especially as these have been transformed into narrative and other forms of artistic expression.

Music performances at the Festival included emergent forms such as the conjunto, which grew out of the interaction between different cultural communities; older forms, such as the corrido, which has been used to preserve a historical vision in the defense of disputed territory; and adapted forms such as the string band music now incorporated into the traditional repertoire of the Tohono O'odham Native American communities. Also featured in the program were five muralists, whose work reflects the traditions of Mexican cholo and United States Chicano muralism. Murals continue to be touchstones of common historical experiences, archaeologies of sociocultural movements, and powerful statements of identity, ethical principles, and community aspirations. The unique fusion of border aesthetics and handcrafted technology was embodied for Festival visitors in lowriders - distinctively customized automobiles. These lowslung, hopping cars complemented the iconography of murals as statements of cultural identity.

Vaqueros of south Texas demonstrated their skills, crafts, and foodways associated with their cowboy tradition, which dates back to the Spanish colonial era. A fisherman from the port of Brownsville demonstrated shrimping techniques. A Laredo blacksmith forged stirrups, belt buckles, and other implements of vaquero life, along with a number of traditional and contemporary decorative objects. A ropemaker demonstrated the use of the local fiber called lechuguilla (a fibrous plant of the agave family). While fine craft traditions like guitar- and furniture-making are not specific to the border, craftspeople have incorporated motifs and instruments native to the region, like the bajo sexto guitar. Other occupational groups characteristic of the border environment included federal Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) agents who regulate movement across the border; coyotes and polleros, who help migrants evade immigration regulations; and workers in maquiladora assembly line industried. Narrative sessions focused on the culture of craft and occupation in the context of the border.

Artisans also demonstrated crafts used in the home and for special celebrations, including quilt-making, flower- and piñata-making, candlemaking, and reverse-painted glass. Participants prepared regional specialties, traditional foods served for fiestas, and offered a sampling of typical vaquero outdoor cooking. Finally, the Festival presented members of the Mixteco Indian community in Tijuana, a recent migrant group, which preserves its cultural identity and contributes to the economy at the border by maintaining ties with other Mixteco communities in Oaxaca and California.

The United States-Mexico border has had a profound effect on the lives of millions of people. The then-pending NAFTA free trade agreement was only the latest in a long line of international socioeconomic arrangements with wide ranging local impacts. Critical attention in Mexico and the U.S. had increasingly focused on the historical consciousness created in this borderland and on its expression in traditional and other forms of art. Recognition of the vitality and value of borderland culture was growing in 1993 at the margins, among borderland populations, as well as in the centers of power and opinion in both countries. Scholars and political leaders increasingly realized that the cultural encounters, syntheses, and resistances characteristic of border life signaled similar cultural developments in the larger societies. This intensifying concern and scrutiny centered on the margin, but could it reduce the marginality in human rights, social dignity, and economic opportunity at the border? Festival organizers hoped that listening to community voices of the border from the Mexican and United States sides could better inform our thinking and decision-making.

Olivia Cadaval served as Program Curator, with Peter Seitel as Research Advisor; Héctor Antonío Corporán was Program Coordinator and Betty Belanus was Presentation Coordinator.

Collaborating institutions included Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universid Autónoma de Nuevo León; Consejo Nacional para las Culturas y las Artes – El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras; El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (COLEF); El Paso-Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Embajada de México en Washington, D.C.; John E. Conner Museum, Texas A & I University; Institute of Texan Cultures; Instituto Cultural de México; Instituto de Bellaas Artes del Estado de Baja California; Instituto Nacional Indigenista; Instituto Mexicano de Cultura, San Antonio; Laredo State University; Mexican Cultural Institute; Museo Regional de la Universidad Autónoma de Baja California en Mexicali; National Museum of the American Indian; New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico; Pimería Alta Historical Society, Arizona; Texas A & I University; Texas Folklife Resources; Tumacácori National Historical Park, Arizona; University of Arizona Library's Southwest Folklore Center; University of Arizona – Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; University of Texas – Brownsville; University of Texas, Center for Mexican-American Studies; University of Texas – Pan American; and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.

United States-Mexico Borderlands was made possible with the support and collaboration of the Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes - El Programa Cultural de las Fronteras, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Texas Commission on the Arts, Cerveza Tecate - Imported Beer, Texas Folklife Resources, University of Arizona Library's Western Folklore Center, Tumacácori National Historical Park, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Léon - Centro de Información de Historia Regional, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Gubierno de Nuevo Léon, Mexican Cultural Institute, and the recording industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Fieldworkers:
María Eugenia de la O, Enrique Madrid, Angel Norzagaray Norzagaray, Manuel Peña, Kathy Raglan, Michael James Ritchie, Suzie Reyes, Irene Vásquez Valle, Kathy Vargas, Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela
Presenters and fieldworkers:
Enrique Avilés, Norma Cantú, Jessica Chapin, Andrew Connors, Maricela González Felix, Mary Lou Gortárez, Everardo Garduño, James S. Griffith, Celso Garza Guajardo, Ian F. Hancock, Pat Jasper, Enrique Lamadrid, Laura Larco, Francisco Javier Moreno, Daniel Sheehy, Emily Socolov, Michael C. Stone; José Manuel Valenzuela Arce, Meynardo Vásquez, Laura Velasco Ortíz, Thomas Vennum, Jr., Cynthia Vidaurri
Participants:
Tijuana, Baja California

Olga Lidia Cortés, Mixteca, hat and basket maker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Guadalupe Isabel Flores de Estrada, 1939-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Juvencio Extrada Maceda, 1936-, Mixteco, storyteller, oral historian, candlemaker, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Gloria López López, Mixteca, vendor, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Elia Ilda Maceda Flores, 1971-, Mixteca, altar maker, cook, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Ofelia Santos López, Mixteca, vendor, oral historian, hat and basket maker, altar maker, cook, weaver, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Francisco Paulino Sierra Cruz, 1955-, Mixteca, schoolteacher, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Cathedral City, California

Carmen Moreno, guitarist, singer, Cathedral City, California

Santa Catarina, Baja California

Benito Peralta González, Paipai, storyteller, oral historian, Santa Catarina, Baja California, Mexico

Tecate, Baja California

José Luis Lee Sandoval, furniture maker, Tecate, Baja California, Mexico

Mexicali, Baja California

Taller Universitario de Teatro -- Taller Universitario de TeatroAngel Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1961-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoHeriberto B. Norzagaray Norzagaray, 1959-, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoLoreto Ramón Tamayo Rosas, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAlejandra Rioseco de la Pena, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoAndrés García Moreno, Mexicali, Baja California, MexicoPedro Gabriel González Castro, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

San Simon Village, Arizona

Tohono O'odham String Band -- Tohono O'odham String BandBlaine W. Juan, 1936-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaJoseph Alonzo García, 1924-, violin, dancer, San Simon Village, ArizonaFrank N. Pedro, 1928-, guitar, San Simon Village, ArizonaVictor Augustine García, 1922-, violin, San Simon Village, ArizonaNacho J. Feleys, 1909-1994, snare drum, San Simon Village, ArizonaMike L. Francisco, 1926-, bass drum, dancer, San Simon Village, Arizona

Lupe Lopez, 1927-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Marie Leon, 1930-, Tohono O'odham basket maker, San Simon Village, Arizona

Nogales, Sonora

Maria Gloria Moroyoqui de Roques, 1930-, Yaqui cook, piñata and flower maker, herbalist, Nogales, Sonora, Mexico

Imuris, Sonora

Anastasio Léon, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Francisco Silva, birdcage and frame maker, Imuris, Sonora, Mexico

Magdalena, Sonora

Felipe de Jesús Valenzuela, regional historian, Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico

Tumacácori, Arizona

María Rodríguez, 1912-2001, tortilla maker, flower maker, cook, Tumacácori, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

Reynaldo B. Hernandez, INS border patrol, storyteller, Tucson, Arizona

Arturo Carrillo Strong, 1930-, author, oral historian, Tucson, Arizona

Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño Band -- Los Hermanos Cuatro, Yaqui Norteño BandJesús Juan Yucupicio, 1965-, electric bass, Tucson, ArizonaAlbert M. Yucupicio, 1954-, accordion, Tucson, ArizonaAngel M. Yucupicio, 1966-, drums, Tucson, ArizonaPeter S. Yucupicio, 1957-, bajo sexto, Tucson, Arizona

Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

Brigada por La Paz -- Brigada por La PazAlonso Encina Herrera, 1968-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoJesús Alberto "Pee Wee" Rodriguez Medina, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoGustavo "Sleepy" Grado Tiscareño, 1973-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoMiguel Angel "El Tandy" Sandoval Lira, 1971-, muralist, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Oscar Ramírez, 1944-, guitar maker, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Los Alegres del Norte, norteño band -- Los Alegres del Norte, norteño bandJosé Flores Cordova, accordion, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoDiego Hidalgo Alvarez, 1944-, bajo sexto, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, MexicoEmilio Chaírez Muñoz, tololoche, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico

El Paso, Texas

Agustín Castillo, 1950-, woodcarver, furniture maker, El Paso, Texas

Carlos Callejo, Chicano muralist, El Paso, Texas

Romulo Frías, lowrider, El Paso, Texas

El Divisidero, Chihuahua

Guadalupe Carrasco Leyva, 1923-, quilter, cook, El Divisidero, Chihuahua, Mexico

Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua

Baltazar Rodríguez Puentes, 1942-, ranching crafts, Paso de Lajitas, Chihuahua, Mexico

Lajitas, Texas

Adolfo O. Rodríguez, 1971-, ranching crafts, Lajitas, Texas

Presidio, Texas

Richard Mark Bernholz, 1954-, INS border patrol, storyteller, Presidio, Texas

Nacimiento, Chihuahua

Gertrude Factor Vásquez, 1921-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Alice Fay Lozano, 1916-, oral historian, cook, herbalist, Nacimiento, Chihuahua, Mexico

Del Rio, Texas

Ethel I. Warrior, 1919-, oral historian, cook, Del Rio, Texas

William F. Warrior, 1927-, oral historian, storyteller, Del Rio, Texas

Laredo, Texas

Armando Flores, 1953-, blacksmith, Laredo, Texas

María Paredes de Solís, 1923-, quilter, Laredo, Texas

Monterrey, Mexico

El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño Band -- El Palomo y el Gorrión, Norteño BandMiguel "El Gorrión" Luna Franco, 1948-, drums, composer, vocals, Monterrey, MexicoMoisés García, guitar, Monterrey, Mexico

Hebbronville, Texas

Omar Galván, 1920-1999, vaquero, rope maker, cook, storyteller, Hebbronville, Texas

Kingsville, Texas

Joe O. Mendietta, 1961-, vaquero, horsehair braider, Kingsville, Texas

San Diego, Texas

Canuto Soliz, 1924-2006, vaquero, leatherworker, storyteller, guitarist, San Diego, Texas

Elsa, Texas

Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto Band -- Los Hermanos Layton, Conjunto BandAntonio V. Layton, 1946-, guitar, vocals, Elsa, TexasRené Layton, drums, Elsa, TexasNorfilia Layton González, vocals, Elsa, TexasGilbert González, bass guitar, Elsa, TexasBenigno Layton, 1950-, accordion, vocals, Elsa, Texas

Brownsville, Texas

Julius Collins, 1928-, shrimper, net maker, cook, Brownsville, Texas
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53366ad74-9495-4412-9336-ea97e6c0f67a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref41

Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Border Stories: Mural Art & Community: Border Imagery in Arts & Crafts

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Strong, Arturo Carrillo, 1930-  Search this
López, Ofelia Santos  Search this
Bernholz, Richard M., 1954-  Search this
Herrera, Alonso Encina  Search this
Frías, Romulo  Search this
Castillo, Agustin, 1950-  Search this
Callejo, Carlos, 1951-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Mexicans  Search this
Mixtec Indians  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Texas
Arizona
Mexico
Tucson (Ariz.)
Presidio (Tex.)
Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico
Durango
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
El Paso (Tex.)
Date:
1993 July 1
1993
Track Information:
101 Border Stories / Arturo Carrillo Strong, Ofelia Santos López, Richard M. Bernholz.

102 Mural Art and Community / Alonso Encina Herrera, Romulo Frías.

103 Border Imagery in Arts and Crafts / Agustin Castillo, Carlos Callejo.
Local Numbers:
FP-1993-CT-0083
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1993
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 1, 1993.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Border patrols  Search this
Law enforcement  Search this
Smuggling  Search this
Borderlands  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Lowriders  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Item FP-1993-CT-0083
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d526cb5f-8ee7-4145-a075-107fe178f527
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref705
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Border Stories: Mural Art & Community: Border Imagery in Arts & Crafts digital asset number 1
  • View Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Border Stories: Mural Art & Community: Border Imagery in Arts & Crafts digital asset number 2

Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Border Theater: Murals & Neighborhoods

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Norzagaray Norzagaray, Heriberto B. , 1959-  Search this
Rosas, L. Ramon Tomaya  Search this
Castro, Pedro Gabriel González  Search this
Herrera, Alonso Encina  Search this
Lira, Miguel Angel Sandova  Search this
Frías, Romulo  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Americans  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Mexico
Mexicali (Mexico)
Durango
Texas
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
El Paso (Tex.)
Date:
1993 July 3
Track Information:
101 Border Theater / Heriberto B. Norzagaray Norzagaray, L. Ramon Tomaya Rosas, Pedro Gabriel González Castro.

102 Murals and Neighborhoods / Alonso Encina Herrera, Miguel Angel Sandova Lira, Romulo Frías.
Local Numbers:
FP-1993-CT-0090
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 3, 1993.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Theater  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Lowriders  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Item FP-1993-CT-0090
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5ddae4f5c-23a1-4cbe-9f22-c5c2390da0f5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref712
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Border Theater: Murals & Neighborhoods digital asset number 1

Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Ranching Crafts: Murals & Lowriders: Border Stories

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Rodríguez, Adolfo O., 1971-  Search this
Rodriguez Puentes, Baltasar, 1942-  Search this
Mendietta, Joe O., 1961-  Search this
Herrera, Alonso Encina  Search this
Callejo, Carlos, 1951-  Search this
Frías, Romulo  Search this
Strong, Arturo Carrillo, 1930-  Search this
Rogues, Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de  Search this
Hernandez, Reynaldo B.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Americans  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Texas
Mexico
Kingsville (Tex.)
Lajitas (Mexico)
Durango
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
El Paso (Tex.)
Arizona
Nogales (Nogales, Mexico)
Tucson (Ariz.)
Date:
1993 July 4
Track Information:
101 Ranching Crafts / Adolfo O. Rodríguez, Baltasar Rodriguez Puentes, Joe O. Mendietta.

102 Murals and Lowriders / Alonso Encina Herrera, Carlos Callejo, Romulo Frías.

103 Border Stories / Arturo Carrillo Strong, Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de Rogues, Reynaldo B. Hernandez.
Local Numbers:
FP-1993-CT-0092
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 4, 1993.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Ranching  Search this
Horsehair braiding  Search this
Saddlery  Search this
Rope  Search this
Cowboys  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Lowriders  Search this
Border patrols  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Smuggling  Search this
Drugs  Search this
Border  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Item FP-1993-CT-0092
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5192f9b4f-f46a-4390-bec7-c4c3e790353e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref714
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Ranching Crafts: Murals & Lowriders: Border Stories digital asset number 1

Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Paper crafts Workshop: Border Imagery & Crafts: Murals & Low Riders

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Rogues, Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de  Search this
León, Anastasio  Search this
Grado Tiscare-o, Gustavo, 1973-  Search this
Herrera, Alonso Encina  Search this
Callejo, Carlos, 1951-  Search this
Frías, Romulo  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Americans  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Mexico
Nogales (Nogales, Mexico)
Durango
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
Imuris (Sonora, Mexico).
Texas
El Paso (Tex.)
Date:
1993 July 5
Track Information:
101 Paper Crafts Workshop / Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de Rogues.

102 Border Imagery and Crafts / Anastasio León, Gustavo Grado Tiscare-o.

102 Murals and Lowriders / Alonso Encina Herrera, Carlos Callejo, Romulo Frías.
Local Numbers:
FP-1993-CT-0095
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1993.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Paper art  Search this
Paper flowers  Search this
Frames  Search this
Graffiti  Search this
Glass etching  Search this
Birdcages  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Lowriders  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Item FP-1993-CT-0095
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk540eca49d-9c60-47c0-908d-410cfe3b618f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref717
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Paper crafts Workshop: Border Imagery & Crafts: Murals & Low Riders digital asset number 1

Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Murals & Low Riders: Border History; Chinese Presence in Baja, California

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Herrera, Alonso Encina  Search this
Callejo, Carlos, 1951-  Search this
Frías, Romulo  Search this
Sandoval, José Luis Lee  Search this
Felix, Marciella  Search this
Warrior, William, 1927-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
compact audio cassette
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Mexicans  Search this
Americans  Search this
Hispanic Americans  Search this
Maroons  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Durango
Mexico
Texas
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
El Paso (Tex.)
China
Tecate (Mexico)
Del Rio (Tex.)
Date:
1993 July 5
Track Information:
101 Murals and Low Riders / Alonso Encina Herrera, Carlos Callejo, Romulo Frías.

102 Border History: Chinese Presence in Baja California / José Luis Lee Sandoval, Marciella Felix, William Warrior.
Local Numbers:
FP-1993-CT-0096
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 5, 1993.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Lowriders  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Emigration & immigration  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1993, Item FP-1993-CT-0096
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1993 Festival of American Folklife / Series 5: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands / 5.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5c48cf350-a1b5-4c9b-8c39-5ffb9aaeb102
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1993-ref718
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Murals & Low Riders: Border History; Chinese Presence in Baja, California digital asset number 1

Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Across North America and throughout the Hawaiian Islands, Native people are engaged in artistic activities deeply rooted in the everyday and ceremonial traditions of their communities. In the face of dwindling or inaccessible natural resources, loss of elders and their specialized knowledge, the profusion of cheap mass-produced goods, and the use-it-and-throw-away attitude of so many, Native artists are nevertheless gathering natural materials and weaving them into objects of beauty and profound meaning. The 2006 Festival program examined the contemporary state of Native weaving in the United States and the ways in which Native baskets - and their makers - are "carriers of culture."

One of the most important developments in indigenous basket weaving was the formation of Native weaving organizations over the previous fifteen years, bringing together weavers from diverse places to identify and examine problems, build a sense of shared experiences, foster communication and networking, share knowledge and skills, and begin to develop strategies to address some of the most critical issues they face. At local and regional gatherings held by these organizations and at workshops or symposia hosted by other supportive agencies, basket weavers began to find common voice as they articulated their concerns and experiences. At the Festival, visitors could listen to those voices while admiring the work of skilled eyes and hands.

The 2006 Festival program reflected the long-term involvement of numerous Native people and provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine contemporary issues across tribal and geographical lines. It also presented a timely opportunity to reflect on recent efforts by Native basket weavers and others to address these issues; the ways in which weaving traditions continue to be passed on; and the meaning weaving has for artists as people and as members of distinct tribal or Native communities. Most importantly, through demonstrations and discussions at the Festival and in the artists' own words, weavers themselves shared these perspectives first hand with Festival visitors.

For Native baskets to continue to be "carriers of culture" for Native traditions, there are still many challenges to overcome - challenges that were identified and discussed by the weavers themselves. The ever-changing natural and built landscape in the United States is leading to loss of plants essential to weaving. As more land moves into private ownership, weavers encounter increasingly limited access to traditional gathering sites. Non-native land management practices continue to affect the health of plant materials and of weavers themselves. Undoubtedly, other challenges to the continuity of the traditions of living Native basketry in the United States will also emerge. While much progress is being made to revitalize the basket traditions in many Native communities, there are other Native communities where basketry is in rapid decline. This means not just fewer baskets, but the irreplaceable loss of an array of indigenous knowledge linked to the art and a diminution of the diversity and richness of our American experience.

As Festival visitors learned, Native baskets were not antiquated containers or artifacts of a past life; they are very much a part of contemporary Native life and identity. Native baskets truly are "carriers of culture": they embody the knowledge of those who have gone before, those who have respect and reverence for the natural world and the plants that form their baskets, and those who have shared their knowledge with others to keep the chain of indigenous knowledge unbroken.

C. Kurt Dewhurst, Marjorie Hunt, and Marsha MacDowell were Curators, with Arlene Reiniger as Program Coordinator, Betty Belanus as Family Activities Area Coordinator, and Mary Monseur as Marketplace Native Basketry Consultant. Curatorial Advisors were: Jennifer Bates, Salli Benedict, Sally Black, Sheree Bonaparte, Peggy Sanders Brennan, Sue Coleman, Sue Ellen Herne, Sara Greensfelder, Elaine Grinnell, Terrol Dew Johnson, Sabra Kauka, Gloria Lomehaftewa, Fred Nahwooksy, Jennifer Neptune, Theresa Parker, Bernadine Phillips, Teri Rofkar, Robin McBride Scott, Theresa Secord, Tatiana Lomehaftewa Slock, and Laura Wong-Whitebear.

The program was produced in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Indian and Michigan State University Museum. Major support came from the National Museum of the American Indian, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee on the occasion of its 40th anniversary. Additional Funding came from Alaska State Council on the Arts, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Michigan State University All-University Research Initiation Grant, Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs, Onaway Trust, Hawai'i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, Fund for Folk Culture, Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund, and the Cherokee Nation.
Researchers:
Researchers and consultants

Brian Bibby, Dawn Biddison, Deborah Boykin, Peggy Sanders Brennan, Tina Bucavalas, Vernon Chimegalrea, Sue Coleman, Marit Dewhurst, Betty DuPree, Carol Edison, Lynn Martin Graton, Sara Greensfelder, Theresa Harlan, Suzi Jones, Amy Kitchener, Jim Leary, Dayna Bowker Lee, Elizabeth Lee, Molly Lee, Richard March, Kathleen Mundell, Jennifer Neptune, Laura Quackenbush, Karen Reed, Teri Rofkar, Elaine Thatcher, Theresa Secord, Malia Villegas, Lois Whitney, Robin K. Wright

Research Assistants

Beth Donaldson, Marie Gile, Je'Keia Murphy
Presenters:
Howard Bass, Betty Belanus, Salli Benedict, Barry Bergey, Peggy Brennan, Schroeder Cherry, C. Kurt Dewhurst, Amy Echo-Hawk, Carol Edison, Rayna Green, Elaine Grinnell, Emil Her Many Horses, Marjorie Hunt, Sabra Kauka, Jared King, Keevin Lewis, Marsha MacDowell, Diana N'Diaye, Helen Maynor Scheirbeck, Pamela Woodis, Laura Wong-Whitebear
Participants:
Native Hawaiian

Gladys Grace, 1919-, Native Hawaiian, Honolulu, Hawai'i

Edwin T. Kaneko, 1930-, Japanese and Native Hawaiian descent, Holualoa, Kona, Hawai'i

Gwendolyn Kamisugi, 1944-, Native Hawaiian, Wahiawa, Oahu, Hawai'i

Sabra Kauka, Native Hawaiian, Lihu'e, Kauai, Hawai'i

Marques Hanalei Marzan, 1979-, Native Hawaiian, Kane'ohe, Hawai'i

Harriet Soong, 1927-, Native Hawaiian, Kailua Kona, Big Island, Hawai'i

Alaska Native

Sheldon Bogenrife, Iñupiaq, Anchorage, Alaska

Delores Churchill, Haida, Ketchikan, Alaska

Holly Joy Churchill, 1955-, Haida, Ketchikan, Alaska

Daisy Demientieff, 1935-, Athabascan, Anchorage, Alaska

Evelyn Douglas, 1947-, Yup'ik, Anchorage, Alaska

June Simeonoff Pardue, 1951-, Alutiiq and Suqpiaq, Wasilla, Alaska

Teri Rojkar, 1956-, Tlingit, Sitka, Alaska

Lisa Telford, 1957-, Haida, Everett, Washington

Northwest

Elaine Timentwa Emerson, 1941-, Colville, Omak, Washington

Pat Courtney Gold, Wasco and Tlingit, Scappoose, Oregon

Elaine Grinnell, 1936-, Jamestown S'Klallam and Lummi, Sequim, Washington

Khia Grinnell, 1985-, Jamestown S'Klallam and Lummi, Sequim, Washington

Nettie Kuneki Jackson, 1942-, Klickitat, White Swan, Washington

Robert Kentta, Siletz, Siletz, Oregon

Bud Lane, 1957-, Siletz, Siletz, Oregon

Theresa Mendoza, 1985-, Makah and Lummi, Neah Bay, Washington

June Parker, 1950-, Makah and Lummi, Neah Bay, Washington

Theresa Parker, 1956-, Makah and Lummi, Neah Bay, Washington

Bernadine Phillips, Colville, Omak, Washington

Craig Phillips, 1989-, Colville, Omak, Washington

Harold "Jimmi" Plaster, 1988-, Lummi, Bellingham, Washington

Lisa Plaster, 1972-, Lummi, Bellingham, Washington

Karen Reed, 1949-, Chinook and Puyallup, Puyallup, Washington

Lynda Squally, 1981-, Chinook and Puyallup, Milton, Washington

Laura Wong-Whitebear, Colville, Seattle, Washington

Great Basin

Elizabeth Brady, 1923-, Western Shoshone, Elko, Nevada

Leah Brady, 1955-, Western Shoshone, Elko, Nevada

Sue Coleman, 1950-, Washo, Carson City, Nevada

Rebecca Eagle, 1964-, Pyramid Lake Paiute, Wadsworth, Nevada

Sandra Eagle, 1961-, Pyramid Lake Paiute, Sutcliff Nevada

California

Jennifer D. Bates, 1951-, Northern Mewuk, Tuolumne, California

Leona Chepo, 1931-, Western Mono, North Fork, California

Lois Jean Conner, 1951-, Chuckchansi, Southern Miwok, and Western Mono, O'Neals, California

Ursula Jones, 1972-, Yosemite Miwok, Mono Lake Paiute, Kashaya Pomo, and Coast Miwok, Mammoth Lakes, California

Julia Parker, 1929-, Kashaya Pomo and Coast Miwok, Mariposa, California

Ruby Pomona, 1925-, Western Mono, North Fork, California

Wilverna Reece, 1946-, Karuk, Happy Camp, California

Eva Salazar, San Diego Kumeyaay, Alpine, California

Linda G. Yamane, 1949-, Ohlone, Seaside, California

Southwest - Navajo

Kayla Black, 1992-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Lorraine Black, 1970-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Mary Holiday Black, 1934-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Sally Black, 1959-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Southwest - Apache, Hopi, and Tohono O'odham

Evalena Henry, 1939-, San Carlos Apache, Peridot, Arizona

Esther Jaimes, 1947-, Tohono O'odham, Tucson, Arizona

Dorleen Gashweseoma Lalo, 1965-, Hopi, Hotevilla, Arizona

Joseph Lopez, 1978-, Tohono O'odham, Tucson, Arizona

Wa:k Tab Basket Dancers -- Wa:k Tab Basket DancersCecelia Encinas, 1988-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaKarlette Miguel, 1990-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaVerna E. Miguel, 1947-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaAngelique M. Moreno, 1996-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaCelestine Pablo, 1958-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaLien Pablo, 1991-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaVictoria M. Pablo, 1975-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaWynona Peters, 1989-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaCarolyn M. Reyes, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaRhonalee Stone, 1995-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, Arizona

Southeast - Choctaw and Chitimacha

Eleanor Ferris Chickaway, 1958-, Conehatta Choctaw, Conehatta, Mississippi

John Darden, 1960-, Chitimacha, Charenton, Louisiana

Scarlette Darden, 1963-, Chitimacha, Clarenton, Louisiana

Louise Wallace, 1949-, Choctaw, Bogue Homa, Mississippi

Southeast - Cherokee

Peggy Sanders Brennan, 1946-, Cherokee, Edmond, Oklahoma

Louise Goings, 1947-, Eastern Band of Cherokee, Cherokee, North Carolina

Lucille Lossiah, 1957-, Eastern Band of Cherokee, Cherokee, North Carolina

Robin McBride Scott, 1966-, Cherokee, New Castle, Indiana

Kathy VanBuskirk, 1961-, Cherokee, Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Perry VanBuskirk, Cherokee, Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Northeast - Maine

Ganessa Bryant, 1982-, Penobscot, Princeton, Maine

Jeremy Frey, 1978-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

George Neptune, 1988-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

Molly Neptune Parker, 1939-, Passamaquoddy, Indian Township, Maine

Northeast - Mohawk

Linda Cecilia Jackson, 1954-, St. Regis Mohawk, Akwesasne, New York

Sheila Ransom, 1954-, St. Regis Mohawk, Akwesasne, New York

Great Lakes

Kelly Church, 1967-, Grand Traverse Band of Chippewa and Ottawa, Hopkins, Michigan

Jacob Keshick, 1987-, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, Pellston, Michigan

Yvonne Walker Keshick, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, Pellston, Michigan

Cherish Nebeshanze Parrish, 1989-, Gun Lake Band of Potawatomi, Hopkins, Michigan

John Pigeon, 1957-, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Dorr, Michigan

Johnny Pigeon, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Dorr, Michigan

Kellogg Cultural Heritage Fellows

Kellogg Cultural Heritage Fellows are young Native people participating "behind-the-scenes" at the 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at the National Museum of the American Indian, made possible by a generous grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to the Michigan State University Museum.

Samantha Jacobs, 1983-, Seneca Nation of Indians, Collins, New York

Crystal Marie Keta Mann, 1987-, Tsimshian and Tlingit, Ketchikan, Alaska

Vanessa Manuel, 1985-, Onk Akimel O'odham, Scottsdale, Arizona

Mary Mokihana Martin, 1985-, Native Hawaiian, Honolulu, Hawai'i

Elizabeth Ann Parker, 1988-, Makah, Neah Bay, Washington

Gabe Paul, 1985-, Penobscot, Indian Island, Maine

Laura Sanders, 1980-, Karuk and Yurok, Orleans, California

Ahtkwiroton Skidders, 1982-, Mohawk, Rooseveltown, New York

Lynda Squally, 1981-, Chinook and Puyallup, Milton, Washington

Tony Stevens, 1985-, Wasco, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Warm Springs, Oregon

Carly Tex, 1984-, Western Mono, Rohnert Park, California

Kellogg Next Generation Weavers

Kellogg Next Generation Weavers are young Native people who have demonstrated a strong interest in basketry and will be weaving at the 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival alongside older mentor culture-bearers. Their participation in the Festival is made possible by a generous grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to the Michigan State University Museum.

Kayla Black, 1992-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, New Mexico

Ganessa Bryant, 1982-, Penobscot, Princeton, Maine

Jeremy Frey, 1982-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

Khia Grinnell, 1985-, Jamestown S'Klallam and Lummi, Sequim, Washington

Ursula Jones, 1972-, Yosemite Miwok, Mono Lake Paiute, Kashaya Pomo, and Coast Miwok, Mammoth Lakes, California

Jacob Keshick, 1987-, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, Pellston, Michigan

Joseph Lopez, 1978-, Tohono O'odham, Tucson, Arizona

Marques Hanalei Marzan, 1979-, Native Hawaiian, Kane'ohe, Hawai'i

Theresa Mendoza, 1985-, Makah, Neah Bay, Washington

George Neptune, 1988-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

Cherish Nebeshanze Parrish, 1989-, Gun Lake Band of Potawatomi, Hopkins, Michigan

Craig Phillips, 1989-, Colville, Omak, Washington

Johnny Pigeon, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Dorr, Michigan

Harold "Jimmi" Plaster, 1988-, Lummi, Bellingham, Washington

Lynda Squally, 1981-, Chinook and Puyallup, Milton, Washington
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2006, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53a0cdcf5-b4fd-4226-b3a8-44ddfc050e4b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2006-ref26

The Mississippi Delta

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Mississippi Delta is the area formed by the alluvial flood plain of the lower Mississippi River and incorporating parts of four states, a region distinguished by both geographic and cultural characteristics. From the flat, rich land of west Tennessee through parts of Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana, the entire region owes many of its cultural traditions to the Mississippi River and the many smaller rivers that permeate the area, some with names reflective of the Native Americans who first settled there or other groups who came later. Entire communities, operating with varying codes and customs based on indigenous traditions, have evolved around the region's rivers and bayous: from the commercial fisherfolk, trappers, and towboat workers, whose houses often cluster near major rivers, landings, and levees; to African American ministers and their congregations, who wade into the waters to baptize believers "the old way"; to the privileged planters' sons, whose membership in the exclusive hunting clubs along the river is bestowed by the accident of birth. The rivers are imbued with personal, local, and regional symbolism and significance.

Today's Delta is still largely rural and agricultural, its economy very closely tied to the land. In spite of a century of clearing, cultivating, draining, and land leveling, the region retains its primitive swamps, bayous, and cypress brakes. It was the environmental wonder and agricultural richness of the region that led a diversity of cultural groups to settle there - or to be brought there, against their will, to cultivate its fields. For instance, in the 1890s several Mississippi plantation owners fretted over the declining work force and looked to Italy for a solution in the form of sharecroppers. Arkansas planters similarly brought Chinese to the Delta.

Though the largest percentages of residents today are black African Americans and white Anglo-Saxons, the region also has substantial populations of people of Jewish, Chinese, Lebanese, Syrian, Italian, Greek, and Mexican ancestry. One can observe small Chinese groceries in many Delta towns, the large presence of Italian families and traditions throughout Mississippi and Arkansas, and the wonderful assimilation of ethnic foodways such as Delta tamales, probably brought to the Delta by Mexican farm workers who came to earn a living in the cotton fields.

The Mississippi Delta program at the 1997 Festival cast its spotlight not only on the diverse musical traditions that evolved or were invented in the Delta, but also at the occupations associated with the land and water, the crafts and foodways that utilized the region's natural resources, the amusements that provided diversion to Delta residents, and the worshipping practices that gave them solace and strength.

The program was curated by a team that included Deborah Boykin, Joyce Jackson, Worth Long, Michael Luster, Maida Owens, Diana Parker, Tom Rankin, Arlene Reiniger, and Susan Roach. Arlene Reiniger also served as Program Coordinator.

Support for the program came from the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the Mississippi Arts Commission, the Rhythm & Blues Foundation, and the Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Presenters:
Deborah Boykin, John T. Edge, Joyce Jackson, Worth Long, Michael Luster, Francesca McLean, Maida Owens, Wiley Prewitt, Tom Rankin, Susan Roach
Participants:
HOME AREA

Gene Chinn, Chinese traditions, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Noah Chinn, Chinese traditions, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Bradley Chow, Chinese traditions, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Gilroy Chow, Chinese traditions, Clarksdale, Mississippi.

Lisa Chow, Chinese traditions, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Sally Chow, Chinese traditions, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Dinni Clark, Southern cook, Columbus, Mississippi

Lawrence M. Craig, barbecue cook, DeValls Bluff, Arkansas

Lucinda Cusic, Southern cook, Leland, Mississippi

Georgie Fisher, gardener, flower arranger, Greenville, Mississippi

Albert Kelly, barbecue pit maker, Monroe, Louisiana

Jewel McCain, tamale maker, Vicksburg, Mississippi

Irma Rodriguez, tamale maker, Natchitoches, Louisiana

Martha Skelton, quilter, Vicksburg, Mississippi

Henrietta Taylor, quilter, Greenville, Mississippi

Alice Virden, gardener, flower arranger, Greenville, Mississippi

Edna White, tatter, Jackson, Mississippi

Tampa Wilson, basket maker, Bentonia, Mississippi

PLAY AREA

Delta Dance Hall

Eddie Cusic, blues guitar, Leland, Mississippi

THE TIM LAUGHLIN'S NEW ORLEANS DIXIELAND JAZZ BAND, Dixieland Jazz -- THE TIM LAUGHLIN'S NEW ORLEANS DIXIELAND JAZZ BAND, Dixieland JazzEd Dowling, trumpet, New Orleans, LouisianaDavid Hansen, drums, New Orleans, LouisianaTim Laughlin, clarinet, New Orleans, LouisianaTom Roberts, piano, Annapolis, MarylandDavid Sager, trombone, Washington, D.C.

BIG LUCKY & HIS MIGHTY MEN OF SOUND, Traditional Blues, Memphis, Tennessee -- BIG LUCKY & HIS MIGHTY MEN OF SOUND, Traditional Blues, Memphis, TennesseeShirley Bobo, vocalsLevester "Big Lucky" Carter, guitar, vocalsWillie "Boogieman" Hubbard, keyboardsMelvin Lee, bassDavid Valentine, drums, vocals

KENNY BILL STINSON & THE ARK-Louisiana-MYSTICS, Rockabilly -- KENNY BILL STINSON & THE ARK-Louisiana-MYSTICS, RockabillyKevin Gordon, electric guitar, Nashville, TennesseePaul Griffith, drums, Nashville, TennesseeLorne Rail, bass guitar, Nashville, TennesseeKenny Bill Stinson, piano, guitar, W. Monroe, Louisiana

SWEET MISS COFFY & THE MISSISSIPPI BURN'IN BLUES BAND, Soul Blues -- SWEET MISS COFFY & THE MISSISSIPPI BURN'IN BLUES BAND, Soul BluesDennis Bonds, guitar, Jackson, MississippiGregory Dishmon, drums, Pearl, MississippiVeeta Hatten, keyboards, vocals, Jackson, MississippiWillie James Hatten, bass guitar, Jackson, MississippiGeorge Myrick, guitar, Jackson, MississippiClaude C. Wells, keyboards, Jackson, Mississippi

THE RUFUS THOMAS GROUP, Rhythm & Blues, Memphis, Tennessee -- THE RUFUS THOMAS GROUP, Rhythm & Blues, Memphis, TennesseeJimmy Kinnard, bassCharles Pitts, guitarJames Robertson, drumsJim Spake, tenor saxMarvell Thomas, keyboardsRufus Thomas, vocalsScott Thompson, trumpet

Camp Site

Bob Neill, camp activities, Leland, Mississippi

Butch Richenbach, duck caller, Stuttgart, Arkansas

Ann Sides, camp activities, Rosedale, Mississippi

George Sides, camp caretaker, Rosedale, Mississippi

WORK AREA

Mabry Anderson, crop duster, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Harry Williams Branton, catfish farmer, Leland, Mississippi

Collins Brent, boat works, Greenville, Mississippi

Grady "Bubba" Brown, crop duster, Lake Providence, Louisiana

Wayne "Tookie" Collom, cotton work, harmonica, Rayville, Louisiana

Henry Dorsey, cotton work, guitar, Rayville, Louisiana

Robroy Fisher, cotton farmer, Greenville, Mississippi

Penny Morris, net maker, Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tom Morris, net maker, Yazoo City, Mississippi

Billy Pearson, cotton farmer, Sumner, Mississippi

Phil Robertson, hunting & fishing skills, W. Monroe, Louisiana

Oren Russell, towboat captain, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Hugh Warren, catfish farmer, Indianola, Mississippi

WORSHIP AREA

Worship Crafts

Rabbi David Skopp, Jewish crafts, Memphis, Tennessee

Annie Staten, baptismal robe maker, Monroe, Louisiana

Gayle Steen, altar cloth maker, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Martha Weissinger, christening gown maker, Greenville, Mississippi

Worship Stage

Penola Caesar, lined-out hymns, Monroe, Louisiana

THE GERALD LEWIS SINGERS, Gospel -- THE GERALD LEWIS SINGERS, GospelBilly Bays, electric guitar, bass guitar, Crossett, ArkansasRenee Calongne, vocals, W. Monroe, LouisianaKelvin Clark, electric guitar, W. Monroe, LouisianaFreedona Dobbins, vocals, W. Monroe, LouisianaAllan Eppinette, electric guitar, bass guitar, Monroe, LouisianaNick Ezell, steel guitar, Bastrop, LouisianaChuck Harris, drums, Bastrop, LouisianaGerald Lewis, piano, Monroe, Louisiana

MARVIN MYLES FAMILY, Gospel -- MARVIN MYLES FAMILY, GospelKeith Myles, vocals, Washington, D.C.LaShondra Myles, vocals, Lyon, MississippiRev. Marvin Myles, vocals, Lyon, MississippiMarvin Myles, II, vocals, Lyon, MississippiMelvin Myles, vocals, Lyon, MississippiOlivia Myles, coordinator, Lyon, MississippiSamantha Myles, vocals, Lyon, MississippiMichael Thomas, keyboards, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Reverend Willie Morganfield, oratory skills, Clarksdale, Mississippi

Brother Phillip Payne, oratory skills, Lake Village, Arkansas

REVELATORS, Gospel -- REVELATORS, GospelGene Coghlan, vocals, Drew, MississippiJim Ellis, vocals, guitar, Drew, MississippiCarl Massengail, guitar, banjo, vocals, Jayess, MississippiHerbie Swain, vocals, guitar, Cleveland, Mississippi

WINNSBORO EASTER ROCK ENSEMBLE, Winnsboro, Louisiana -- WINNSBORO EASTER ROCK ENSEMBLE, Winnsboro, LouisianaHattie M. AddisonLaketa AddisonBooker T. BurkhalterSheila JacksonJimmy JonesTammie LynchShirley SpearsRev. Lionell Wilson
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1997, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1997 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk545f41015-59a1-46cd-8c69-0edcef86ffaa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1997-ref26

Corona panel designed for NMAAHC (Type A: 65% opacity)

Designed by:
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup, American, founded 2008  Search this
Sir David Adjaye, British, born 1966  Search this
J. Max Bond Jr., American, 1935 - 2009  Search this
Philip G. Freelon, American, 1953 - 2019  Search this
SmithGroupJJR, American, founded 1853  Search this
Manufactured by:
Peerless Pattern Works, Inc., founded 1923  Search this
Morel Industries, founded 1917  Search this
Dura Industries, American, ca. 1985  Search this
Northstar Contracting, Inc., American  Search this
Medium:
cast aluminum coated with vinyl paint
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 63 × 41 1/4 × 1 1/2 in. (160 × 104.8 × 3.8 cm)
Type:
facades
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
ca. 2013
Topic:
African American  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Design  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Ornamentation  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.41.1
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Buildings and Structures
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5a4e2a8e9-1fc3-41b6-88ad-f57a25aab423
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.41.1

Corona panel designed for NMAAHC (Type C: 75% opacity)

Designed by:
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup, American, founded 2008  Search this
Sir David Adjaye, British, born 1966  Search this
J. Max Bond Jr., American, 1935 - 2009  Search this
Philip G. Freelon, American, 1953 - 2019  Search this
SmithGroupJJR, American, founded 1853  Search this
Manufactured by:
Peerless Pattern Works, Inc., founded 1923  Search this
Morel Industries, founded 1917  Search this
Dura Industries, American, ca. 1985  Search this
Northstar Contracting, Inc., American  Search this
Medium:
cast aluminum coated with vinyl paint
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 63 × 41 1/4 × 1 1/2 in. (160 × 104.8 × 3.8 cm)
Type:
facades
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
ca. 2013
Topic:
African American  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Design  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Ornamentation  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.41.2
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Buildings and Structures
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5385cf384-e5d4-4a20-bc02-d280991ecb86
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.41.2

Corona panel designed for NMAAHC (Type E: 85% opacity)

Designed by:
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup, American, founded 2008  Search this
Sir David Adjaye, British, born 1966  Search this
J. Max Bond Jr., American, 1935 - 2009  Search this
Philip G. Freelon, American, 1953 - 2019  Search this
SmithGroupJJR, American, founded 1853  Search this
Manufactured by:
Peerless Pattern Works, Inc., founded 1923  Search this
Morel Industries, founded 1917  Search this
Dura Industries, American, ca. 1985  Search this
Northstar Contracting, Inc., American  Search this
Medium:
cast aluminum coated with vinyl paint
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 63 × 41 1/4 × 1 1/2 in. (160 × 104.8 × 3.8 cm)
Type:
facades
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
ca. 2013
Topic:
African American  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Design  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Ornamentation  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.41.3
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Buildings and Structures
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5b7bfff85-dbf9-4e99-8f07-286ff3756efe
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.41.3
Online Media:

Corona panel designed for NMAAHC (Type F: 90% opacity)

Designed by:
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup, American, founded 2008  Search this
Sir David Adjaye, British, born 1966  Search this
J. Max Bond Jr., American, 1935 - 2009  Search this
Philip G. Freelon, American, 1953 - 2019  Search this
SmithGroupJJR, American, founded 1853  Search this
Manufactured by:
Peerless Pattern Works, Inc., founded 1923  Search this
Morel Industries, founded 1917  Search this
Dura Industries, American, ca. 1985  Search this
Northstar Contracting, Inc., American  Search this
Medium:
cast aluminum coated with vinyl paint
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 63 × 41 1/4 × 1 1/2 in. (160 × 104.8 × 3.8 cm)
Type:
facades
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
ca. 2013
Topic:
African American  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Design  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Ornamentation  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.41.4
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Buildings and Structures
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd54572e6dc-5082-4900-8adc-dfe0ad1933b8
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.41.4

Hat made by Vanilla P. Beane

Created by:
Vanilla Beane, American, 1919 - 2022  Search this
Medium:
felt, feather, rhinestone, ribbon
Dimensions:
6 1/2 x 14 3/4 x 14 1/2 in. (16.5 x 37.5 x 36.8 cm)
On Form: 11 3/8 x 13 1/2 x 12 3/8 in. (28.9 x 34.3 x 31.4 cm)
Type:
hats
Place made:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
2013
Topic:
African American  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Fashion  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Nichols and Sanders Family
Object number:
2013.113
Restrictions & Rights:
© Vanilla Beane
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Clothing-Fashion
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5df0ca54e-1f7d-4d70-8bd0-696fd3f44df9
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.113

Green wrap hat made by Vanilla Beane

Created by:
Vanilla Beane, American, 1919 - 2022  Search this
Medium:
velveteen on buckram
Dimensions:
5 1/4 × 7 1/4 × 8 1/4 in. (13.3 × 18.4 × 21 cm)
Type:
hats
Place made:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1950-1969
Topic:
African American  Search this
Black Enterprise  Search this
Business  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Local and regional  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Vanilla Beane
Object number:
2013.141.1
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Clothing-Fashion
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5733382ad-a1a8-4a97-9de1-d5540f781ecd
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.141.1
Online Media:

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